Events: Symposium – Biographies of Belonging Amsterdam

Symposium: Biographies of Belonging Amsterdam

by Marlou Schrover

Biographies of Belonging – VU University

Date: 10-11 March 2015

Place: VU University, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Cost: €100 (€50 for students and Phd candidates)

We are proud to announce a two-day international symposium, to be held at the VU University in Amsterdam, organized by the research group Identities, Diversity, and Inclusion of the Sociology Department, in collaboration with the Research Committee 38 ‘Biography & Society’ of the International Sociological Association. The focus of the symposium is on the experience and narratives of belonging and what it means in people’s lives. Where and when do they feel ‘at home’ and how has this experience changed in the course of their lives? What kinds of ‘spaces’ (e.g. cultural, geographical, imaginary) engender a sense of belonging and which do not? What are the features of contexts which are conducive to the people feeling that they ‘belong’? What stories do they tell about feeling ‘at home’ or ‘not at home’ and how can these stories help us to understand the social parameters of conditions of inclusion and exclusion? Which niches for social change can be found in people’s everyday experiences of belonging and not belonging?
We are also particularly interested in addressing methodological questions which arise in studying biographies of belonging: for example, how can we investigate belonging as an embodied, sensual, affective experience? What does belonging (or not belonging) actually ‘feel’ like? What kinds of interactional practices produce, facilitate or undermine an experience of belonging? What do people do in order to ‘include’ or ‘exclude’ others in a particular setting? How do individuals make sense of processes of inclusion or exclusion? What kinds of discourses and cultural narratives are available for talking about exclusion and inclusion?

Topics for possible sessions (not exhaustive):
Spaces and places of belonging
Imagined belonging
Exclusion and inclusion in organizational/institutional settings
Transversal connections; virtual communities
Unexpected sources of belonging
Histories of belonging and othering
Mobility and belonging
Belonging and everyday life
Belonging and civic engagement

Deadline: We invite those interested in presenting a paper to submit a short abstract (150 words) and bio (50 words) before 1 December, 2014 to:
Ewa Szepietowska ‎ [ewa.karolina@gmail.com]

We are looking forward to welcoming you in Amsterdam: Halleh Ghorashi, Kathy Davis, Peer Smets, Melanie Eijberts, Ewa Karolina Szepietowska (organizing committee)

CMRB Event: On The Making of a National Tragedy: The Transformation of the Meaning of the Indian Residential Schools in Canada

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) is pleased to announce the following seminar:

On The Making of a National Tragedy: The Transformation of the Meaning of the Indian Residential Schools in Canada

This seminar will take place in EB 1.04, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD

http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

Monday 27th October 2014, 4–6pm

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at

http://onthemakingofanationaltragedy.eventbrite.co.uk

Abstract: The Indian residential school system has become the pre-eminent symbol of the historic maltreatment of Aboriginal peoples of Canada, triggering, among other measures, numerous official apologies from political and religious leaders, the largest compensation payment in Canadian history, and the creation of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission. However, the current representation of the school system as a terrible tragedy is in sharp contrast from the way in which it was formerly represented by its champions, who once heralded the residential schools as a humanitarian – even sacred – enterprise designed to save Aboriginal people from their ostensible obsolescence in the face of higher civilization. The aim of this seminar is to trace the process by which this remarkable transformation in the meaning of the residential schools occurred. To bring this process to light, the chapter draws on Jeffrey Alexander’s strong program in cultural sociology.

Bio: Dr Eric Woods is a Lecturer in Sociology at the University of East London, a Faculty Fellow in the Center for Cultural Sociology at Yale University, and an Advisor to the Association for the Study of Ethnicity and Nationalism at the LSE. Eric serves on the editorial boards of the scholarly journals Cultural Sociology and Nations and Nationalism. Eric’s most recent book, The Cultural Politics of Nationalism and Nation-building: Ritual and Performance in the Forging of Nations, was published with Routledge in 2013. His book for Palgrave, entitled, A Cultural Sociology of the Acknowledgement of Injustice: The Anglican Church of Canada and the Indian Residential Schools, is expected to be published in 2015.

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb

 

Calls for papers: ‘Refugee Livelihoods: Innovations in Career-Laddering’

Call For Papers

The Forced Migration Innovation Project at Southern Methodist University is pleased to announce the Call For Papers for its conference on Refugee Livelihoods: Innovations in Career-laddering, held at the Dallas Highland and Conference Center in Dallas, Texas from 4th-5th March 2015.

2015 SPECIAL CONFERENCE FOCUS: “Refugee Livelihoods: Innovations in Career-Laddering “

Stakeholders in refugee resettlement around the globe are searching for innovative and durable solutions to sustainable refugee livelihoods. In response, the Forced Migration Innovation Project at Southern Methodist University is committed to bringing the best and brightest ideas in livelihood and career-laddering innovation. This unique conference will gather academics, service providers, employers, state actors, faith based organizations, and academics to inspire creative collaborative paths forward. Its goal is to inspire the rethinking of refugees in resettlement as active agents in their own livelihoods.

The 2015 meeting will focus on this provocative subject. We welcome debate, discourse, and research from scholars and practitioners who want to engage with a broad audience these issues as well as other subjects related to facilitating moves for newcomers toward sustainable livelihoods.

CONFERENCE THEMES:
Proposals for inspiring presentations, workshops, short films, posters, or colloquia are invited that address the broader themes listed below. In addition to the special focus, paper presentations will be grouped into one of the following categories for presentation at the conference:

Theme 1: New technologies aiding marginalized populations in obtaining sustainable livelihoods
Theme 2: Creative private/public sector partnerships moving newcomers into living wages
Theme 3: Mainstream development programming that could be adapted to limited English speakers
Theme 4: Innovative solutions to overcoming the traditional barriers to career-laddering
Theme 5: Policy and public discourse – barriers and prospects for overcoming them
Theme 6: Refugee voices- their experiences and strategies for overcoming obstacles in career-laddering

Deadline to submit a proposal (a title and short abstract) is 4 November 2014. Direct to fnibbs@smu.edu with “FMIP Abstract” in the subject line.

For more information on submitting your proposal and registering for the conference, please visit the link below:
www.smu-fmip.org

Calls for papers: Forced Migraton Review issue 49: ‘Climate change, disasters and displacement’

Call for Papers:

Forced Migration Review issue 49 – to be published in May 2015 – will include a major feature on ‘Climate change, disasters and displacement’.

Deadline for submission of articles: Monday 12th January 2015
www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters

(Please circulate to anyone you think might be interested.)

This forthcoming issue of FMR aims to discuss the linkages between climate change, disasters and displacement; the impact of both internal and cross-border displacement; measures to prevent or reduce the likelihood of displacement; and approaches to ensure the protection of those who are displaced (or who are unable to move).

In 2015 the Nansen Initiative, led by the Governments of Norway and Switzerland, will bring together states to discuss a protection agenda addressing the needs of people displaced in the context of disasters caused by natural hazards, including those linked to climate change. While some articles in the FMR issue will emanate from the Nansen Initiative’s regional consultations and civil society meetings that have been taking place since 2013, additional articles would be welcomed, in particular those that address the Arctic, Central Asia, Europe, West Africa, the Caribbean and Central Asia.

For more background please see full call for articles online at www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters

The FMR Editors are looking for practice-oriented submissions reflecting a diverse range of perspectives which address questions such as the following:

  • What have been the most significant developments in relation to a better understanding of the linkages between climate change, disasters and displacement since publication of FMR issue 31 in 2008?
  • What measures can be taken to prevent, or reduce the likelihood of, displacement in the context of climate change and disasters?
  • What gaps remain in national, regional and international legal regimes in terms of providing protection for individuals and communities displaced internally or across borders, or facing displacement, in the context of disasters caused by natural hazards, including those linked to climate change?
  • How can the operational response be improved, with roles and responsibilities better clarified, when providing protection and assistance for those displaced by disasters and the effects of climate change? What examples exist of states admitting displaced people in the context of disasters?
  • Are new methods of data collection, analysis and the use of quantitative modelling proving useful in predicting, planning for and responding to displacement in the context of disasters caused by natural hazards, including those linked to climate change?
  • Are there examples of good practice in supporting resilience, adaptation and coping strategies that can be replicated elsewhere?
    What evidence is there of improved guidelines and practice in disaster risk reduction and management, relating to displacement, disasters and climate change?
  • To what extent is human mobility included within national adaptation plans?
  • How can governments, civil society and the international community work together to help boost the adaptive capacities of local host communities and communities affected by displacement?
  • What are potentially affected local communities saying and doing about climate change, disasters and displacement? How can their expertise and insights feed in effectively to planning and responses at the local, national, regional and international level?
  • How can pre-emptive voluntary migration or planned relocation, and/or admission to another country to provide temporary protection, be facilitated?
  • In what circumstances will both affected citizens and non-citizens have access to humanitarian assistance?
  • What is needed in terms of international and regional cooperation and coordination?
  • What good practice currently exists?
  • How should governments and other actors respond in order to guard against protracted displacement and avoid premature return?

If you are interested in submitting an article, please email the Editors fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk with a proposed outline. (There is no deadline for this but of course you will need to leave time then to prepare the full article.)

Deadline for submission of articles: 12th January 2015

Maximum length: 2,500 words.
Please note that space is always at a premium in FMR and that published articles are usually shorter than this maximum length. Your article, if accepted for publication, may well be shortened but you will of course be consulted about any editing changes. Please consult our Guidelines for authors at: www.fmreview.org/writing-fmr

Authors are reminded that FMR seeks to include articles with a gendered approach or a gender analysis as part of them. We are also particularly keen to reflect the experiences and knowledge of communities and individuals directly affected by these questions. If you can put us in touch with displaced people and/or local organisation representatives who might be interested in writing, please do email us; we are happy to work with individuals to help them develop an article.

Please note that we also welcome articles on other subjects relating to forced migration for consideration for publication in the ‘general articles’ section of the issue.

If your contact details have recently changed, or if you would like us to remove you from our email alerts list, please let us know. Thank you.

Best wishes

Marion Couldrey & Maurice Herson
FMR Editors
fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Forced-Migration-Review/105563989479431?v=wall&ref=ss
Twitter: @FMReview

Forced Migration Review | +44 (0)1865 281700 | fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk | skype: fmreview
www.fmreview.org
Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford
Oxford Department of International Development
3 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TB

Workshop: ‘Undesirable and Unreturnable’: the UK’s response to excluded asylum seekers and other migrants suspected of serious criminality

Workshop: ‘Undesirable and Unreturnable’: the UK’s response to excluded asylum seekers and other migrants suspected of serious criminality

Thursday 23rd October, 16:30-18:30pm

Chancellor’s Hall, Senate House

Speakers: Dr Mariagiulia Giuffré, Edge Hill University, Jerome Phelps, Detention Action and Dr Sarah Singer, Refugee Law Initiative, School of Advanced Study

Attendance is free. Register for a ticket here.

 

Abstract: The question of migrants suspected of serious criminality regularly generates storms of political controversy. Human rights law is pushed to its limits here, as governments grapple with the political and legal implications of unwanted (criminal) foreigners on their territory. Human rights protections and practical considerations mean that such individuals can often not be removed to their country of origin nor a third State. Faced with these unreturnable yet undesirable migrants, governments have in some cases nevertheless pursued removal on the basis of diplomatic assurances and other forms of agreement with third states. However, such assurances have been heavily criticised as ineffective in practice, and been subject to considerable judicial challenge. In the absence of impending removal from the host state, such individuals are left in an uncertain legal limbo, subject to various counter-terrorism measures, (indefinite) detention and precarious forms of leave. This workshop explores the UK’s response to unreturnable asylum seekers and other migrants suspected of serious criminality, and questions how far human rights law can survive in an area so far towards the edges of protection, where human rights are celebrated by so few and contested by many.

 

Speakers: Jerome Phelps has been working with people in immigration detention since 2003.  In that time he has led Detention Action’s transformation from a local service-delivering organisation, London Detainee Support Group, to taking on a national role in challenging immigration detention in the UK.  He is the lead author of Detention Action’s reports: Detained Lives: the real cost of indefinite immigration detention (2009), No Return No Release No Reason (2011) and The State of Detention (2014), and co-author of Fast Track to Despair (2012) and Point of No Return: the futile detention of unreturnable migrants (2014).  Jerome writes regularly on detention and migration issues, including for the New Internationalist, Huffington Post, Forced Migration Review and openDemocracy.  He is the Western Europe representative of the International Detention Coalition.

 

Dr Mariagiulia Giuffré joined the Department of Law and Criminology at Edge Hill University as a Lecturer in Law in October 2013. She received her PhD (with the Doctor Europaeus Certificate) from the School of International Studies of the University of Trento in May 2014. She holds an LLM in Human Rights Law from the Queen Mary University of London, and she has been a Visiting Fellow at the Centre of Migration Law at the Radboud University of Nijmegen. She has served as an Intern at the Italian Consulate in London, and has both worked and volunteered for human rights NGOs. She is an Affiliate to the Refugee Law Initiative (RLI), School of Advanced Study, University of London, and a Member of the Lund/Uppsala Migration Law Network (L/UMIN). Thanks to a Scholarship awarded by the Swedish Institute, Mariagiulia has been a Visiting Researcher at the Faculty of Law, Lund University, where she has taught, since October 2010, on the LLM programs in Maritime Law and International Human Rights Law. Mariagiulia’s research interests are in International and European Law, Refugee Law and Policy, Human Rights and Migration Law. Her articles on refugees’ access to protection, migration by sea, readmission agreements, extraterritorial human rights obligations and diplomatic assurances have been published on the International and Comparative Law Quarterly, the International Journal of Refugee Law, and the Refugee Survey Quarterly, among others.

 

Dr Sarah Singer is an academic at the Refugee Law Initiative and Lecturer in Human Rights Law at the School of Advanced Study, University of London. Sarah is also Managing Editor of the International Community Law Review, a peer reviewed academic journal published by Brill; Martinus Nijhoff. She is Programme Director of the MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies (launching October 2014), the first postgraduate distance learning programme of its kind, run by the Refugee Law Initiative and delivered through the prestigious University of London International Programmes. She also teaches the law component of the MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights at the Human Rights Consortium, School of Advanced Study, University of London.

Sarah’s research interests are in refugee law and policy, human rights and migration. She specialises in and has a number of publications on the topic of exclusion from refugee status. Her current research addresses the challenges posed to national and international public policy by asylum seekers who are suspected of serious criminality but cannot be removed from the territory of the host State. Sarah previously worked as an immigration caseworker at the House of Commons and has received a number of awards for her research including the prestigious Modern Law Review Scholarship.

Events: Counter-terrorism laws: what aid agencies need to know

Counter-terrorism laws: what aid agencies need to know
http://www.odi.org/events/4023-counter-terrorism-humanitarian-practice-network

6 November 2014, 14:00-16:00 GMT
Venue: Overseas Development Institute, London (directions: http://www.odi.org/about/contact-details) and screened live online

Do aid workers risk violating counter-terrorism laws to reach people who need humanitarian support?

Counter-terrorism laws and humanitarian action share several goals, including the prevention of attacks against civilians and of the diversion of aid to armed actors. Yet tensions between these two areas of law and policy have emerged in recent years, resulting in challenges for governments and humanitarian actors.

This event launches Network Paper 79, Counter-terrorism laws and regulations: what aid agencies need to know, published by the Humanitarian Practice Network with the Counter-terrorism and Humanitarian Engagement Project at the Harvard Law School (part of the Program on International Law and Armed Conflict). Speakers will present key findings from the paper, engage the audience in an exercise which will address key challenges that anti-terrorism laws and regulations pose for humanitarian action and explore how humanitarian actors might respond to these challenges.

To register for this event please visit the event webpage (http://www.odi.org/events/4023-counter-terrorism-humanitarian-practice-network) or email hpn@odi.org. You can also follow #Counterterrorism on Twitter for live coverage.

Refreshments will be available from 16:00

Speakers:

Naz K. Modirzadeh – Director, Harvard Law School Program on International Law and Armed Conflict (via video-link)
Dustin Lewis  – Senior Researcher, Harvard Law School Program on International Law and Armed Conflict (via video-link)
Mike Parkinson – Policy Advisor, Oxfam GB
Abdurahman Sharif – Operations Manager, Muslim Charities Forum

Chair:

Sara Pantuliano – Director, Humanitarian Policy Group (http://www.odi.org/experts/99-sara-pantuliano)

Call for Papers: Everyday Muslim Symposium

Everyday Muslim Symposium

Saturday 31st January 2015, at Bishopsgate Institute, London.

Call for Papers

Dear Friends and Colleagues

(Please forward and share with colleagues with interest in this area.)

This one-day symposium, organised by the Khizra Foundation in partnership with Bishopsgate Institute, is dedicated to exploring constructions of Muslim heritage in the UK. It aims to bring together those working in academic, arts and media organisations to interrogate the changing ways in which everyday Muslim life has been represented and archived. It seeks to ask how the process of constructing a Muslim heritage has changed over the years and looks forward to possible forms that this might take in the future. We welcome 15-minute papers on any aspect of Muslim heritage in the UK. We are keen to capture a wide range of voices across a number of different sectors and therefore welcome papers with a non-academic focus.

Topics may include, but are not restricted to:

 

  • reflections on the current state of British Muslim heritage today
  • the shift in categorisation from ethnicity (e.g. Asian, Arab) to ‘Muslim’
  • museum and archive collecting policies and their impacts on representation and self-identity
  • representations of the diversity of the Muslim community
  • opportunities and challenges of establishing a centralised archive of British Muslim life
  • creating , using and accessing archives
  • existing projects/archives on British Muslim identity
  • the legacy of a British Muslim archive and its contemporary relevance
  • the impact of inter-faith and inter-racial relations on British Muslim identity
  • Muslim narratives and Muslim figures in the UK National Curriculum

Interested participants should send an abstract (maximum 300 words) and a short biography to info@khizrafoundation.org by Friday 31 October 2014. 

For more information about the project: http://www.everydaymuslim.org/#!about/c1va9

Courses: Palestine Refugees and International Law (Refugee Studies Centre Short Course)

Forthcoming dates

6-7 March 2015: British Institute, Amman, Jordan
13-14 March 2015: Asfari Institute, American University of Beirut, Lebanon
www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/palestine

About the course

This two day short course places the Palestinian refugee case study within the broader context of the international human rights regime. It examines, within a human rights framework, the policies and practices of Middle Eastern states as they impinge upon Palestinian refugees. Through a mix of lectures, working group exercises and interactive sessions, participants engage actively and critically with the contemporary debates in international law and analyse the specific context of Palestinian refugees in the Middle East (Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, the West Bank, Gaza and Israel).

The short course commences with the background of the Palestinian refugee crisis, with special attention to the socio- political historical context and legal status of Palestinian refugees in the region. This is followed by a careful examination of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights including its philosophical underpinnings and ensuing human rights instruments in international law. The key themes, which have taken centre stage in the debate on the Palestinian refugee crisis, are statelessness, right of return, repatriation, self-determination, restitution compensation and protection. These themes are critically examined along with current discussions about the respective roles of UNRWA, UNHCR and the UNCCP in the Palestinian refugee case.

This course is suitable for: experienced practitioners; graduate researchers; parliamentarians and staff; members of the legal profession; government officials; and personnel of inter-governmental and non-governmental organisations.

This programme qualifies for Continuing Professional Development with the Solicitors Regulation Authority (CPD SRA) in the United Kingdom.

Instructors

Dawn Chatty, Professor of Anthropology and Forced Migration, Refugee Studies Centre

Professor Dawn Chatty is a social anthropologist and has conducted extensive research among Palestinian and other forced migrants in the Middle East. Some of her recent works include Children of Palestine: Experiencing Forced Migration in the Middle East (ed. with Gillian Lewando-Hundt), Berghahn Press, 2005, and Dispossession and Displacement in the Modern Middle East, Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Susan M Akram, Clincal Professor, Boston University School of Law

Professor Susan M Akram teaches immigration law, comparative refugee law, and international human rights law at Boston University. She is a graduate of Georgetown University Law Center, Washington DC (JD), and the Institut International des Droits de l’Homme, Strasbourg (Diploma in international human rights). She is a past Fulbright Senior Scholar in Palestine, teaching at Al-Quds University/Palestine School of Law in East Jerusalem.

Apply

Fee: £350. The fee includes tuition, lunch and all course materials. Participants will need to meet their own travel and accommodation costs and arrange any country entry requirements.
Instructions for payment of course fee will be sent with your offer of place. Your place will be confirmed once payment has been received. Offers are made on a first-come-first-served basis to suitably qualified and experienced applicants.

Maximum twenty-five spaces

The Palestine Refugees and International Law short course is also an optional module within the International Summer School in Forced Migration. Candidates may wish to apply to attend the Summer School: www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/summerschool

Click here to complete the online application form: http://mr31.qeh.ox.ac.uk/application-form-palestine-refugees

Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB) Public Seminar Series 2014-2015

Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB)
Public Seminar Series 2014-2015

Link: www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/index.htm

6th Oct 2014       ‘Criminals, victims or migrants? Media and political framing of Roma migrants in Nordic countries’*

Dr. Miika Tervonen (University of Helsinki, Finland)

13th Oct 2014     ‘Border Struggles in the Migrant Metropolis’*

Dr. Nicholas De Genova (King’s College, University of London, UK)

27th Oct 2014     ‘From Pride to Regret: The Anglican Church of Canada, The Civilizing Mission, and the Indian Residential Schools’

Dr. Eric Woods (University of East London, UK)

10th Nov 2014    ‘Between Innocence and Deviance: figuring the asylum-seeker child in Australia’*

Dr. Carly Mclaughlin (University of Potsdam, Germany)

24th Nov 2014    Title tbc

Dr. Arlington Trotman (University of East London)

15th Dec 2014    ‘The Reserve Army of Labour and International Migration to Britain: Developing a conceptual model’*

Dr. Tom Vickers (Northumbria University, UK)

12th Jan 2015     ‘Differential Entitlement and the Logics of State Racism’

Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya (University of East London, UK)

26th Jan 2015     ‘Hierarchy, Inequality and Stratification: classing intersectionality and intersectionalising class’ Prof. Floya Anthias (University of East London, UK)

16th Feb 2015    ‘Constellations of Women’s Political Engagement in the Diaspora’

Marie Godin and Prof. Giorgia Dona (University of East London, UK)

23rd Feb 2015    ‘The American-Far Right and Islamophobia’

Dr. Aaron Winter (University of East London, UK)

9th Mar 2015       ‘Borders, Boundaries and Beyond: a feminist exploration of the making of borders, boundaries and identities in the post-colonial Bangladesh’* Rumana Hashem and Zobaida Nasrin (University of East London, UK)

16th Mar 2015     ‘Bordering Europe Abroad: Schengen visa policy implementation in Morocco and transnational policy-making from below’*

Dr. Federica Infantino (University Libre De Bruxelles, Belgium)

30th Mar 2015     ‘”It doesn’t matter what colour, as long as it’s gold”: Olympic legacies in the age of multicultural capitalism’

Prof. Phil Cohen (University of East London, UK)

13th Apr 2015     ‘I’m not racist but some of my best friends are: paradoxes of xenophobia and structures of disavowal’

Dr. Ben Gidley (COMPAS, Oxford University)

27th Apr 2015    ‘Sovereignty and Agency in the Post-Ottoman Middle East’

Dr. James Renton (Edge Hill University, UK)

11th May 2015    Title tbc

Can Yildiz (NHS, UK)

1st Jun 2015       Title tbc

Dr. Alex Hall (University of York, UK)

Time

16.00–18.00

Location

Docklands Campus, University of East London, E16 2RD

Nearest tube: Cyprus DLR (http://www.uel.ac.uk/campuses/docklands/)

Room number

2014 seminars: EB.1.04

2015 seminars: EB.G.06

* = All seminars marked with * are part of CMRB’s Borders and Bordering Seminar series, which are organised as part the centre’s work in the European Union’s EUBorderscapes project.

Call for Papers: Gender and Education Special Issue – If not now, when? Feminism in contemporary activist, social and educational contexts

Call for Papers:

If not now, when? Feminism in contemporary activist, social and educational contexts

Proposals should be sent to:

Olivia Guaraldo, University of Verona, Italy olivia.guaraldo@univr.it and

Angela Voela, University of East London, UK  a.voela@uel.ac.uk

Political and socio-economic developments in recent years have created new opportunities and new battlegrounds for feminism, with women taking to the streets and demonstrating against the status quo, corruption, sexism, austerity and capitalism. On February 13th 2011,

demonstrations took place in various Italian cities, with over a million participants in total. They were coordinated by the feminist coalition Se Non Ora Quando? (If not now, when?). The demonstrations voiced the urgent need to reassert women’s dignity and renewed faith in the effectiveness of a popular feminist movement.

There seems to be a pervasive optimism that feminism is now entering a new era, as evidence from different countries seems to suggest. At the same time, it is said that the advance of neoliberalism and the indisputable gains of feminism in the last thirty years have resulted in de-politicisation and a decline of interest in feminism. The mainstreaming of feminism has also raised concerns about its independent and autonomous existence.

‘If not now, when?’ invites potential contributors to consider the present moment of feminism and the presence of feminism on the streets and in mainstream society. It is seeking both theoretically informed and more empirical contributions on feminist endeavours, the strategies they employ and the values they uphold, the lessons learnt, and the new or emerging debates and challenges. In the context of a broadly defined feminist education, ‘If not now, when?’ also wishes to explore the pedagogical aspect of contemporary feminism, as well as testimonies of politicisation and mobilisation relevant to the formation of a feminist consciousness, especially in higher education.

Further, and focusing on the present, it invites contributions on the theoretical ideas that are most relevant for feminism today. We are particularly interested in the notion of timeliness or kairos, the right time for something to happen as opposed to chronos or linear time. This temporal aspect of the contemporary feminism needs to be analysed and fully understood in the light of debates over the future of democracy, the welfare state, neoliberalism and globalisation. As evidence from the ‘periphery’ of Europe and the Mediterranean show that feminists decide to take to the streets again, we particularly welcome contributions that speak about the present and recent past of feminism in that part of the world, especially in the light of the significant political, social and economic changes in the region.

Contributions might address the following topics:

  • Feminist alternatives to patriarchy and neoliberalism: contemporary strategies, theoretical ideas and practices;
  • Feminism in the academia and beyond: reflections on the past, emerging issues in the present, pedagogical prospects;
  • Contemporary feminist activism in the South of Europe and beyond: what do know, what do we learn?
  • Feminism, ethical values and the role of the individual;
  • Feminism and the idea time and timeliness (Kairos);
  • Is feminism still transformative or has it become too mainstream and confluent with dominant politics?
  • How could the insight, issues and strategies of popular movements be transformed into permanent advantages for feminism?
  • How does academic feminism respond to ideological, political and cultural demands outside the academia?

350-500 word abstracts are due by 1st December 2014.

Proposals should be for original works not previously published (including in conference proceedings) and that are not currently under consideration for another journal or edited collection. If your proposal is accepted for the special issue, a full draft (5000-7000 words) will be required by June 2015. Editors are happy to discuss ideas prior to the deadline.

Proposals should be sent to:

Olivia Guaraldo, University of Verona, Italy olivia.guaraldo@univr.it and

Angela Voela, University of East London, UK  a.voela@uel.ac.uk

Conference Announcement – ‘Migration, Integration and Neighbourhoods: Where’s the Harm?’

“Migration, Integration and Neighbourhoods: Where’s the Harm?”

***Conference Announcement***

Date: 21-22 November 2014

Venue: Cumberland Lodge, The Great Park, Windsor

Delegate Rate: £195  (includes all food and accommodation in unique historic surroundings)

Partnership:

In partnership with the Centre on the Dynamics of Ethnicity: www.ethnicity.ac.uk

Key speakers (to date):

Dr Robert Arnott Director (Border & Immigration System, Home Office), Professor Simon Burgess (Economics, University of Bristol), Dr Nissa Finney (Hallsworth Fellow, University of Manchester), Dr Robert Ford (Politics, University of Manchester), Phoebe Griffith (Deputy Director, IPPR), Ruth Grove-White (Policy Director, Migrant Rights Network), Sue Lukes, (director of MigrationWork CIC), Dr Therese O’Toole (Sociology, University of Bristol), Professor James Nazroo (Director, Centre on the Dynamics of Ethnicity, University of Manchester), Trevor Phillips OBE (founding Chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission).

Register here:

www.cumberlandlodge.ac.uk/migration

Introduction:

Migration will be a key policy issue in the 2015 general election: we are already seeing heated political rhetoric about levels of migration to the UK.  But what do we really know about the effect of migration on local communities?

Migrant populations are often thought to be harmful to social cohesion at the local, neighbourhood level. The widely accepted idea is that neighbourhoods with diverse migrant populations lack a sense of community spirit, leading to increased social isolation. The influential sociologist Robert Putnam described this effect as “pull[ing] in like a turtle” (2007: p.149).

Drawing on the latest research from the Centre on the Dynamics of Ethnicity, this conference challenges the notion that diversity is harmful to neighbourhoods. It offers a practical examination of key indicators of social capital and cohesion, such as: whether there is a correlation between educational attainment and prevalence of English as a second language in schools; voting registration rates; access to social housing; fear of crime; trust; levels of health and well-being.

The conference will:

•     evaluate one of the key policy issues of the next general election

•     give an analysis of the latest thinking on migration and integration

•     examine up-close the fissures between different kinds of sociological research,

•     analyse the competing influences of public discourse and research on policy

The event will be of interest to academic researchers; researchers from think tanks; parliamentary researchers and members of the civil service; representatives from the voluntary sector; and anyone with an interest in social cohesion, population movement and integration.

Venue

The colloquium will be held at the former royal residence of Cumberland Lodge (www.cumberlandlodge.ac.uk) which is located in Windsor Park, Berkshire, SL4 2HP.

About Cumberland Lodge:

Cumberland Lodge is an educational charity dedicated to the betterment of society through the promotion of ethical discussion.  This is a not-for-profit event.

Contact us:

For more information please visit the website:            www.cumberlandlodge.ac.uk/migration

Or email:     janis@cumberlandlodge.ac.uk

 

Events: ‘Refugee and Forced Migration Studies: The state of the art’ (Refugee Studies Centre Public Seminar Series, Michaelmas term 2014)

Refugee and Forced Migration Studies: The state of the art | Public Seminar Series, Michaelmas term 2014 

Wednesdays at 5pm in Seminar Room 1, Oxford Department of International Development, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TB
www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/michaelmas2014

This term’s series is convened by Dr Cathryn Costello and Dr Kirsten McConnachie

This series will range across disciplines and subjects in refugee studies, commencing with the launch of The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (OUP, 2014), a multi-contributor volume providing an overview of the discipline, its evolution and challenges. Refugee and Forced Migration Studies has grown from being a concern of a relatively small number of scholars and policy researchers in the 1980s to a global field of interest with thousands of students and scholars worldwide. Like the Oxford Handbook, this series will critically assess the development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, providing an opportunity for scholars to present their most recent monographs and other research, and discuss their contribution to the discipline, its place in the academy, and refugee studies’ relationships with policy and practice.

15 October 2014
The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies [Book launch]
http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/the-oxford-handbook-of-refugee-and-forced-migration-studies-book-launch
Dr Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (University College London) and Professor Gil Loescher (Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford)

22 October 2014
The Ideal Refugees: Gender, Islam, and the Sahrawi Politics of Survival [Book event]
http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/the-ideal-refugees-gender-islam-and-the-sahrawi-politics-of-survival-book-event
Dr Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (University College London)

29 October 2014
Governing Refugees: Justice, Order and Legal Pluralism on the Thai-Burma border [Book event]
http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/governing-refugees-justice-order-and-legal-pluralism-on-the-thai2013burma-border-book-event
Dr Kirsten McConnachie (Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford)

5 November 2014
ANNUAL HARRELL-BOND LECTURE*
Displacement and integration in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan: a century later
http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/harrellbond2014
Her Royal Highness Princess Basma bint Talal

12 November 2014
Love of women and a place in the world: romantic love and political commitment in the life of a forced migrant
http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/love-of-women-and-a-place-in-the-world-romantic-love-and-political-commitment-in-the-life-of-a-forced-migrant
Professor Jonny Steinberg (African Studies Centre and the Centre for Criminology)

19 November 2014
Sans Papiers: The Social and Economic Lives of Young Undocumented Migrants [Book event]
http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/sans-papiers-the-social-and-economic-lives-of-young-undocumented-migrants-book-event
Professor Roger Zetter (Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford) and Dr Nando Sigona (University of Birmingham)

26 November 2014
Inequality, immigration and refugee protection
http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/inequality-immigration-and-refugee-protection
Dr Katy Long (Stanford University and University of Edinburgh)

3 December 2014
Citizenship revocation and the privilege to have rights
http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/citizenship-revocation-and-the-privilege-to-have-rights
ProfessorAudrey Macklin (University of Toronto)

TIME AND LOCATION
All seminars take place on Wednesdays at 5pm in Seminar Room 1, Oxford Department of International Development, OX1 3TB. Everyone is welcome to attend and no registration is required. All events are free of charge.

*The Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture takes place at the Examination Schools, 81 High Street, Oxford OX1 4AS. Please note: all are welcome to attend, but registration is required for this event. Sign up here: http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/forms/lectures/annual-harrell-bond-lecture-2014

Council of Europe anti-torture Committee publishes report on Greece

Originally posted on clandestina:

Read the report: 2014-26-inf-eng

Strasbourg, 16.10.2014 – The Council of Europe’s Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT) has published today the report on its eleventh visit to Greece. The visit took place two years after the CPT had issued a public statement in which it had expressed serious concerns regarding the lack of effective action to tackle systemic deficiencies concerning the conditions of detention of irregular migrants and the situation in the prisons. Regrettably, the findings of the 2013 visit demonstrate clearly that the situation has not improved. Further, the problem of ill-treatment by the police appears to be growing and there is little evidence that allegations of ill-treatment are investigated promptly and thoroughly, leading to some police officers believing they can act with impunity.

View original 291 more words

Courses: Refugee Council Training Dates for November 2014

The Refugee Council have training dates coming up in November. All courses will take place at Refugee Council head offices based in Stratford.

Courses coming up:
. Key Issues in Asylum and Asylum Support- 20th  November
. Emotional Well Being of Refugee Children and Young People- 21st November
. Age Assessment Awareness and Working with Age Disputed Young People – 24th November
. End of Process: Support for Asylum Seekers who have been Refused Asylum- 27th November

Prices for the courses are:
£175 + VAT = £210 for all Organisations and Businesses
£115 + VAT = £138 for all Charities

All courses can be booked online: http://www.refugeecouncil.org.uk/training_conferences/training/current_training_courses?utm_medium=email&utm_source=Refugee+Council&utm_campaign=4809161_Training+November+2014&utm_content=All%2520current%2520courses%2520information%2520November%25202014&dm_i=I6P,2V2RT,31JK3Q,ADILL,1

Or call 0207 346 6737

- Key Issues in Asylum & Asylum Support – 20th November

Working with asylum seekers and refugees requires an understanding of some key issues. Asylum and immigration legislation and policy are characterised by frequent changes which can make it difficult for practitioners to keep up-to-date and offer accurate advice and most effective practice.

This course will provide an overview of some key structures in the asylum system (including determination and support) in order to support delegates’ understanding of asylum issues.

By completing this one-day course, delegates will have a basic understanding of:
. The distinction between refugees, asylum seekers and other migrant groups
. The current international context of asylum and the causes of flight
. The current legislative structure including updates on the Immigration Act 2014 and legal aid changes
. The asylum determination process including the appeal process
. Support provision under current legislation
. Possible implications of future legislative changes

Book now: http://noreply.refugeecouncil.org.uk/I6P-2V2RT-31JK3Q-1AUY7H-1/c.aspx

- Emotional well-being of refugee children and young people – 21st November

The aim of the course is to examine the effects of trauma and loss on emotional well-being of refugee children and young people and to develop further understanding of their overall needs. Participants will be provided with the tools to assess the organisation in which they work, to identify factors which are detrimental to emotional well-being and to devise strategies for providing appropriate care and support.

On completing this course, participants will have a practical understanding of:
. The experiences of refugee children and young people
. The impact of trauma and loss on mental health
. Risk and protective factors
. Problems refugee children and young people may encounter in the UK
. The importance of appropriate support and access to education
. Cultural backgrounds and coping mechanisms

Book now: http://noreply.refugeecouncil.org.uk/I6P-2V2RT-31JK3Q-1AUY7I-1/c.aspx

- Age Assessment Awareness and working with age disputed young people – 24th November

This course aims to give delegates a thorough understanding of the legal and policy framework around age assessment, and practical insight into what is required of a social workers undertaking this assessment and the roles of others involved in the process. Delegates are invited to consider the child’s background, the impact of the assessment on the child, and the context within which it takes place.

On completing this course delegates will have a practical understanding of:
. The impact of cultural background on the age assessment process
. The legislative and policy framework of Children’s Services and the Home Office.

Book now: http://noreply.refugeecouncil.org.uk/I6P-2V2RT-31JK3Q-1AUY7J-1/c.aspx

- End of Process: Support for asylum seekers who have been refused asylum – 27th November

End of Process is the term used to describe the situation for those asylum seekers who have been refused asylum and have exhausted all appeal rights. UK policy states that when someone is in this position they are no longer entitled to many services and support, including asylum support. For many asylum seekers at the end of the process who are unable or unwilling to return to their home country, this means that they become destitute. For those working in the voluntary and statutory sector, knowing how and when they are able to support asylum seekers at the end of process is a challenge. Service providers often hear conflicting messages and myths, and can struggle to ensure they are up to date with the continual changes to policy and procedures to support entitlements and legal options.
On completing this course, participants will be able to:

. Clarify some misconceptions and misunderstandings regarding ‘categories’ of refugee and asylum seekers
. Identify the processes of making a further representation and a fresh asylum claim
. Define the eligibility criteria and entitlements under Section 4 support
. Recognise who is eligible for community care support
. Discern when different client groups are entitled to healthcare and employment

Book now: http://noreply.refugeecouncil.org.uk/I6P-2V2RT-31JK3Q-1AUY7K-1/c.aspx

In-House Training Courses:
. Training tailored to organisation needs
. Value for money: as little as £70 per delegate (based on 20 delegates)
. Convenient, one or a half day out for all staff
. Venue of your choice

Ask us about in-house courses by emailing training@refugeecouncil.org.uk or call 020 7346 6737.

Please note all courses are subject to VAT at the current rate

Event: What is it like to be Asian in Britain?

What is it like to be Asian in Britain?

Wednesday 22 October 2014

18:30 – 20:15

London South Bank University – Abbey Conference Suite – Southwark Campus

FREE ADMISSION (Registration Essential)

Queries:

events@lsbu.ac.uk

Join award winning author, Jocelyn Watson, and a panel of experts to explore what is means to be Asian in Britain today.

Is it more accurate to refer to Indians, Pakistanis, Bengalis, Tamils, Gujaratis, or Ugandan-Asians for example?

What part does our histories of migration and cultural continuity and the conditions in which we have been received and criticised, play?

What about cultural difference and ‘Asianness’?  What part do they play?

How have we responded to cultural difference over the years?

The panel includes Gita Sahgal and Ranjit Kaur.

Gita Sahgal is Executive Director of the Centre for Secular Space and a writer and film maker of controversial programmes on Salman Rushdie, fundamentalism and racism.

Ranjit Kaur has campaigned on human rights and equality issues for over  30 years during which she has worked as a Civil Servant, a Trade Union Officer for Unison, and the Director of a national charity assisting women access their legal rights and remedies.

Jocelyn will also be reading The Gardener, the story that won the 2014 UK Asian Short Story Award.

 

Research report launched

Originally posted on precariouslives:

Research report launch – 2 July 2013

The Precarious Lives research report was launched in Leeds on 2nd July, 3-5pm, Refugee Council, Hurley House, 1 Dewsbury Rd, Leeds.

Forty asylum and refugee organisations, trade union representatives, local authority officers, the police, academics, researchers and people seeking asylum/refugees attended to hear about the research findings and recommendations. There were contributions from national experts and opportunity for discussion. We were especially pleased that Klara Skřivánková, Trafficking Programme Coordinator at Anti-Slavery International, Beryl Randall, Director of the Employability Forum and Andrew Lawton, Refugee Employment Services Manager at the Refugee Council joined us to be part of a panel to respond to the findings.

We also heard about the launch of the Platform on Forced Labour and Asylum which will bring together academics, policy-makers and practitioners to take forward the research findings to develop strategies to tackle forced labour among refugees and asylum seekers.

View original

Call for Papers: “Complex place attachments – migration and cities” | CfP AAG 2015

with apologies for crossposting

Call for Papers: Association of American Geographers (AAG) Annual Meeting, April 21-25, 2015, Chicago

Session title: Complex Place Attachments – Migration and Cities

Session organizers: Anna-Lisa Müller (University of Bremen, Germany), Jörg Plöger (ILS – Research Institute for Regional and Urban Development, Germany)


Globalization and localization affect the social, spatial, and geographic conditions of contemporary societies. This general statement holds true for several realms of society, be it the job market on the macro-level or family structures on a micro-level. It has led researchers to characterize today’s society as increasingly “glocalized” (Robertson, Bauman). The proposed session focusses on a specific field in which the intersection of globalization and localization has fundamental consequences: migration.

As mobility between locales is facilitated by the process of globalization, the variety of mobility phenomena is increasing. Not only has migration – that is mobility between different geographic places – in general become more common for certain groups of people. The forms of migration have also become increasingly diverse: temporary migration, back-and-forth-migration between places and continuous transmigration add to ‘classical’ migration types like diaspora and labor migration.

This session intends to shed light on the increasingly complex spatial affiliations and place attachments that can be observed on different scales. The aim is to further investigate the relationship between highly mobile lifestyles, feelings of belonging and attachment to places (and objects), particularly in urban areas.

These socio-spatial phenomena are often revealed most clearly at the “extremes” of societies, that is, in social groups which constitute either the upper or the lower end of a society’s structure. The session thus focuses on (a) highly-skilled transnational migrants and (b) low-skilled transnational “vagabonds” (Bauman). In both cases, the basic assumption is that these migrants are multi-attached both in practice and mentally, and that an analysis of their practices must consider all relevant locales.

Departing from these ideas, we particularly address the following questions:

  • Does (local) space matter during increasingly fluid, mobile and detached times?
  • Which factors shape the local incorporation process of these groups?
  • In how far are the practices of highly-mobile persons transforming places?
  • Which are the characteristics of the relevant places for this group?
  • Do these transformations contribute to the emergence of “new urban spaces”?
  • Can we identify the emergence of new global or rather glocal urban lifestyles?
  • How can we conceptualize practices/processes of local attachment, belonging or incorporation on more than one spatial level?

We invite papers that address one or more of the above mentioned questions. Both theoretical and empirical studies are welcome.

Please send a proposal of max. 500 words to the session’s organizers (anna-lisa.mueller@uni-bremen.de and joerg.ploeger@ils-forschung.de) until October 19th, 2014.

For detailed information on the AAG Annual meeting, please visit http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting.

RSC Events: Refugee and Forced Migration Studies: The state of the art | Public Seminar Series, Michaelmas term 2014

Refugee and Forced Migration Studies: The state of the art | Public Seminar Series, Michaelmas term 2014 

Wednesdays at 5pm in Seminar Room 1, Oxford Department of International Development, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TB

www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/michaelmas2014

This term’s series is convened by Professor Cathryn Costello and Dr Kirsten McConnachie

This series will range across disciplines and subjects in refugee studies, commencing with the launch of The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (OUP, 2014), a multi-contributor volume providing an overview of the discipline, its evolution and challenges. Refugee and Forced Migration Studies has grown from being a concern of a relatively small number of scholars and policy researchers in the 1980s to a global field of interest with thousands of students and scholars worldwide. Like the Oxford Handbook, this series will critically assess the development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, providing an opportunity for scholars to present their most recent monographs and other research, and discuss their contribution to the discipline, its place in the academy, and refugee studies’ relationships with policy and practice.

15 October 2014

The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies [Book launch]

http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/the-oxford-handbook-of-refugee-and-forced-migration-studies-book-launch

Dr Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (University College London) and Professor Gil Loescher (Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford)

22 October 2014

The Ideal Refugees: Gender, Islam, and the Sahrawi Politics of Survival [Book event]

http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/the-ideal-refugees-gender-islam-and-the-sahrawi-politics-of-survival-book-event

Dr Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (University College London)

29 October 2014

Governing Refugees: Justice, Order and Legal Pluralism on the Thai-Burma border [Book event]

http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/governing-refugees-justice-order-and-legal-pluralism-on-the-thai2013burma-border-book-event

Dr Kirsten McConnachie (Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford)

5 November 2014

ANNUAL HARRELL-BOND LECTURE*

Displacement and integration in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan: a century later

http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/harrellbond2014

Her Royal Highness Princess Basma bint Talal

12 November 2014

Love of women and a place in the world: romantic love and political commitment in the life of a forced migrant

http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/love-of-women-and-a-place-in-the-world-romantic-love-and-political-commitment-in-the-life-of-a-forced-migrant

Professor Jonny Steinberg (African Studies Centre and the Centre for Criminology)

19 November 2014

Sans Papiers: The Social and Economic Lives of Young Undocumented Migrants [Book event]

http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/sans-papiers-the-social-and-economic-lives-of-young-undocumented-migrants-book-event

Professor Roger Zetter (Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford) and Dr Nando Sigona (University of Birmingham)

26 November 2014

Inequality, immigration and refugee protection

http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/inequality-immigration-and-refugee-protection

Dr Katy Long (Stanford University and University of Edinburgh)

3 December 2014

Citizenship revocation and the privilege to have rights

http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/citizenship-revocation-and-the-privilege-to-have-rights

Professor Audrey Macklin (University of Toronto)

TIME AND LOCATION

All seminars take place on Wednesdays at 5pm in Seminar Room 1, Oxford Department of International Development, OX1 3TB. Everyone is welcome to attend and no registration is required. All events are free of charge.

*The Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture takes place at the Examination Schools, 81 High Street, Oxford OX1 4AS. Please note: all are welcome to attend, but registration is required for this event. Sign up here: http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/forms/lectures/annual-harrell-bond-lecture-2014

 

Towards a sociology of statelessness

Originally posted on Postcards from ...:

In the first week at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies (EUI) I’m finalising an article for a special issue on ‘Markers of Identity’ linked to the Oxford Diasporas Programme and its sister programme at the University of Leicester. The article draws on the work I have done for the ‘Stateless Diasporas in the EU’ project. I’ve presented a draft version of the paper last June in Oxford and was very well received. I’m now in the process of polishing the empirical sections. It’s now a couple of weeks overdue and I’m hoping to send it to the editors (Professor Joanna Story and Dr Iain Walker) by tomorrow or at the latest Sunday night.

I’ll post the abstract of the paper next week, once the article is sent out.

View original

January-September 2014: 3,072 migrant deaths in the Mediterranean…

Originally posted on clandestina:

MissingMigrantsProject2014

View original

Events: Three-part event on the experiences of refugees – Canterbury Festival Fringe

Please join us at a major three-part event on the experiences of refugees that is being held this month in Canterbury.

It is hosted by Kent Refugee Help and the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies, University of Kent, and is part of the Canterbury Festival Fringe programme.

‘Moving a Country: Refugee Stories’ spotlights what it’s like to be a refugee.

Highlights include: readings and talks by writers and former detainees, a play by an award winning poet and playwright, and political poetry by local, national and international poets. For more details on the exciting line up please see attachment [Moderator’s note: please see the information below].

Event details:

Have you been in a place where routinely, and without any apparent qualm, you have been held outside the law? Or have you tried to establish a new identity in a world unknown to you? Our three-part event captures the experience of such a state through the world of:

Detention in Contention: 2pm
Readings and talks by writers, former detainees, sureties and others

The play of ‘Another World': 4pm
by Avaes Mohammad

Political Poetry through the Ages: 5:45 pm
Fawzi Karim, David Herd, Caroline Rooney, Alev Adil, Jade Amoli-Jackson, Alia’ Kawalit, Anthony Anaxagorou and Karim Kamar

Moving a Country is on Saturday 25th October at Penny Theatre, 30-31 Northgate, Canterbury CT1 1BL, 2pm- 7pm. Entry is free, but there will be a donation box. To book in advance email: refugeestories@hotmail.com

For more information email Bahriye Kemal on refugeestories@hotmail.com or b.kemal@kent.ac.uk.

News Stories (Daily) 10/16/2014

  • “‘Whatever you thought of him, he was certainly ahead of his time.’ That, in sum, is what it took Aasmah Mir twenty-eight minutes to say in her recent Radio 4 broadcast, produced by Martin Williams, on The Lessons of Ray Honeyford. Recounting the intense, bitter furore surrounding the Bradford headteacher for a few years in the 1980s, the ‘Honeyford affair’, she argued, has come to represent ‘a kind of contemporary parable’ when looked at some three decades later. It ‘is a story upon which different people have different claims’, Aasmah Mir suggests, ‘[with] its meaning chang[ing] depending on who is telling it’. And she is assiduously fair in her attempts to portray them. Equal weight was given in the programme to competing perspectives on a man described as a hero for the Right and hate figure for the Left. Her quintessentially liberal account, however, is unfortunately devoid of any historical or contemporary meaning. And as such is little more than an appendage to the ongoing revisionist attempt to rehabilitate Honeyford.”

    tags:news

  • “Your readers would be forgiven for thinking the UK is being flooded by asylum seekers. This couldn’t be further from the truth, with asylum applications around the 23,000 mark a year the UK is home to less than 1 per cent of the world’s refugees and takes proportionately below the EU average.

    To characterise the people housed in Folkestone as having a ‘lovely break’ by the sea that Brits would be envious of is hugely misleading and dangerous.”

    tags:news

  • “GENEVA — Human traffickers rammed a boat filled with migrants they were smuggling from North Africa to Europe, making it sink in the open sea and “deliberately drowning” hundreds of the migrants, the International Organization for Migration said Monday.

    Christiane Berthiaume, a spokeswoman for the migration organization, said the traffickers rammed the boat with another vessel off the coast of Malta on Wednesday after an argument broke out between the traffickers and the migrant passengers. Ms. Berthiaume cited accounts by two Palestinians who had survived the sinking and had been rescued. Only nine people are known to have survived the disaster, the group said, out of as many as 500 who were said to have been on the boat.”

    tags:news

  • “The Home Office is investigating a disturbance at an immigration removal centre which began following the death of a detainee.

    Staff at Morton Hall, in Swinderby, Lincolnshire, had to find a “place of safety” when about 30 men reportedly refused to go into their rooms.

    The disorder was eventually brought under control on Saturday evening.

    A Home Office spokesman said there were no reported injuries to staff or detainees.

    Earlier, officers in riot gear were seen going into the site and there were reports alarms were sounding inside the complex.

    Immigration and Security Minister James Brokenshire said an investigation was taking place following the man’s death.”

    tags:news

  • “The scenes at Calais over the past few days raise the question of why Britain is the “favoured destination” for illegal/irregular entrants to the European Union. Several people asked me that on Twitter yesterday. For the Mail and Express, and indeed the Mayor of Calais, there is no doubt, it is the lure of our “generous benefit system” that makes us an “El Dorado”. For more rational analysts, it is “Britain’s extensive informal economy.”

    Except this is the wrong question. Look more closely at the Mail article:

    Meanwhile, the number of migrants arriving in Italy is rising daily. So far this year, 91,000 Africans have landed at Lampedusa..or after being rescued at sea by the Italian navy. Numbers are expected to reach 100,000 by the end of August. In just 24 hours, between Wednesday and Thursday this week, 2,500 Africans, Syrians and Egyptians landed in Italy.”

    tags:news

  • “Foreign students should no longer be labelled as “immigrants” because restrictions on studying in the UK are damaging universities and the economy, ministers have been told.

    Leading vice-chancellors called on the government to dramatically overhaul its policies towards overseas students amid claims existing rules are driving them towards countries such as the United States and Australia. “

    tags:news

  • “Following a critical Supreme Court judgment on the Home Office’s use of controversial language analysis tests to determine the nationality of asylum seekers, Aisha Maniar asks: why does the government insist on using these tests?

    Language is a crucial element of the identity of each and every one of us, and a marker of social and cultural inclusion. Over the past twenty years, it has increasingly been used by western states as a means of determining political and bureaucratic identity – nationality – and consequently to reject the claims of undocumented asylum seekers on the basis that the language they speak is not that of their claimed country of origin. And where a language analysis places the claimant’s linguistic origin elsewhere than the country from which they are seeking asylum, not only is the asylum claim rejected, but removal is, in many cases, to the wrong country, which the language analysis deems them to come from.”

    tags:news

  • “Matt Carr reflects on the complicity of Britain and France in the horrific situation for migrants in Calais.

    For millions of British tourists, Calais is a gateway for continental driving holidays and the pleasures of the Summer. For others it’s a city of designer shops, of the massive Euroshopping mall Cité Europe, where the Daily Mail and P&O ferries were offering £1 fares for foot passengers to do their Christmas shopping last year.

    There is of course another Calais, the city that has become a trap and another of the world’s border bottlenecks, where Europe’s unwanted migrants come each year in the hope of getting onto a truck that can take them to the UK. Most of them have endured astonishingly harsh and difficult journeys to escape poverty and political, religious or gender oppression, only to find themselves living in derelict squats, tent camps or on the streets, constantly watched, harrassed, arrested and often beaten by the contingents of the Republican Security Companies[1] who have been deployed there especially to make their lives hell.”

    tags:news

  • “At the weekend, a group of stowaways were found at Tilbury Docks desperately trying to escape a container they had been sealed into. By the time it was opened, one of the migrants, 40-year-old Meet Singh Kapoor was already dead.

    Thirty-four migrants, Sikhs from Afghanistan, were found in the container, ten men, nine women and fifteen children, with their ages ranging from one to 72. Among them were Meet Singh Kapoor’s children and wife. Apparently they had had to watch him die.”

    tags:news

  • “A new Institute for Research into Superdiversity (IRiS) Working Paper has been published which analyses the link between poverty and refugees and asylum seekers in the UK from the 1980s to the present. Focusing on three main groups: asylum seekers; refugees; and refused asylum seekers, it also examines the impact on women, children, unaccompanied asylum seeking minors, families, elderly people, Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) people, disabled people and members of cultural and religious minorities.”

    tags:news

  • “The Guardian newspaper has responded to a complaint set out in a recent joint letter headed by Right to Remain and supported by other groups including MRN, which complained about the use of the term ‘illegal migrants’ in a recent article.”

    tags:news

  • “Have you ever sought advice? Because you have paid too much income tax? For clarification with an issue at work? A landlord doesn’t want to return your deposit? You have had a dispute with a neighbour? Problems with your health and you can’t find a GP to register with? Have you had complications in dealing with a government department such as the Department for Work and Pensions? Or, maybe you require support settling back into the UK if you are an expat that has lived abroad the last 10 years of your life.”

    tags:news

  • “In the wake of recent armed attacks by the Islamic State (IS) group in Nineveh, which have had a devastating effect on vulnerable religious minorities, Iraq’s multi-ethnic future is now at grave risk, warns Minority Rights Group International (MRG).

    ‘The latest events in Nineveh have now proved beyond doubt that the Iraqi government is incapable of protecting its minority communities, including Christians, Yezidi and Shabak,’ says Mark Lattimer, MRG’s Executive Director. ‘The process of expelling Iraq’s minorities from their homelands that began some ten years ago is now being completed,’ he added.”

    tags:news

  • “Does this open the door to millions of people who might be displaced by climate change in the future?

    In June, New Zealand granted residency to a family from the Pacific island state of Tuvalu.

    Last week the Washington Post asked “Has the era of the ‘climate change refugee’ begun?”

    I spoke to a number of experts who say the media headlines have misrepresented the case.”

    tags:news

  • “New service standards introduced by UK Visas and Immigration have given customers greater transparency regarding the time taken to complete different types of visa application. The Department has also prioritized clearing backlogs of cases, and made additional resource available to do so.

    Progress in clearing the backlogs varies, however. UK Visas and Immigration has cleared all straightforward cases in the areas of temporary and permanent migration but, as at March 2014, the Department had around 301,000 open cases. These comprise some 85,000 which are in hand and remain within the timescales for reaching a decision in the temporary and permanent migration area; and other specific backlogs, most notably over 25,000 claims for asylum.”

    tags:news

  • “While it is an unprecedented crisis, Gervais Appave, special policy adviser to the International Organisation for Migration’s director general, frames it “within a more general global trend”, which could be defined as “survival migration”.

    Children travelling from the Horn of Africa to European countries, through Malta and Italy, or seeking to reach Australia by boat from Afghanistan, Iran and Sri Lanka, are just two examples.”

    tags:news

  • “In May, Ioane Teitiota, from the South Pacific island nation of Kiribati, had his bid to become the world’s first climate change refugee rejected. But later this summer, New Zealand granted a Tuvalu family residency on humanitarian grounds that referred to climate change. Keen to avoid opening ‘floodgates’ (their term) to similar claims, the tribunal stressed this family’s connections to New Zealand. It appears headlines like ‘the era of climate refugees has begun’ are misleading, but it is a case to watch.

    There’s a small thread of anti-immigration green politics, and environmental rhetoric gets used by anti-immigration groups (even climate sceptic ones) but the problem is usually larger than that. More broadly, the issue of immigration is a good example of how climate change can intersect with other political controversies. Climate change aggravates already heated immigration rhetoric; likewise, immigration can disrupt climate discussion.”

    tags:news

  • “Titi wants better for his family. At the age of 13 he moved from an outer island to South Tarawa, the capital of Kiribati, to accompany his older sister who had found employment with the Government. Titi’s family moved with him in the hope of better opportunities for the family, however, like many small islanders, Titi never found formal employment which would allow him to create a secure environment for his family.

    Already in a difficult situation due to a lack of economic opportunities, his family also feels the pressures of climate change as rising water levels reclaim and diminish useable space on the island. Without the resources to move off his sister’s property, Titi, his wife and his four children constructed a small one-room home (about five metres by five metres in size) where the land meets the ocean. During King tides, the waves roll in and out of his home, and with United Nations predictions that global sea levels will rise up to 82 cm by 2100 (mean figure) that situation seems unlikely to improve.”

    tags:news

  • “The populations of small tropical islands are particularly vulnerable to climate change. Over the past decade, a number of media outlets and organizations have presented various figures showing that rising sea levels or changing weather conditions will force millions of people in low-lying areas and small island states to migrate.

    Research Associate Himani Upadhyay of The Energy and Resources Institute in India is sceptical of such calculations.

    “There are so many figures circulating which speculate [on] the number of future climate refugees, without giving due attention to understanding the term climate refugee,” says Upadhyay.”

    tags:news

  • “This project aims to better understand how aid agencies engage with armed non-state actors (ANSAs), and how humanitarian engagement ultimately affects access to protection and assistance for vulnerable populations. It will seek to examine various issues and country case studies that illuminate this engagement in difficult political and security environments. This includes what lessons can be learned from experiences of negotiations and dialogue with ANSAs to ensure that vulnerable populations are better able to access assistance and protection. It will also explore the risks inherent to this engagement, including the moral dilemmas that often arise and the compromises that agencies make in order to gain access.”

    tags:news

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

A conference call for papers: Anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms and the question of Palestine/Israel

*Please circulate widely*

A conference call for papers: Anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms and the question of Palestine/Israel

This conference seeks to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are being constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel. In particular it seeks to examine how the histories of Zionist settlement, anti-colonial and nation-building struggles and 20th century warfare in the Middle East region are being transformed in the current historical conjuncture. Of particular importance in this context will be ideological and political alliances that have emerged locally, regionally and globally around notions such as the ‘New Antisemitism’, ‘Islamophobia’ and how these relate to racialised discourses against Jews and Muslims. Drawing on the expertise of scholars and activists from a variety of backgrounds, the aim of the conference will be to serve as a step for building a transversal anti-racist political vision that will aim to destabilise some of the oppositional dichotomies which are currently hegemonic in discourses around Jews, Muslims and Middle East politics.

Location: SOAS
Date: 10 February 2015 (tbc)
Call for Paper Deadline: 30th September 2014

Sponsors: Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging (UEL), Centre for the study of Human Rights (LSE), The Runnymede Trust, Centre for Palestine Studies, London Middle East Institute (SOAS).

Confirmed plenary speakers (listed alphabetically):

Prof. Gilbert Achcar (SOAS)
Dr. Muhammad Idrees Ahmad (University for the Creative Arts)
Prof. Chetan Bhatt (LSE)
Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL)
Prof. Haim Bresheeth (SOAS)
Dr. John Bunzl (OIIP)
Prof. Robert Fine (Warwick)
Prof. Yosefa Loshitzky (SOAS)
Dr. Dina Matar (SOAS)
Yasmin Rehman (Cross government working group on hate crimes)
David Rosenberg (Jewish Socialists’ Group)
Prof. Nira Yuval-Davis (UEL)
Prof. Sami Zubaida (Birkbeck)

Conference schedule

9-9.30 Coffee and registration

9.30-10 Welcome by organizers

10-11.15 Plenary panel 1: The Role of the Palestine/Israel Question in Racialised Discourses on Jews

11.15-12.30 Parallel sessions

12.30-1.30 Lunch

1.30-2.45 Plenary panel 2: The Role of the Palestine/Israel Question in Racialised Discourses on Muslims

2.45-4 Parallel discussion workshops

4-4.30 Tea break

4.30-6 Plenary panel 3: The Interrelationships between Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racialised Discourses

6-6.30 Final session: The Way Forward

We invite abstracts (500 words max.) for 20 minute presentations for the parallel sessions that address any aspect of the issues outlined above. Please send all abstracts to Jamie Hakim at j.hakim@uel.ac.uk. Please include a short biographical note when sending the e-mail.

Statelessness averted? Former Burundian refugees to receive Tanzanian citizenship

Originally posted on IntLawGrrls:

On 29 September 2014, at the annual meeting of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees’ Governing Executive Committee in Geneva, the government of Tanzania announced that it finally intends to deliver on its 2008 promise of citizenship to tens of thousands of former Burundian refugees by offering them proof of their new status as citizens. This promise – if delivered upon – will avert a growing crisis that had made those caught up in its midst effectively stateless.

This predicament has arisen from good intentions: the government of Tanzania was seeking to end exile for this group, not create a situation in which their exile would metamorphose into statelessness. It is rare for countries to offer citizenship to groups of refugees, especially in the Great Lakes region where millions have been displaced. Instead, most governments wait for circumstances to change so that refugees can go back to…

View original 761 more words

“The Endorois decision” – Four years on, the Endorois still await action by the Government of Kenya

Originally posted on minorities in focus:

RebeccaRebecca Marlin is currently the Legal Fellow at Minority Rights Group International (MRG) in London. She earned her B.A. from Wellesley College and her J.D. from Fordham University School of Law. During her time at MRG she will be working extensively with the Endorois to achieve implementation of the 2010 African Commission decision granting them rights to Lake Bogoria.

For the Endorois of Kenya’s Lake Bogoria, the process of reclaiming their land from the government of Kenya has been one step forwards and two steps back. In 2003, MRG and partner organisation Centre for Minority Rights Development (CEMIRIDE), acting on behalf of the Endorois Welfare Council, went before the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights to demand that the Kenyan government recognise the rights of the Endorois to Lake Bogoria.

p1040091

Lake Bogoria is of great cultural significance to the Endorois. Copyright MRG

The Endorois had inhabited Lake Bogoria for…

View original 1,083 more words

Europe: Minorities are protected, but by whom?

Originally posted on minorities in focus:

alexAlexandra Veloy, MRG’s Fundraising Intern, muses on the shifting patterns of minority rights protection in Europe.

On 3rd September, an event entitled ‘Citizenship, Minority Rights and Justice’ took place at the University of Sussex. The event was part of a series of workshops organised by the Sussex European Institute, New Europeans and the Sussex Centre for Responsibilities, Rights and the Law, to discuss current issues affecting minorities in Europe.

The workshop was divided into two sessions. The first, ‘Minority Rights and European Integration Debates’, explored integration in Europe and its effect on the respect of minority rights. This session analysed, for example, the recent and very polemic decision of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) SAS v. France (also known as the ‘burqa ban case’,), where the ECtHR upheld the ‘burqa ban’ in France since it concluded that the applicant’s rights had not been violated. According to…

View original 644 more words

Publication: the Israeli Supreme Court’s decision on detention of asylum seekers

Originally posted on Interest Group on Migration and Refugee Law:

Second Strike and You are (Finally) out? The Quashing of the Prevention of Infiltration Law (Amendment No. 4)
by Reuven (Ruvi) Ziegler
(this article has been cross-posted on the Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog)

Introduction

On 22 September 2014, the Israeli Supreme Court sitting as a High Court of Justice quashed in a 217-page judgment (HCJ 8425/13 Anon v. Knesset et al,full text in Hebrew) the Prevention of Infiltration Law (Amendment no. 4) (full text in Hebrew). The amendment enacted two schemes: first, section 30A, authorising the detention for one year of any ‘infiltrator’ (the term was introduced by the above law, and shall be used in quotation marks in this discussion) entering Israel after the amendment’s coming into force. Second, Chapter D, authorising the holding in an ‘open’ residency centre of ‘infiltrators’ whose removal from Israel (according to the State’s official determination) proves…

View original 2,398 more words

UEL Course: Femicide across Europe: Italy and United Kingdom, 20 October, UEL Docklands Campus, 2-4pm

Femicide across Europe:
Italy and United Kingdom

Sabrina Brutto and Giorgia Doná
Lumsa University, Italy and University of East London

ALL WELCOME

20 October 2014

University of East London, Docklands Campus, East Building, room: EB. G.07

2pm-4pm

The seminar will introduce the activities of the Femicide Across Europe Network of which the University of East London is a partner, and discuss current data and interventions in two European countries.

Femicide is a leading cause of premature death for women globally, distinct from homicide and other forms of gender violence. In Europe, research on femicide is in its infancy and uncoordinated. The network established the first pan-European coalition on femicide in order to advance research clarity, agree on definitions, improve the efficacy of policies for femicide prevention, and publish guidelines for the use of national policy-makers. The seminar will offer a comparative analysis of femicide representations, policies and interventions in Italy and the United Kingdom.

Speakers
Sabrina Brutto, Department of Humanities, University of Lumsa, Italy, has many years of experience in applied research and project management on juvenile justice and victim-offender mediation. She is member of the research team at LUMSA University that examines Femicide across Europe, where she is also doing her Doctorate focussing on male perpetrators of gender-based violence. She is visiting the University of East London under COST Short Scientific Missions.

Giorgia Doná is Professor of Forced Migration and Refugee Studies and Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Her research focuses on violence and society, forced migration, culture and well-being. She has held positions at the Oxford University’s Refugee Studies Programme, the Child Studies Unit of University College Cork, Ireland, and the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Giorgia is member of the Management Committee of the European funded Cooperation for Science and Technology Action 1206 “Femicide Across Europe’ (2013-2017)

Admission free. No booking required.
Docklands Campus, University of East London, E16 2RD
Nearest tube: Cyprus DLR (http://www.uel.ac.uk/campuses/docklands/)

Feminist Research Group

School of Social Sciences

The event is organized by the Feminist Research Group, School of Social Sciences, University of East London.

It is sponsored by European COST Action IS1206 (http://www.cost.eu/domains_actions/isch/Actions/IS1206)

 

RSC Event: Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture 2014: ‘Displacement and integration in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan: a century later’

Displacement and integration in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan: a century later’ 

Her Royal Highness Princess Basma bint Talal

Wednesday, 5 November 2014, 5pm to 6.30pm

Examination Schools, 81 High Street, Oxford OX1 4AS

Please note: This event is open to all but registration is required. To register, please visit: www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/harrellbond2014

The communities comprising the modern Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan have a long history as refugee hosts. HRH Princess Basma bint Talal will examine the ways in which earlier refugee communities’ experience of displacement itself contributed to their integration within the developing Jordanian state. Princess Basma will discuss the ways in which Jordan’s Circassian, Chechen, and Armenian communities have negotiated different aspects of their specific identities and integrated in Jordan, considering the role of forced migration itself in creating identities.

About the speaker:

For nearly thirty years, Princess Basma has worked to promote a range of global issues, most notably in the areas of human development, gender equity and women’s empowerment, and the well-being and development of children. She is particularly involved with supporting the implementation of sustainable development programmes that address the social and economic needs of marginalised groups, including refugees.

Princess Basma is Honorary Human Development Ambassador for the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women). She is also a Global Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).

 

State Department bows to pressure to rescind plan to resettle refugees in Athens

Originally posted on Friends of Refugees:

brakeThe U.S. State Department has decided to put on indefinite hold the plan this fiscal year to begin resettling refugees to Athens, Georgia after local and state government opposition. Both the mayor of Athens as well as the Governor and Georgia Human Services Commissioner have come out against the plan. Senior level officials from the State Department are planning a visit to Athens next month, apparently to try some diplomacy and to negotiate with local government officials. An article in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution explores the case:

The U.S. State Department has shelved a plan to resettle 150 refugees in Athens following objections from Mayor Nancy Denson and Gov. Nathan Deal’s administration.

The International Rescue Committee said it got an email last week from the federal agency saying it would consider the proposal “after additional planning and community consultation.”…

“There is always hope in the future and the good news is…

View original 238 more words

“Migrants’ and children’s rights need better protection in the Netherlands”

Originally posted on Interest Group on Migration and Refugee Law:

news

Nils Muižnieks, Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights, released a report after his visit to the Netherlands, stating that “The Netherlands has a solid human rights protection system, but in practice there are shortcomings, in particular as concerns migrants and children, that need to be addressed”.

Especially the extensive use of administrative detention of asylum seekers and immigrants concerns Muižnieks, since detention is a practice that is only allowed as a measure of last resort, for the shortest possible period of time and when no effective alternative is applicable. Addressing specifically the systematic detention of asylum seekers arriving at international (air)ports from non-Schengen countries, the Commissioner notes that unaccompanied minors are exempted from its application and that families with children are to be detained only in exceptional circumstances.

See here more information, and click here for the report.

View original

Calls: EU Calls Launched for Capacity Building in the Field of Female Genital Mutilation and Rights of the Child

Originally posted on UEL Research Support Blog:

New EU Calls Launched for Capacity Building in the Field of Female Genital Mutilation and Rights of the Child

Calls for Proposals aimed at increasing capacity in the areas of Female Genital Mutilation and Rights of Child have been published by the Directorate General for Justice. The Calls are as follows:

Action grant(s) to create a web-based knowledge platform for professionals dealing with female genital mutilation -2014 Pilot Project

The aim of this Call is to co-fund one or several transnational projects to develop a web-based knowledge platform on female genital mutilation (FGM). A single project is preferred covering at least ten of the most affected EU Member States and involving organisations from at least three participating countries. Funding will support the development and maintenance of an online platform including an e-learning course on the different aspects of FGM and country specific information pages.

A budget of €900,000 is available.

View original 137 more words

Re-blog: UN International Day of Charity: NGO & Charity Archives at SOAS Library

To celebrate UN International Day of Charity – which takes place this year on the 5th September – we are today looking in a little more detail at the archives of charities & nongovernmental organisations (NGOs) available to the public here at SOAS Archives & Special Collections.

SOAS Archives seeks to play a national role in the preservation of the heritage of UK-based NGOs and charitable bodies who work in the fields of global poverty-eradication, international development, and humanitarian relief. In our role as the National Research Library for Asia, Africa and the Middle East, we look to acquire and make publicly available the archives of NGOs, international development charities, and campaign groups whose work focuses on the Global South or the ‘developing world’.

For the full article, please visit: UN International Day of Charity: NGO & Charity Archives at SOAS Library

Posted on September 5, 2014 by

 

STOP CAMPSFIELD EXPANSION – PUBLIC MEETING

Originally posted on Close Campsfield:

There will be a public meeting about the proposed expansion to Campsfield on Monday 20 October, 7.30pm. Exeter Hall, Kidlington, OX5 1AB

Come to hear more about Campsfield and the plans for expansion.

View original

Azerbaijan: Human rights situation

Originally posted on European Parliamentary Research Service:

Written by Jacques Lecarte

Azerbaijan is considered by many international NGOs to be an authoritarian country in which civil and political rights are severely restricted and frequently violated. The EU may soon be ready to agree on a Strategic Modernisation Partnership with Azerbaijan. Nevertheless, the Council and the EP have stressed deep concerns about the persecution of human-rights defenders in the country.

Current situation

Azerbaijan: Human rights situation

© Andrey Zyk / Fotolia

According to the watchdog Freedom House, Azerbaijan is not a real democracy but a totalitarian state in which human rights are brutally limited and constantly violated. Political power is concentrated completely in the hands of President Ilham Aliyev and the ruling party, the New Azerbaijan Party, which is under his direct control. The Azerbaijani president and his party dominate the domestic political scene through exerting control over the government, parliament and local authorities. The president also commands the army…

View original 1,221 more words

New Items Archive (weekly)

  • “What influences the decisions of internally displaced persons (IDPs) to return home after prolonged displacement? This article investigates the attitudes of victims of forced migration by analysing survey data on Kurdish displaced persons and returnees in Turkey. In an attempt to give a voice to displaced persons, we survey the conditions under which IDPs return home despite continuing tensions, lack of infrastructure and risk of renewed violence. The findings suggest that integration into a new environment in Western Turkey, measured by economic advancement and knowledge of Turkish, reduces the likelihood of return. Yet contrary to conventional wisdom, more educated IDPs demonstrate a stronger desire to return to their ancestral communities, suggesting that education increases available options for displaced persons. The findings are relevant in informing global responses to forced migration as well as understanding the local experiences and perceptions of IDPs in conflict-ridden societies. “

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • “This review article compares Thomas Gammeltoft-Hansen’s analysis in Access to Asylum, with the outcomes of three recent landmark decisions of the European Court of Human Rights: Hirsi Jamaa, Al Skeini and Al Jedda. The central question of Gammeltoft-Hansen’s book is whether new practices of states in the field of immigration control—in particular extraterritorialization efforts such as push-back operations on the high seas or migration control in foreign territorial jurisdictions—have induced a progressive reaction in the relevant human rights courts. By examining its case law, this article demonstrates that the ECtHR is willing to use its interpretative tools to extend the human rights obligations beyond state territory if the involved state wishes to go that far. The ECtHR makes clear that it will counterbalance the circumvention of human rights and refugee rights obligations by providing a new interpretation to the concept of extraterritorial jurisdiction, which involves in particular a shift to a more functional reading of the effective control test. “

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    In hope and despair : life in the Palestinian refugee camps
    Author: Mia Grondahl photographer
    Hanan Ashwari author; Peter Hansen author; author
    Subjects: Palestine Arabs — pictorial works; Refugee camps — pictorial works; Palestinians; Refugees; Israel; Palestine
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in reading room at classmark GP53.5 HOPE.
    Publisher: Cairo ; New York : American University in Cairo Press
    Publication Date: 2003
    Format: xxii, 128 pages : colour photographs and portraits ; 30 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Displacement and dispossession through land grabbing in Mozambique : the limits of international and national legal instruments
    Author: Hannah Twomey author
    editor of compilation.; University of Oxford. Oxford Department of Information Development. Refugee Studies Centre, publisher.
    Subjects: Displacement; International instruments; Mozambique
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/QU5 RSC/Box 8.
    Related Titles: Series: Working Paper Series ; no. 101
    Publisher: Oxford : Refugee Studies Centre
    Publication Date: 2014

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    An exploration and critique of the use of mental health information within refugee status determination proceedings in the United Kingdom
    Author: Jenny Barrett author
    Ilim Baturalp author; Nath Gbikpi author; Katherine Rehberg author; University of Oxford. Oxford Department of Information Development. Refugee Studies Centre, publisher
    Subjects: Refugee status determination procedures; Mental health; United Kingdom
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/QU5 RSC/Box 8.
    Related Titles: Series: Working Paper Series ; no. 100
    Publisher: Oxford : Refugee Studies Centre
    Publication Date: 2014

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    From reporter to refugee : the law of asylum in Great Britain : a personal account
    Author: Victor Lal
    University of Oxford. Refugee Studies Programme.
    Subjects: Lal, Victor; Refugees — Great Britain — Biography; Political refugees — Great Britain — Biography; Political refugees — Fiji — Biography; Refugees — Legal status, laws, etc. — Great Britain; Asylum, Right of — Great Britain; Refugees — Fiji — Biography; Immigration; Refugee status determination procedures; Great Britain — Emigration and immigration — Government policy
    Description: Located in the Refugee Council Archive reading room at classmark at QU44 LAL.
    Related Titles: Series: ViewPoints series ; 1
    Publisher: Oxford : WorldView

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    The economic life of refugees
    Author: Karen Jacobsen
    Subjects: Economic assistance; International relief; Refugee camps; Refugees — Economic conditions
    Description: Popular images of refugees depict thousands of traumatized people pouring across borders, congregating in camps where relief agencies try to meet their health and food needs in and outside camps. This book explores the economic life of refugees in protracted situations in a variety of settings.
    Publisher: Bloomfield, Conn. : Kumarian
    Publication Date: 2005
    Format: 176 p..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Living in limbo : conflict-induced displacement in Europe and central Asia
    Author: Steven B. Holtzman 1959-
    Taies Nezam
    Subjects: Refugees — Former Yugoslav republics; Refugees — Former Soviet republics; Refugees — Turkey; War and society — Former Yugoslav republics; War and society — Former Soviet republics; War and society — Turkey; Forced migration; Refugees; Internally displaced persons
    Description: Located in the Refugee Council Archive reading room at classmark A31.1 HOL.
    Publisher: Washington, DC : World Bank
    Publication Date: c2004
    Format: xv, 194 p. : ill. ; 23 cm..

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Displacement economies in Africa : paradoxes of crisis and creativity
    Author: Amanda Hammar editor of compilation.; Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, issuing body.
    Subjects: Refugees — Africa — Economic conditions; Social conflict — Economic aspects — Africa; Africa — Economic conditions
    Description: Located in the Refugee Council Archive reading room at classmark J31.1 HAM.
    Publisher: London : Zed Books in association with the Nordic Africa Institute
    Publication Date: 2014
    Format: vii, 260 pages ; 24 cm.
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Redefining security : population movements and national security
    Author: Nana Poku 1971-; David T. Graham 1953-
    Subjects: Emigration and immigration — Political aspects; Migration, Internal — Political aspects; Population geography — Political aspects; National security
    Description: Located in the Refugee Council Archive in the Archive reading room at classmark A30 POK.
    Publisher: Westport, Conn. ; London : Praeger
    Publication Date: 1998
    Format: xv, 245 p. ; 25 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Views on migration in Sub-Saharan Africa : proceedings of an African Migration Alliance workshop
    Author: Catherine Cross; African Migration Alliance.
    Subjects: Urbanization — Africa, Sub-Saharan — Congresses; Rural-urban migration — Africa, Sub-Saharan — Congresses; Migration, Internal — Africa, Sub-Saharan — Congresses; Refugees — Africa, Eastern; Internally displaced persons — Great Lakes Region (Africa); Rural development — Nigeria; Migration, Internal — Africa, Southern; Rural-urban migration; International migration; Internal migration; Refugees; Internally displaced persons; Africa, Sub-Saharan — Emigration and immigration — Congresses; Africa, Sub-Saharan — Population policy — Congresses; Botswana — Emigration and immigration
    Description: Includes statistical tables.
    Located in the Refugee Council Archive in the reading room at classmark J30 CRO.

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Roots : the saga of an American family
    Author: Alex Haley
    Subjects: Haley, Alex; Haley family; Kinte family; African Americans — Biography; African American families
    Description: Located in the Refugee Council Archive reading room at classmark SU83 HAL.
    Publisher: New York, NY : Vanguard Books
    Publication Date: c2007
    Format: xi, 899 p. ; 21 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Voices in exile : Bhutanese youth photograph their lives in refugee camps
    Author: PhotoVoice, publisher.
    Subjects: Photographs; Minors; Refugee camps; Bhutanese; Nepal
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A73.1 PHO/Box 1.
    Publisher: London : PhotoVoice
    Publication Date: 2007
    Format: no pagination : colour illustrations ; 15 x 21 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Transparency : young refugees take on London
    Author: PhotoVoice, publisher.
    Subjects: Photographs; Minors; United Kingdom
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A73.1 PHO/Box 1.
    Publisher: London : PhotoVoice
    Publication Date: 2006
    Format: no pagination : colour illustrations ; 15 x 21 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Positive negatives : Congolese women picture life with HIV/Aids
    Author: PhotoVoice, publisher.
    Subjects: Photographs; AIDS; Viral diseases; Women; Democratic republic of Congo
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A73.1 PHO/Box 1.
    Publisher: London : PhotoVoice
    Publication Date: 2006
    Format: no pagination : colour illustrations ; 15 x 21 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Shooting Kabul : Afghan street-working girls photograph their lives
    Author: PhotoVoice, publisher.
    Subjects: Photographs; Minors; Afghanistan
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A73.1 PHO/Box 1.
    Publisher: London : PhotoVoice
    Publication Date: 2006
    Format: no pagination : colour illustrations ; 15 x 21 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Global assessment report on disaster risk reduction 2013 : press kit : from shared risk to shared value: the business case for disaster risk reduction
    Author: United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, publisher
    Subjects: Disaster prevention; Disasters
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A5 RCA/Box B.
    Publisher: Geneva : United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction
    Publication Date: 2013
    Format: 1 press pack ; 30 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Common threads : the sexual and reproductive health experiences of immigrant and refugee women in Australia
    Author: Maria Hach author.
    Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health, publisher
    Subjects: Women refugees; Women immigrants; Refugee experiences; Australia
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A5 RCA/Box B.
    Publisher: Collingwood, Victoria : Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health
    Publication Date: 2012
    Format: pages.
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    United Nations plan of action on disaster risk reduction for resilience
    Author: United Nations System : Chief Executives Board for Coordination, publisher
    Subjects: Reports; Disaster prevention; Disasters
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A5 RCA/Box B.
    Publisher: Geneva : United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction
    Publication Date: 2013
    Format: 14 pages : colour illustrations ; 30 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Disaster risk reduction in the United Nations : roles, mandates and results of key UN entities
    Author: United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, publisher
    Subjects: Disaster prevention; Disasters
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A5 RCA/Box B.
    Publisher: Geneva : United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction
    Publication Date: 2013
    Format: 171 pages ; 20 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Journal Articles (weekly)

  • “The European men canonized as the founders of sociology sought to explain the societal shifts they associated with modernization including urbanization, the development of bureaucracy, and the emergence of the nation state. In this essay, I suggest how developing theoretical and methodological tools have gone hand in hand with social changes and new questions about the place of religion in contemporary society to make religion more visible in the discipline of sociology. Seeing gender has also been problematic in sociology, although in somewhat different ways. I show how asking questions about gender illuminates the unevenness of the secularization process. I outline recent developments in feminist thinking. I show how considering gender and religion together enhances our understanding of both. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article explores shifting perspectives on African clandestine economies. Previously condemned as products of clientelism and corruption, clandestine economies are attracting renewed interest for their developmental potential in weak state contexts. Focusing on systems of illicit cross-border trade in East and West Africa, this article shows that more favourable views of clandestine trading activities are driven more by their compatibility with liberal reform agendas than by their positive contribution to local development. Indeed, the optimistic turn in perspectives on illicit African trade glosses over its increasingly negative impact on local security and development. While discourses of violence and criminalization were used to characterize the largely peaceful cross-border trading systems in West Africa in the 1990s, new discourses of hybrid governance and state building are used to frame the more violent and socially disruptive cross-border trading complexes of East Africa in the 2000s. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Items Archive (daily) 10/11/2014

  • “What influences the decisions of internally displaced persons (IDPs) to return home after prolonged displacement? This article investigates the attitudes of victims of forced migration by analysing survey data on Kurdish displaced persons and returnees in Turkey. In an attempt to give a voice to displaced persons, we survey the conditions under which IDPs return home despite continuing tensions, lack of infrastructure and risk of renewed violence. The findings suggest that integration into a new environment in Western Turkey, measured by economic advancement and knowledge of Turkish, reduces the likelihood of return. Yet contrary to conventional wisdom, more educated IDPs demonstrate a stronger desire to return to their ancestral communities, suggesting that education increases available options for displaced persons. The findings are relevant in informing global responses to forced migration as well as understanding the local experiences and perceptions of IDPs in conflict-ridden societies. “

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • “This review article compares Thomas Gammeltoft-Hansen’s analysis in Access to Asylum, with the outcomes of three recent landmark decisions of the European Court of Human Rights: Hirsi Jamaa, Al Skeini and Al Jedda. The central question of Gammeltoft-Hansen’s book is whether new practices of states in the field of immigration control—in particular extraterritorialization efforts such as push-back operations on the high seas or migration control in foreign territorial jurisdictions—have induced a progressive reaction in the relevant human rights courts. By examining its case law, this article demonstrates that the ECtHR is willing to use its interpretative tools to extend the human rights obligations beyond state territory if the involved state wishes to go that far. The ECtHR makes clear that it will counterbalance the circumvention of human rights and refugee rights obligations by providing a new interpretation to the concept of extraterritorial jurisdiction, which involves in particular a shift to a more functional reading of the effective control test. “

    tags:newitemsarchive

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Items Archive (daily) 10/10/2014

  • Title:
    In hope and despair : life in the Palestinian refugee camps
    Author: Mia Grondahl photographer
    Hanan Ashwari author; Peter Hansen author; author
    Subjects: Palestine Arabs — pictorial works; Refugee camps — pictorial works; Palestinians; Refugees; Israel; Palestine
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in reading room at classmark GP53.5 HOPE.
    Publisher: Cairo ; New York : American University in Cairo Press
    Publication Date: 2003
    Format: xxii, 128 pages : colour photographs and portraits ; 30 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Displacement and dispossession through land grabbing in Mozambique : the limits of international and national legal instruments
    Author: Hannah Twomey author
    editor of compilation.; University of Oxford. Oxford Department of Information Development. Refugee Studies Centre, publisher.
    Subjects: Displacement; International instruments; Mozambique
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/QU5 RSC/Box 8.
    Related Titles: Series: Working Paper Series ; no. 101
    Publisher: Oxford : Refugee Studies Centre
    Publication Date: 2014

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    An exploration and critique of the use of mental health information within refugee status determination proceedings in the United Kingdom
    Author: Jenny Barrett author
    Ilim Baturalp author; Nath Gbikpi author; Katherine Rehberg author; University of Oxford. Oxford Department of Information Development. Refugee Studies Centre, publisher
    Subjects: Refugee status determination procedures; Mental health; United Kingdom
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/QU5 RSC/Box 8.
    Related Titles: Series: Working Paper Series ; no. 100
    Publisher: Oxford : Refugee Studies Centre
    Publication Date: 2014

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    From reporter to refugee : the law of asylum in Great Britain : a personal account
    Author: Victor Lal
    University of Oxford. Refugee Studies Programme.
    Subjects: Lal, Victor; Refugees — Great Britain — Biography; Political refugees — Great Britain — Biography; Political refugees — Fiji — Biography; Refugees — Legal status, laws, etc. — Great Britain; Asylum, Right of — Great Britain; Refugees — Fiji — Biography; Immigration; Refugee status determination procedures; Great Britain — Emigration and immigration — Government policy
    Description: Located in the Refugee Council Archive reading room at classmark at QU44 LAL.
    Related Titles: Series: ViewPoints series ; 1
    Publisher: Oxford : WorldView

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    The economic life of refugees
    Author: Karen Jacobsen
    Subjects: Economic assistance; International relief; Refugee camps; Refugees — Economic conditions
    Description: Popular images of refugees depict thousands of traumatized people pouring across borders, congregating in camps where relief agencies try to meet their health and food needs in and outside camps. This book explores the economic life of refugees in protracted situations in a variety of settings.
    Publisher: Bloomfield, Conn. : Kumarian
    Publication Date: 2005
    Format: 176 p..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Living in limbo : conflict-induced displacement in Europe and central Asia
    Author: Steven B. Holtzman 1959-
    Taies Nezam
    Subjects: Refugees — Former Yugoslav republics; Refugees — Former Soviet republics; Refugees — Turkey; War and society — Former Yugoslav republics; War and society — Former Soviet republics; War and society — Turkey; Forced migration; Refugees; Internally displaced persons
    Description: Located in the Refugee Council Archive reading room at classmark A31.1 HOL.
    Publisher: Washington, DC : World Bank
    Publication Date: c2004
    Format: xv, 194 p. : ill. ; 23 cm..

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Displacement economies in Africa : paradoxes of crisis and creativity
    Author: Amanda Hammar editor of compilation.; Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, issuing body.
    Subjects: Refugees — Africa — Economic conditions; Social conflict — Economic aspects — Africa; Africa — Economic conditions
    Description: Located in the Refugee Council Archive reading room at classmark J31.1 HAM.
    Publisher: London : Zed Books in association with the Nordic Africa Institute
    Publication Date: 2014
    Format: vii, 260 pages ; 24 cm.
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Redefining security : population movements and national security
    Author: Nana Poku 1971-; David T. Graham 1953-
    Subjects: Emigration and immigration — Political aspects; Migration, Internal — Political aspects; Population geography — Political aspects; National security
    Description: Located in the Refugee Council Archive in the Archive reading room at classmark A30 POK.
    Publisher: Westport, Conn. ; London : Praeger
    Publication Date: 1998
    Format: xv, 245 p. ; 25 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Views on migration in Sub-Saharan Africa : proceedings of an African Migration Alliance workshop
    Author: Catherine Cross; African Migration Alliance.
    Subjects: Urbanization — Africa, Sub-Saharan — Congresses; Rural-urban migration — Africa, Sub-Saharan — Congresses; Migration, Internal — Africa, Sub-Saharan — Congresses; Refugees — Africa, Eastern; Internally displaced persons — Great Lakes Region (Africa); Rural development — Nigeria; Migration, Internal — Africa, Southern; Rural-urban migration; International migration; Internal migration; Refugees; Internally displaced persons; Africa, Sub-Saharan — Emigration and immigration — Congresses; Africa, Sub-Saharan — Population policy — Congresses; Botswana — Emigration and immigration
    Description: Includes statistical tables.
    Located in the Refugee Council Archive in the reading room at classmark J30 CRO.

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Roots : the saga of an American family
    Author: Alex Haley
    Subjects: Haley, Alex; Haley family; Kinte family; African Americans — Biography; African American families
    Description: Located in the Refugee Council Archive reading room at classmark SU83 HAL.
    Publisher: New York, NY : Vanguard Books
    Publication Date: c2007
    Format: xi, 899 p. ; 21 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Voices in exile : Bhutanese youth photograph their lives in refugee camps
    Author: PhotoVoice, publisher.
    Subjects: Photographs; Minors; Refugee camps; Bhutanese; Nepal
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A73.1 PHO/Box 1.
    Publisher: London : PhotoVoice
    Publication Date: 2007
    Format: no pagination : colour illustrations ; 15 x 21 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Transparency : young refugees take on London
    Author: PhotoVoice, publisher.
    Subjects: Photographs; Minors; United Kingdom
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A73.1 PHO/Box 1.
    Publisher: London : PhotoVoice
    Publication Date: 2006
    Format: no pagination : colour illustrations ; 15 x 21 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Positive negatives : Congolese women picture life with HIV/Aids
    Author: PhotoVoice, publisher.
    Subjects: Photographs; AIDS; Viral diseases; Women; Democratic republic of Congo
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A73.1 PHO/Box 1.
    Publisher: London : PhotoVoice
    Publication Date: 2006
    Format: no pagination : colour illustrations ; 15 x 21 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Shooting Kabul : Afghan street-working girls photograph their lives
    Author: PhotoVoice, publisher.
    Subjects: Photographs; Minors; Afghanistan
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A73.1 PHO/Box 1.
    Publisher: London : PhotoVoice
    Publication Date: 2006
    Format: no pagination : colour illustrations ; 15 x 21 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Global assessment report on disaster risk reduction 2013 : press kit : from shared risk to shared value: the business case for disaster risk reduction
    Author: United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, publisher
    Subjects: Disaster prevention; Disasters
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A5 RCA/Box B.
    Publisher: Geneva : United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction
    Publication Date: 2013
    Format: 1 press pack ; 30 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Common threads : the sexual and reproductive health experiences of immigrant and refugee women in Australia
    Author: Maria Hach author.
    Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health, publisher
    Subjects: Women refugees; Women immigrants; Refugee experiences; Australia
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A5 RCA/Box B.
    Publisher: Collingwood, Victoria : Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health
    Publication Date: 2012
    Format: pages.
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    United Nations plan of action on disaster risk reduction for resilience
    Author: United Nations System : Chief Executives Board for Coordination, publisher
    Subjects: Reports; Disaster prevention; Disasters
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A5 RCA/Box B.
    Publisher: Geneva : United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction
    Publication Date: 2013
    Format: 14 pages : colour illustrations ; 30 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Disaster risk reduction in the United Nations : roles, mandates and results of key UN entities
    Author: United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, publisher
    Subjects: Disaster prevention; Disasters
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/A5 RCA/Box B.
    Publisher: Geneva : United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction
    Publication Date: 2013
    Format: 171 pages ; 20 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    “I’d rather be in prison” : experiences of Africans in Immigration removal Centres in the UK
    Author: Diana Ineghenebor author
    Fatima Kumba Sagba author.; Jacqueline Stevenson author.; Eunice Sinyemu author.; Mariama Kamara author.; African Health Policy Network, publisher.
    Subjects: Refugee experiences; Detention of immigrants; Detention of asylum seekers; United Kingdom
    Description: Located in the Refugee Council Archive in a box file at RCA/QU40 RCA/Box A.
    Publisher: London : African Health Policy Network
    Publication Date: 2012
    Format: 15 pages ; 30 cm..

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Fundamental rights : challenges and achievements in 2012
    Author: European Union. Agency for Fundamental Rights, author
    Subjects: European Union. Agency for Fundamental Rights — Publications; Civil rights — European Union countries — Publications; Human rights — European Union countries — Publications; Annual reports; Human rights violations; Europe
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/Q40 FRA/ Box 11.
    Publisher: Vienna : Agency for Fundamental Rights
    Publication Date: 2013
    Format: 302 pages ; 30 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Archive Slides from Inducation for Postgraduate MA

DSCF5906Further to our Archive induction session last week for postgraduate MA students on the UEL courses in Refugee Studies, Refugee Studies and Community Development, and Conflict, Displacement and Human Security, I am uploading the slides and handout for this event on this blog posting in addition to making them available via UEL Moodle.

Please use the links below to download the relevent file:

  • UEL Archive MA Induction Slide:  Download (PDF)
  • UEL Archvie Handount: Handout (PDF)

 

New Items Archive (daily) 10/07/2014

  • Description: Filmmaker Robb Leech attempts to understand his stepbrother’s journey from middle-class white boy in Weymouth to convicted terrorist. In 2010 Robb spent a year filming his stepbrother Rich after he turned his back on the world in which he grew up to become a fundamentalist Muslim called Salahuddin. Robb began filming with his stepbrother as he entered a strange new world where everyone talked about fighting jihad and implementing Sharia law. The result was Robb’s acclaimed BBC Three documentary, My Brother the Islamist. When, in 2013, Salahuddin is convicted of preparing terrorism acts and jailed for six years, Robb is desperate to know what triggered his stepbrother, and others like him, to cross the line. Robb seeks out imam and psychologist Alyas Karmani to understand what drives young British-born men and women into radical jihadism. And he confronts Anjem Choudary, the man who converted Rich, about his role in Salahuddin’s radicalisation.

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Description: Located in the Refugee Archive at MM86.22 UNR.
    Current affairs. Unreported World visits a remote area of Madagascar, where the dead make the rules. A set of taboos, handed down from long-dead ancestors, controls what you eat, when you work and every aspect of how you behave. Reporter Kiki King and director David Fuller visit the town of Mananjary, on the isolated east coast, to reveal how one taboo against twins leads to children being abandoned and mothers becoming outcasts..

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Description: Located in the Refugee Archive at GIQ7.2 UNR.
    Current affairs. Reporter Evan Williams and director Marcel Mettelsiefen travel to Baghdad to meet the extraordinary young dancers and musicians at Iraq’s only music and ballet school. The students are battling to keep their art alive against the rising tide of sectarian violence in the city. It’s the run up to the elections at the end of April and up to 300 people are being killed in Baghdad every week by car bombs and assassinations. But, hidden away from the violence, the school is a refuge of culture and artistic expression, with 162 students from across the city.

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Description: Located in the Refugee Archive at ONI21.2 DIS.
    Evan Williams reveals the other side of Nigeria’s war on Islamist terror: a campaign by Nigeria’s security forces against civilians that is so violent it could constitute war crimes. The Dispatches team have gathered dozens of videos over the past year, many of which show the arbitrary arrest, torture and summary execution of civilians and unarmed Boko Haram suspects by Nigerian soldiers and their civilian militia counterparts. Through the videos, eyewitness testimony and first-hand accounts of militia insiders, a hidden war is revealed, one which could undermine the government’s campaign against Boko Haram and strengthen the insurgency’s ability to escalate its murderous campaign against the state and civilians.

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • DVD highlights of the Refugee Voices groundbreaking Holocaust testimony collection of 150 filmed interviews with Jewish survivors and refugees from Nazism who rebuilt their lives in Great Britain. It was commissioned by the Association of Jewish Refugees (AJR), with Dr Anthony Grenville and Dr Bea Lewkowicz directing the project.

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Description: Located in the Refugee Archive at NC21.2 OUR.
    Featuring news on issues around the world. Two religious leaders, from opposing sides in war-torn Central African Republic, are risking their lives by travelling the country together to try to stop the killing.

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Description: Located in the Refugee Archive at MZI7.2 OUR.
    Featuring news on issues around the world. The Zimbabwean president, Robert Mugabe, has just turned 90 and is showing no sign of stepping aside. Our World joins him as he celebrates his 90th and asks what his legacy will be.

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Located in the Refugee Archive at QU31.3 BIG.
    Channel 5’s live debate explores the controversial topic of immigration, the issue that has underpinned and troubled Britain for decades. With new rules on who enters Britain now in place and growing populations of immigrants around the UK, The Big Immigration Row: Live explores the thorniest issue of our time – who is really British? Who should or should not be allowed to come here? Is Britain getting too full? Does integration work, or is it being resisted, and who is intolerant of who? As the racial mix becomes more and more complex, can we ever all live together in harmony?

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Description: Located in the Refugee Archive at A65 REE.
    Adventurer and journalist Simon Reeve heads to Vietnam to uncover the stories behind the morning pick-me-up. While we drink millions of cups of the stuff each week, how many of us know where our coffee actually comes from? The surprising answer is that it is not Brazil, Colombia or Jamaica, but Vietnam. Eighty per cent of the coffee we drink in Britain isn’t posh cappuccinos or lattes but instant coffee and Vietnam is the biggest supplier. From Hanoi in the north, Simon follows the coffee trail into the remote central highlands where he meets the people who grow, pick and pack our coffee.

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Description: Located in the Refugee Archive at A65 REE.
    Adventurer and journalist Simon Reeve heads to east Africa to uncover the stories behind Britain’s favourite drink. Britons consume millions of cups of tea each day, but how many know where the tea comes from? Perhaps surprisingly, most of the leaves in everyday teabags do not come from India or China but are bought at an auction in the coastal city of Mombasa in Kenya. From here, Simon follows the tea trail through the epic landscapes of Kenya and Uganda and meets some of the millions of people who pick, pack and transport tea. Drinking tea with everyone from Masai cattle herders to the descendants of the original white tea planters, Simon learns that the industry is not immune to the troubles of the continent – poverty, low wages and child labour.

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Making migration work for development
    Author: University of Sussex. Development Research Centre on Migration, Globalisation and Poverty, publisher.
    Subjects: Migration; Development
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/QU5 RCA/Box C1.
    Publisher: Brighton : University of Sussex
    Publication Date: 2010
    Format: 45 pages : colour illustrations ; 21 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Full and equal citizens : a strategy for the integration of refugees into the United Kingdom.
    Author: Great Britain. Home Office.
    Subjects: Refugees, Government policy — Great Britain; Government policy; Integration; Receiving country; Refugees; United Kingdom
    Description: Located in the Refugee Council Archive in a box file at RCA/QU5 RCA/Box C1.
    Publisher: London : Home Office
    Publication Date: 2000
    Format: 16p ; 30 cm..
    Language: English
    Snippet: Full and equal citizens : a strategy for the integration of refugees into the United Kingdom.

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Coping with destitution : survival and livelihood strategies of refused asylum seekers living in the UK
    Author: Heaven Crawley author.
    Joanne Hemmings author.; Neil Price author; Oxfam, publisher.; Swansea University. Cntre for Migration Policy Research, author.
    Subjects: Poverty; Livelihoods; Rejected asylum seekers; United Kingdom
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/QU5 RCA/Box C1.
    Related Titles: Series: Oxford Research Report..
    Publisher: Oxford : Oxfam
    Publication Date: 2011
    Format: 68 pages ; 30 cm..

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    The refugee roulette : the role of country information in refugee status determination
    Author: Immigration Advisory Service. Research, Information and Policy Unit, author.
    Subjects: Information; Refugee status determination procedures; United Kingdom
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/QU5 RCA/Box C1.
    Publisher: London : Immigration Advisory Service
    Publication Date: 2010
    Format: 115 pages : charts ; 30 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Independence under threat : the voluntary sector in 2013 : the Panel’s second annual assessment
    Author: Panel on the Independence of the Voluntary Sector, author.
    Subjects: NGO’s; Civil Society,; United Kingdom
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/QU5 RCA/Box C1.
    Publisher: London : Panel on the Independence of the Voluntary Sector
    Publication Date: 2013
    Format: 50 pages ; 30 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    Transforming development : Institute of Development Studies annual report 2014
    Author: Institute of Development Studies, author.
    Subjects: Institute of Development Studies; Annual reports; Development; United Kingdom
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/QU5 RCA/Box C1.
    Publisher: Brighton : Institute of Development Studies
    Publication Date: 2014
    Format: 35 pages : colour illustrations and maps ; 21 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    The deportation machine : Europe, asylum and human rights
    Author: Liz Fekete
    Institute of Race Relations.
    Subjects: Asylum, Right of — Europe; Deportation — Europe
    Description: Archive version held in a box file at RCA/QU5 RCA/Box C1.
    Related Titles: Series: European race bulletin no. 51
    Publisher: London : Institute of Race Relations
    Publication Date: 2005
    Format: 78 p. ; 30 cm..
    Language: English

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • Title:
    International labour migration : a UNISON discussion paper
    Author: UNISON. author.
    Subjects: Migrant labour; Migration; United Kingdom
    Description: Located in the Refugee Archive in a box file at RCA/QU5 RCA/Box C1.
    Publisher: London : UNISON
    Publication Date: 2005
    Format: 20 pages ; 30 cm..
    Language: English
    Snippet: International labour migration : a UNISON discussion paper /

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • tags:newitemsarchive

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Welcome to the Refugee Council Archive at the University of East London

Welcome to the Refugee Council Archive at the University of East London

DSCF5920As the new term is now officially underway, we would like to take this opportunity to highlight the services and resources available as part of the Refugee Council Archive here at the University of East London. My name is Paul Dudman and I am the Archivist here at UEL.

To begin with, we would like to take a few moments to introduce the collection:

The origins of the Refugee Council can be traced back to 1951 with the creation of the 1951 United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees. In the United Kingdom, the response to the 1951 Convention was the founding two independent organisations, British Council for Aid to Refugees (BCAR) and the Standing Conference on Refugees (SCOR), which were later to be merged to become the British Refugee Council. The Refugee Council is now one of the largest charities dealing directly with refugees and asylum seekers within the UK, and the Refugee Council Archive at the University of East London now represents one of the largest collections of materials relating to the study of forced migration and the refugee. It is a source of information and analysis on displacement, flight and exile; on legal, political and social issues; and on refugee community life.

The Archive contains materials on refugees in all parts of the world, with special DSCF5932emphasis on Britain. It was originally housed at the Refugee Council, the lead organization in Britain on refugee issues. For over 30 years the Refugee Council collected official and unofficial reports, books and journals, newsletters, conference proceedings, research documents, field reports, informal data, and working papers. It also developed an extensive library of press cuttings.  In addition to this Special Collection, the Archive also contains archival material recording the history of the Refugee Council as an organisation.

In support of this, the Archive also contains:

The UNHCR Audio-Visual Archive.  A selection of Photographs, Slides and Audio-Visual materials collected by the UNHCR London office.

The Northern Refugee Centre.  The Archive contains a range of published and unpublished materials including reports, conference papers publications, grey literature and press cuttings.

Charter 87.  Incorporated within this are minutes of the Charter 87 Steering Group; records of correspondence predominantly with the Home Office; records of the organisation’s newsletter and occasional publications and files of press cuttings relating to asylum seekers and refugees.

We are committed to provide a range of services to both undergraduate, postgraduate and research students and staff at the University of East London and we also welcome enquiries from external researchers and members of the public. We endeavour to make our Archives as open and accessible as we can and to do this with developed a range of services which we hope will help support our Archive users.

These services can include the provision of Individual and Group Archive Induction and Guidance Sessions for undergraduate, postgraduate and research students whilst we are also happy to seek to engage with our academic community through the provision of one-to-one and group teaching support combined with activity engaging with e-learning activity through the utilisation of our of archives and special collections, both physical and digital. We are keen to embed our Archives within UEL academic courses and we would welcome any expressions of interest from UEL academic staff who may wish to make use of our Collections in support of their courses and learning and teaching requirements.  We are always looking at ways in which we can develop our Archives to support the learning experience of our students.

DSCF5872In addition, we are looking to develop a number of online tools to help facilitate access to our Archival collections. To date, these include:

A new Archives online portal at: uelarchivesportal.wordpress.com/

A Refugee Archives specific web resource at: refugeearchives.wordpress.com/

Online access to our Archival descriptions at: Archives Hub and AIM25 and Archives Portal Europe websites.

Dedicated Twitter Accounts for the UEL Archives (@ArchivesUEL) and Refugee Archive (@refugee_archive).

A Jiscmail Refugee Research Listserv.

We would strongly recommend that you have a look at some of these resources and we hope that you will find them useful and rewarding. We would also recommend any feedback on the range of services that we offer here at the UEL Archives and do please get in touch with any question or query that we may have.

Archive opening hours for the UEL Docklands Campus Archive will be Mondays to Fridays: 1pm to 6pm for a drop-in service. Access to the Stratford Campus Archive for the Hackney Empire Archive is by Prior Appointment Only and morning appointments can also be made for the Docklands Archive between 10am and 12pm.

To contact the Archivist to make an appointment, or with any other query, please contact: Paul Dudman on 020 8223 7676 or by email on library-archives@uel.ac.uk.

A history of the development of the Refugee Council itself can be found here.

New Journal Articles (weekly) (weekly)

  • “The multiple geographies approach, which combines the spatial-analytic and sociospatial perspectives, highlights the lack of homogenous experience for internally displaced persons across places. After laying out the significance of the multiple geographies approach, we show how geographical perspectives on the economic, material, and social circumstances of internally displaced persons in Georgia cast a different light on creating visibility for their experiences, possibilities for amelioration of circumstances, and the creation of spaces of displacement. We argue that data presentation in a categorical manner is useful for highlighting the forced migrant experience but that adding the sociospatial lens provides deeper insight into human security and people’s lived experiences. We do this through a discussion of the material and social life of internally displaced persons in collective centres as compared to those in private accommodation, by gender, and in different locations in Georgia. We argue that we are ultimately able to improve human security by refining our knowledge of the internally displaced persons’ experiences by highlighting spatial processes. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Based on qualitative interviews conducted between 2011 and 2013 with urban refugees in the first asylum ports of Hong Kong and Thailand, this study examines three inter-related dimensions in refugee migration: aspirations, practices and embodiment. It demonstrates what actually happens in the asylum seeking process, from home to host destinations, and the cultural process of “becoming a refugee”. Travelling abroad is not merely a matter of crossing “the border” at an immigration checkpoint. Rather, the participants in this research have to “fashion” themselves as potential “legitimate” travellers or smuggled persons in the making of exits and entrances. This article shows how they make use of their local and transnational social connections for making both “legal” and “illegal” exits and entrances, and how the embodied experience of cross-border movement influence their perception of being refugee. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “UNHCR’s Executive Committee is the only specialized multilateral forum which contributes to the development of international guidance on refugee protection. Based on observation of the negotiation of ExCom Conclusion No. 107, this article examines global refugee norms in the making. It argues that empirical studies can further our understanding of global refugee policy, by re-embedding norms and policies that claim to be global into the specific configurations of state and non-state actors that produce them. The ethnographic approach in particular sheds light on how different stakeholders’ conflicting interests, beliefs and legal frameworks are turned into a depoliticized and consensual narrative of global refugee protection, having an apparently positive and ambitious connotation. These narratives produce a hegemonic ‘truth regime’ on refugee issues but also windows for contestation. Moreover, the article illustrates how global refugee norms may not necessarily be about improving refugee standards for decision-makers but may be used for other, implicit, reasons such as perpetuating narratives, maintaining social prestige, making claims for political consideration, or legitimizing new bureaucratic interventions. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “International refugee law is seen by many as constitutive for national refugee policy. Yet, as asylum has become politicized, many countries have adopted procedural and physical deterrence mechanisms to prevent refugees from accessing protection. The present article examines these policies, as well as the legal responses to them, as a critical case study for understanding the relationship between international law and refugee policy. Based on a theoretical triangulation of the dominant accounts of the interplay between international law and politics within liberal, realist and critical legal studies scholarship, it is argued that the two should rather be seen in a dialectic process of co-evolution. This speaks both to the continued power of international refugee law, but also to the instrumentalist approach of certain states trying to contest or circumvent their international legal commitments. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Drawing on data collected during a 26-month ethnographic study of refugees in a city in upstate New York, I examine the gendered and gendering training and work contexts with which refugee women engage. Utilizing the notion of assemblage, a term often associated with actor-network theory (ANT), I ask, among other questions, how do the gathered collages of texts, aims, histories, resources, knowledges, and practices that instantiate what we might recognize as resources for newcomers, come to frame refugee women as they enter the workforce? I demonstrate that through the processes of becoming employed, certain material objects, such as completed job applications, combine with case workers’ assessments of employability, and employers’ ethnic and gender stereotypes, to create socio-material renderings of refugee women. However, even as they participate in the labour market, the refugee women push against the constraints imposed by their limited English-language ability, lack of formal education, initial lack of socio-economic connections, culturally-defined gender roles, and gender stereotypes. I argue that greater efforts through changes in the national policy and also the related practices of local resettlement agencies should address gender more explicitly. Greater time investment in educational programmes, a longer period of workforce training in more varied, less gender-stereotypical areas, and explicit programmes educating the receiving community about the refugees could result not only in greater economic adaptation, but also increased social integration for refugee women. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The European Union’s ambition to create a harmonized reception system for asylum seekers differs from the realities on the ground. We address how differences in national reception conditions stimulate the secondary migration that challenges the creation of an effective common migration regulation in Europe. We base our analysis on the Dublin Regulation (DR) and the secondary movement of Eritrean asylum seekers from Italy to Norway. The empirical material consists of qualitative interviews with civil servants, NGO representatives, and Eritrean migrants in Milan and Rome, and Norwegian civil servants. Recently developed models of migration destination selection were used to analyse the interaction between individual aspirations and structural constraints. We found that the Eritrean informants remained highly motivated to apply in a second country but were to some extent held back by the DR. Supranational regulations were challenged by the migrants’ actions and by national differences in reception and welfare standards. Both the migrants’ aspirations to move on and the challenges to a harmonized regional regulation of migration increased during times of economic crisis. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Although witnesses are indispensable to the operation and success of war crimes courts, little is known about their motivations for agreeing to testify. This article advances existing knowledge by drawing on findings from interviews conducted with 200 witnesses after they gave evidence in the Special Court for Sierra Leone. Participants were asked to describe their reasons for testifying. Content analysis was used to examine the variety and frequency of responses. Overall, 18 conceptually distinct motivations were mentioned, with most witnesses reporting multiple motivations. The response given most frequently was ‘to denounce wrongs committed against me during the war,’ followed by ‘to contribute to public knowledge about the war.’ Desires for retributive justice (e.g., accountability, punishment), and to fulfill a moral duty to other victims, were each mentioned by approximately one in four witnesses. Other key motivations included establishing the truth and narrating their stories. Motivations differed by gender, age, victimization status, side (prosecution versus defense) and trial. The results support the idea that witnesses value the opportunity to publicly denounce atrocities committed against themselves and others. The findings point to both congruities and incongruities between the aims of witnesses and the goals of war crimes courts. Further, the findings suggest that there may be two broad, overarching aspects of the decision to testify: those that are primarily geared toward helping oneself and those that are primarily geared toward helping others. Pragmatically, the findings can enhance efforts to support witnesses in preparing for and completing their testimonies. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

The remarkable shrinking backlog at the European Court of Human Rights – Alice Donald

Originally posted on UK Human Rights Blog:

dutch-boyIn recent years, a constant feature of debate about the future of the European Court of Human Rights has been the backlog of applications that threatens to engulf it. At its height, in September 2011, this backlog reached the dizzying figure of more than 160,000.

The accumulation of applications has been the basis of the argument both by politicians (such as David Cameron) and figures formerly associated with the Court (such as Luzius Wildhaber) that the Strasbourg system should be fundamentally reformed so that it would deliver far fewer judgments relating only to large-scale violations, structural problems, or important questions of the interpretation and application of the European Convention on Human Rights.

Such reform would mean drastically curtailing the right of individual petition, which for decades has been the cornerstone of the Convention system (and of other regional human rights mechanisms that have emulated the ECHR model).  Yet…

View original 1,051 more words

Five things we learned from Cameron’s human rights announcement

Originally posted on UK Human Rights Blog:

9e422861-3131-40b3-a703-62426b2d1c9a-620x372There was some surprise at the lack of detail over human rights in Justice Secretary Chris Grayling and Home Secretary Theresa May’s speeches yesterday. Now, David Cameron has revealed all. Or at least, he has revealed some. Here is what we learned.

1. The Conservative Party will not be leaving the European Convention on Human Rights if it obtains a majority in 2015-2020.

This is the really important bit, as everyone knew the longstanding Tory policy of repealing the Human Rights Act and replacing it with a Bill of Rights (see below) would be maintained. There has been plenty of noise from the Eurosceptic right of the party in relation to the ECHR – both Grayling and May have consistently said leaving was a possibility. But surely now it is not. Or at least, if it intends to do so it would be very odd for that major policy…

View original 1,091 more words

Nauru asylum seekers reportedly sewing lips shut over visa denial

Originally posted on Hazara Asylum Seekers:

October 01, 2014 | SBS News

Suicide attempts are on the rise and more than a dozen asylum seekers have sewn their lips shut on Nauru since the Abbott Government announced changed visa arrangements last week, advocates say.

Of those sewing their lips together, activists say at least seven are minors, some of them unaccompanied minors (Supplied)

More than a dozen refuges have attempted suicide, according to activists, who have also alleged that at least seven children have sewn their lips together in the wake of the Abbott government’s recent visa decision.

The decision, announced last week, could mean the reintroduction of temporary protection visas to boat arrivals on Christmas Island and the mainland.

However neither temporary protection visas nor the newly-created Safe Haven Enterprise visas will be available to detainees on Nauru or Manus Island, sparking what the Refugee Action Coalition’s Ian Rintoul called an “epidemic of self-harm”.

Protesters gather on Nauru (Supplied)

Protesters gather on Nauru (Supplied)

“You’ve got the young woman who is in hospital in Sydney after drinking…

View original 895 more words

2013 report by Euro-Mediterranean Foundation of Support to Human Rights Defenders

Originally posted on Hans Thoolen on Human Rights Defenders:

The Euro-Mediterranean Foundation of Support to Human Rights Defenders (EMHRF) today released its 2013 Annual Report detailing its activities in support of individuals, groups and NGOs who are defending human rights in a wide variety of distinctly challenging contexts across the Arab region. In 2013, when access to internal and external funding sources in the region remained limited and difficult, the Foundation faced the dual challenges of protecting defenders in increasingly repressive and violent environments and of consolidating positive civil society dynamics in countries where tentative steps were taken toward democratisation.

In countries such as Syria, Libya, Algeria and Egypt,

View original 248 more words

Manus Island: Work on new asylum seeker facilities halted by provincial government

Originally posted on Hazara Asylum Seekers:

October 02, 2014 | ABC News

Manus Island dispute

Manus Island provincial leaders and their supporters confront construction workers at the site of a new facility to accommodate asylum seekers sent to PNG by Australia. Photo supplied on October 2, 2014

The provincial government on Manus Island has stopped the construction of new facilities for asylum seekers and is threatening to close the existing detention centre.

Local leaders are demanding that Australia renegotiate its assistance package to Manus Island and the rest of Papua New Guinea, which is worth about $1 billion.

Political leaders and about 50 supporters arrived at the Australian-run regional processing centre in a convoy of 15 vehicles to make their demands known.

Manus Island governor Charlie Benjamin ordered work on the new development to stop.

“No further work should be done in building the camps until the Australian Government and the Papua New Guinea government sit down with us…

View original 334 more words