Courses: International Summer School in Forced Migration, Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford

APPLICATIONS NOW OPEN

INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL IN FORCED MIGRATION
www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/summer-school

06-24 July 2015
Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford

Download the brochure (PDF 316 KB): http://origin.library.constantcontact.com/download/get/file/1116006239837-63/Summer+School+2015_12pp_WEB.pdf

Applications are invited for this year’s International Summer Schoolin Forced Migration, to be held at Wadham College, Oxford. The Summer School, now in its 26th year, offers an intensive, interdisciplinary and participative approach to the study of forced migration. It aims to enable people working with refugees and other forced migrants to examine critically the forces and institutions that dominate the world of the displaced. Beginning with reflection on the diverse ways of conceptualising forced migration, the course considers political, legal and wellbeing issues associated with contemporary displacement. Individual course modules also tackle a range of other topics, including globalisation and forced migration, and negotiating strategies in humanitarian situations.

The participants
Typically comprising more than 40 nationalities, Mid-career and senior practitioners involved with assistance and policymaking for forced migrants and researchers specialising in the study of forced migration. The course, which is residential, is held in Oxford. Teaching is conducted in English.

The teaching
Lecturers and tutors include research staff, academics and professionals from the Refugee Studies Centre and other world-class institutions, drawn from a number of disciplines and practices including law, anthropology, politics, and international relations.
Sponsorship

Asfari Foundation and Saïd Foundation bursaries are available for Summer School candidates who work on refugee-related issues from Palestine, Lebanon and Syria (or Palestinians and Syrians resident in the Arab world). Candidates wishing to be considered for a bursary must apply directly via the International Summer School office and not the Foundations. Please note the deadline for all bursary applications to the International Summer School is 1 March 2015. For any enquiries please contact
summer.school@qeh.ox.ac.uk

Fees
£3,300

Applications
Online: www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/summer-school

For further information and an application form, please visit our website or contact
Heidi El-Megrisi
International Summer School Manager
Refugee Studies Centre
Oxford Department of International Development
University of Oxford
3 Mansfield Road
Oxford, OX1 3TB
United Kingdom
tel: +44 (0)1865 281728/9
fax: +44 (0)1865 281730
email: summer.school@qeh.ox.ac.uk

Calls for papers: Canadian Association for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (CARFMS) 2015 Student essay contest

Source: Forced Migration List.

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION FOR REFUGEE AND FORCED MIGRATION STUDIES (CARFMS)

2015 STUDENT ESSAY CONTEST

The Canadian Association for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (CARFMS) seeks to foster an independent community of scholars dedicated to the advancement and dissemination of Canadian refugee and forced migration research. The Association aims to engage students as active members of the Canadian refugee research community, and invites students to participate in the fourth annual CARFMS Student Essay Contest. For the first time this year, there will be two categories: one for graduate and law students; and, one for undergraduate students.

The CARFMS Student Essay Contest will recognize the most outstanding research produced by students in the field of refugee and forced migration studies. The authors of the shortlisted papers will be invited to present their work at the 7th Annual CARFMS Conference, which will take place May 13-15 in Toronto, Quebec.

Papers submitted to Student Essay Contest may address any issue relevant to refugee and forced migration studies, in Canada or elsewhere.

The selection committee will shortlist three authors in each category: 1) undergraduate students; 2) graduate and law students. Subject to peer review, high quality short-listed papers will be considered for publication as working papers on the CARFMS website and/or in Refuge: Canada’s Journal on Refugees.

Eligibility
.       Participants in the contest must be members of CARFMS, or join the association in advance of the 2015 Conference.
.       Participants must be Canadian students or international students registered at a Canadian university. Papers from any disciplinary background are welcome.
.       The student must be the sole author of the submitted paper.
.       The authors of shortlisted papers are encouraged to present their work in person at the 2015 CARFMS Conference, but students may participate in the competition even if they cannot attend the conference.

Application process and editorial guidelines
.       Papers must be submitted by email at mmillard@yorku.ca by 5:00 PM EST, December  31st, 2014.
.       Papers may be submitted in either English or French.
.       Papers must not exceed 7,500 words. Please use 12-point font and standard margins.
.       Submissions must include an abstract of no more than 150 words, setting out the main arguments or findings of the paper.
.       Papers should follow appropriate referencing conventions.
.       The papers will be evaluated through an anonymous review process. Submissions should include a cover page indicating the title of the article and the author’s name and institutional affiliation. This cover page will be removed before the review process. Please do not include any identifying information in the rest of the paper.
.       Submissions that do not meet the basic editorial guidelines will not be reviewed by the assessment committee.

Any questions should be directed to:
Christina Clark-Kazak, PhD
International Studies/Centre for Refugee Studies, York University
Email: cclark-kazak@glendon.yorku.ca

ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE D’ÉTUDES SUR LES RÉFUGIÉS ET LA MIGRATION FORCÉE (CARFMS)

CONCOURS 2015 D’ESSAIS POUR LES ÉTUDIANTS

L’Association Canadienne d’études sur les réfugiés et la migration forcée cherche à encourager une communauté académique indépendante qui se consacre à l’avancement et la diffusion de la recherche canadienne sur les réfugiés et la migration forcée. L’Association vise à impliquer les étudiants comme membres actifs de la communauté canadienne de recherche sur les réfugiés, et invite les étudiants à participer au cinquième Concours annuel d’essais de la CARFMS. Pour la première fois cette année, nous aurons deux catégories: étudiants du premier cycle ; et étudiants des Facultés de droit et aux études supérieures.

Le Concours d’essais pour étudiants reconnaîtra la recherche la plus remarquable réalisée par des étudiants dans le domaine des études sur les réfugiés et la migration forcée. Les auteurs des essais présélectionnés seront invités à présenter leurs travaux durant la 7ème Conférence Annuelle de la CARFMS, qui se tiendra du 13 au 15 mai 2015 à Toronto, Ontario.

Les travaux soumis au Concours peuvent aborder toute question pertinente et en lien avec les études sur les réfugiés et la migration forcée, au Canada ou ailleurs.

Trois essais dans chaque catégorie – étudiants du premier cycle ; et étudiants des Facultés de droit et aux études supérieures – seront présélectionnés.

Après une revue de paires favorables, des essais de haute qualité seront considérés pour publication comme documents de travail de recherche au site web de la CARFMS et/ou à Refuge : revue canadienne sur les réfugiés.

Éligibilité
.       Les participants au concours doivent être membres de la CARFMS, ou joindre l’Association avant la Conférence annuelle 2015.
.       Les participants doivent être des étudiants canadiens ou des étudiants étrangers inscrits à une université canadienne. Les travaux provenant de toute discipline seront les bienvenus.
.       Les étudiants doivent être les seuls auteurs de l’essai soumis au concours.
.       Les auteurs des essais présélectionnés sont encouragés à présenter leurs travaux en personne durant la Conférence Annuelle de la CARFMS. Toutefois, les étudiants ne pouvant être présents à la Conférence seront éligibles à participer au concours.

Processus d’application et directives éditoriales
.       Les essais doivent être soumis en ligne au : mmillard@yorku.ca avant 17h , le 31 décembre 2014.
.       Les essais peuvent être soumis en français ou en anglais.
.       Les essais ne doivent pas dépasser 7,500 mots. Prière d’utiliser une police de 12 points et des marges ‘standard’.
.       Les propositions d’essai doivent inclure un résumé de 150 mots présentant les principaux arguments ou résultats.
.       Les essais doivent suivre un style standard de citation.
.       Les essais seront évalués par un processus anonyme de révision. Les propositions d’essais doivent inclure une page titre indiquant le titre de l’essai et le nom de l’auteur ainsi que son institution d’affiliation. La page titre sera retirée avant le processus de révision. Prière de ne pas inclure des informations pouvant vous identifier dans le reste du document.
.       Les propositions d’essai qui ne respectent pas les directives éditoriales ne seront pas révisées par le comité d’évaluation.

Pour toute question, veuillez communiquer avec :
Christina Clark-Kazak, PhD
Courriel: cclark-kazak@glendon.yorku.ca

 

Conferences: “The Business of Immigration Detention: Activisms, Resistances, Critical Interventions”

Source: Forced Migration List.

The Business of Immigration Detention: Activisms, Resistances, Critical Interventions

In January (22-23rd), Lancaster’s migrancy research group and the Centre for Mobilities Research at Lancaster University (CeMoRe) are hosting an ESRC sponsored conference, “The Business of Immigration Detention: Activisms, Resistances, Critical Interventions” (which is the final event in part of a larger series of workshops titled  ‘Exploring Everyday Practice and Resistance in Immigration Detention’: http://immigration-detention-seminar-series.org/). Bringing together a range of leading academics, post-graduate researchers, practitioners, artists, activists and former detainees this seminar series investigates the ways in which the UK experience of detention reflects and re-produces the contradictory logics inherent in contemporary global detention practices. “The Business of Immigration Detention” will consider the challenges facing academics and activists in the area of immigration detention and related border-security practices.

The conference will mark an important gathering of activists and scholars from across the world, with a public lecture by Professor Alison Mountz Professor of Geography and Canada Research Chair in Global Migration, Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada) and a keynote by Dr Jenna Loyd (Assistant Professor in Public Health Policy at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, as well as a prison and detention abolitionist activist).

Events will begin on the 22nd of Jan at 5.30pm with Alison’s public lecture, followed by a human rights performance at 7pm by the acclaimed ice&fire in the chaplaincy centre. These events are free to all, but please register your interest online http://online-payments.lancaster-university.co.uk/browse/product.asp?compid=1&modid=1&catid=505

On the 23rd of Jan there will be a day-long conference on campus. The programme of speakers is online at the link below. This is a unique opportunity to hear key organisations, activists and academics discuss the politics and business of immigration detention. A few spaces are still available but you need to register asap for a place.

The Business of Immigration Detention: Activisms, Resistances, Critical Interventions conference
SPACES LIMITED, BOOK HERE: (£10 unwaged, £4O waged includes lunch) http://online-payments.lancaster-university.co.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=1&deptid=6&catid=504&prodvarid=165

More details about speakers at http://socialabjection.wordpress.com/conference-2015-the-business-of-immigration-detention-activisms-resistances-critical-interventions/

For more information please contact Imogen Tyler (conference organiser) or Pennie Drinkall (admin support for the conference):

Imogen Tyler: i.tyler@lancaster.ac.uk
Pennie Drinkall: p.drinkall@lancaster.ac.uk

Dr Imogen Tyler
Philip Leverhulme Prize Winner 2014
Senior Lecturer & Doctoral Director Sociology
Director of the Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies (with Celia Roberts)
Pathway Leader for Sociology in ERSC NWDTC
@Drimogentyler http://socialabjection.wordpress.com/
New Book: Immigrant Protest: Politics, Aesthetics and Everyday Dissent (SUNY, 2014)
See also: Revolting Subjects: Social Abjection and Resistance in Neoliberal Britain (Zed 2013 shortlisted for 2014 Bread & Roses prize)

Calls for papers: Gender, Violence and Refugee Communities (ECAS 2015)

Call for Papers:

Panel “Gender, Violence and Refugee Communities”, ECAS 2015
8-10 July 2015 in Paris, deadline: January 9, 2015.

Convenors: Buckley-Zistel, Susanne; Krause, Ulrike
Center for Conflict Studies, University of Marburg

For many refugees, the end of conflicts does not coincide with the end of violent assaults, but escaping war and repression only offers a certain degree of shelter from physical and structural violence. Women and girls, yet also men and boys, may become victims of sexual and gender-based violence, as has been increasingly reported by aid and human rights agencies in the past years. Moreover, the forceful recruitment of individuals in camps into armed groups, gang violence erupting amongst young refugees or violent disputes upon return to the place of origin suggest that there is a continuation of violence which penetrates into the supposedly safe havens. The experiences of displacement has an impact on social relations, in particular gender relations. While many humanitarian agencies and refugee-supporting organisations recognise this continuum of violence in general and sexual and gender-based violence in particular, they themselves become entangled in the re-negotiation of relations and the forging of new identities.

The panel explores the origins, scope and forms of violence against and amongst refugees from a gender perspective. It assesses how masculinities and femininities – as well as the way they relate to each other – change in the context of displacement and encampment. Case studies reach from the analysis of gendered violence in refugee camps, via the impact of the host community on gender relations, to the role of humanitarian agencies and their gender programmes.

The panel is now online and accessible via http://www.ecas2015.fr/gender-violence-and-refugee-communities/

Please submit a short abstract of max. 1500 characters by January 9, 2015.

 

The Refugee Council Archives at UEL Weekly Bulletin Issue: 4 (16th December 2014)

uel-logo

Refugee Archives News
The Refugee Council Archives at UEL Weekly Bulletin
Issue: 4
(16th December 2014)

Introduction

Welcome to the fourth issue of Refugee Archive News: The Refugee Council Archives at UEL Weekly Bulletin.

This bulletin has the aim of providing both the latest news and developments on the Refugee Council Archive at the University of East London whilst also providing additional information on issues of concern to refugee and forced migration studies more generally. This I hope will include details of news stories, calls for papers, conferences and seminars, and online resources of potential interest. This bulletin, I hope, will aim to provide useful information to both students and academics on both UEL undergraduate courses in International Development and postgraduate students on our courses in Refugee Studies; Refugee Studies and Community Development and Conflict, Displacement and Human Security, whilst also being hopefully of interest to a wider readership represented by our Twitter and Blog followers.

This bulletin will be circulated via our Refugee Archive WordPress blog and also via our Refugee-Research Jiscmail email list. We would welcome any feedback that you may have on this bulletin and we would also welcome any input that you may have in terms of current and future content for both this bulletin and also our WordPress blog more generally. Please Contact Paul Dudman via email (library-archvies@uel.ac.uk) or Twitter (@PaulDudman) with any feedback or thoughts that you may have.

There are also some general Archive details included at the end of this and every bulletin posting for your reference.

Archive, CMRB and Course-Related News

Archive Opening Hours: The UEL Archive collections will be closed over the Christmas and New Year period. The Archive at the UEL Docklands Campus will open foe the last time this year on Friday 19th December, 2014 and it will then be closed until Monday 5th January, 2015.

For details of the UEL Library opening hours during this period, please visit the Library Web Pages at: http://www.uel.ac.uk/lls/about/openinghours/

 

In the News

The Compas Blog – “It’s not just about the individual story”: Performing migrant experiences

Human Rights Watch – Australia: Stop Forced Returns Without Proper Screening

Human Rights Watch – Libya: Countries Should Suspend Forcible Returns

The Compas Blog – ‘It is easy to come here but difficult to leave’: The ‘point of no return’ in migration trajectories

Human Rights Watch – US: Release Torture Report

UNHCR – One year after the fall of Bangui, more than 852,000 Central Africans still displaced

UNHCR – UNHCR: Return of displaced people in Eastern DR Congo should be voluntary

UNHCR – More people risk lives across Indian Ocean despite abuse, deterrence

UNHCR – 16 Days of Activism: UNHCR backs Colombian women in response to sexual violence

UNHCR – Governments at Geneva meeting agree to take in 100,000 Syrian refugees

UNHCR – UNHCR, IOM, IMO, UNODC and OHCHR Joint Statement on Protection at Sea in the Twenty-First Century

UNHCR – First Somali refugees in Kenya decide to return home as part of a new pilot project

Amnesty International30 years of torture convention – states still failing on obligations

The Guardian – Four reasons Britain’s roads are in chaos – and immigrants aren’t one of them

The Guardian – Take in Syrian refugees, aid agencies tell rich countries

The Guardian – Farage blames immigration for traffic on M4 after no-show at Ukip reception

The Guardian – There are still some reasons to be cheerful

 

New Additions to the Archive

Precarious lives : experiences of forced labour among refugees and asylum seekers in England / by Hannah Lewis, Peter Dwyer, Stuart Hodkinson, and Louise Waite.

Roofs and roots : the care of separated children in the developing world / David Tolfree.

A fight to belong : teacher’s pack / designed by Neil Adams and edited by Gaynor Spray.

Life and law in Britain : a guide for young asylum seekers and refugees / Richard Jarvis and Tony Thorpe

When is a child not a child? : asylum, age disputes and the process of age assessment / Heaven Crawley.

Working with children and young people subject to immigration control : guidelines for best practice / Heaven Crawley with Gaenor Bruce, Jane Coker, Nadine Finch, Susan Rowlands, Sue Shutter, and Alison Stanley.

Aiming high : guidance on supporting the education of asylum seeking and refugee children : a guide to good practice / DfES.

Far from the battle but still at war : troubled refugee children in school / by Dick Blackwell.

Ethnicity and education : the evidence on minority ethnic pupils aged 5-16 / Department for Education and Skills.

A study on how asylum seekers and refugees access education in four local authorities in England / Vijayshree Appa.

Mapping the provision of education and social services for refugee and asylum seeking children : lessons from the eastern region / Carolyn Hamilton, Christine Daly, Alison Friday.

Going to University from Care / by Sonia Jackson.

Refugee children in the early years : issues for policy-makers and providers
Jill Rutter

The education of asylum-seeker pupils / Office for Standards in Education, (OFSTED).

The education of refugee children : policy and practice in the education of refugee and asylum-seeker children in England / Neil Remesbery.

The refugee education handbook / edited by Jeanette Redding

Supporting refugee and asylum-seeking children in school and early years settings / Health Action Zone Young Refugee Project.

New arrivals : education issues / Advisory Centre for Education.

Food, shelter and half a chance : assessing the needs of unaccompanied asylum seeking and refugee children / Selam Kidane.

Justice denied : asylum and immigration legal aid – a system in crisis / compiled by Bail for Immigration Detainees (BID) and Asylum Aid

One day we had to run! : refugee children tell their stories in words and paintings / Sybella Wilkes.

One day we had to run! : refugee children tell their stories in words and paintings / Sybella Wilkes ; [editor, Nicola Barber].. Rev ed.

How to access disability services : a guide for organisations in contact with refugees and asylum seekers in London / complied by Derek Kinrade and Sian Perez. Edited by Ann Darnbrough.

The situation of separated children in Central Europe and the Baltic States / by William Spindler.

Separated children, exile and home-country links : the example of Somali children in the Nordic Countries / by Wendy Ayotte.

Separated children in Europe : policies and practices in European Union member states : a comparative analysis / by Terry Smith.

Separated children seeking asylum in Europe : a programme for action / by Sandy Ruxton.

Separated Children in Europe Programme statement of good practice / published by Save the Children Denmark and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Separated Children Europe Programme / published by Save the Children and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Separated children and EU asylum and immigration policy / by Sandy Ruxton.

The case owner’s workbook : minors training programme / Home Office.

Working against the clock : inadequacy and injustice in the fast track system : $$b based on research by Bail for Immigration Detainees at Harmonsworth Immigration removal Centre in March 2006 / by Sharon Oakley and Katrina Crew and edited by Anna Morvem and Sarah Cutler.

Get it right : how Home Office decision making fails refugees / a report from Amnesty International UK.

Like any other child? : Children and families in the asylum process / by John Reacroft.

This is a good place to live and think about the future… : the needs and experiences of unaccompanied asylum-seeking children in Scotland / Peter Hopkins and Malcolm Hill.

Starting again : young asylum-seekers views on life in Glasgow / a joint report by Save the Children and Glasgow City Council Educational Services.

My mum is now my best friend– : asylum-seeker and refugee families in Glasgow / published by Save the Children.

Future Scots : pre five services for asylum seekers and refugees in Glasgow / [written by Frances Hume and Richard Morran ; edited by Susan Fisher and Douglas Hamilton].

Crocodiles in the Loch : a handbook for youth work practitioners working with young refugees in Glasgow / Rikki Payne.

Working with refugee children / Jill Rutter.

Small places, close to home : Project led by refugee and asylum-seeking communities / Compiled and published by Community Links.

Where is my home? : children in war.

Australian Journal of Emergency Management: Volume 29 Number 4, (October 2014).

Let’s talk to the media : practical guide for refugee community organizations and refugee practitioners on working with the media / produced by the Refugee Media Group in Wales.

What’s the story? : results from research into media coverage of refugees and asylum seekers in the UK / written by Sarah Buchanan and Bethan Grillo … Terry Threadgold . Edited by Tom Wengraf.

 

New Off Air Recording Requests

The following off-air recordings have been requested for the Refugee Council Archive at UEL:

Saturday 13th December: 0430-0500: BBC News 24: Our World – Pakistan’s Women – Punished for Loving.

Monday 15th December: 2000-2030: ITV: Tonight – Europe the People’s Poll.

Archive Opening Hours

The current Opening Hours for our Archival collections are detailed as follows. The Refugee Council Archive and the British Olympic Association Archive are currently located on our Docklands Campus Library whilst the Hackney Empire Archive is currently located in our Stratford Campus Library.

The opening hours for both Docklands and Stratford Archives are as follows:

Docklands Archive

Mondays:  1pm – 6pm*

Tuesdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Wednesdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Thursdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Fridays: 1pm – 6pm*

Sat/Sun:  Both Archives Closed

Access to the Stratford Archive for the Hackney Empire Archive is by prior appointment only.

* Morning appointments between 10am and 12pm are available by prior appointment.  The Archive will be closed between 12pm and 1pm for lunch.

We would recommend that, especially for external users, that you contact us in advance of your trip in order to make an appointment to use the Archives.  This enables us to ensure that a member of staff will be on hand to assist you.

To make an appointment, please click on the link to our Make an Appointment page.

 

Archive Web Resources and Email List

Please find details below of our various online and social media resources which are currently available online and please do take a look. We would also welcome any feedback that you may have on how these can be improved:

Blogs

We have created several blogs to help support the archival work that we undertake and these are highlighted as follows:

Facebook

Please join and Like Us on Facebook, links are as follows:

Twitter

Please follow us on Twitter by selecting one of the options below:

Refugee-Research Email Mailing List

Please also consider joining our Refugee Research Jiscmail e-mail list which is managed in conjunction with this blog.  To subscribe to the mail group
www.jiscmail.ac.uk, type REFUGEE‐RESEARCH into the ‘find lists’ box, or use the alphabetical index to scroll down to R. and then follow the instructions on our REFUGEERESEARCH homepage to ‘join or leave the list’. Most users need only enter their email address and name. Alternatively, email the Archivist, Paul Dudman on p.v.dudman@uel.ac.uk, requesting to join the mail group.

Please let us know of any further links that you would like to see added.

 

Contact Details

Paul Dudman is currently the Archivist responsible for all of the physical Archives located here at the University of East London Library and Learning Services: Archives. Paul is happy to receive and respond to any questions or queries that you may have in response to both our Archival collections and also our social media presence.

If you wish to contact the Archive, please contact Paul Dudman via one of the contact methods detailed below:

By email at: library-archives@uel.ac.uk

By telephone at: +44 (0) 20 8223 7676

Online at: uelarchivesportal.wordpress.com/contact-us/

On Twitter at: @refugee_archive

By post to:

Paul V. Dudman
Archivist
Library and Learning Services
University of East London
Docklands Campus
4-6 University Way
London, E16 2RD
United Kingdom.

Table of Contents Alert: Journal of Refugee Studies Vol. 27, No. 4 (December 2014)

Oxford Journal have published their latest Table of Contents alert for the Journal of Refugee Studies.  Further details of the articles included in Volume 24 Number 4, (December 2014) are detailed below:

Introduction

Introduction: Understanding Global Refugee Policy
James Milner
Journal of Refugee Studies 2014 27: 477-494
[Extract]

Articles

Lessons from the Global Public Policy Literature for the Study of Global Refugee Policy
Sarah Deardorff Miller
Journal of Refugee Studies 2014 27: 495-513
[Extract]

Building Consensus within UNHCR’s Executive Committee: Global Refugee Norms in the Making
Marion Fresia
Journal of Refugee Studies 2014 27: 514-533
[Abstract]

Wither Policy? Southern African Perspectives on Understanding Law, ‘Refugee’ Policy and Protection
Loren B. Landau and Roni Amit
Journal of Refugee Studies 2014 27: 534-552
[Abstract]

Can Global Refugee Policy Leverage Durable Solutions? Lessons from Tanzania’s Naturalization of Burundian Refugees
James Milner
Journal of Refugee Studies 2014 27: 553-573
[Abstract]

International Refugee Law and Refugee Policy: The Case of Deterrence Policies
Thomas Gammeltoft-Hansen
Journal of Refugee Studies 2014 27: 574-595
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

The Bali Process and Global Refugee Policy in the Asia–Pacific Region
Susan Kneebone
Journal of Refugee Studies 2014 27: 596-618
[Abstract]

Table of Contents Alert: Oxford Economic Papers Special Issue on The Economics of Terrorism and Counterterrorism

Oxford Journals have published their lateast Table of Contents Alert for the journal Oxford Economic Papers.  Volume 67, Number 1 (January 2015) is a special issue on the subject of `The Economics of Terrorism and Counterterrorism.’

Details of the articles included in this special issue are available below:

Terrorism and counterterrorism: an overview
Todd Sandler
Oxf. Econ. Pap. 2014 67: 1-20
[Abstract]

Terrorist group location decision: an empirical investigation
Khusrav Gaibulloev
Oxf. Econ. Pap. 2014 67: 21-41
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Supplementary Data] [Request Permissions]

International terrorism as a trade impediment?
Peter Egger and Martin Gassebner
Oxf. Econ. Pap. 2014 67: 42-62
[Abstract]

Terrorism and fertility: evidence for a causal influence of terrorism on fertility
Claude Berrebi and Jordan Ostwald
Oxf. Econ. Pap. 2014 67: 63-82
[Abstract]

Oppressive governments, dependence on the USA, and anti-American terrorism
Thomas Gries, Daniel Meierrieks, and Margarete Redlin
Oxf. Econ. Pap. 2014 67: 83-103
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Supplementary Data] [Request Permissions]

Socially efficient detection of terror plots
Edward H. Kaplan
Oxf. Econ. Pap. 2014 67: 104-115
[Abstract]

When terrorism is evidence of state success: securing the state against territorial groups
David B. Carter
Oxf. Econ. Pap. 2014 67: 116-132
[Abstract]

Does globalization mitigate the adverse effects of terrorism on growth?
Javed Younas
Oxf. Econ. Pap. 2014 67: 133-156
[Abstract]

Economic growth and terrorism: domestic, international, and suicide
Seung-Whan Choi
Oxf. Econ. Pap. 2014 67: 157-181
[Abstract]

 

International Criminal Justice: Theory, Policy and Practice

Originally posted on IntLawGrrls:

Socio-Legal Studies Association Annual Conference

University of Warwick

 Call for Papers

This proposed stream contains four panel sessions and invites submissions on all areas of substantive international criminal justice, whether on theory, policy or practice. Empirical work would be particularly welcomed and papers based on “works in progress” will be considered so long as the work is sufficiently developed. Both individual papers and panel submissions (of three related papers) can be submitted for consideration. Postgraduate students are also encouraged to submit abstracts.

Successful papers will be published in a symposium. Details of which will be available shortly.

For an informal discussion please email the convenor, Anna Marie Brennan at Anna.Marie.Brennan@liverpool.ac.uk

Abstracts may only be submitted via the Easy Chair system. They must be no longer than 300 words and must include your title, name and institutional affiliation and your email address for correspondence.

The deadline for the submissions…

View original 5 more words

Jail employers who exploit migrants, profit from slave labor – Miliband

Originally posted on Aletho News:

RT | December 15, 2014

UK employers responsible for flagrant exploitation of migrant workers by violating their rights, paying them paltry wages and offering them poor working conditions, could face jail sentences under a Labour government, Ed Miliband warned on Monday.

During a speech in Norfolk, the Labour leader pledged to introduce a new law to tackle unsatisfactory and inhumane working conditions, which many migrants face in Britain. Legislation change would also help curb wage cuts for local workers, he said.

The proposed law would hold to account those that exploit migrants’ difficult situations. It would focus on criminalizing servitude, slavery, bonded labor, and toughen sentencing for those who force their staff to work under conditions that breach UK requirements. Offenders could face up to 10 years in jail, Miliband said.

To illustrate the acute crisis many migrant workers in Britain face, the Labour chief highlighted a damning case, where…

View original 562 more words

A Libyan ‘arms dealer’ carrying order for £18million of ammunition, two British ‘jihadis’ and 17 illegal migrants… all found in one lorry leaving Dover!

Originally posted on ~~Defender of Faith~Guardian of Truth~~:

  • Six men charged by police in relation to alleged plot to sneak men abroad
  • One had order form for arms and was heading overseas, magistrates told
  • Two others were allegedly going abroad to join terrorists, court hears
  • Also among them is Anthony Small, a former boxer from London
  • Two others also appeared in court charged over false identity documents
  • All six men will appear at the Old Bailey early next year
  • Comes as another man is arrested in separate south London terror probe 
libyan smuggler Capture

‘British jihadi’ Simon Keeler, 43, of east London was among those charged with terror offences. Ambition: Keeler had intended to ‘flee the country, with plans to travel to Syria to fight for the Islamic State’

When police stopped a suspicious looking lorry leaving Britain from Dover late one night, little did they suspect what they would find inside.

For…

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Hazara asylum seeker fears for life if forceably returned, say refugee advocates

Originally posted on Hazara Asylum Seekers:

December 15, 2014 | the age

Protesters say a Hazara asylum seeker faces death if returned.Protesters say a Hazara asylum seeker faces death if returned.

Refugee advocates say they fear a Victorian Hazara asylum seeker will be killed when the Federal Government sends him back to Afghanistan on Wednesday.

More than 150 Hazara and refugee advocates protested against his deportation outside the Immigration Department’s Melbourne offices on Sunday holding placards such as “no return is safe” and “Hazarans face genocide”.

Gulistan, 33, will be the third Hazara, and the first from Victoria, to be sent back to war-torn Afghanistan since forced removals began in August.

Pamela Curr from the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre said DFAT advice that Afghanistan was now safe was incorrect and that it was more dangerous than ever for Hazara.

“The strategy seems to be to pick Hazaras out at random and then issue them with a letter and send them back,” she said

Ms Curr said the first man to be sent…

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New Journal Articles (weekly)

  • “Much attention has focussed on the severity of the sentences imposed following the 2011 ‘summer rioting’ in England. The Court of Appeal confirmed that participation in a collective outbreak of disorder takes offending outside the sentencing guidelines. The position for sentencing riot-related offending in future is unclear, however, as the Court gave no indication of how to calibrate this departure, and the Sentencing Council has made offending during public disorder an aggravating factor only in its burglary guideline. This article explores new empirical evidence regarding the sentences imposed in Manchester, together with national Ministry of Justice data, to demonstrate for the first time how this ‘uplift’ effect was a feature throughout the criminal process, from arrest to sentence. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The riots of 2011 arguably represent the most significant civil disorder on the British mainland in at least a generation. Over four days, there were five deaths, injuries to dozens of police officers and civilians and damage to property running into the tens of millions of pounds. Commentators writing in the aftermath of the riots have pointed both to what are taken to be unusual aspects of the 2011 disorders—the role of gangs, the nature and extent of looting and use of social media among others—as well as some of the parallels with previous riots. In placing the 2011 riots in their recent historical context, this article outlines a model for structuring comparative analysis of disorder and then moves on to consider some of the similarities between 2011 and riots in the post-war period, concluding by identifying four significant points of departure. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “An examination of recent scholarly criminological literature concerning British Muslim reveals dominant discursive themes of victimization, discrimination and demonization and a highly politicized discourse, often rhetorical in nature and seldom supported by empirical evidence. Where such evidence is adduced, criminologists rely predominantly on limited qualitative research designs and small non-representative sample sizes. This article presents analysis of British Crime Survey/Crime Survey of England and Wales data and argues that quantitative findings highlight the need for a more nuanced criminological picture of British Muslim communities. It is argued that criminologists should place renewed focus on household crime, the effects of socio-economic factors, crimes involving non-physical forms of violence and Muslim respondents who report positive attitudes towards the police. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The article critically examines the peculiar co-existence of the securitization of the border and the growing presence and prominence of human rights and humanitarian ideals in border policing practices. Concretely, it focuses on Frontex, the agency tasked with management of EU’s external borders. Based on interviews with Frontex officials and border guard officers, and on the analysis of relevant policy documents and official reports, the article explores what may come across as a discrepancy between the organization’s activities and its public self-presentation. The objective is to provide an insight into the complex and volatile relationship between policing and human rights, which marks contemporary migration control as well as mundane forms of professional and personal self-understanding. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Most people are unable to accurately estimate the number of immigrants in their country. Nonetheless, it has been argued that the size of the immigrant population would affect people’s immigration attitudes. Part of the effect of immigration on attitudes occurs not so much because of real immigration figures, but rather because of media reporting about immigration. In this study, negative attitudes towards immigration are explained by investigating the impact of the salience and the tone of immigration topics in the news media vis-à-vis the impact of immigration statistics. The cases of Denmark and the Netherlands are analysed for a period from 2003 to 2010, using a multilevel design. Overall, real-world immigration numbers have little impact. The tone of news coverage has an effect in the Netherlands: a positive tone reduces negativity towards immigration, while a negative tone does not increase negativity. We cautiously conclude that the longevity of the issue’s salience has a moderating effect. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article examines the extent to which transitional justice should address corruption in terms of both theory and practice. Examining the Kenyan Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission and the Tunisian Truth and Dignity Commission, the author highlights the important role of truth commissions in shaping the public narrative so as to reflect the devastating impact of corruption on human rights. However, given the inherent limitations of truth-telling and truth-seeking processes, combined with the coexistence of the anti-corruption ‘industry,’ it is essential to establish clear boundaries and adopt an approach that complements, rather than duplicates, parallel processes. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “There has been much theorizing, but little empirical exploration, of the relationship between transitional justice (TJ) and economic structures. In this article, we articulate three models implicit in present studies: TJ as a roadblock to economic growth; TJ as a bridge to human development; and TJ as a vehicle of inequality. We then perform a plausibility probe of these models using a new cross-national dataset of human rights prosecutions, truth commissions and reparations. We find that TJ is correlated with both increasing inequality and human development, while it appears unrelated to economic growth. In order to clarify the nature of these relationships, we examine the case of Argentina. We conclude that TJ, while perhaps a byproduct of global inequalities across countries, does not necessarily contribute to the expansion of aggregate inequality within specific countries. In fact, it might provide some tools for resisting economic abuses. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article uses the example of a failed project, whose aim was to achieve consensus around constructing a memorial at the former Omarska camp in Bosnia and Herzegovina, to illustrate some of the dangers of transitional justice interventions involving victims of dislocation and violence, as well as the potential for hidden harms. It is based on nine years of ethnographic research into a small returnee community in Kozarac, in the municipality of Prijedor. Well-intentioned as the project undoubtedly was, it had unintended consequences for the social relations of the local community. Like other internationally led initiatives, it can be argued that it helped reinforce a victim-perpetrator dynamic that prevented rather than assisted progress. Although we cannot draw too many conclusions from one project, the issues highlighted by this initiative have been echoed on a smaller scale in much of the international involvement of transitional justice scholars and activists in the town since then. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article investigates the evolution of the safe country of origin concept within the European legal framework and asks whether any country can ever be considered truly ‘safe’ in the context of refugee protection. Safe country of origin practices enable European countries to make generalised assumptions of safety and to reject asylum applications as ‘unfounded’ without complete or individualised examination procedures. This research looks at the early development of safe country practices by national governments and tracks their proliferation and eventual introduction to the Community legal order. It then focuses on the prolonged negotiation process for new procedural rules in the EU, culminating in the adoption of Directive 2012/32/EU, and questions whether the continued use of the safe country of origin concept represents a justified procedural aid as proponents insist. The concept has developed under European law in direct contravention of well established principles of judicial protection that are intended to guarantee the human rights of refugees entering Europe. Current regulations facilitate highly divergent procedural standards across the continent and allow for the widespread abuse of guaranteed rights. The article questions whether such practices can ever be human rights compliant, or whether discrimination and procedural abuse will continue in the future asylum framework, undermining the goal of fair and harmonised asylum procedures across the European Union. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Human Rights Day 2014: ODIHR Director Link wants to move from words to deeds for human rights defenders in the OSCE

Originally posted on Hans Thoolen on Human Rights Defenders:

On the occasion of International Human Rights Day, Michael Georg Link, Director of the OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR), called on all OSCE participating States to do more to protect human rights defenders in the OSCE region: “It is time for all OSCE participating States to move from words to deeds and to provide more effective protection to those who strive to promote and safeguard human rights in our countries.

The words must refer to the Guidelines on Human Rights Defenders which OSCE adopted this year: see: http://thoolen.wordpress.com/2014/06/11/osce-publishes-guidelines-on-the-protection-of-human-rights-defenders/

Unfortunately, in 2014 we have witnessed numerous attacks and threats against human rights defenders,” the ODIHR Director said. “This includes human rights defenders with whom ODIHR has worked, and I am particularly disturbed that those standing up for human rights in the OSCE region may be being targeted for activities they carry out in partnership…

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Women Who Defend Human Rights – a series by Protection International

Originally posted on Hans Thoolen on Human Rights Defenders:

Protection Int'I_logo_final_vertical_72dpiTo shine a light on the courageous work of women human rights defenders (WHRDs) worldwide, the NGO Protection International announces the launch of a series of interviews with women who defend human rights across the globe, from December and continuing in 2015, each month will see a new portrait of a WHRD.

alejandra

This month’s conversation is with Alejandra Ancheita, a leading human rights defender from Mexico and winner of the 2014 Martin Ennals Award for Human Rights Defenders. Alejandra is the founder and executive director of The Project of Economic, Cultural, and Social Rights. To read the interview and watch the (Vimeo) video that goes with it go to Protection International’s website (see link below).
Other outstanding women lined up in the months to come include Rehana Hashmi (Pakistan), Eva Bande (Indonesia), María Martín (Spain), Porntip Honchai (Thailand).

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Event at UEL: The rights of women seeking asylum: The role of research and civic engagement in securing the rights of women to protection

MA in Refugee Studies
Feminist Research Group
and
Centre for Social Justice and Change
UEL
Seminar & Lecture Series

The rights of women seeking asylum:
The role of research and civic engagement in securing the rights of women to protection

Date: Monday, December 15, 2014
Time: 6 to 8 pm
Room: EB.G 07, Docklands Campus

All welcome!

Speakers:
Debora Singer MBE
Policy and Research Manager, Asylum Aid
Gabriella Bettiga
Immigration Solicitor, Lawrence Lupin Solicitors

This seminar engages with the question of how to secure the rights of women seeking asylum. In doing so, it examines why women’s experiences of persecution have tended to be excluded from the dominant interpretation of the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, and explores why women are often unable to benefit equitably from protection under the Refugee Convention. In the past decade, Asylum Aid has been working, lobbying and campaigning to secure the rights of women to protection under the Geneva Convention. Asylum Aid is a NGO based in London which provides free legal representation to asylum seekers and has a national profile in the UK.  Its Women’s Project, set up in 2000, aims to enable women fleeing serious human rights violations to gain protection in the UK through its casework, research, lobbying and campaigning. By discussing their work, the seminar will point to the way in which research and civic engagement can gradually bring the change and improve the lives of women seeking asylum.

Debora Singer is Policy and Research Manager at Asylum Aid where she has worked since May 2004.  She manages the Women’s Project and lobbies and campaigns on issues affecting women asylum seekers.  As part of this work, Debora launched the Charter of rights of women seeking asylum in 2008, to persuade the UK to adopt a gender sensitive asylum system.

Before joining Asylum Aid, Debora worked as Policy Manager at Victim Support focusing on issues of sexual violence, domestic violence and human rights as they affected victims of crime.  In 2006 she obtained a distinction for her Masters degree in Refugee Studies at University of East London. Asylum Aid published her MA Dissertation research on women asylum seekers and international human rights mechanisms, which has had an impact on various campaigns and policy documents. Debora has become well known for her persistence and enthusiasm in lobbying strategically and achieving long term impacts. A well-respected campaigner, responsible for a series of creative campaigns on the rights of women seeking asylum Debora was awarded an MBE for services to women in the 2012 New Year Honours List.

Her most recent publications include chapters in edited volumes: Gender in Refugee Law: From the Margins to the Centre, Arbel, E. et al. Eds. Routledge 2014; and Moving in the Shadows: Violence in the lives of minority women and children, Rehman, Y. et al. Eds. Ashgate 2013.

Gabriella Bettiga, is an Immigration Solicitor at Lawrence Lupin Solicitors since 2003. She is Head of the firm’s Supervisors, as well as Manager of the fast-track and detention scheme. She is in charge of the firm’s training programme and regularly delivers training courses.

Her private casework has included the points-based system as well as human rights, asylum and outside-the-rules applications. She also regularly deals with Judicial Reviews and Court of Appeal matters. Gabriella studied an LLM in Human Rights (in particular the rights of the child), Islamic law, Immigration and Asylum law at the School of Oriental and African Studies.

Gabriella is a Trustee at Asylum Aid and a member of the Women’s Project Committee promoting the Women’s Asylum Charter. She has been involved with various NGOs in several projects and policy work in relation to gender issues in asylum claims and detention.

 

Join ICC to safeguard human rights every day

Originally posted on :

HRD 20412

By ensuring accountability for war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide, the ICC system is a powerful mechanism for protecting core human rights.

This Human Rights Day, all states should commit to joining the Court to safeguard the human rights of their citizens every day.

This year, the theme of Human Rights Day is Human Rights 365, meaning that every day is Human Rights Day. It celebrates the fundamental proposition in the Universal Declaration that each one of us, everywhere, at all times is entitled to the full range of human rights.

“The power of the Universal Declaration is the power of ideas to change the world. It tells us that human rights are essential and indivisible – 365 days a year,” says UN human rights chief Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein.

Governments and civil society attending the 13th session of the ICC’s governing body – the Assembly of States…

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Why is UNHCR Doing RSD Anyway? A UNHCR Report Identifies the Hard Questions

Originally posted on :

Back in 2001 and 2002, when I was working on setting up legal aid for asylum-seekers applying to UNHCR for refugee status determination (RSD) in Egypt, UNHCR officials would sometimes tell me: “Why don’t you put your energy into getting the Egyptian government to live up to its responsibilities? UNHCR is not even supposed to be doing RSD.”

By this time, UNHCR had been doing RSD in Egypt for nearly five decades, and so many people in Cairo took it for granted that this was UNHCR normal role. But it was a provocative question. So, whenever I met up with an Egyptian lawyer or human rights activist, I would ask their opinion: “Do you think we should push the Egyptian government to take over from UNHCR and start deciding refugee cases?” I would always get the same answer: “Are you crazy? Why would anyone want to have the Egyptian Government…

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The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)

Originally posted on European Parliamentary Research Service:

Written by Martin Russell
ASEAN: building an Economic Community

© MasterLu / Fotolia

The Association of Southeast Asia Nations (ASEAN) has long been one of the developing world’s most active regional organisations. Set up in 1967 by Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand, it has — like the EU —helped to bring stability to a formerly turbulent region. Successive enlargements have added Brunei, former Cold War adversaries Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, and —most recently — Myanmar.

However, in contrast to the EU, ASEAN remains a mostly intergovernmental organisation. Decisions are non-binding, taken by national leaders at annual summits, based on the principles of consensus and non-interference in domestic affairs. ASEAN has no equivalent of the EU’s strong supranational institutions such as the European Commission. Partly because of this, progress towards regional integration has been slow.

After criticism of its weak response to the 1997 Asian financial crisis, ASEAN decided to step up cooperation. Its…

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Cracking intercepts: the war on terror and difficulties with Human Rights

Originally posted on UK Human Rights Blog:

TheImitationGame-BCLiberty v Government Communications Headquarters ( IPT/13/77/H); Privacy International v FCO and others (IPT/13/92/CH); American Civil Liberties Union v Government Communications Headquarters (IPT/13/168-173/H); Amnesty International Ltd v The Security Service and others (IPT/13/194/CH); Bytes for All v FCO (IPT/13/204/CH), The Investigatory Powers Tribunal [2014] UKIPTrib 13_77-,  5 December 2014 – read judgment

Robert Seabrook QC is on the panel of the IPT and  David Manknell of 1 Crown Office acted as Counsel to the Tribunal  in this case. They have nothing to do with the writing of this post.

This is a fascinating case, not just on the facts or merits but because it is generated by two of the major catalysts of public law litigation: the government’s duty to look after the security of its citizens, and the rapid outpacing of surveillance law by communications technology. Anyone who has seen The Imitation Game, a film loosely based on the biography of…

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An internship at RIJ

Originally posted on Refugees International Japan Blog:

Hi, I am Siri and I have just completed a three months internship at RIJ. Please read on to learn more about what an internship actually is and what you can gain from it.

What is an internship?_S__5816361
An internship is all about gaining work experience in a given field. It may be something you know you want to do or to explore opportunities and see what suits your interests and education. Whichever reason you have, it is important to acknowledge that the organization you are working for is doing actual work, this is what they do and you should support their work as best you can. If you discover that this is not the field for you, try to do your best with the time you are spending there – you can still learn a lot.

I am lucky enough to have an internship that complements my interests and my…

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Scott Morrison may gloat but asylum seekers’ boats haven’t really stopped

Originally posted on Autonomous Action Radio:

The Guardian

Two facts emerge as the UNHCR meets in Geneva to look at protection for refugees at sea: more people than ever are fleeing their country by boat, and deterrence doesn’t stop them…

For all the slogans and military operations, over 54,000 people have boarded boats across the Indian Ocean this year, with around 20,000 in just the two months of October and November. As much as Scott Morrison may gloat, the boats haven’t really stopped.

The point you won’t see on any media release or hear at a doorstop press conference is this: even if people haven’t drowned on the way to Australia, they’ve still drowned. Because people fleeing countries in the region are still getting on boats.

There are many inconvenient facts for those who won’t stop talking about stopping the boats. But perhaps the facts are not so bothersome if they aren’t on the…

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Did the Torture Report Just Open the U.S. Up to ICC Prosecution?

Originally posted on Justice in Conflict:

Camp X-Ray, Guantanamo Bay (Photo: AP)

Camp X-Ray, Guantanamo Bay (Photo: AP)

Does the recent ‘torture report’ on CIA ‘enhanced interrogation methods’ leave US citizens vulnerable to prosecution by the International Criminal Court (ICC)? That was the question I was asked to answer in my latest article for the Washington Post’s Monkey Cage, originally posted here.

Dec. 9 saw the much anticipated release of the U.S. Senate’s “torture report,” outlining in harrowing and tragic detail the CIA’s program of “enhanced interrogation techniques” in its “global war on terror.” On Dec. 2, the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court also released a report in which it made clear that it was inching closer to opening an official investigation into crimes in Afghanistan – including U.S. interrogation techniques. These developments could very well expose U.S. officials to formal investigation – and potentially prosecution – by the ICC. But is the court truly prepared to…

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CIA torture report: Former Agency chiefs criticise ‘partisan attack’ on the agency – Americas – World – The Independent

Originally posted on :

George Tenet, Porter Goss and Michael Hayden jointly challenged the main findings – that the CIA lied about the extent of the torture, which included waterboarding, wall slamming and “rectal feeding” of prisoners, and that the interrogations yielded no useful intelligence.

“The committee has given us … a one-sided study marred by errors of fact and interpretation – essentially a poorly done and partisan attack on the agency that has done the most to protect America after the 9/11 attacks,” they wrote in The Wall Street Journal.

“In no way would we claim that we did everything perfectly, especially in the emergency and often-chaotic circumstances we confronted in the immediate aftermath of 9/11,” they said.

via CIA torture report: Former Agency chiefs criticise ‘partisan attack’ on the agency – Americas – World – The Independent.

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Victims at the ICC: What is the Way Forward?

Originally posted on Justice in Conflict:

The following is a guest-post on the future of victims and victim participation at the International Criminal Court. It was written by Stephen Smith Cody (Director of the Atrocity Response Program at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law), Susana SáCouto (Director of the War Crimes Research Office (WCRO)) and Chris Tenove (a doctoral candidate at the University of British Columbia).

A witness testifying before the ICC. (Photo: Reporting Kenya)

A witness testifying before the ICC. (Photo: Reporting Kenya)

When the Assembly of States Parties convenes this week, members will select judges, finalize a budget, and debate new rules and regulations. Another topic sure to arise is the major reform of the Registry of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Such actions don’t make headlines, but they have serious implications for how the ICC operates and how it relates to one of its key constituencies, victims of crimes. We have several concerns about how proposed reforms of the Registry might…

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UNHCR: 3,419 died in Mediterranean in 2014

Originally posted on clandestina:

More than 3,400 people have died in the Mediterranean this year trying to reach Europe, the UN refugee agency said Wednesday, urging governments to take more action to save lives.

More than 207,000 people have made the risky sea crossing since January, almost three times the previous high of 70,000 during the Libyan civil war in 2011, the UNHCR said.

Of these, a record 3,419 died, out of a total of 4,272 reported deaths worldwide on migrant vessels this year.

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Regulating ‘irregular’ migration – podcast on Sans Papiers

Originally posted on Postcards from ...:

Last November Roger Zetter, Alice Bloch (but Alice couldn’t make it) and I were invited to present ‘Sans Papiers: The social and economic lives of young undocumented migrants’ (Pluto, 2014) at the Refugee Studies Centre as part of RSC seminar series this term. The podcast of the presentation is available here.Pluto Bloch Sigona Zetter

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Why has this Italian politician’s neighbourly photo prompted such a furious backlash?

Originally posted on Postcards from ...:

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
Read the original article.

By Nando Sigona, University of Birmingham

Italy has been experiencing a resurgence of xenophobia recently. Migrants and Roma have been violently attacked by gangs, and people claiming to be “ordinary citizens” have organised marches in racially mixed neighbourhoods to stir up unrest.

Against this backdrop, Enrico Rossi, the left-leaning president of Tuscany, has turned what appears to be a rather mundane photograph into a bold political statement.

In the photo, Rossi stands flanked by a family of men, women and children. It’s a Sunday afternoon in Florence. “Let me introduce my neighbours” reads the description posted on Facebook. His neighbours are Romanian Roma.

Enrico Rossi, president of Tuscany, and his neighbours, 2014

Enrico Rossi, president of Tuscany, and his neighbours, 2014

Tense times

The picture was taken just a few weeks after Matteo Salvini, the new leader of the anti-immigration, anti-EU Northern…

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Bringing Conflict into the Peace Versus Justice Debate

Originally posted on Justice in Conflict:

(Photo: Reuters)

Graffiti depicting Muammar Gaddafi during the 17 February Revolution (Photo: Reuters)

This article first appeared on the new blog Post-Conflict Justice which I encourage all readers to check out!

The so-called ‘peace versus justice’ debate has come to dominate the politics of International Criminal Court (ICC). A tremendous amount of ink and number of neurons have been expended in the attempt to answer the question: do ICC interventions help or hinder ‘peace’?

A gamut of hypotheses have been proffered with regards to the effects of the ICC. On the one hand, it is claimed that the ICC yields a net positive effect on ‘peace’ by marginalizing perpetrators, deterring potential war criminals and inducing parties to enter peace negotiations. On the other hand, critics insist that the Court’s interventions undermine peace by instigating continued violence and leaving belligerents with few options but to continue fighting ‘to the bitter end’.

While recent…

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Scoping Out the Crime: Palestine, the Mavi Marmara and the ICC

Originally posted on Justice in Conflict:

Dr Russell Buchan joins JiC for this guest-post on the ICC Prosecutor’s decision to close its investigation of Israel’s attack on the Gaza Flotilla. Russell a Senior Lecturer in International Law at the University of Sheffield and the author of International Law and the Construction of the Liberal Peace

(Photo: AFP / Getty)

(Photo: AFP / Getty)

On 31 May 2010, a flotilla of vessels set sail with the express intention of delivering humanitarian aid to Gaza. They set out on the mission despite the fact that it meant violating a naval blockade that Israel had imposed against the Gazan coast in order to prevent war material from being delivered to Hamas fighters. Whilst the flotilla was in international waters, and anticipating that the flotilla was about to breach the naval blockade, the Israeli military intercepted the vessels. This occurred largely without incident. However several vessels, including the Mavi Marmara, the Rachel Corrie and…

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Syrian from Athens refugee protest dies trying to enter Albania

Originally posted on clandestina:

A doctor who was part of the protest that Syrian refugees started two weeks ago in Athens to highlight their plight has died trying to cross the Greek–Albanian border, other Syrians at the protest said on Thursday.

They named him as Dr Ayman Ghazal, who was around 50 and originally from Aleppo. Friends said that after spending a ten days at the protest, he felt it was in his best interest to continue his journey to northern Europe and what he hoped would be safety.

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New Journal Articles (weekly)

  • “This article examines the educational selectivity of immigrants in France—i.e. how their level of education contrasts with that of non-migrants in their country of birth–and the influence of this selectivity on the educational attainment of their children. I combine the Barro-Lee data set (2010) with the French TeO survey (2008–2009) to construct a measure of ‘relative educational attainment’, i.e. an immigrant’s position in the distribution of educational attainment among the population of the same cohort and gender in the immigrant’s country of birth. I demonstrate that the level of immigrants’ relative educational attainment differs both between and within countries of origin. I then show the positive influence of immigrant parents’ relative educational attainment on their children’s educational attainment, over and above family socioeconomic status in France. The intergenerational transmission of cultural resources and subjective social status are the proposed sociological mechanisms that can account for the intergenerational effect of immigrant educational selectivity. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article examines attitudes among 14-year-old native students in 14 Western countries to assess how out-group size, as measured by the proportion of first- and second-generation migrant children in a class, is related to inclusive views on immigrants. It develops three competing hypotheses: (i) higher proportions of immigrants contribute to inclusive views everywhere; (ii) higher proportions have a negative effect on inclusive views everywhere; (iii) the effect of out-group size depends on the ratio of first- to second-generation migrant children: the higher this ratio, the weaker the effect. It discovers that out-group size is positively related to inclusive views on immigrants in countries where second-generation outnumber first-generation migrant children (i.e., the old immigration states), and that there is no significant link with such views in countries where the reverse is the case (i.e., the new immigration states). The same regularity applies at the classroom level: in classes with more second than first generation students, out-group size enhances inclusive views while it shows no relationship to such views in classes with more first than second generation students. The results thus support the third hypothesis. The non-relation in contexts with many first generation students may well be a temporary phenomenon, however. Once immigrant communities have become more settled and integrated in the destination countries, positive effects of ethnic mixing could well emerge everywhere. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “If transitional justice initially emerged as handmaiden to liberal political transitions, it has increasingly become associated with postconflict peacebuilding more generally. While this may suggest a significant moment in the evolution of the field’s foundational paradigm, it remains unclear what any emerging ‘transitional justice as peacebuilding’ narrative might mean in practice and how, if at all, it might differ from what came before. I argue that the particular conceptions of ‘transition,’ ‘justice’ and ‘peacebuilding’ that come to undergird any such emerging narrative matter a great deal. This article seeks to deconstruct each component of that narrative based on historically dominant and narrow assumptions about what they can and should mean in the aftermath of mass atrocity. I look to concepts from critical peacebuilding theory – including ‘positive peace,’ ‘popular peace,’ ‘the everyday’ and ‘hybridity’ – that might serve as useful correctives to these narrow assumptions, bridging the way to a more emancipatory ‘transitional justice as peacebuilding’ narrative. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Migration scholars often assume a close association between transnational social practices and transcultural forms of belonging. Nonetheless, we argue that the distinction of both concepts is analytically important and helpful in understanding the transnational lives of second-generation migrants. To analyse the biographical accounts and network maps of second-generation Spaniards living in Switzerland, we draw a theoretical distinction between social practice (transnational networks) and forms of belonging (transcultural belonging). Our analysis shows second-generation migrants maintaining social networks over time, interrupting them, or reconnecting with them. Their sense of belonging may either endure or fade. Although the interconnection between social networks and the sense of belonging is neither straightforward nor causal, we can nevertheless identify five types of network/belonging combinations. These types describe the various ways in which second-generation migrants are likely to articulate transnational networks and transcultural belonging in their lives.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In this article, I argue that, by offering ageing return migrants new opportunities both to organize their lives and to rethink their social attachments, the extension of public healthcare in Taiwan constitutes a new contextual feature of the transnational social field bridging Taiwan and the USA. I use the concept of ‘transnational healthcare seeking’ to describe how returning seniors try to maintain their physical, psychological and social well-being by accessing the benefits of public healthcare available in their homeland rather than in the USA. Furthermore, I offer the concept of ‘logics of social right’ to demonstrate how older returnees seek to reconfirm their social commitment to their homeland and to defend their entitlement to its state-provided benefits against public criticism that they are free riders. In so doing, this article contributes a nuanced understanding of how ageing migrants imagine, pursue and construct an ideal later life across national borders.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In this article, I examine the transnational identities that return migrants create upon resettlement in their country of origin. Specifically, I draw on interviews with Republic of Ireland-born return migrants from the United States between the years 1996 and 2006. The analysis shows that return migrants – like other migrant groups – maintain and establish translocal identities and practices that straddle ‘here’ (Ireland) and ‘there’ (United States) upon return. However, the article goes further, asking why returnees develop such border-spanning social fields. Some recent scholarship suggests that some migrants develop transnational identities as an adaptive response to a hostile receiving society. The analysis here shows a similar process at play for certain return migrants in the post-return environment. Doubtless, for some returnees, a transnational identity is a natural outgrowth of having spent several years in the United States. Yet for others, one can better explain this transnational identity as a coping strategy to buffer resettlement anxieties and disappointments.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In this article, we study the emergence of the political spaces of activism of second-generation Swiss Tamils resulting from a critical event – the suffering of Tamils during and after the final battle in early 2009 of a civil war in northern Sri Lanka that had lasted for decades. We contend that we can explain the geographies of newly emerging second-generation activism committed to achieving Tamil Eelam through two factors. These are first, this generation’s multiple senses of belonging both to Switzerland and to the Tamil ‘nation’ and, second, the way a specific politics of affect remoulded second-generation identities because the pain of witnessing the brutality of war and suffering of Tamils occurred concurrently with a perceived lack of interest from their ‘new home’ (Switzerland). The combination of these factors made them want to acknowledge their Tamil ‘roots’ and encouraged them to become politically active. Consequently, these second-generation activists primarily sought to engage with their host society – to awaken it from its indifference to the suffering of Tamils and from its passivity in taking action on an international level. We thereby witness the emerging of a new type of Tamil activism in Switzerland, which is firmly located in and bound to the host country.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “We argue that social media are not only new communication channels in migration networks, but also that they actively transform the nature of these networks and thereby facilitate migration. Despite some limitations, which stem from the ‘digital divide’ and the lower trustworthiness of virtual ties, qualitative data reveal four relevant ways in which social media facilitate international migration. First, they enhance the possibilities of maintaining strong ties with family and friends. Second, they address weak ties that are relevant to organizing the process of migration and integration. Third, they establish a new infrastructure consisting of latent ties. Fourth, they offer a rich source of insider knowledge on migration that is discrete and unofficial. This makes potential migrants ‘streetwise’ when undertaking migration. Based on these empirical findings we conclude that social media are transforming migration networks and thereby lowering the threshold for migration.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In this article, we contribute to the growing and diverse literature on the lived experiences of children and their agency in the context of migration. Drawing on in-depth interviews with children whose migrant parents have left them behind, as well as with those who care for them in Vietnam, we demonstrate that the various ways in which they affect migration decision-making and transnational communication shape the children’s imaginations of migration. The context-specific social construction of childhood, or more specifically adult perceptions of children’s agency and needs, in turn structures these processes. We emphasize the need for debates on children’s agency to take into account both broader socio-economic processes at the macro level and the concrete and local scale at which children’s lives unfold. By outlining how children’s experiences of parental migration are constitutive of their attitudes toward this livelihood strategy, we also argue that the ability of those ‘left-behind’ to exercise agency is closely intertwined with processes of social becoming and navigation in the transnational social fields constructed for them by adults.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Thirty months after the Indian Ocean tsunami of 26 December 2004, thousands of families in Aceh Province, Indonesia, remained in temporary barracks while sanitation conditions and non-governmental organisation support deteriorated. This study sought to determine the factors associated with functional impairment in a sample of 138 displaced and non-displaced Acehnese children. Using multivariate linear regression models, it was found that displacement distance was a consistent predictor of impairment using the Brief Impairment Scale. Exposure to tsunami-related trauma markers was not significantly linked with impairment in the model. Paternal employment was a consistent protective factor for child functioning. These findings suggest that post-disaster displacement and the subsequent familial economic disruption are significant predictors of impaired functioning in children’s daily activities. Post-disaster interventions should consider the disruption of familiar environments for families and children when relocating vulnerable populations to avoid deleterious impacts on children’s functioning.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This paper compares the distribution of jobs by complexity and firms’ willingness to hire low-educated labour for jobs of varying complexity in Norway, Italy and Hungary. In investigating how unqualified workers can cope with complex jobs, it compares their involvement in various forms of post-school skills formation. The countries are also compared in terms of the proportion of small businesses, which, it is assumed, manage and tolerate the losses from functional illiteracy more than large firms do. Unskilled Norwegians benefit from synergies that exist between work in complex jobs, post-school skills formation and civil integration. Italy has an abundant supply of simple jobs and its small businesses employ unqualified workers even in complex jobs. Inadequate post-school skills formation and the lack of a sizeable small-business sector set limits on the inclusion of low-educated Hungarians.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Rights-based approaches have become prevalent in development rhetoric and programmes in countries such as India, yet little is known about their impact on development practice on the ground. There is limited understanding of how rights work is carried out in India, a country that has a long history of indigenous rights discourse and a strong tradition of civil society activism on rights issues. In this article, we examine the multiple ways in which members of civil society organizations (CSOs) working on rights issues in the state of Rajasthan understand and operationalize rights in their development programmes. As a result of diverse ‘translations’ of rights, local development actors are required to bridge the gaps between the rhetoric of policy and the reality of access to healthcare on the ground. This article illustrates that drawing on community-near traditions of activism and mobilization, such ‘translation work’ is most effective when it responds to local exigencies and needs in ways that the universal language of human rights and state development discourse leave unmet and unacknowledged. In the process, civil society actors use rights-based development frameworks instrumentally as well as normatively to deepen community awareness and participation on the one hand, and to fix the state in its role as duty bearer of health rights, on the other hand. In their engagement with rights, CSO members work to reinforce but also challenge neoliberal modes of health governance.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This paper surveys frameworks of labour migration in southern Africa and determines South Africa’s policy responses to inflows of migrants from seven neighbouring countries. Legislations, policy reports and scientific publications on migration were thoroughly reviewed and interviews and correspondence with key policymakers were conducted. Statistical analyses of data on foreign worker recruitments and permits issued by South Africa’s Department of Home Affairs were also performed. The absence of a migration protocol in southern Africa suggests SADC Members have not implemented the African Union’s migration policy basic guidelines. Two systems coexist in southern Africa that complicate migration governance: a South Africa-managed bilateral migration policy, and aspirations for a formal SADC-managed migration policy. Bilateral agreements between South Africa and neighbours have established a labour migration system that dims prospects for a regional migration policy. SACU Members could establish a two-tier policy to achieve free movement while maintaining managed migration policy outside SACU. An official multilateral migration governance mechanism would serve SADC better than the current ad-hoc measures.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The potential of migrant remittances to foster access to financial services for low-income households has been largely unexplored. Comparing three Latin American countries – the Dominican Republic, El Salvador and Mexico – this inter-disciplinary study links research on remittances and microfinance with multi-actor governance approaches. While the context of high remittance-dependence provides similar challenges in all cases, it finds remarkable variety both in the structure of the remittances market and the actors involved in microfinance and in the role governments play. It explains the diverging success of MFIs in remittance markets by pointing to the interplay of for-profit, non-profit and state actors embedded within the specific market structures of each country.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This study investigates the experiences of psychological and sociocultural adaptation among 404 first- and second-generation South Asian immigrants in Hong Kong. Results indicate that for first-generation immigrants, lack of host language fluency, fewer contacts and friendships with host members, the strategy of marginalisation, and perceived discrimination are all related to higher psychological distress, lower self-esteem and less competence in sociocultural adaptation. For second-generation individuals, although they reported higher knowledge of the host language and higher preferences the for assimilation strategy, the levels of psychological distress were higher compared with the first-generation group. An interesting finding of this study is the preference for the marginalisation strategy as opposed to the assimilation and/or separation strategy. The findings of this study highlight the importance of considering the unique experiences of the second generation in order to further our understanding of immigration and acculturation processes.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “A comprehensive review of online, official, and scientific literature was carried out in 2012–13 to develop a framework of disaster social media. This framework can be used to facilitate the creation of disaster social media tools, the formulation of disaster social media implementation processes, and the scientific study of disaster social media effects. Disaster social media users in the framework include communities, government, individuals, organisations, and media outlets. Fifteen distinct disaster social media uses were identified, ranging from preparing and receiving disaster preparedness information and warnings and signalling and detecting disasters prior to an event to (re)connecting community members following a disaster. The framework illustrates that a variety of entities may utilise and produce disaster social media content. Consequently, disaster social media use can be conceptualised as occurring at a number of levels, even within the same disaster. Suggestions are provided on how the proposed framework can inform future disaster social media development and research.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

The Refugee Council Archives at UEL Weekly Bulletin: Issue Number 4

uel-logo
Refugee Archives News
The Refugee Council Archives at UEL Weekly Bulletin
Issue: 4, 05/12/2014

Introduction

Welcome to the fourth issue of Refugee Archive News: The Refugee Council Archives at Bulletin.

This bulletin has the aim of providing both the latest news and developments on the Refugee Council Archive at the University of East London whilst also providing additional information on issues of concern to refugee and forced migration studies more generally. This I hope will include details of news stories, calls for papers, conferences and seminars, and online resources of potential interest. This bulletin, I hope, will aim to provide useful information to both students and academics on both UEL undergraduate courses in International Development and postgraduate students on our courses in Refugee Studies; Refugee Studies and Community Development and Conflict, Displacement and Human Security, whilst also being hopefully of interest to a wider readership represented by our Twitter and Blog followers.

This bulletin will be circulated via our Refugee Archive WordPress blog and also via our Refugee-Research Jiscmail email list. We would welcome any feedback that you may have on this bulletin and we would also welcome any input that you may have in terms of current and future content for both this bulletin and also our WordPress blog more generally. Please Contact Paul Dudman via email (library-archvies@uel.ac.uk) or Twitter (@PaulDudman) with any feedback or thoughts that you may have.

There are also some general Archive details included at the end of this and every bulletin posting for your reference.

Archive, CMRB and Course-Related News

Archive News:

Opening Hours: The Archivist, Paul Dudman, will be on annual leave on Monday 8th and Tuesday 9th December. In addition, Paul will also be at the UEL Stratford Campus on Thursday. If you wish to access the UEL Docklands Campus Archive on these days, please contact a member of Library Staff.

Christmas Opening Hours: The UEL Library Archives will be closed from Saturday 20th December until Sunday 4th January and will re-open on Monday 5th January, 2015. Details of the UEL Libraries Christmas and New Year Opening Hours are available via the Library website at www.uel.ac.uk/lls/about/openinghours/

Micro Site: We are very pleased to announce the launch of our new UEL Archives Micro Site hosted by the Archives Hub.  Our micro site will provide a unique interface for searching just the UEL Archive descriptions that we have contributed to the Hub.

Direct access to our new micro site is available from the link below:

Micro sites have been developed by the Archives Hub to enable individual Hub contributors to make their own descriptions available to researchers via a dedicated search and retrieval tool.  This tool has been designed both to resemble the traditional Archives Hub interface (search boxes, search options, hit list, display of records and tables of contents); whilst allowing a customizable template for the individual contributor.

CMRB Events:

CMRB (The Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) at the University of East London is pleased to announce as part of its Borders and Bordering Seminar Series:

‘The Reserve Army of Labour and International Migration to Britain: Developing a conceptual model’, Dr. Tom Vickers (Northumbria University)

This seminar will take place 4-6pm, Monday 15th December 2014. It will be held in EB.1.04, Docklands Campus, University of East London, E16 2RD, nearest tube: Cyprus DLR (http://www.uel.ac.uk/campuses/docklands/)

The event is free but spaces are limited so please reserve a place by following this link: ralimb.eventbrite.co.uk

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) and SOAS’ Centre for Gender Studies are pleased to announce the following seminar:

Gender, Fundamentalism and the New Politics in the Middle East

This seminar will take place 2-5pm, Saturday 13th December in room G3, Main Building, SOAS, London, WC1H 0XG
http://www.soas.ac.uk/visitors/location/maps/#RussellSquareCampusMap

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at
gfnpme.eventbrite.co.uk

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb and facebook.com/CMRBuel
For more info on Centre for Gender Studies: http://www.soas.ac.uk/genderstudies/

Asylum and Migration Symposium: The Role of Churches in Asylum and Migration politics – Ethical Reflections and Perspectives for the 21st Century.

This event will take place 10.30-17.00, Wednesday 17th December in Room UH.1.36, Stratford Campus, University of East London, E15 4LZ. Nearest tube: Stratford. Details here: http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/stratford/

If you are interested in attending please fill out the attached registration form and email it to info@ccme.eu or fax it to +32 2 231 1413.

A full conference programme is now available for the following event:

‘Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel’

Date: Monday 9th February 2015
Time: 09.00–18.30
Place: School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG

To register use the following link: ajamrqpisoas.eventbrite.co.uk

Full price tickets – £20
Concessionary tickets (All students; Staff associated with sponsoring organisations) – £15

The conference programme can be downloaded from the CMRB website: www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/events.htm

This conference seeks to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are being constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel. In particular it seeks to examine how the histories of Zionist settlement, anti-colonial and nation-building struggles and 20th century warfare in the Middle East region are being transformed in the current historical conjuncture. Of particular importance in this context will be ideological and political alliances that have emerged locally, regionally and globally around notions such as the ‘New Antisemitism’, and ‘Islamophobia’ and how these relate to racialised discourses against Jews and Muslims. Drawing on the expertise of scholars and activists from a variety of backgrounds, the aim of the conference will be to serve as a first step for building a transversal anti-racist political vision that will aim to destabilize some of the oppositional dichotomies which are currently hegemonic in discourses around Jews, Muslims and Middle East politics.

The conference is sponsored by University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging, SOAS’s Centre for Palestine Studies (London Middle East Institute), the Runnymede Trust and the LSE Centre for the Study of Human Rights.

Events and Call for Papers

Crossing Borders, Traversing Narratives
A Postgraduate Symposium of Film and Screen Studies
11 February 2015, University of St Andrews, Scotland

The very recent history saw issues related to nation and nationality re-emerge steadily, often aggressively, questioning and reframing notions such as identity, citizenship, or the irreversibility of globalisation as a border-dissolving, unifying process. In this context, investigating narratives of the displaced and of displacement, as well as their production, representation, distribution and reception, appears to be an increasingly complex, varied, and challenging process.

Crossing Borders, Traversing Narratives aims to re-interrogate cinema’s relationship with the notion of geographical border, and the subsequent effects of this relationship. This one-day symposium is meant to provide an inclusive exchange platform for postgraduate students in the fields of film and screen studies, whose interests either lie in, or can be applied to, this particular area.

Keynote Speaker: Dr Shohini Chaudhuri (University of Essex)

Topics may include, but are certainly not limited to:

Diasporic cinemas

Migrant and diasporic filmmakers

Multicultural communities and cinema

On- and off-screen identities of displacement

Issues of distribution and exhibition. Diasporic film festivals

Translation, adaptation, assimilation (thematic, stylistic)

Cross-border politics, activism, civic engagement

Fluid chronotopes

Intersections of nation with race, gender, sexuality, class, religion

Formal and genre variations

Proposals with a brief abstract (250 words) for a 20-minute paper, as well as a short biographical note, should be submitted to Andrei Gadalean (amg21@st-andrews.ac.uk<mailto:amg21@st-andrews.ac.uk>). The deadline for all proposal submissions is 21 December 2014.

New Additions to the Archive

The following are recently catalogued addition to the Refugee Council Archive:

Everyday Emergency: Silent Suffering in Democratic Republic of Congo

On the Edge: Why older people’s needs are not being met in humanitarian emergencies

Fundamental Rights Training for Border Guards: training manual.

Prevent combat protect : human trafficking / by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Shady traffic : review of the portfolio supported by the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs on combating trafficking in human beings / by Kate Halvorsen and Hugo Stokke.

Evaluation of the International Organization for Migration and its efforts to combat human trafficking / by Jacqueline Berman and Phil Marshall.

More ‘trafficking’ less ‘trafficked’ : trafficking for exploitation outside the sex sector in Europe / primarily written by Nerea Bilbatua Thomas and Xenia Commandeur.

Moving beyond ‘supply and demand’ catchphrases : assessing the uses and limitations of demand-based approaches in anti-trafficking / writer and researcher: Julie Ham.

What’s the cost of a rumour? : a guide to sorting out the myths and the facts about sporting events and trafficking / writer and researcher: Julie Ham.

The Protection Project review of the Trafficking in Persons Report / by The Protection project at John Hopkins University.

Asylum matters : restoring trust in the UK asylum system : a report by the Asylum and Destitution Working Group, chaired by Julian Prior.

Not gone, but forgotten : the urgent need for a more humane asylum system / by the British Red Cross Society.

Immigration and nationality : your rights to live and work in the UK / leaflet written by the Consumers’ Association in association with the Immigration Law Practitioners Association and Mick Chatwin, a solicitor specialising in immigration law

Claiming asylum : your rights if you are a refugee / leaflet written by the Consumers’ Association in association with the Immigration Law Practitioners Association and Mick Chatwin, a solicitor specialising in immigration law.

Mental health : rights for people with mental health problems / leaflet written by the Consumers’ Association in association with Camilla Parker, an independent consultant specialising in mental health law and policy.

Equal opportunities : dealing with discrimination / leaflet written by the Consumers’ Association in association with the Equal Opportunities Commission.

Racial discrimination : your legal rights / leaflet written by the Consumers’ Association in association with the Equal Opportunities Commission.

No going back : $$b lesbian and gay people and the asylum system / by Nathanial Miles.

Supporting disabled refugees and asylum seekers : opportunities for new approaches : summary and policy recommendations / produced by Refugee Support

Over not out : the housing and homelessness issues specific to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender asylum seekers : executive summary and policy recommendations / produced by Refugee Support.

Over not out : the housing and homelessness issues specific to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender asylum seekers ; by Michael Ball and Cole Hansen.

Pushed back : systematic human rights violations against refugees in the Aegean Sea and at the Greek-Turkish border / by Pro Asyl.

Education for refugee and asylum seeking children in OECD countries : case studies from Australia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom / by Paloma Bourgonje.

How free is free movement : dynamics and drivers of mobility within the European Union / by Meghan Benton and Milica Petrovic.

Understanding European Community aid : aid policies, management and distribution explained / Aidan Cox, Antonique Koning ; with Adrian Hewitt, John Howell, Ana Marr.

Guide to locating migration policies in the European Commission / a report by Mary-Anne Kate and Jan Niessen.

Security Community: The OSCE Magazine Issue 1 (2014).

Asylum matters : restoring trust in the UK asylum system : a report by the Asylum and Destitution Working Group, chaired by Julian Prior.

Not gone, but forgotten : the urgent need for a more humane asylum system / by the British Red Cross Society.

Immigration and nationality : your rights to live and work in the UK / leaflet written by the Consumers’ Association in association with the Immigration Law Practitioners Association and Mick Chatwin, a solicitor specialising in immigration law

Claiming asylum : your rights if you are a refugee / leaflet written by the Consumers’ Association in association with the Immigration Law Practitioners Association and Mick Chatwin, a solicitor specialising in immigration law.

Mental health : rights for people with mental health problems / leaflet written by the Consumers’ Association in association with Camilla Parker, an independent consultant specialising in mental health law and policy.

Equal opportunities : dealing with discrimination / leaflet written by the Consumers’ Association in association with the Equal Opportunities Commission.

Racial discrimination : your legal rights / leaflet written by the Consumers’ Association in association with the Equal Opportunities Commission.

No going back : lesbian and gay people and the asylum system / by Nathanial Miles.

Supporting disabled refugees and asylum seekers : opportunities for new approaches : summary and policy recommendations / produced by Refugee Support

Over not out : the housing and homelessness issues specific to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender asylum seekers : executive summary and policy recommendations / produced by Refugee Support.

Over not out : the housing and homelessness issues specific to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender asylum seekers ; by Michael Ball and Cole Hansen.

Pushed back : systematic human rights violations against refugees in the Aegean Sea and at the Greek-Turkish border / by Pro Asyl.

In the News

The Guardian – Does Britain really want to be the country nobody would migrate to?

The Guardian – Labour accused of foul play over immigration polling

The Guardian – Thirteen migrants found in tanker at Dover

The Guardian – Only two leave UK under scheme to deport petty foreign criminals

The Guardian – Immigration discussed in UK as if a disease, says shadow minister

Free Movement – Statelessness, deprivation of nationality, and EU Citizenship…what is B2 in the Supreme Court really all

Channel 4 News – UN ‘b*******’ migration comments ‘ignorant’ says Ukip

The Telegraph – United Nations investigator describes British attitudes to immigration as ‘b******t’

The Guardian – David Cameron under fire across Europe for migrants plan

The Guardian – A migrant’s verdict on immigration plan: ‘there is a war against us’

European Network on Statelessness – Stateless Voices.

The Guardian – Owen Paterson: immigration issue cannot wait for EU renegotiation

The Guardian – Immigration discussed in UK as if a disease, says shadow minister

The Guardian – Another Norman Tebbit immigration test? This time it’s war

The Telegraph – Landlords to rent homes to ‘white tenants with British-sounding names’ to avoid immigration red tape

The Telegraph – Enoch Powell would have enjoyed David Cameron’s immigration speech.

Amnesty International – The world’s pitiful response to Syria’s refugee crisis.

The Times – Muslim schools may be shut over fears for child welfare

Reuters – Obama to Republican critics on immigration: ‘Pass a bill’

BBC News – Immigration target unlikely to be met, says Theresa May

Evening Standard – East London school not protecting pupils from extremism, says Ofsted

BBC News – ‘Radicalisation risk’ at six Muslim private schools, says Ofsted

The Guardian – Schools accused of failing to protect children from extremism

ITV News – Ofsted: East London schools ‘vulnerable to extremism’

Evening Standard – Ukip’s Mark Reckless accuses Nigel Farage of EU immigration U-turn

The Telegraph – Romania and Bulgaria migrants reach record high

Sunday Times – ‘Pregnant sex slave’ lie used to win asylum

Newham Recorder – From Albania to Plaistow via the back of a van: Story of the Shpresa Programme

 

Archive Opening Hours

The current Opening Hours for our Archival collections are detailed as follows. The Refugee Council Archive and the British Olympic Association Archive are currently located on our Docklands Campus Library whilst the Hackney Empire Archive is currently located in our Stratford Campus Library.

The opening hours for both Docklands and Stratford Archives are as follows:

Docklands Archive

Mondays:  1pm – 6pm*

Tuesdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Wednesdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Thursdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Fridays: 1pm – 6pm*

Sat/Sun:  Both Archives Closed

Access to the Stratford Archive for the Hackney Empire Archive is by prior appointment only.

* Morning appointments between 10am and 12pm are available by prior appointment.  The Archive will be closed between 12pm and 1pm for lunch.

We would recommend that, especially for external users, that you contact us in advance of your trip in order to make an appointment to use the Archives.  This enables us to ensure that a member of staff will be on hand to assist you.

To make an appointment, please click on the link to our Make an Appointment page.

 

Archive Web Resources and Email List

Please find details below of our various online and social media resources which are currently available online and please do take a look. We would also welcome any feedback that you may have on how these can be improved:

Blogs

We have created several blogs to help support the archival work that we undertake and these are highlighted as follows:

Facebook

Please join and Like Us on Facebook, links are as follows:

Twitter

Please follow us on Twitter by selecting one of the options below:

Refugee-Research Email Mailing List

Please also consider joining our Refugee Research Jiscmail e-mail list which is managed in conjunction with this blog.  To subscribe to the mail group
www.jiscmail.ac.uk, type REFUGEE‐RESEARCH into the ‘find lists’ box, or use the alphabetical index to scroll down to R. and then follow the instructions on our REFUGEERESEARCH homepage to ‘join or leave the list’. Most users need only enter their email address and name. Alternatively, email the Archivist, Paul Dudman on p.v.dudman@uel.ac.uk, requesting to join the mail group.

Please let us know of any further links that you would like to see added.

Contact Details

Paul Dudman is currently the Archivist responsible for all of the physical Archives located here at the University of East London Library and Learning Services: Archives. Paul is happy to receive and respond to any questions or queries that you may have in response to both our Archival collections and also our social media presence.

If you wish to contact the Archive, please contact Paul Dudman via one of the contact methods detailed below:

By email at: library-archives@uel.ac.uk
By telephone at: +44 (0) 20 8223 7676
Online at: uelarchivesportal.wordpress.com/contact-us/
On Twitter at: @refugee_archive

By post to:

Paul V. Dudman
Archivist
Library and Learning Services
University of East London
Docklands Campus
4-6 University Way
London, E16 2RD
United Kingdom.

New UEL Micro Site on the Archives Hub

We are very pleased to announce the launch of our new University of East UEL Micro SiteLondon (UEL) Archives Micro Site hosted by the Archives Hub.  Our micro site will provide a unique interface for searching just the UEL Archive descriptions that we have contributed to the Hub.

Direct access to our new micro site is available from the link below:

Micro sites have been developed by the Archives Hub to enable individual Hub contributors to make their own descriptions available to researchers via a dedicated search and retrieval tool.  This tool has been designed both to resemble the traditional Archives Hub interface (search boxes, search options, hit list, display of records and tables of contents); whilst allowing a customizable template for the individual contributor.

This template allows the contributors to facilitate researchers’ access to the archival descriptions of their own institution, incorporating their own logos and institutional colour schemes.

The UEL Archives Micro Site provides access to*:

  • A dedicated search and retrieval tool for searching just the UEL Archives descriptions located within the Archives Hub.
  • The ability to search by keyword, title, creator ,date, reference, subject and name
  • The option to search by ‘all’, ‘any’ and ‘phrase’
  • The option to search only collection level descriptions, or all levels of description
  • Search results displayed as they are on the Hub, with the title as a clickable link to display the description
  • Display of descriptions as they are displayed on the Hub, with navigation to search within the description (up and down the levels where appropriate)
  • Display of a table of contents for multi-level descriptions, with an expanding folder structure and links to all levels of description
  • Display of images and links to digital content
  • Search within a multi-level description
  • A citation with a link to individual entries at all levels
  • An email link on every description
  • The ability to reference every description in Twitter and on Facebook

* List adapted and taken from the Archives Hub Micro Sites page.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank the Archives Hub team for making our new UEL Micro Site possible.  The Archives Hub itself provides a very important role in facilitating access to a the descriptions of a number of archival collections.  The Hub now represents over 220 archival institutions within the UK, and “provides a gateway to thousands of the UK’s richest archives.”

Further details on the work of the Archives Hub can be found on the About Us section of their website.  Details of the Contributors and further information for Researchers is also available.

For further information in regard to the UEL Micro Site or the UEL Archives in general, please contact the Archivist, Paul Dudman.  Full details available via our Contact Us page.

Armed only with their Dignity

Originally posted on minorities in focus:

Photo of Gay McDougall

Gay J. McDougall

Gay J. McDougall is Chair of MRG’s International Council and is currently the Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the Fordham Law School Leitner Center for International Law and Justice. She served as the first UN Independent Expert on Minority Issues from 2005 through 2011. Here she tells us of the struggle and courage of a group of Afro-Colombian she met on a recent trip to the country.

View original 1,055 more words

Sulla pelle dei rom, dei rifugiati, degli sfollati

Originally posted on Postcards from ...:

di Nando Sigona (su osservAzione.org)

[For a brief on ‘Middle-Earth’ (Tolkien’s citation comes directly from the criminal network leader) in English: The Guardian; BBC, unfortunately they only focus on the involvement of Rome’s former mayor Gianni Alemanno and don’t explore the network targetting in particular of contracts for public services for the most marginalised groups in society.] 

L’inchiesta ‘Mondo di Mezzo’ fa tremare il sistema politico-economico romano. Presunti corrotti, corruttori, picchiatori, conniventi, collusi e faccendieri (nani, prostitute e ballerine verrano fuori fra poco) mostrano che non ci sono più divisioni ideologiche che tengano: ‘gli affari sono affari’, dice uno degli inquisiti. Il tariffario che emerge dalle intercettazioni ambientali mostra che la cifra giusta può comprare chiunque: tanto pagano i rom, i rifugiati e i senza casa.

euros

 Noi quest’anno abbiamo chiuso… con quaranta milioni di fatturato ma tutti i soldi… gli utili li abbiamo fatti sui zingari, sull’emergenza alloggiativa e sugli…

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Protection International Focuses on national protection mechanisms

Originally posted on Hans Thoolen on Human Rights Defenders:

Protection Int'I_logo_final_vertical_72dpiBrussels-based Protection International‘s Focus Report  provides detailed monitoring of developments in the field ofnationalpublic policy on the protection of Human Rights Defenders. This year’s edition of Focus highlights the renewed interest in adopting legal instruments for the protection if HRDs in Latin America (in Honduras and Guatemala) and in Sub-Saharan Africa (in Côte d’Ivoire, Burundi and Mali).

The report (second year running) draws attention to the recent publication of guidelines on the protection of HRDs by OSCE’s Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR). The work of several Latin American civil society organisations (CSOs) that have presented cases concerning murdered HRDs before the regional mechanisms has been of great value. These efforts have led to the development of jurisprudence by the Inter-American Court of Human Rights.

Finally, this edition includes contributions by external collaborators:

  • the Preface, prepared by Michel Forst, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Situation of…

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The Refugee Council Archives at UEL Weekly Bulletin Issue: 5 (18th December 2014).

uel-logo

Refugee Archives News

The Refugee Council Archives at UEL Weekly Bulletin

Issue: 5 (18th December 2014).

Introduction

Welcome to the fifth issue of Refugee Archive News: The Refugee Council Archives at UEL Weekly Bulletin.

This bulletin has the aim of providing both the latest news and developments on the Refugee Council Archive at the University of East London whilst also providing additional information on issues of concern to refugee and forced migration studies more generally. This I hope will include details of news stories, calls for papers, conferences and seminars, and online resources of potential interest. This bulletin, I hope, will aim to provide useful information to both students and academics on both UEL undergraduate courses in International Development and postgraduate students on our courses in Refugee Studies; Refugee Studies and Community Development and Conflict, Displacement and Human Security, whilst also being hopefully of interest to a wider readership represented by our Twitter and Blog followers.

This bulletin will be circulated via our Refugee Archive WordPress blog and also via our Refugee-Research Jiscmail email list. We would welcome any feedback that you may have on this bulletin and we would also welcome any input that you may have in terms of current and future content for both this bulletin and also our WordPress blog more generally. Please Contact Paul Dudman via email (library-archvies@uel.ac.uk) or Twitter (@PaulDudman) with any feedback or thoughts that you may have.

There are also some general Archive details included at the end of this and every bulletin posting for your reference.

Archive, CMRB and Course-Related News

Archive News:

Archive Opening Hours: The UEL Archive collections will be closed over the Christmas and New Year period. The Archive at the UEL Docklands Campus will open foe the last time this year on Friday 19th December, 2014 and it will then be closed until Monday 5th January, 2015.

For details of the UEL Library opening hours during this period, please visit the Library Web Pages at: http://www.uel.ac.uk/lls/about/openinghours/

In the News

Recent figures have been published by UNHCR point to a “record high” of nearly 350,000 sea crossings by migrants and asylum-seekers worldwide this year, with the Mediterranean crossing being the “deadliest route of all”, with at least 3,419 people losing their lives since January 2014.

References: UNHCR – Focus on saving lives, says UNHCR, as numbers of people taking to the seas in search of asylum or migration passes 348,000 globally

Amnesty International – UN finds Mediterranean ‘deadliest’ sea route for migrants

Amnesty InternationalMore deaths in the Mediterranean Sea highlight need for EU-wide search and rescue plan

A selection of news stories:

ICRC – Life of a Syrian refugee in Jordan

ICRC – Ukraine: Donetsk displaced receive emergency supplies

ICRC – South Sudan crisis – one year: Enormous needs must not be forgotten

International Crisis Group – The Central African Republic’s Hidden Conflict

International Rescue Committee – Impending winter may be a ‘second disaster’ for Iraqis fleeing violence [TESTIMONY]

International Rescue Committee – Trapped: Powerful photos from South Sudan

Pulitzer Centre – Syrian Refugees Find Little Comfort in Greece

Refugee Council – A glimmer of hope for refugees seeking family reunion

Refugee Council – Record numbers of people take to sea to reach Europe

Refugee Council – Protection Gap must be closed

BBC News – BBC Pop Up: Tropical refugees in US’s frozen Mid-West

The Independent – We Are All Refugees: The radio soap about displaced Syrians inspired by The Archers

The Age (Australia) – Australia ignoring its obligation to refugees sets a dangerous precedent

Mail Online – Iran extends visas for 450,000 Afghan refugees

Aljazeera – Countries vow to double Syria refugees intake

Aljazeera – Syrian refugees unwelcome in Bulgaria

Amnesty International – CAR: Failure to effectively investigate war crimes fuels further atrocities and fear

EIN – Ed Miliband says Labour will “control immigration with fair rules”

EIN – ECJ judgment clarifies the right of irregular migrants to be heard

Global Voices – Is Argentina Really ‘Infected With Foreign Criminals’? Or Just Xenophobic Politicians?

The Guardian – How painkillers really can relieve a headache brought on by foreigners

Compas Blog – The floating label of ‘the migrant’

UNHCR – Resettlement offers hope to ailing Syrian refugees in need of treatment

Amnesty International – 17 December: the day we lost our homes

The Guardian – Jimmy Mubenga’s widow: I can’t watch this happen to another family

The Guardian – G4S guards found not guilty of manslaughter of Jimmy Mubenga

The Guardian – Three arrested after raid on ‘slave’ factory in Rochdale

The Guardian – What should Labour’s message on immigration be?

The Guardian – Ed Miliband says Labour immigration document ‘not very well drafted’

The Guardian – Legal aid restrictions on deportation cases are unlawful, court confirms

The Guardian – Labour strategy to counter Ukip threat over immigration revealed

The Guardian – Labour plans jail terms for exploitation of migrant workers

The Guardian – These days, money buys you a better class of citizenship

The Guardian – Yarl’s Wood: Labour pledges to investigate claims of sexual abuse

The Guardian – Sudanese man killed on M25 after clinging to bottom of lorry

The Guardian – South African man faces deportation from UK because wife’s income too low

The Guardian – Immigrants on the M4: are our traffic jams really not British enough?

The Guardian – Hanif Kureishi: Knock, knock, it’s Enoch

Institute of Race Relations – Patriot games and culture wars: the politics of national identity in Europe

Migrants Rights Network – Labour spells out its approach to immigration policy for 2015 general election

The Telegraph – Landlords to rent homes to ‘white tenants with British-sounding names’ to avoid immigration red tape

The Herald (Scotland) – Plans to rehouse asylum seekers ‘in disarray’

Evening Times (Glasgow) – Refugees ‘at risk’ in early move from Red Road flats

The Telegraph – European court: asking asylum seekers to prove sexuality is breach of human rights

Migrants Rights Network – High Court rules against the government on provision of legal aid in immigration cases

EIN – Detention Action: Court of Appeal rules policy of detaining asylum seekers for ‘quick processing’ of their appeals is not lawful

Channel 4 News – G4S guards cleared of Jimmy Mubenga killing

Daily News Egypt – Exhibition attempts to raise ‘Refugee Voices’

Refugee Council – Judges rule part of detained fast track unlawful

The Guardian – Racism is still a factor in British political life

The Guardian – From the archive, 17 December 1958: Immigrant ship bound for Australia

UK Climate Change and Migration Coalition – How Should Refugee and Migration NGOs Work on Climate Change Issues?

ICRC – Migration: The desperate search for a brighter tomorrow

The Guardian – Migrant overstayer figures swell to more than 300,000, watchdog reveals.

Events and Call for Papers

CFP Panel: The politics of ethnic conflict in contemporary Europe at the UACES 45th Annual Conference
Bilbao (7th – 9th September 2015)

Standing Group “Ethnopolitics” of Political Studies Association UK and Specialist Group “Peace and Conflict Studies” of Political Studies Association of Ireland are calling for papers on “The politics of ethnic conflict in contemporary Europe”, a panel at the UACES conference in Bilbao on 7-9 September 2015 (see here: www.uaces.org/bilbao ).

Ethnic conflict in Europe remains an important political issue into the twenty first century. Whilst ‘peace deals’ such as the Good Friday Agreement (Northern Ireland), the Ohrid Agreement (Macedonia) and the Dayton Agreement (Bosnia and Herzegovina) have had some success in managing violent conflict, the salience of ethnic divisions often endures. This panel will address the continued significance of these divisions, with proposals invited on any aspect of ethnic conflict in Europe broadly conceived.

Topics may include (but are not limited to):

  • The significance of ethnically-based political systems, parties and voting in contemporary Europe;
  • Methods of ethnic conflict management and resolution;
  • Comparative analysis of ethnic conflict in different European societies;
  • The role of European Union institutions in conflict management
  • Impact of regional key actors (international organisations, kin states, diasporas) on conflict dynamics.

Proposals are welcomed from researchers at all stages of their careers.  Please forward a 250 word abstract to Henry Jarrett (University of Exeter, UK) at hj239@exeter.ac.uk by Friday 9th January 2015. Please include your name, institution and paper title.

We are particularly inviting postgraduate students to apply.

CfP: Panel “Gender, Violence and Refugee Communities”, ECAS 2015
8-10 July 2015 in Paris, deadline: January 9, 2015.

Convenors: Buckley-Zistel, Susanne; Krause, Ulrike
Center for Conflict Studies, University of Marburg

For many refugees, the end of conflicts does not coincide with the end of violent assaults, but escaping war and repression only offers a certain degree of shelter from physical and structural violence. Women and girls, yet also men and boys, may become victims of sexual and gender-based violence, as has been increasingly reported by aid and human rights agencies in the past years. Moreover, the forceful recruitment of individuals in camps into armed groups, gang violence erupting amongst young refugees or violent disputes upon return to the place of origin suggest that there is a continuation of violence which penetrates into the supposedly safe havens. The experiences of displacement has an impact on social relations, in particular gender relations. While many humanitarian agencies and refugee-supporting organisations recognise this continuum of violence in general and sexual and gender-based violence in particular, they themselves become entangled in the re-negotiation of relations and the forging of new identities.

The panel explores the origins, scope and forms of violence against and amongst refugees from a gender perspective. It assesses how masculinities and femininities – as well as the way they relate to each other – change in the context of displacement and encampment. Case studies reach from the analysis of gendered violence in refugee camps, via the impact of the host community on gender relations, to the role of humanitarian agencies and their gender programmes.

The panel is now online and accessible via http://www.ecas2015.fr/gender-violence-and-refugee-communities/

Please submit a short abstract of max. 1500 characters by January 9, 2015.

Crossing Borders, Traversing Narratives: A Postgraduate Symposium of Film and Screen Studies
11 February 2015, University of St Andrews, Scotland

The very recent history saw issues related to nation and nationality re-emerge steadily, often aggressively, questioning and reframing notions such as identity, citizenship, or the irreversibility of globalisation as a border-dissolving, unifying process. In this context, investigating narratives of the displaced and of displacement, as well as their production, representation, distribution and reception, appears to be an increasingly complex, varied, and challenging process.

Crossing Borders, Traversing Narratives aims to re-interrogate cinema’s relationship with the notion of geographical border, and the subsequent effects of this relationship. This one-day symposium is meant to provide an inclusive exchange platform for postgraduate students in the fields of film and screen studies, whose interests either lie in, or can be applied to, this particular area.

Keynote Speaker: Dr Shohini Chaudhuri (University of Essex)

Topics may include, but are certainly not limited to:

  • Diasporic cinemas
  • Migrant and diasporic filmmakers
  • Multicultural communities and cinema
  • On- and off-screen identities of displacement
  • Issues of distribution and exhibition. Diasporic film festivals
  • Translation, adaptation, assimilation (thematic, stylistic)
  • Cross-border politics, activism, civic engagement
  • Fluid chronotopes
  • Intersections of nation with race, gender, sexuality, class, religion
  • Formal and genre variations

 

Proposals with a brief abstract (250 words) for a 20-minute paper, as well as a short biographical note, should be submitted to Andrei Gadalean (amg21@st-andrews.ac.uk<mailto:amg21@st-andrews.ac.uk>). The deadline for all proposal submissions is 21 December 2014.

New Additions to the Archive

Reporting diversity : how journalists can contribute to community cohesion / developed by the Society of Editors and the Media Trust.

Refugees and asylum seekers in Scotland : a guide for journalists in Scotland / an Amnesty International publication in conjunction with Oxfam, National Union of Journalists and the Scottish Refugee Council.

Show Racism the Red Card : study notes / published by Show Racism the Red Card.

Show racism the red card [videorecording] : a new video from Show Racism the Red Card.

A safe place [videorecording] : a video from Show Racism the Red Card to combat racist myths against asylum seekers.

Diversity and dialogue : living in a multi-faith society / published by the Diversity and Dialogue partnership project.

Missing out : a study of child trafficking in the North-West, North-East and West Midlands / Christine Beddoe.

Joint east west research on trafficking in children for sexual purposes in Europe : the sending countries / edited by Muireann O’Briain, Anke van den Borne and Theo Noten.

The health risks and consequences of trafficking in women and adolescents : findings from a European study / Cathy Zimmerman.

Protecting children from sexual exploitation and sexual violence in disaster and emergency situations : a guide for local and community based organisations / compiled and written by Stephanie Delaney.

More than one chance! : Young people involved in prostitution speak out / Julie Taylor-Browne.

More than one chance! : Young people involved in prostitution speak out / Julie Taylor-Browne.

Rights here, rights now : a recommendations for protecting trafficked children / J. Sillen and Christine Beddoe.

Servir. Issue 58, (November 2014). Jesuit Refugee Service.

Panorama: Ebola Frontline. [videorecording]

Tribal peoples for tomorrow’s world / a guide by Stephen Corry.

Refugee education : a global review / Sarah Dryden-Peterson.

Global overview 2012 : people internally displaced by conflict and violence / by Sebastian Albuja [and others].

Body of evidence : treatment of medico-legal reports for the survivors of torture in the UK asylum tribunal / Jo Pettitt.

Internal displacement and the Kampala Convention : an opportunity for development actors / Walter Kalin and Nina Schrepfer.

Durable solutions : perspectives of Somali refugees living in Kenyan and Ethiopian camps and selected communities of return / by Danish Refugee Council and Norwegian Refugee Council.

Asylum under threat : assessing the protection of Somali refugees in Dadaab refugee camps and along the migration corridor / a publication of the Refugee Consortium of Kenya.

Childhood under fire : the impact of two years of conflict in Syria / Nick Martlew.

Untold atrocities : the stories of Syria’s children / Save the Children.

Global migration futures : using scenarios to explore future migration in the Horn of Africa and Yemen : project report – November 2012 / the Regional Mixed Migration Secretariat and the International Migration Institute.

The rise of Africa : miracle or mirage? / Nordic Africa Institute.

Where are they …? : the situation of children and armed conflict in Mali / Layal T.E. Sarrouh.

Internal displacement in Africa : a development challenge : exploring development initiatives to alleviate internal displacement caused by conflict, violence and natural disasters / Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre.

Testing sexual orientation : a scientific and legal analysis of plethysmography in asylum & refugee status proceedings / Organization for Refuge, Asylum & Migration.

No shelter : protection gaps in Israel facing refugees fleeing gender-based persecution / Organization for Refuge, Asylum & Migration.

Unsafe haven : the security challenges facing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender asylum seekers and refugees in Turkey / joint publication of Helsinki Citizens’ Assembly. Turkey Refugee Advocacy and Support Program & ORAM.

Unsafe haven : the security challenges facing lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender asylum seekers and refugees in Turkey / joint publication of Helsinki Citizens’ Assembly, Turkey Refugee Advocacy and Support Program & ORAM. (updated ed.)

Rainbow bridges : a community guide to rebuilding the lives of LGBTI refugees and asylees / Organization for Refugee, Asylum & Migration.

Knowing our rights : women, family, laws and customs in the Muslim world.

Breaking the silence on violence against indigenous girls, adolescents and young women : a call to action based on an overview of existing evidence from Africa, Asia Pacific and Latin America / UNICEF

A woman’s struggle : using gender lenses to understand the plight of women human rights defenders in Kurdish regions of Turkey / Roj Women’s Association.

Satisfying labour demand through migration / produced by the European Migration Network.

Asylum and migration glossary 2.0 / produced by the European Migration Network.

Viewing nuclear weapons through a humanitarian lens / John Borrie and Tim Caughley, editors.

Overcoming human poverty / United Nations Development Programme.

Insufficient evidence? : the quality and use of evidence in humanitarian action / Paul Knox Clarke and James Darcy.

Implementation of the Hyogo Framework for Action : summary of reports 2007-2013 / United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, (UNISDR).

Progress on global platform chair’s summaries / United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, (UNISDR).

UNHCR operational guidance on the use of special nutritional products to reduce miconutrient deficiencies and malnutrition in refugee populations / UNHCR Division of Programme Support and Management Public Health and HIV Section.

A review of the work of the Refugee Education Unit / Praxis Refugee Education Unit.

Refugees and the “new” Europe : a selected directory of European networking on refugees’ education, training and employment / World University Service (UK) Refugee Education and Training Advisory Services.

Refugee education policy for the 1990s : towards implementing The Refugee Education Charter / compiled be Refugee Education and Training Working Group.

Refugee community schools directory, 1998 : a directory of supplementary schools run by refugee communities / Refugee Council.

Raising the profile of invisible students : practical and peer-led approaches to enhancing educational and emotional support for refugee and asylum seeking children in schools / [written by Michael Brewin and Athy Demetriades].

There you go! / Oren Ginzburg.

For asylum seekers and their supporters : a self help guide against detention and deportation / by Legal Action for Women and edited by Neil Adams and Nina Lopez.

Immigration bail hearings : a travesty of justice? Observations from the public gallery / Campaign to Close Campsfield.

Sanctuary in a cell : the detention of asylum seekers in Northern Ireland / [Victoria Tennant].

Maintaining contact : what happens after detained asylum seekers get bail? / Irene Bruegel, Eva Natamba ; with a foreword by Stephen Castles.

Immigration detention and human rights : deserving the name of democracy : independent research project on the detention of asylum seekers / written by NS Ghaleigh.

Legal advice for people who are detained by the immigration service / published by the Immigration Law Practitioners Association, The Law Society of England and Wales, The Law Society of Scotland, Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner and the Legal Services Commission.

Campsfield report / produced by Sue Lukes and Leonara Lloyd.

Notebook on bail $$n part two : representing yourself in bail applications / by Bail for Immigration Detainees.

Notebook on bail $$n part one : preparing applications for release / by Bail for Immigration Detainees.

Archive Opening Hours

The current Opening Hours for our Archival collections are detailed as follows. The Refugee Council Archive and the British Olympic Association Archive are currently located on our Docklands Campus Library whilst the Hackney Empire Archive is currently located in our Stratford Campus Library.

The opening hours for both Docklands and Stratford Archives are as follows:

Docklands Archive

Mondays:  1pm – 6pm*

Tuesdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Wednesdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Thursdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Fridays: 1pm – 6pm*

Sat/Sun:  Both Archives Closed

Access to the Stratford Archive for the Hackney Empire Archive is by prior appointment only.

* Morning appointments between 10am and 12pm are available by prior appointment.  The Archive will be closed between 12pm and 1pm for lunch.

We would recommend that, especially for external users, that you contact us in advance of your trip in order to make an appointment to use the Archives.  This enables us to ensure that a member of staff will be on hand to assist you.

To make an appointment, please click on the link to our Make an Appointment page.

 

Archive Web Resources and Email List

Please find details below of our various online and social media resources which are currently available online and please do take a look. We would also welcome any feedback that you may have on how these can be improved:

Blogs

We have created several blogs to help support the archival work that we undertake and these are highlighted as follows:

Facebook

Please join and Like Us on Facebook, links are as follows:

Twitter

Please follow us on Twitter by selecting one of the options below:

Refugee-Research Email Mailing List

Please also consider joining our Refugee Research Jiscmail e-mail list which is managed in conjunction with this blog.  To subscribe to the mail group
www.jiscmail.ac.uk, type REFUGEE‐RESEARCH into the ‘find lists’ box, or use the alphabetical index to scroll down to R. and then follow the instructions on our REFUGEERESEARCH homepage to ‘join or leave the list’. Most users need only enter their email address and name. Alternatively, email the Archivist, Paul Dudman on p.v.dudman@uel.ac.uk, requesting to join the mail group.

Please let us know of any further links that you would like to see added.

 

Contact Details

Paul Dudman is currently the Archivist responsible for all of the physical Archives located here at the University of East London Library and Learning Services: Archives. Paul is happy to receive and respond to any questions or queries that you may have in response to both our Archival collections and also our social media presence.

If you wish to contact the Archive, please contact Paul Dudman via one of the contact methods detailed below:

By email at: library-archives@uel.ac.uk

By telephone at: +44 (0) 20 8223 7676

Online at: uelarchivesportal.wordpress.com/contact-us/

On Twitter at: @refugee_archive

By post to:

Paul V. Dudman
Archivist
Library and Learning Services
University of East London
Docklands Campus
4-6 University Way
London, E16 2RD
United Kingdom.

 

News Stories (Daily) 12/18/2014

  • “A Prison and Probation Ombudsman (PPO) report on Brian Dalrymple’s six weeks in immigration detention paints a grim picture of how the vulnerable are treated. Although Dalrymple was a white man, we report on his case to show that, in immigration detention, immigration status ensures a grim equality of treatment.”

    tags: news

  • “Forcing private landlords to police undocumented migrants will exacerbate inequality and deflect blame for the housing shortage.

    The drive to embed immigration enforcement into all aspects of economic and social life is about to become even more intrusive. From 1 December, in a pilot scheme, residential landlords in Birmingham, Wolverhampton, Dudley, Walsall and Sandwell[1] will be obliged to carry out immigration status checks on all new tenants and adults living with them, on pain of a £3,000 fine if they are found to be renting to anyone without the right to be here. This will involve seeing, checking, and copying documents such as British and EU passports, biometric residence permits, refugee status documents, birth certificates and a myriad of alternative documents indicating that the prospective tenant has Home Office permission to be in the UK. They must retain documents for the duration of the tenancy and for a year afterwards, to avoid liability. If the prospective tenant has no documents or their status is unclear, the landlord (including a sub-letting tenant or someone taking in lodgers) must contact the Home Office’s Landlord Checking Service, which must respond within 48 hours, either issuing a ‘positive right to rent notice’ or telling the landlord that the person concerned is disqualified from renting.”

    tags: news

  • “David Cameron has urged other EU leaders to support his “reasonable” proposals for far-reaching curbs on welfare benefits for migrants.

    Britain’s prime minister said lower EU migration would be a priority in future negotiations over the UK’s membership and he would “rule nothing out” if he did not get the changes he wanted.

    Under his plans, migrants would have to wait four years for certain benefits.

    Brussels said the ideas were “part of the debate” to be “calmly considered”.”

    tags: news

  • “The backlog of overstayers in Britain whose whereabouts are unknown has swelled to more than 300,000 after the discovery of piles of unopened boxes left for years in basements and meeting rooms in Home Office buildings in Sheffield.

    John Vine, the chief inspector of borders and immigration, revealed the existence of a further 223,600 records of foreign nationals who have overstayed their visas, all dated before December 2008, in a report published on Wednesday.”

    tags: news

  • “(Brussels, December 17, 2014) – A Danish immigration report on Eritrea that suggests changing refugee policy for Eritrean asylum seekers is deeply flawed. Denmark and other European governments should await the outcome of the United Nations Commission of Inquiry on Eritrea, established in June 2014, before considering any major policy changes concerning Eritrea.

    tags: news

  • “The tears begin at Waterloo, the London terminus; not so many of the seers-off are going to Southampton; apart from the distance from London it is a special train and permission has to be got to board it if you are not a ship’s passenger.

    This is a very different boat-train from those which go from Victoria to the Continent. There are no smart clothes and no gaiety. This train is taking people to an immigrant ship for Australia and the bulk of the passengers seem to be made up of families with young children. There are a number of unattached young men, but there are more families – and so many children that one gets a confused feeling after a time that a child is as indispensable a piece of baggage for the journey as a suitcase and should be labelled “Cabin.””

    tags: news

  • “This appeal concerns a challenge to the Secretary of State for the Home Department’s policy, practice and procedure in respect of the detention of applicants for asylum in the fast-track system (“the DFT process”) after the refusal of asylum by the Secretary of State and pending an appeal against that decision. The DFT process is designed to facilitate the expeditious determination of applications for asylum and of appeals. It involves the detention of all applicants for asylum whose claims the Secretary of State considers can be determined quickly and a tight timetable for decisions on applications and appeals against a refusal of asylum to the First Tier Tribunal and the Upper Tribunal. Those who meet what I describe as the “quick processing criteria” in the Secretary of State’s Detained Fast-Track Processes Guidance (the “DFT Guidance”) are detained even if they do not meet the more stringent general detention criteria in her Enforcement Instructions and Guidance (“EIG”). The “general detention criteria” require all reasonable alternatives to be considered before detention is authorised and focus, for example, on whether a person poses a risk of absconding. “

    tags: news

  • “The Home Office is to release asylum seekers in the detained fast track system who have appeals pending and who show no risk of absconding.

    The indication from the Home Office comes as the Court of Appeal ruled that locking up asylum seekers who show no risk of absconding while their appeal is pending is unlawful.

    The news is the latest outcome of a long running legal challenge brought by charity Detention Action against the Home Office’s detained fast track system. Judges had previously ruled that the detained fast track system carried an unacceptable risk of unfairness.”

    tags: news

  • “Two young boys set their eyes on the horizon of the new city they have recently moved to, leaving behind memories of violence and conflict. The yellow swing they sit in offers them a window onto their new home, a refugee camp in Cairo.”

    tags: news

  • “The problem of low pay in the UK extends far beyond migrant workers and in many instances is at it worst in parts of the country with very small proportions of migrants.

    The Resolution Foundation said the numbers earning less than two thirds of median hourly pay – equivalent to £7.69 an hour – increased by 250,000 last year to reach 5.2 million. According to the Migrant Advisory Committee – the body which advises the government on the economic impact of migration – the majority, over 80%, are British citizens. Many of these very low-paid jobs are located in areas of the country with low migrant population”

    tags: news

  • “Gay and lesbian asylum seekers must not be asked to prove they are homosexual in order to stay in Britain, following a judgement by a European court yesterday.

    Asking refugees detailed questions about their sexual habits in order to establish whether they are at risk of persecution at home is a breach of their fundamental human right to a private life, the European Court of Justice ruled. “

    tags: news

  • “The Scottish Refugee Council has raised concerns over proposals to transfer newly-arrived asylum seekers from the Red Road housing development to hostel accommodation.

    They have also urged the council to scrutinise plans to develop the former Scottish Water site in Balmore Road into housing for people seeking refuge in the country.

    The plea came after the application received around 300 objections from residents.

    The Evening Times reported last week how a drop-in meeting at Lambhill Stables turned into a heated debate.”

    tags: news

  • “PLANS to rehouse newly-arrived asylum seekers in Scotland have been thrown into disarray after a proposal to develop an industrial site was suddenly withdrawn.

    PLANS to rehouse newly-arrived asylum seekers in Scotland have been thrown into disarray after a proposal to develop an industrial site was suddenly withdrawn.

    Housing provider Orchard and Shipman, which works on behalf of Serco and the Home Office, had identified the old Scottish Water office in a business park on Balmore Road in Possil as a new location for short-stay accommodation for migrants.”

    tags: news

  • “The hint has come in a paper the party has published today called ‘Changing Britain Together’. The 52 pages of text in the document include a section entitled ‘Immigration’ which sets out the argument that the Conservatives have “let people down on immigration.”

    It says that David Cameron has failed in his plan to bring net migration down to the tens of thousands and also claims that “illegal immigration” is a growing problem. The grounds for this claim come in the assertion that “Fewer people are being stopped at the border, more people are absconding and fewer foreign criminals are being deported; yet the government still has no way of properly tracking who is coming into the country and who is leaving.””

    tags: news

  • “Is it possible to demand a common reflex, a unified emotional response from all the citizens of a country to the symbols or cultural traditions that epitomise the nation? Across Europe, tensions are growing around specific symbols, whether it be the St George’s flag in England or Zwarte Piet in the Netherlands. Similarly, but from a different direction, veils are part of the new culture war, with bans and restrictions on ‘covering’ cast as essential for national coherence, marking out who belongs in Europe and who does not.”

    tags: news

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Recasting integration policy and discourse, my contribution to Bright Blue’s Immigration Commission

Originally posted on Postcards from ...:

In September 2014, the Conservative think-tank Bright Blue hosted an oral evidence session on immigration. A team of high-profile commissioners interviewed experts from academia, government, journalism, the third sector and business. There were eight main sessions: business and growth; work and poverty; education, research, innovation and skills; local communities and public services; refugees, border control, visas and detention centres; families and children; and integration. I was invited to contribute to the discussion on integration. The interview panels included: David Goodhart, Carlos Vargas-Silva, and Sunder Katwala.

View original