Resources: URBAN DISPLACEMENT: Discussion hosted on urb.im

URBAN DISPLACEMENT: Discussion hosted on urb.im

Urban Refugees in partnership with URB.im are now hosting a live online discussion focused on possible solutions to the challenges faced by urban refugees and IDPs and the key role of CBOs until the 23rd June: http://urb.im/c140609

Our featured panellists are experts Erin Mooney, Archie Law, Simone Haysom, Dale Buscher, Louise Olliff, Loren B. Landau, PhD, and Jeff Crisp.

Today most refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) live in urban settings, not in camps, due in part to the numerous advantages cities offer, including economic opportunities and freedom of movement. This phenomenon of urban displacement is not new, but has received little attention over the years. Assisting and advocating for refugees and IDPs scattered in urban areas is incredibly challenging for organizations that are often ill-equipped to assist populations in urban environments.

Recently, this phenomenon has gained more visibility, particularly since the onset of the Syrian refugee crisis. The question now is to understand how better to support and assist the growing number of urban refugees and IDPs. Self-help groups and community-based organizations have proven that they can play a critical role in the protection of their own communities. Supporting their work and their initiatives, as well as increasing collaboration between humanitarian and development organizations, could be part of the solution.

We would like to encourage you all to visit the website and leave comments in the discussion threads. Your individual insights would be highly valued as we hope to make the debate as stimulating and as balanced as possible. Visit http://urb.im/ now to join the conversation.

New resources: LGBTI Refugee Project Portal (Organization for Refuge, Asylum and Migration)

New web portal to help rising numbers of LGBTI refugees fighting for safety
http://portal.oraminternational.org/?utm_source=World+Refugee+Day+-+Portal+Launch+%28Non-Press%29&utm_campaign=World+Refugee+Day&utm_medium=email

On World Refugee Day (20 June 2014), ORAM – the Organization for Refuge, Asylum and Migration – is today launching a new online portal to help official bodies and NGOs share approaches to protecting LGBTI refugees and to adopt best practices in the face of rising persecution of LGBTI people globally.

The LGBTI Refugee Project Portal showcases projects and approaches that enhance the protection of LGBTI forced migrants in the areas of refugee status determination, policy development and research, practical protection measures and staff development. ORAM is encouraging posting of projects that will lead to better treatment of LGBTI refugees across the globe.

ORAM says the recent upsurge in the marginalization and persecution of millions of LGBTI people across the world has led to the number of refugee claims rising sharply, and yet only a small percentage are disclosing their sexual orientation or gender identity as the cause, for fear of further persecution or rejection. Even when the refugees do come out, many refugee agencies are not handling their claims properly or sensitively.

In addition to launching the portal, ORAM is calling on the UNHCR to maintain and release statistics about the LGBTI refugees within its protection mandate. It says that only with accurate data can the crisis be appropriately addressed. ORAM is also calling on all government and intergovernmental bodies to ensure the appropriate training of their staff, to recognize genuine LGBTI asylum claims and to better understand what it means to be an LGBTI refugee, to help ensure they are sensitively and appropriately treated.

Some jurisdictions deny bona fide LGBT refugee claims, telling applicants to go home and conceal their sexual orientation or gender identity. In November 2013, the European Union Court of Justice ruled that this practice is no longer acceptable. ORAM points out there is an urgent need for all bodies processing asylum claims to undergo training that is in-depth and nuanced to convey the complex nature of LGBTI identities and claims. In the past year, ORAM has trained hundreds of refugee professionals including UNHCR, at tens of locations. The organization is working with Columbia University with US State Department funding to assess the impact of LGBT training on refugee professionals.

Neil Grungras, founder and Executive Director of ORAM, said: “LGBTI people are among the most persecuted individuals in the world. We encourage all agencies and NGOs working with refugees to share examples of good practice through our portal in the hope it will help others to improve approaches and lead to safety for the many LGBTI refugees currently fighting for their survival.”

For more information on the LGBTI Refugee Project Portal, visit: http://portal.oraminternational.org/

 

New resources: Annotated Bibliography – Refugee Claims Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

This is to inform you that Mary Kapron (a JD student at uOttawa) and I have posted an annotated bibliography on refugee claims based on sexual orientation and gender identity. You can find the document at the following SSRN page:

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2457503

This annotated bibliography gives an account of legal and social sciences research sources related to refugee claims based on sexual orientation and gender identity. The bibliography, which focuses primarily on English language publications, includes close to 200 items that fall into the following two categories of research sources:

(1)   scholarly publications on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) refugees and asylum-seekers and the refugee determination process;
(2)   reports from international, inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations on the same topic.

Research sources are first organized topically according to the definition of a Convention refugee under the 1951 United Nations Convention relating to the Status of Refugees. As a second listing, we have provided a geographical classification of the sources that focus on specific countries or regions. Finally, we have included an alphabetical listing by author of all of the research sources we were able to locate for this project.

We hope you will find this a useful research tool.

 

Courses: Psychosocial Consequences of Migration & Promoting Integration

Psychosocial Consequences of Migration and Asylum (3 September-14 October 2014)

This e-learning course introduces the psychosocial and mental health consequences of migration and the practical issues related to the provision of multidisciplinary culturally sensitive interventions. It will also address the issue of the stress experienced by humanitarian practitioners while working with affected populations.

Course outline

Week 1. Overview of the psychosocial and mental health consequences of migration
Week 2. The Inter Agency Standing Committee Guidelines (IASC) for Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) for Emergency Settings and their implications for intervention
Week 3. Skills to assess problems, needs and resources
Week 4. Culturally and contextually sensitive interviewing skills and working with translators
Week 5. Introduction to individual, family and community interventions for populations living in camps and urban contexts
Week 6. Specific mechanisms workers and organisations can use to minimize staff burnout and maximise organisational effectiveness

For more detailed information and online registration: www.hrea.org/psychosocial-consequences-migration.
——-

Promoting Migrant and Refugee Integration (29 October-9 December 2014)

This e-learning course focuses on the main issues at stake related to migrant and refugee integration in increasingly multi-cultural and multi-ethnic societies, including labour market access, family reunification, access to education and education support programs for migrant children, and the integration of irregular migrants and especially vulnerable groups.

Course outline

Week 1. Guiding principles for integration and policies
Week 2. The links between immigration and anti-discrimination
Week 3. A secure status as the starting point: family reunification and long-term residence
Week 4. Access to nationality and political participation
Week 5. Support for immigrant adults: employment, education and language courses
Week 6. Support for immigrant children: the 1.5 and 2.0 generations

For more detailed information and online registration: www.hrea.org/promoting-integration.

For a complete listing of courses offered in HREA’s Migration & Asylum program, please visit: www.hrea.org/migration.

 

New publications: ‘EU Asylum Procedures and the Right to an Effective Remedy'; ‘The Reception of Asylum Seekers under International Law’ (discounts available)

New publications: ‘EU Asylum Procedures and the Right to an Effective Remedy'; ‘The Reception of Asylum Seekers under International Law’ (discounts available).

Adequate and fair asylum procedures are a precondition for the effective exercise of rights granted to asylum applicants, in particular the prohibition of refoulement. In 1999 the EU Member States decided to work towards a Common European Asylum System. In this context the Procedures Directive was adopted in 2005 and recast in 2013. This directive provides for important procedural guarantees for asylum applicants, but also leaves much discretion to the EU Member States to design their own asylum procedures.

This book examines the meaning of the EU right to an effective remedy in terms of the legality and interpretation of the Procedures Directive in regard to several key aspects of asylum procedure: the right to remain on the territory of the Member State, the right to be heard, the standard and burden of proof and evidentiary assessment, judicial review and the use of secret evidence.

Table of contents: http://www.hartpub.co.uk/pdf/9781849465458.pdf

Marcelle Reneman is Assistant Professor in the Migration Law Section of the Department of Constitutional and Administrative Law at the VU University Amsterdam.

May 2014, 428pp, Hbk, 9781849465458
RSP:  £60 / €78
Discount Price: £48 / €62.40
To receive the 20% discount online write ref: AM9 in the voucher code field and click ‘apply': http://www.hartpub.co.uk/BookDetails.aspx?ISBN=9781849465458

 

Calls for papers: Forced Migration Review issue 49: Climate change, disasters and displacement (deadline 12 January 2015)

Calls for papers: Forced Migration Review issue 49: Climate change, disasters and displacement (deadline 12 January 2015).

Deadline for submission of articles: 12th January 2015

Every year around the world people are displaced by floods, cyclones, droughts and other sudden- and slow-onset events. In light of the projected increase in the frequency and intensity of disasters associated with climate change and environmental degradation, it is anticipated that the number of people displaced in the context of disasters, including across international borders, is likely to rise.

Forced Migration Review published an issue in 2008 looking at ‘Climate change and displacement’ which brought together researchers and practitioners to debate this growing area of concern – and the tension between the need for research and the need to act. In the years since then there has been much debate, analysis and developments in thinking, approaches and needs.

While existing national, regional and international legal regimes respond to some of the protection concerns arising from displacement in the context of disasters, others remain unaddressed.  Despite legal standards to protect internally displaced people, significant operational protection gaps remain for those displaced in disasters. Regarding cross-border displacement in disaster contexts, where the 1951 Refugee Convention would not apply, the legal gap relates primarily to admissions, status during stay, and finding durable solutions.

International cooperation and solidarity will be essential to ensure adequate protection of the rights of displaced people, while identifying needs and crafting an appropriate response will demand a cross-sectoral approach that addresses different forms of human mobility (displacement, migration and planned relocation). Those working in many different fields – technical and scientific, political, humanitarian, human rights and developmental, among others – will have something to contribute to solutions and to mitigating the impact of displacement.

This issue of FMR, to be published in May 2015, aims to discuss the linkages between climate change, disasters and displacement, the impact of both internal and cross-border displacement, measures to prevent or reduce the likelihood of displacement, and approaches to ensure the protection of those who are displaced (or who are unable to move).

In 2015, the Nansen Initiative, led by the Governments of Norway and Switzerland, will bring together states to discuss a protection agenda addressing the needs of people displaced in the context of disasters caused by natural hazards, including those linked to climate change. While some articles in the FMR issue will emanate from the Nansen Initiative’s regional consultations and civil society meetings that have been taking place since 2013 in the Pacific, Central America, the Horn of Africa, South-East Asia and South Asia, additional articles would be welcomed, in particular those that address the Arctic, Central Asia, Europe, West Africa, the Caribbean and Central Asia.

The FMR Editors are looking for practice-oriented submissions reflecting a diverse range of perspectives which focus on situations of displacement and address questions such as the following:

. What have been the most significant developments in relation to a better understanding of the linkages between climate change, disasters and displacement since publication of FMR issue 31 in 2008?
. What measures can be taken to prevent, or reduce the likelihood of, displacement in the context of climate change and disasters?
. What gaps remain in national, regional and international legal regimes in terms of providing protection for individuals and communities displaced internally or across borders, or facing displacement, in the context of disasters caused by natural hazards, including those linked to climate change?
. How can the operational response be improved, with roles and responsibilities better clarified, when providing protection and assistance for those displaced by disasters and the effects of climate change?  What examples exist of states admitting displaced people in the context of disasters?
. Are new methods of data collection, analysis and the use of quantitative modelling proving useful in predicting, planning for and responding to displacement in the context of disasters caused by natural   hazards, including those linked to climate change?
. Are there examples of good practice in supporting resilience, adaptation and coping strategies that can be replicated elsewhere?
. What evidence is there of improved guidelines and practice in disaster risk reduction and management, relating to displacement, disasters and climate change?
. To what extent is human mobility included within national adaptation plans?
. How can governments, civil society and the international community work together to help boost the adaptive capacities of local host communities and communities affected by displacement?
. What are potentially affected local communities saying and doing about climate change, disasters and displacement? How can their expertise and insights feed in effectively to planning and responses at the local, national, regional and international level?
. How can pre-emptive voluntary migration or planned relocation, and/or admission to another country to provide temporary protection, be facilitated?
. In what circumstances will both affected citizens and non-citizens have access to humanitarian assistance?
. What is needed in terms of international and regional cooperation and coordination? What good practice currently exists?
. How should governments and other actors respond in order to guard against protracted displacement and avoid premature return?

If you are interested in submitting an article, please email the Editors fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk with a proposed outline.

Deadline for submission of articles: 12th January 2015
Maximum length: 2,500 words.

Please note that space is always at a premium in FMR and that published articles are usually shorter than this maximum length. Your article, if accepted for publication, may well be shortened but you will of course be consulted about any editing changes. Please consult our Guidelines for authors at: www.fmreview.org/writing-fmr

Authors are reminded that FMR seeks to include articles with a gendered approach or a gender analysis as part of them. We are also particularly keen to reflect the experiences and knowledge of communities and individuals directly affected by these questions. If you can put us in touch with displaced people and/or local organisation representatives who might be interested in writing, please do email us; we are happy to work with individuals to help them develop an article.

View the call for articles online at http://www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters

 

 

Calls for papers: Environmental changes and human mobility: what role for migration governance?

Please find attached the call for papers for the COST Action IS1101 Climate Change and Migration – Bern Workshop: Environmental changes and human mobility: what role for migration governance?, which will take place 24 October, 2014 at the World Trade Institute, University of Bern, Switzerland [Moderator's note: please see the call for papers below].

We invite abstracts of papers concerned with these questions from different academic disciplines as well as practitioners. Contributions of not more than 1-2 pages should be sent to the conference organisers at  Roberto Cherchi, rcherchi@unica.it; Ilenia Ruggiu, iruggiu@unica.it; Elisa Fornalé, elisa.fornale@wti.org, by 31 July, 2014.

Please refer to the attached call for papers for further information or contact the conference organisers at Elisa Fornalé, World Trade Institute, elisa.fornale@wti.org.

We would be grateful if you could forward this call to interested colleagues and disseminate it through your channels.

Call for Papers

ISCH COST Action IS1101 (Climate change and migration)
Environmental changes and human mobility: what role for migration governance?
Working Group: WGII (Law and Policy)

Date: Friday 24 October 2014
Place: World Trade Institute (WTI), University of Bern

Workshop theme: environmental changes, human mobility and normative implications

This workshop aims to examine the influence of climate change on immigration policies and on the migration governance in a globalized world.

The growing role of environmental drivers is likely to impact international migratory flows, although the normative implications of this interdependence remain underexplored.

The workshop intends to adopt the environmental degradation-migration nexus as one way to gain new insights into post-national rulemaking processes and their normative implications. A key issue is whether states can still adopt migration measures and provide legally effective mechanisms to face natural changes in a world that is increasingly marked by globalization and neoliberalization.

To this end, the workshop will cover the interplay between different legal orders and levels of governance (at the international, regional and domestic level) to overcome the mismatch between normative perspectives and real-life processes.

There should be a reflection on the nexus between environmental migration issues and the existing legal concepts and tools of immigration law. Special attention should be paid to new legal
frames related to environmental migration flows, migrants’ status and human rights protection.

A special investigation should be conducted on the nexus between trade liberalization and immigration policy. To date there has been little research to capture the potential to refer, for example, to free trade agreements and their influences on immigration policies. Studies are also lacking on the impact of regional integration and cross-continental migration agreements on the regulation of migration flows and migrants’ legal statuses, with a specific focus on temporary movement of natural persons. Therefore, this workshop is primarily aimed to further develop legal research that conceptualizes human mobility linked to environmental degradation by identifying migration strategies as effective protective responses.

In addition, it is necessary to focus on new post-national governance in a globalized world: what form can it take in the framework of national environmental-immigration policies?

Issues that may be addressed at the workshop include:
– Challenges to global governance raised by environmental degradation-induced migration at the international, regional and national levels;
– Identification of normative gaps in current implementation and research on environmental migration policies;
– Case study of human mobility as an adaptation strategy to environmental changes;
– Investigation on the interactions of free trade agreements, temporary mobility schemes and climate-change induced migration;
– Analysis of the legal frameworks and policy mechanisms to support environmental migration decisions, both at the international and at the national level.

Structure of the workshop:
The workshop will consist of a keynote lecture, followed by round tables for discussions and case studies/ presentations current research. All statements and presentations should be circulated no later than one month before the workshop. The organizers envisage publishing all contributions of it in a relevant journal as a Special Issue.

Participants:
The organizers will select 12-14 participants from different disciplinary backgrounds addressing the above-mentioned topics and related aspects of human mobility and environmental changes.

Application procedure:
This workshop aims to invite scholars, researchers and policy-makers to present and discuss legal, governance and policy frameworks with particular consideration of the adaptation strategies of climate migrants and future challenges that climate migration poses. We will invite scholars from different disciplines to present expert papers on policy and legal frameworks for managing migration, potential migration or adaptation strategies resulting from climate change at the national, regional and international levels. Representatives from non-governmental organizations, research agencies, government and policy-makers are also particularly welcome to participate.

Please send an abstract of 1-2 pages (max) and a short biography (half page) to the organizers of the workshop:
– Professor Roberto Cherchi, Professor of Public Law, Department of Law, University of Cagliari, rcherchi@unica.it
– Professor Ilenia Ruggiu, Professor of Constitutional Law, Department of Law, University of Cagliari, iruggiu@unica.it
– Dr Elisa Fornalé, World Trade Institute, elisa.fornale@wti.org

Host institution: World Trade Institute, University of Bern, Switzerland

Travel and accommodation: Travel and accommodation expenses will be covered for those participants and paper presenters of the COST Action Network who have been accepted to participate in the workshop. Non-COST members are subject to financial approval procedures.

Deadline for applications: 31 July 2014
Notification of acceptance: 10 August 2014
Full paper submission: Participants will be asked to submit a full paper of 10-15 pages by 1 October 2014.

This Workshop is funded by the COST Action IS1101 Climate Change and Migration: Knowledge, Law and Policy, and Theory

For further details, see:
www.climatemigration.eu
www.cost.eu/domains_actions/isch/Actions/IS1101

 

ToC: International Journal of Refugee Law

The latest edition of the International Journal of Refugee Law, Vol. 26, No. 2., (June 2014).  A table of contents is as follows:

Articles

Filling the Gaps? Subsidiary Protection and Non-EU Harmonized Protection Status(es) in the Nordic Countries
Liv Feijen
Int J Refugee Law 2014 26: 173-197
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Testing Repatriation Contracts for Unconscionability: The Case of Refugees in Israel
Mollie Gerver
Int J Refugee Law 2014 26: 198-222
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Another Brick in the Wall: Carrier Sanctions and the Privatization of Immigration Control
Tilman Rodenhäuser
Int J Refugee Law 2014 26: 223-247
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Caught in Limbo: How Alleged Perpetrators of International Crimes who Applied for Asylum in the Netherlands are Affected by a Fundamental System Error in International Law
Joke Reijven and Joris van Wijk
Int J Refugee Law 2014 26: 248-271
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Opinion

What Constitutes Persecution? Towards a Working Definition
Hugo Storey
Int J Refugee Law 2014 26: 272-285
[Extract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Case Law

R (on the application of EM (Eritrea)) (Appellant) v Secretary of State for the Home Department (Respondent) [2014] UKSC 12
Int J Refugee Law 2014 26: 286-306
[Extract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Case BVerwG 10 C 26.12 German Federal Administrative Court
Int J Refugee Law 2014 26: 307-314
[Extract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Book Reviews

Reworking the Relationship between Asylum and Employment
Michelle Foster
Int J Refugee Law 2014 26: 315-318
[Extract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Human Trafficking: Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Claire Healy
Int J Refugee Law 2014 26: 319-321
[Extract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Protection of the Right to Seek and Obtain Asylum under the African Human Rights System
Marina Sharpe
Int J Refugee Law 2014 26: 321-324
[Extract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Cover / Standing Material

Abbreviations
Int J Refugee Law 2014 26: NP
[PDF] [Request Permissions]

Subscriptions
Int J Refugee Law 2014 26: NP
[PDF] [Request Permissions]

Table_of_Contents
Int J Refugee Law 2014 26: NP
[PDF] [Request Permissions]

 

Events: Statelessness and Transcontinental Migration Conference Conference: 24th – 25th July 2014

Statelessness and Transcontinental Migration Conference Conference: 24th – 25th July 2014
United Nations University Institute on Globalization, Culture and Mobility (UNU-GCM)

This conference focuses on a range of issues related to the wellbeing and recognition of people who traverse continents devoid of citizenship. Issues related to refugees remain crucially unanswered in debates and policies surrounding migration. In the wake of acknowledgement within the academy that it is not always possible to isolate refugees from migrants, this conference analyses a range of contexts where dignity and human rights are compromised through the absence of legal and political recognition. By focusing on situations of extreme vulnerability and on lives lived on the borderline, this conference seeks to articulate and address urgent needs with regard to the stateless migrants who have entered Europe.

Keynote speakers:

Professor Eduard Sagarra i Trias, ‘The Necessity of Immigration in the Globalized World’, President of the United Nations Associations of Spain (ANUE), Barcelona / University of Barcelona
Professor Khadija Elmadmad, ‘Statelessness and Migration: The Case of de facto and de jure stateless children in Morocco’, Director of The UNESCO Centre, The Law and Migration (CUDM), Rabat
Attendance:  Please confirm attendance by emailing franzil@unu.edu with full name and ID number by July 21st 2014

More info: http://gcm.unu.edu/index.php/events/conference/268-statelessness-and-transcontinental-migration-conference-conference-24th-25th-july-2014

 

‘Racism: From the Labour Movement to the Far-Right’ conference to be held at the University of Glasgow on 5-6 September 2014

‘Racism: From the Labour Movement to the Far-Right’ conference to be held at the University of Glasgow on 5-6 September 2014.

Conference Website:  http://racismconference14.wordpress.com/

The first decades of the 21st century have seen two worrying developments for anyone concerned with opposing oppression:

  • the continuing mutation and expansion of racism into new ‘cultural’ forms, above all in the form of a virulent Islamophobia; and
  • the electoral consolidation of parties of the far-right, who are not always fascist, but committed to deeply reactionary positions on most social issues, above all in relation to migration.

These two developments are distinct, but overlapping. On the one hand, racism is more widespread than on the far right, institutionally embedded over centuries in even the most notionally liberal states and exerting an influence even in the labour and trade union movement which might be thought to have most to lose from the divisions which it engenders. On the other hand, the far-right almost always includes racism among its repertoire of mobilising issues, but has politics which extend beyond it. Since planning for the conference began in March, consideration of both these issues has been given added urgency by the success of far-right parties in elections to the European Parliament and the NatCen British Social Attitudes survey which showed continuing, if uneven levels of racism across the UK.

Although our focus is international, no conference held in Scotland during September 2014 can avoid the fact of the independence referendum. While the national question is not directly our subject, any discussion of racism inevitably has to deal with its role in national formation, particularly in the case of the imperial powers of which Britain was once so preeminent, and in which Empire Scots played such a disproportionately large role. Themes which the Conference will address in relation to Scotland are anti-Irish racism and, more generally, claims that it suffers less from racism than England or other areas in Western Europe–claims which, at the very least have to be modified in the light of UKIP’s recent electoral success.

Finally, the range of this conference extends far beyond Scotland and the UK, to encompass developments in many of the nation-states of Europe. With over 40 speakers, and involving trade unionists, political and community activists as well as academics from a range of disciplines, we invite anyone concerned with these central problems of our time to attend and participate in the discussion.

Conference Schedule:

Friday 5 September

9.00am-9.45am: Registration, tea and coffee

9.45am: Plenary speaker

Professor Floya Anthias (University of East London): Intersectionality and  the Struggles against Racisms: problems of theory and practice

10.45am: Tea and coffee

11.00am: Parallel sessions

1. Race, gender and class in the workplace

Sundari Anitha (Lincoln University) and Ruth Pearson (Leeds University) South Asian women industrial militants from Grunwick to Gate Gourmet: finding and losing our place in the British labour movement

Steve Jefferys (London Metropolitan University) The EU and trade union anti-racism

Wilf Sullivan (Trade Union Congress, London) Neo-liberal authoritarianism and racism in austerity Britain

2.Welfare states and the populist far-right in Europe: comparative perspectives

Lena Karamanidou (City University) Far right parties, welfare chauvinism and migration to Greece

Markus Ketola (University of Ulster) Welfare regimes vs. Europeanisation: what explains the European far-right’s relationship with the welfare state?

Johan Nordensvard (University of Southampton) Is ethnocentric nationalism becoming a contender to neo-liberal welfare discourse? the case of the Nordic countries

12.30pm: Lunch

1.30pm: Parallel sessions

3.Theorizing racism and anti-racism 

Franka Welz (University of Essex) Idioms of racism: toward a refined theoretical approach to racism, then and now

Federico Oliveri (University of Pisa) Migrant struggles and critical race theory: rethinking race, racism and anti-racism from below

Satnam Virdee (University of Glasgow) Racial formation, anti-racism and the significance of the racialized outsider

4.Racisms of the far-right 

Stephen Ashe (University of Manchester) Attitudinal predictors without guarantees: why people don’t vote BNP

Aaron Winter (University of East London) The American far-right and Islam(ophobia)

Federico Zannoni (Bologna University) Secession, xenophobia and symbolism: the Lega Nord party in Italian politics and society

3.00pm: Tea and coffee

3.15pm: Parallel sessions

5.Neoliberalism, racialization and the contemporary workplace

Sarah Burton (Goldsmiths College, University of London) The (racial) politics of hegemony: pedagogies of racism in the neoliberal academy

Gina Netto (Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh) Low-paid work, ethnicity and identity work: dealing with everyday racism in the workplace

Carol Young (Coalition of Racial Equality and Rights) Changing the race equality paradigm

6.Anti-racism, anti-fascism and the socialist Left: historical perspectives 

Brendan McGeever (University of Glasgow) Revolution, racism and anti-racism: antisemitism in the Russian Revolution, 1917

David Renton (London) Against fascism, against the state: the friends of Blair Peach in retrospect

Mark Hayes (Southampton Solent University) Anti-Fascist Action/ Red Action

4.45pm: Book launches followed by drinks reception

Racism, Class and the Racialized Outsider by Satnam Virdee. Discussant: Wilf Sullivan (Head of Race Equality, Trade Union Congress)

The Longue Duree of the Far-Right edited by Richard Saull, Alex Anievas, Neil Davidson and Adam Fabry. Discussant: David Renton (Barrister, Garden Court Chambers)

 

 

Saturday 6 September

9.15am: Teas and coffees

9.30am: Parallel sessions

7.Refugees, asylum and migration

Bob Mouncer (Hull) A racist asylum policy and what it means for its victims

Gareth Mulvey (University of Glasgow) Immigration policy in Britain: discrimination by design?

Monish Bhatia (University of Abertay, Dundee) Asylum seeker resistance: breaking the deportation machine

8.The far-right and capitalism since WW2 

Neil Davidson (University of Glasgow) Far-right social movements as a problem for capital

Aurelien Mondon (University of Bath) The far right as a decoy for the real democratic crisis

Richard Saull (Queen Mary College, University of London) Reassessing the cold war and the politics of the far-right

11.00am: Teas and coffees

11.15am: Parallel sessions

9.The racialization of Muslims in Britain 

Nicholas Cimini (Edinburgh Napier University) Cousin marriage, reproductive risk and anti-Muslim racism

Elisabeth Miloud (La Sorbonne (Paris IV) GEMASS) How British South Asians became Muslims: from blackness to Muslimness

Waqas Tufail (University of Liverpool) Asian, Muslim and Dangerous: ‘grooming’ and the politics of racialization

Paul Goldie (University of Glasgow) Discourse of disdain: cultural racism and Islamophobia in Glasgow

10.Imperialism and its legacies in Scotland 

Allan Armstrong (Edinburgh) Gavin Bowd’s ‘Fascist Scotland’ and the absent role of the UK state

Minna Liinpää (University of Glasgow) Contemporary nationalist narratives and Scotland’s imperial past

Stephen Lees (TAL Fanzine, Glasgow) Football fandom and anti-fascism: a case study of Glasgow Celtic F.C. 

12.45pm: Lunch

1.45pm: Parallel sessions

11.Racism, multiculturalism and citizenship in Europe 

Elisabeth Badenhoop (University of Glasgow) Re-producing the nation-state: a critical comparison of current citizenship regimes in Britain and Germany

Peter Hervik (Aalborg University) What is in the Scandinavian nexus of Islamophobia, multiculturalism, and Muslim-Western Relations?

Barrie Levine (Glasgow Caledonian University) Never again? The growth of antisemitism in Europe: contradictions and complexity

12.Loyalism and the legacy of anti-Irish racism in Scotland 

Jim Slaven (James Connolly Society, Edinburgh) The Irish experience in Scotland

Alex Law (University of Abertay, Dundee) Sectarianism and the civilizing process

Maureen McBride (University of Glasgow) Cultural racism in Scotland: a case study of Irish Catholics

13.Racism, ethnicity and employment in Scotland 

Colin Clark (University of the West of Scotland) Immigration, racism and employment: the Romanian and Bulgarian experience in Scotland

Jatin Haria (Coalition of Racial Equality and Rights) Race and employment equality outcomes set by public bodies in Scotland

Zandra Yeaman (Coalition for Racial Equality and Rights) Positive action, positive inaction: is it now time for quotas?’

3.15pm: Conference summation

3.30pm: Conference closes

 

Conference: Migrant mothers caring for the future: creative interventions in making new citizens

Migrant mothers caring for the future: creative interventions in making new citizens

Thursday, 18 September 2014, 09:30Friday, 19 September 2014, 17:30

London South Bank University

An International conference co-organised by Umut Erel, Lecturer in Sociology and member of CCIG (Faculty of Social Sciences at The Open University)

This event is part of the Research Project Migrant Mothers caring for the future, led by Umut Erel (The Open University) and Tracey Reynolds (London South Bank University).

This international multidisciplinary conference engages with perspectives from cultural studies, cultural geography, sociology, migration studies, and the creative arts to explore how migrant mothers realise and problematise their role in bringing up future citizens in contemporary societies, which are increasingly characterised ethnic, racial, religious, cultural and social diverse.

It will ask important questions about the processes that shape migrant mothers’ cultural and caring work in enabling their children to occupy a place as future citizens. It also interrogates how immigration and integration policies produce particular obstacles and limitations for migrant families and children.

In considering migrant women’s caring, cultural and social practices as interventions into citizenship the conference aims to find out what we can learn by understanding transnational social and cultural resources of care, and also the inter-relationship between motherhood and nationhood.

Confirmed keynote speakers

Professor Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, University of Southern California

Professor Eithne Luibheid, University of Arizona, U.S

Professor Ann Phoenix, Institute of Education, London

Professor Hirokazu Yoshikawa, New York University

Preliminary programme can be downloaded below. 

Registration

Newly Published Books on Refugee and Forced Migration Related Issues (weekly)

  • “Law of Asylum in the United States is an authoritative presentation of U.S. asylum law, long considered a must-have publication for practitioners, students, and teachers. It is frequently relied upon and cited by decision-makers. Law of Asylum describes and interprets applicable U.S. laws, as well as numerous international sources, providing an up-to-date analysis of all aspects of asylum law. This edition addresses current hot topics such as developments in the law interpreting particular social groups and a new approach to interpreting and applying the political opinion ground. Law of Asylum also addresses fundamental issues such as:

    The meaning of well-founded fear and persecution
    The five grounds for asylum (race, religion, nationality, social group membership, and political opinion)
    Withholding of removal protection and protection under the Convention Against Torture
    Claims based on childhood status and gender-based persecution
    When non-state actors can be considered agents of persecution
    Extensive coverage of gang membership/opposition to gangs
    Elements of proof
    Credibility determinations
    Recent changes in statutory language enacted with the REAL ID Act
    New BIA cases on social distinction and particularity”

    tags:books

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Research and Publications (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

News Stories (weekly)

  • “Thirty lifeless bodies found in the bow of a fishing boat carrying 600 migrants off the coast of Sicily have reignited the debate on illegal crossings in the Mediterranean and how the EU should respond. The Italian navy is facing an unprecedented flow of migrants across the sea, with the number intercepted in first half of 2014 already outnumbering those of the past year and at levels seen in 2011 during the Arab Spring.”

    tags:news

  • “The day began with an APPG on Migration meeting, attended by over 100 people, including affected families, thinktanks and parliamentarians from across the political parties. The meeting was chaired by Paul Blomfield MP and addressed by Conservative MP Andrew Percy, Katy Clark MP (Labour) and Lord Robin Teverson (Liberal Democrat), as well as conservative thinktank director Ryan Shorthouse (Bright Blue) and JCWI’s Saira Grant. The meeting saw compelling arguments for rethinking the family migration rules put forward by all sides, most thoughtfully from Bright Blue director Ryan Shorthouse. He offered up his views on why the current rules are simply incompatible with core Conservative values. Over the coming months we hope that these alternative critiques of the rules will be able to reach new audiences and build support for a change in the rules.”

    tags:news

  • “As the response to recent strike action on the part of public sector workers shows, it is not always easy to convince people of the need to protect the rights of all workers, British or migrant. It is particularly hard in the face of high-unemployment and a struggling economy when the argument is put that migrant workers are filling roles British workers could take.”

    tags:news

  • “The long-awaited judgment of the Court of Appeal in the case ‘MM’ on the matter of the lawfulness of the UK immigration rules setting income levels for the sponsorship of non-EEA family members was made public this morning.

    The Court ruled that the Secretary of State’s rules, though discriminatory in their effect, had a legitimate objective and were for this reason not unlawful.

    The immigration rule which was subject to the proceedings requires the British resident sponsor of a non-EEA spouse to demonstrate an income of at least £18,600 per annum in order that a visa be issued. In the event that a non-EEA national child is being sponsored a further £3,800 per annum income is required for the first child and £2,400 for each additional child after that. Provisions also exist for the sponsor to demonstrate a means to support through the savings of amounts indicated by the rules being available.”

    tags:news

  • “In a landmark ruling, the High Court has today found that the way the government operates the Detained Fast Track asylum system is unlawful. The judgment follows a legal challenge brought by charity Detention Action against the use of the Detained Fast Track System.

    The Detained Fast Track is a system of deciding asylum claims whilst the asylum-seeker is in detention. It is designed for asylum claims that are considered to be suitable for a quick decision. The fast track process was originally set up in 2002 in response to increased numbers of asylum applications. In 2002 there were 84,132 applications for asylum in the UK. In 2012 there were 21,875 such applications.”

    tags:news

  • “The Department of Health (DH) has today published its plans to recover costs for NHS treatment of visitors and migrants.

    The Visitor & Migrant NHS Cost Recovery Programme: Implementation plan 2014-16 sets out two approaches towards recovering the cost of treatment.

    The first of these is improving the ability of the NHS to recover the costs of healthcare provided to European Economic Area (EEA) patients (non-resident in the UK) from their home member state. This will be achieved through making greater use of European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) system as well as the S1 and S2 agreements. “

    tags:news

  • “The Migration Advisory Committee has today released a detailed examination of migrants in low-skilled jobs in the UK and their wider impacts. In 2013 there were 2.1 million foreign born workers in low-skilled jobs in the UK, one million of whom had come to the UK since 2004.

    Many of the findings of the MAC research echo those of prior investigations into low-paid migrant workers, including noting issues relating to labour conditions and the high number of migrants employed through agencies. The MAC finds that ‘the availability of migrant workers combined with the low level of labour market regulations has enabled some employers to maximize the advantages to them and, at the same time, allowed migrants to acquire a significant place in the UK labour market, particularly in low-skilled sectors’.”

    tags:news reports

  • “The European Migration Network (EMN), which works under the aegis of the Home Affairs Directorate of the European Commission, has published a study entitled Migrant access to social security and healthcare:policies and practice .

    The study notes that “Social security systems, including access to healthcare, constitute one of the most powerful tools to reduce poverty and inequality and promote social inclusion.”

    The provision of social security and healthcare systems depends on countries having active workforces acting to sustain growth in economies and generate taxation revenues to pay for support that is needed. In the ageing societies which are typical of Europe, these workforces emerge at least in part from the migration of workers across national frontiers.”

    tags:news reports

  • “In 2010 the British government announced that the outrage of child detention for immigration purposes was to end. Simultaneously, however, it commissioned the opening of a new family detention centre, CEDARS, which was to be run under novel governance arrangements by the Home Office, private security company G4S and the children’s charity Barnardo’s.”

    tags:news reports

  • “8 July 2014 – The UN organization dedicated to gender equality and the empowerment of women (UN Women), today announced that it has tapped British actress Emma Watson as Goodwill Ambassador.

    “We are thrilled and honoured to work with Emma, whom we believe embodies the values of UN Women” said Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka.

    Known for playing the leading role of “Hermione Granger” in the Harry Potter saga, Ms. Watson has been involved with the promotion of girls’ education for several years, and previously visited Bangladesh and Zambia as part of her humanitarian efforts. “

    tags:news

  • “Bradford East is currently held by Lib Dem MP David Ward, who on immigration issues has been an astute and committed campaigner, in particular, on family migration, a key issue impacting his constituents. An interesting and diverse constituency, Bradford East has a massive Asian community at almost 40% of the overall population, it is also a constituency with high home ownership rates (including mortgages), as well as an unusually young electorate.”

    tags:news

  • “Housing has become disproportionately expensive for most of London’s population, and this is reflected in the rental market. Supply is low, demand is high, and migrants face additional obstacles. Eastern Europeans form one of the largest migrant groups, yet they remain particularly vulnerable to the pitfalls of the rental sector. Solutions to help these migrants would also benefit the London population as a whole. “

    tags:news

  • “The All-Party Parliamentary Group on Migration and the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Refugees have today launched a cross-party inquiry into the use of immigration detention.

    The inquiry, which will be chaired by Liberal Democrat MP Sarah Teather, will examine the use of detention in the UK immigration and asylum systems, with a particular focus on the conditions within detention centres, the impact on individual detainees and their families, the wider financial and social consequences, how detention is used in other countries, and the future role of detention within the immigration system.”

    tags:news

  • “The Modern Slavery Bill will receive its second reading in the House of Commons this Tuesday.

    The Modern Slavery Bill was introduced into the House of Commons in June 2014, following its mention in the 2014 Queen’s Speech. It has been informed by the findings of a Joint Committee in April 2014 on a draft version of the bill, which also gathered evidence from a range of NGOs and legal experts.”

    tags:news

  • “A consortium led by MOSAIC Centre for Research on Multilingualism, University of Birmingham, is conducting research on multilingualism in superdiverse neighbourhoods.

    The 4-year research project, Translation and Translanguaging: Investigating Linguistic and Cultural Transformations in Superdiverse Wards in Four UK Cities, is a collaboration between four universities. The interdisciplinary research programme will develop new understandings of multilingual interaction in cities in the UK, and communicate these to policy-makers and communities locally, nationally, and internationally. The research project, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) runs from 2014 – 2018.

    Globalisation and changing patterns of migration mean that ‘superdiverse’ cities are increasingly populated by speakers of multiple languages.Researchers from University of Birmingham, Birkbeck (University of London), University of Leeds, and Cardiff University will generate new knowledge about communication in changing urban communities.”

    tags:news

  • This is part of a series of Annual Reports and Accounts, which presents the Government’s outturn and planned expenditure for 2013-14.”

    tags:news reports

  • Latest edition of Border Force bulletin includes operational updates, a news round-up and details of border technology and transformation, detections and seizures and partnership working.”

    tags:news reports

  • This version of the Immigration Rule has been replaced by the current Immigration Rules.”

    tags:news reports

  • “Read this guide if you are considering on making a visa application, or sponsoring an applicant if they want to work in the UK.

    You should read the guidance before you apply.”

    tags:news reports

  • “Asylum support policy bulletin about how UKVI applies section 55 of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 to the consideration of applications made for asylum support.”

    tags:news reports

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Journal Articles (weekly)

  • “More than ten million people are stateless today. In a world of nation states, they live on the margins without membership in any state, and, as a consequence, have few enforceable legal rights. Stateless individuals face gaps in protection and in many cases experience persecution that falls within the refugee paradigm. However, US asylum policy does not adequately address the myriad legal problems that confront the stateless, who have been largely invisible in the jurisprudence and academic literature.

    Two federal appellate court opinions shed new light on the intersection of statelessness and refugee law in the United States. In 2010, Haile v. Holder examined the asylum claim of a young man rendered stateless when the Ethiopian government issued a decree denationalizing ethnic Eritreans. In a 2011 case, Stserba v. Holder, the court reviewed an asylum claim by a woman who became stateless when the Soviet Union collapsed, and the successor state of Estonia enacted citizenship legislation that included a language requirement. This article analyzes the opinions which suggest that state action depriving residents of citizenship on ethnic and other protected grounds warrants a presumption of persecution. This article also identifies additional circumstances in which stateless individuals may have a well-founded fear of persecution that qualifies them for asylum in the United States.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The economic crisis of the late 2000s has transformed inter-ethnic relations. Despite the fact that North American and European economies have depended on international migration flows for decades (Piore 1979; Sassen 1988; Zolberg 2006), recent years have witnessed an increasing tension in perceptions of international migration among citizens in these regions (Telles and Ortiz 2007: 292). The increasing success of the far-right at the polls and the support for policies strengthening border controls and criminalizing unregulated migration reveal the extent to which immigrants continue to be the outsiders and scapegoats of the present era (Allport 1979; Benhabib 2004; Wimmer 2002). The unprecedented number of votes of Le Front National in the 2014 French municipal elections illustrate this generalized trend. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Recent scholarship points to three emerging lines of research on the migration and citizenship nexus. The first unsettles assumptions of citizenship’s internal homogeneity by identifying internal lines of exclusion (Balibar 2004; Anderson 2013). This goes beyond a binary between citizenship’s inclusionary promise and constitutive exclusions to explore what Linda Bosniak (2006) has characterized as its ‘soft inside’. The second line of research maps spaces and practices of membership that incorporate different regimes of rights (Redclift 2013a, 2013b; Rygiel 2011; Sigona 2015) and relationships to the state (Coutin 2000; Düvell 2008; Kubal 2012). These challenge theorizations of rule and exception (cf. Agamben 1998) and the representation of subjects produced within these conditions. In doing so, this research contributes a groundswell of literature critiquing the depiction of migrant subjects as depolicitized and agency-less social actors (cf. Bloch, Sigona and Zetter 2014; Isin and Neilson 2008; Nyers and Rygiel 2012; Rancière 2010; Redclift 2013b; Sigona 2012). Thirdly, scholars have just begun to test concepts and analytical frameworks developed within/for Western liberal democracies in contexts with different political traditions (Reeves 2013; Vora 2013) and genealogies of citizenship (Ong 2006; Somers 2008). As we will discuss at the end of this review essay, some of these themes are echoed and further developed in the books under review. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “I have investigated the nature of the transformation triggered by the reform of labour mobility entitled ‘New Rules for Labour Immigration’, introduced in Sweden in 2008, and its impact on migrants’ well-being. By applying the methodology of the ‘What’s the problem represented to be?’ approach (Bacchi 2009), I show that the problem at which the reform was aimed is represented as a shortage of skills and labour. I argue that such a representation and the silences it invokes are underpinned by the paradigms of managed migration and of neoliberalism, thus marking a discontinuity in the political rhetoric of universalism which had been endorsed by Sweden since the beginning of the 1970s. I contend that such a formulation of the problem assumes and entails a conceptualisation of migrants as factors of production. This formulation stands in sharp opposition to the one advanced by the Human Development and Capability Approach to migration (UNDP 2009) which recognises migrants as human beings, endowed with capabilities, aspirations, and agency. Such reification of migrants implies that the reform regulates the stay of immigrants in Sweden with the purpose of maximising their contribution to Swedish economic growth, thus putting them in a vulnerable position which is likely to reduce their capability for work (Bonvin 2009).”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Immigration has long been a controversial subject in Japan, with the country’s historic aversion to foreign populations well noted. This article seeks to discuss recent developments in Japanese immigration policy, looking specifically at how both local governments and the national government address education issues for foreign children. Examining the specific case of Kawasaki City’s foreign student educational policies in detail, this article compares local initiatives to national policy developments, arguing that Kawasaki has been a pioneer in many cases and that the national government has ultimately adopted similar resolutions. The national government, for its part, has been slow to take up issues addressing immigrants, trailing more progressive cities like Kawasaki, but has slowly been making efforts to improve foreign student education. In the broader sense, this article argues two additional points: that largely ethnically homogenous countries like Japan are no longer able to completely ignore their immigrant populations and that highly centralized states are moving slowly toward empowering their local governments.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article discusses how Islamic umbrella organizations advocate for civil rights of immigrants and Muslims in Germany. By focusing on the changing migration and security regimes at the turn of the twenty-first century, it analyzes the political emphasis on perceived “threats” in light of theoretical debates about the “securitization of migration”, and in particular, the role of Islamic organizations as lobbyists which publicly protest against associations being made between the two policy fields. Their public protest is against provisions of the new Nationality Act (2000) and the Immigration Act (2005) that require immigrants to prove German language skills, to be able to support themselves, and to pass naturalization tests as well as against the lack of dual citizenship and local voting rights. In addressing these issues, Islamic umbrella organizations expand their traditional scope of advocacy work to achieve religious rights for Muslim individuals and organizations, such as the official recognition of Islamic umbrella organizations and the introduction of Islamic religious education in public schools.
    Journal of International Migration and Integration Journal of International Migration and Integration Look
    Inside

    Within this Article

    Introduction
    Desecuritization as a Lobbying Strategy
    Legal Linkages Between Security, Immigration, and Islam in Germany Since the Turn of the Twenty-First Century
    Lobbying Against the Securitization of Immigration, Security, and Religious Policies
    Conclusion
    References
    References

    Other actions

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    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In many European countries, including the Netherlands, refugees stay in asylum accommodation pending a decision on their asylum request. While it seems evident that the lack of resources and insecurity about the future experienced during this stay will impact refugees’ subsequent ability to integrate with the host society, so far this has hardly been studied in an extensive way. Also, the type of residence status granted can be a source of insecurity that impacts their integration. Previous studies on refugee integration have already shown the impact of pre-migration stressors such as traumatic experiences on mental health and integration. In this study, we use a large-scale dataset containing detailed information on about 4,000 refugees to show that also post-migration stressors affect mental health and hinder the socio-economic integration of the four largest refugee groups in the Netherlands: Afghan, Iraqi, Iranian and Somali.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Sweden and Denmark share a similar socio-political structure, yet these two countries demonstrate two distinct discourses on immigration. This article focuses on the tone of the debate in Denmark and Sweden concerning immigration and national identity. If the tone of debate is shaped by a language of fear, we argue, this predisposes people to vote for anti-immigration parties. Our analysis highlights the position of anti-immigration parties; hence, the Sweden Democrats (SD) in Sweden and the Danish People’s Party (DPP) in Denmark. We use frame analysis to detect recurrent frames in the media debate concerning the SD and the DPP in the political competition over votes. Our material concentrates on the run-up to the European Parliamentary (EP) elections of 2004 and 2009, in total 573 articles in ten major Danish and Swedish newspapers. We show that the harsh tone of the debate and the negative dialogue risks leading to the construction of beasts that are impossible to negotiate with. In the Swedish political debate, the SD is highly stigmatized as the beast (the extreme other) in Swedish politics and this stigma is used by the SD in the mobilization of votes. In Denmark the religion of Islam as such plays a similar role and provides the DPP with an identity. We conclude that we are confronted with a two-faced beast that feeds on perceptions of the people as ultimately afraid of what are not recognized as native goods.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Public sector employment of immigrants can increase their economic assimilation and potentially improve their treatment by government. Yet, as we show using Census data from 1990, 2000, and 2009–2011, immigrants are substantially underrepresented in federal, state, and local governments. To understand why, we use logit analysis for federal and for state and local government employment in each time period to test whether immigrants’ weaker educational attainment and English proficiency, lower probabilities of being citizens and military veterans, and different age, gender, and race/ethnicity distributions can explain that underrepresentation. Disparities in education and preferential government treatment of veterans are factors, but citizenship requirements appear to be the major obstacle to immigrant employment in the public sector.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In the literature on religion and assimilation, Muslims are usually categorized into one group without any reference to their differences in terms of religious practice and ethnicity. This paper sheds light on such differences by illustrating the case of Turkish immigrants in the USA, one of the least studied immigrant groups. Based on interviews with practicing and non-practicing Turkish Muslims in Houston, we address the issue of how practices of religion play its role in the assimilation of Turkish immigrants. Data reveal that while Turks in general are fairly well adapted into American society, there are some major differences between practicing and non-practicing Turkish Muslims, even though practically all Turks identify as Muslim.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “n this study, we use quantitative and qualitative data to analyze how historical events shaped skilled emigration and integration of two Eastern European groups into the USA. Some of these migrants lost all interest in their country of origin and seek to fully assimilate to the new society. Others developed a new type of identity, as global citizens rather than of a particular country. They are willing to learn and understand the new society, but at the same time, they keep in touch with the home country. These two fundamental avenues of skilled migrant integration are related to individual characteristics as well as structural forces, and may highlight potential subsequent moves, addressing the global circulation of skilled international migrants.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This paper seeks to move beyond what Martin and Ruhs described as the numbers versus rights equation in temporary labour migration programs. We do this by examining the ideology of temporary labour migration. This ideology has three key elements: temporariness, labour markets and rights. The paper describes how these concepts obscure key features of temporary labour migration programs. The argument is developed by examining points of contrast between current programs in place in the USA, Canada, Australia and the UK. The paper concludes by demonstrating how unmasking the power imbalances of this ideology will lead to new policy directions.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In the Swedish migration system, the local level plays a crucial role since the municipalities have full autonomy to accept or decline refugees. This has created a considerable variation in numbers of immigrants among municipalities, and there is a large variation in local societies’ willingness to receive refugees. In this study, we focus on all the Swedish municipalities for a time span of several years and derive from economic, demographic, socio-cultural, and explanatory factors that have been put forward in earlier research. Through quantitative analysis, we can show how income, the unemployment rate, population, and support for the right-wing party negatively vary with the willingness to receive refugees. Moreover, the distribution of income results in the opposite significant direction. These results, partly contradicting theory, show the importance of a nuanced and holistic theoretical base in further research.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This paper explores the role of physical proximity of places of worship in facilitating interfaith dialogue. The research focuses on a religious cluster within the Greater Toronto Area, which emerged due to incremental zoning changes over time. Using key informant interviews as the method and Allport’s contact hypothesis as the guiding theoretical framework, it explores the effects of proximity and contact (interaction or encounters) on intergroup relations. The findings suggest that physical proximity is not a strong factor in facilitating interfaith dialogue initiatives. However, proximity does seem to have an effect in creating a space for interactions and encounters to occur, which can lead to attitudinal shifts concerning the religious “other.””

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Feminist debates on sex trafficking have become entrenched and polarised, with abolitionists producing images of helpless abused victims, while sex worker advocates work hard to achieve some recognition of the agency of migrant sex workers. This article explores constructions of embodiment, subjectivity and agency in the debate, showing how abolitionist views, in spite of their efforts to challenge liberal pro-sex perspectives, rely on a familiar vision of the body as a singular, bounded and sovereign entity whose borders must be secured against invasion. The result is a vision in which victimisation is taken to epistemically compromise the subjectivities of sex workers, forcing them and their advocates to argue for recognition of their agency according to familiar liberal models of consent in order to be able to enter the debate. Drawing on the recent work of Judith Butler on consent and vulnerability, this article argues that what is needed is a rethinking of bodily ontology so that the vulnerability of sex workers is not opposed to their agency, but rather seen as an inevitable aspect of embodied sociality, constituting a call to ethical engagement and a recognition of the inequitable global distributions of precarity that produce sex trafficking as part of contemporary geopolitics. From this perspective, the alignment between radical feminist efforts to secure women’s bodily borders and global efforts to secure national borders no longer appears as coincidence.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Using narrative methodology this paper analyses the life stories of 25 former refugees from two African countries, resettled in Australia. Study findings demonstrated a salient divergence between the stories of the two communities; within which there were also individual differences in structure and content of participants’ narratives. Five narrative types were identified along a continuum from detailed disclosure to near-complete silence about traumatic events and experiences. They were: (1) avoiding narratives; (2) struggling narratives; (3) prompted narratives; (4) narratives exceeding demarcated boundaries of disclosure; and (5) returning narratives. We discuss these differences in narrative structure, narrated experience, identity reconstruction, and meaning-making within the context of the personal, interpersonal, sociocultural and historical influences that have shaped the lives of participants. Findings were supported by interviews with 25 resettlement agency staff. Broader implications of the study’s findings for therapists and researchers working with refugees are also discussed. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Research involving resettled refugees raises methodological and ethical complexities. These complexities typically emerge within cross-sectional research that focuses on refugee experiences at a specific point in time. Given the long-term and dynamic nature of refugee settlement, longitudinal research is valuable, yet it raises distinct complexities within the research process. This article focuses on the methodological and ethical insights that emerged in a longitudinal study of settlement and wellbeing with a cohort of young people from refugee backgrounds in Australia. It considers: engagement and retention of a cohort over time; the need to adapt research tools to changing settlement contexts and life stages; participants’ experiences of long-term involvement in the study; and the challenge of timely translation of findings into evidence for policy and practice. The article contributes to a growing understanding of the practical, ethical and epistemological challenges and opportunities presented by longitudinal research, in this case, with resettled refugee background youth. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The concept of biopower is often used in the analysis of contemporary aid. Referring to a power that is exercised over life and that operates through self-government, it seems very appropriate for the operations of humanitarian agencies, particularly in refugee contexts. This article critiques the application of biopower in studies of humanitarianism, arguing that many aid operations are based on top-down control, rather than self-government and the internalization of norms. As an illustration, I examine a supplementary feeding programme in South Sudan, looking at how food was provided, how hunger was measured, and pointing out the hierarchical and paternalistic control involved. As well as suggesting that biopower often lacks relevance in refugee contexts, I also argue it has been applied too broadly. By being associated with a vast array of humanitarian practices, it risks losing any analytical utility, becoming a substitute for detailed descriptions of power. This article seeks to return to that detail, describing a humanitarian programme and pointing out some discrepancies with the ever-popular notion of biopower, which, I argue, has a tendency to be applied without an adequate definition. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article examines the role of two regional actors in the Asia–Pacific region, namely the Bali Process and the Asia Pacific Refugee Rights Network (APRRN), a platform of civil society organizations, as two very different models of mechanisms and agenda-setting on Global Refugee Policy (GRP). The Bali Process has limited actors and a narrow discourse on refugees which reflects a hierarchical agenda-setting process or ‘steering mode’. By contrast, the APRRN is a non-state network actor which works through non-hierarchical mechanisms as a transnational activist network (TAN) and has a normative agenda. This article demonstrates the tension within GRP which is being created within the region through these two intermediaries between the global North and the global South. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Global, regional and national refugee law and policy present important sites for contestation, agenda setting, normative pronouncements and symbolic action. But international and even domestic legislation seldom realize the promises of protection. In the kind of weakly legalized environments in which many self-settled refugees reside, progressive protection regimes may be far removed from the realities of refugees’ lives. Drawing primarily on research from South Africa, this paper makes a two-part argument. The first highlights the narrow practical and analytical value of focusing on legal reforms and formal ‘refugee’ policy as determinants of protection, given that legal status and documentation have only limited practical protection effects. The second argument is that even in analysing refugee policy, we must grant considerable space for bureaucratic autonomy. The paper concludes with a dual call: first, to broaden our focus of refugee law and policy to include a range of other social and political policy fields so that formal commitments to refugee protection can be translated into practical protection; second, it asks analysts to take sub-national bureaucracies far more seriously as sites of policy formation and practice. Such a perspective requires introducing a spatialized, socialized and politicized understanding of institutional incentives and operations. Together these will offer a more realistic understanding of protection possibilities through policy and illuminate the practices associated with state actions relating to the displaced. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Conferences: ‘Using Human Securit as a legal framework to analyse the Common European Asylum System’

‘Using Human Security as a legal framework to analyse the Common European Asylum System,’ 4 July, T.M.C Asser Instituut, The Hague, Netherlands

This expert conference will explore new territory in its analysis of protection under the Common European Asylum System through the prism of Human Security. The four thematic panels of the conference will analyse the added value of using Human Security as a legal framework for protection in Asylum law whilst assessing the prospects of legal interaction between both fields. It will take stock of recent developments in legislation, jurisprudence and doctrine, proposing insightful approaches to contemporary asylum challenges.

The event is free of charge. However, registration is required. Please register here: http://www.asser.nl/onlineforms/CLEERHumanSecurity.aspx

Link to the event with more information including conference programme and confirmed speakers: http://www.asser.nl/events.aspx?id=423

 

Conference: “Migration, Integration and Neighbourhoods: Where’s the Harm?”

“Migration, Integration and Neighbourhoods: Where’s the Harm?”
***Conference Announcement***

Conference Title: Migration, Integration and Neighbourhoods: Where’s the Harm?

Date: 21-22 November 2014

Venue: Cumberland Lodge, The Great Park, Windsor

Delegate Rate: £195 (includes all food and accommodation in unique historic surroundings)

About Cumberland Lodge:
Cumberland Lodge is an educational charity dedicated to the betterment of society through the promotion of ethical discussion. This is a not-for-profit event.

Partnership:
In partnership with the Centre on the Dynamics of Ethnicity

Key speakers (to date):
Dr Robert Arnott Director, Border & Immigration System, Home Office
Professor Simon Burgess, Economics, University of Bristol,
Dr Nissa Finney Hallsworth Fellow, University of Manchester,
Ruth Grove-White, Policy Director, Migrant Rights Network
Dr Therese O’Toole Sociology, University of Bristol,
Professor James Nazroo Director, Centre on the Dynamics of Ethnicity, University of Manchester
Trevor Phillips OBE founding Chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

Register here:
www.cumberlandlodge.ac.uk/migration

Introduction:
Migration will be a key policy issue in the 2015 general election: we are already seeing heated political rhetoric about levels of migration to the UK. But what do we really know about the effect of migration on local communities?
Migrant populations are often thought to be harmful to social cohesion at the local, neighbourhood level. The widely accepted idea is that neighbourhoods with diverse migrant populations lack a sense of community spirit, leading to increased social isolation. The influential sociologist Robert Putnam described this effect as “pull[ing] in like a turtle” (2007: p.149).
Drawing on the latest research from the Centre on the Dynamics of Ethnicity, this conference challenges the notion that diversity is harmful to neighbourhoods. It offers a practical examination of key indicators of social capital and cohesion, such as: whether there is a correlation between educational attainment and prevalence of English as a second language in schools; voting registration rates; access to social housing; fear of crime; trust; levels of health and well-being.
The conference will:
• evaluate one of the key policy issues of the next general election
• give an analysis of the latest thinking on migration and integration
• examine up-close the fissures between different kinds of sociological research,
• analyse the competing influences of public discourse and research on policy
The event will be of interest to academic researchers; researchers from think tanks; parliamentary researchers and members of the civil service; representatives from the voluntary sector; and anyone with an interest in social cohesion, population movement and integration.

Venue
The colloquium will be held at the former royal residence of Cumberland Lodge (www.cumberlandlodge.ac.uk) which is located in Windsor Park, Berkshire, SL4 2HP.

Student Bursaries:
A limited number of student bursaries are available for students who wish to attend the conference, but have no access to institutional funding. The bursaries provide a free place at a conference, covering registration charges, accommodation and all food for the duration of the conference. They do not cover travel expenses to and from the conference. Bursaries are awarded individually, and applicants will be notified of the outcome within 7 working days of the application deadline – 10th October 2014 at 1pm.
To apply for a bursary please visit: http://www.cumberlandlodge.ac.uk/Programme/Student+Bursaries
Please
note: Bursaries are only awarded when the application has been formally endorsed by an academic supervisor. Applicants should give the name and contact details for their referee, having first asked them to endorse the application.

Contact us:
For more information please visit the website: www.cumberlandlodge.ac.uk/migration
Or
email: janis@cumberlandlodge.ac.uk

 

Courses: Master of Arts in Migration and Displacement, University of the Witwatersrand

Master of Arts in Migration and Displacement
Applications are now invited

Who We Are

Based in the School of Social Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand, the African Centre for Migration & Society is an interdisciplinary, internationally engaged and Africa-based centre that shapes global discourse on human mobility and social transformation. The Centre’s research informs academic debates, policy discussions, government and international organisations’ practices, and civil society organisations’ advocacy. Our academics are widely published and engaged in a range of innovative partnerships for knowledge transfer and sharing. Our graduates are sought after by government, private companies, civil society, international organisations and academia.

What We Offer

Our MA in Migration & Displacement encompasses public health, political science, sociology, urban planning, development studies and other disciplines. With migration being an important and hotly-debated topic world-wide, the study of migration has wide-ranging academic and practical applications. Graduate students are equipped with a comprehensive conceptual framework and the practical skills necessary to understand, analyse and advise on the drivers, impacts and management of migration within academia, government and the NGO world. ACMS enrols a maximum of 20 students each year. The students are drawn from various academic backgrounds and are selected from South Africa and around the world. Students are encouraged to take part in the Centre’s research and outreach activities and have presented their work in conferences, meetings and academic forums. Limited tuition scholarships are granted each year and students can inquire with the Centre about research assistant positions and academic fellowships.

Apply Now:
Please visit www.wits.ac.za/prospective to apply online
teaching@migration.org.za | www.wits.ac.za/acms

Application Deadline:
31 August 2014 (international applicants)
30 September 2014 (SA applicants)

 

News Stories (Daily) 07/19/2014

  • “Thirty lifeless bodies found in the bow of a fishing boat carrying 600 migrants off the coast of Sicily have reignited the debate on illegal crossings in the Mediterranean and how the EU should respond. The Italian navy is facing an unprecedented flow of migrants across the sea, with the number intercepted in first half of 2014 already outnumbering those of the past year and at levels seen in 2011 during the Arab Spring.”

    tags:news

  • “The day began with an APPG on Migration meeting, attended by over 100 people, including affected families, thinktanks and parliamentarians from across the political parties. The meeting was chaired by Paul Blomfield MP and addressed by Conservative MP Andrew Percy, Katy Clark MP (Labour) and Lord Robin Teverson (Liberal Democrat), as well as conservative thinktank director Ryan Shorthouse (Bright Blue) and JCWI’s Saira Grant. The meeting saw compelling arguments for rethinking the family migration rules put forward by all sides, most thoughtfully from Bright Blue director Ryan Shorthouse. He offered up his views on why the current rules are simply incompatible with core Conservative values. Over the coming months we hope that these alternative critiques of the rules will be able to reach new audiences and build support for a change in the rules.”

    tags:news

  • “As the response to recent strike action on the part of public sector workers shows, it is not always easy to convince people of the need to protect the rights of all workers, British or migrant. It is particularly hard in the face of high-unemployment and a struggling economy when the argument is put that migrant workers are filling roles British workers could take.”

    tags:news

  • “The long-awaited judgment of the Court of Appeal in the case ‘MM’ on the matter of the lawfulness of the UK immigration rules setting income levels for the sponsorship of non-EEA family members was made public this morning.

    The Court ruled that the Secretary of State’s rules, though discriminatory in their effect, had a legitimate objective and were for this reason not unlawful.

    The immigration rule which was subject to the proceedings requires the British resident sponsor of a non-EEA spouse to demonstrate an income of at least £18,600 per annum in order that a visa be issued. In the event that a non-EEA national child is being sponsored a further £3,800 per annum income is required for the first child and £2,400 for each additional child after that. Provisions also exist for the sponsor to demonstrate a means to support through the savings of amounts indicated by the rules being available.”

    tags:news

  • “In a landmark ruling, the High Court has today found that the way the government operates the Detained Fast Track asylum system is unlawful. The judgment follows a legal challenge brought by charity Detention Action against the use of the Detained Fast Track System.

    The Detained Fast Track is a system of deciding asylum claims whilst the asylum-seeker is in detention. It is designed for asylum claims that are considered to be suitable for a quick decision. The fast track process was originally set up in 2002 in response to increased numbers of asylum applications. In 2002 there were 84,132 applications for asylum in the UK. In 2012 there were 21,875 such applications.”

    tags:news

  • “The Department of Health (DH) has today published its plans to recover costs for NHS treatment of visitors and migrants.

    The Visitor & Migrant NHS Cost Recovery Programme: Implementation plan 2014-16 sets out two approaches towards recovering the cost of treatment.

    The first of these is improving the ability of the NHS to recover the costs of healthcare provided to European Economic Area (EEA) patients (non-resident in the UK) from their home member state. This will be achieved through making greater use of European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) system as well as the S1 and S2 agreements. “

    tags:news

  • “The Migration Advisory Committee has today released a detailed examination of migrants in low-skilled jobs in the UK and their wider impacts. In 2013 there were 2.1 million foreign born workers in low-skilled jobs in the UK, one million of whom had come to the UK since 2004.

    Many of the findings of the MAC research echo those of prior investigations into low-paid migrant workers, including noting issues relating to labour conditions and the high number of migrants employed through agencies. The MAC finds that ‘the availability of migrant workers combined with the low level of labour market regulations has enabled some employers to maximize the advantages to them and, at the same time, allowed migrants to acquire a significant place in the UK labour market, particularly in low-skilled sectors’.”

    tags:news reports

  • “The European Migration Network (EMN), which works under the aegis of the Home Affairs Directorate of the European Commission, has published a study entitled Migrant access to social security and healthcare:policies and practice .

    The study notes that “Social security systems, including access to healthcare, constitute one of the most powerful tools to reduce poverty and inequality and promote social inclusion.”

    The provision of social security and healthcare systems depends on countries having active workforces acting to sustain growth in economies and generate taxation revenues to pay for support that is needed. In the ageing societies which are typical of Europe, these workforces emerge at least in part from the migration of workers across national frontiers.”

    tags:news reports

  • “In 2010 the British government announced that the outrage of child detention for immigration purposes was to end. Simultaneously, however, it commissioned the opening of a new family detention centre, CEDARS, which was to be run under novel governance arrangements by the Home Office, private security company G4S and the children’s charity Barnardo’s.”

    tags:news reports

  • “8 July 2014 – The UN organization dedicated to gender equality and the empowerment of women (UN Women), today announced that it has tapped British actress Emma Watson as Goodwill Ambassador.

    “We are thrilled and honoured to work with Emma, whom we believe embodies the values of UN Women” said Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka.

    Known for playing the leading role of “Hermione Granger” in the Harry Potter saga, Ms. Watson has been involved with the promotion of girls’ education for several years, and previously visited Bangladesh and Zambia as part of her humanitarian efforts. “

    tags:news

  • “Bradford East is currently held by Lib Dem MP David Ward, who on immigration issues has been an astute and committed campaigner, in particular, on family migration, a key issue impacting his constituents. An interesting and diverse constituency, Bradford East has a massive Asian community at almost 40% of the overall population, it is also a constituency with high home ownership rates (including mortgages), as well as an unusually young electorate.”

    tags:news

  • “Housing has become disproportionately expensive for most of London’s population, and this is reflected in the rental market. Supply is low, demand is high, and migrants face additional obstacles. Eastern Europeans form one of the largest migrant groups, yet they remain particularly vulnerable to the pitfalls of the rental sector. Solutions to help these migrants would also benefit the London population as a whole. “

    tags:news

  • “The All-Party Parliamentary Group on Migration and the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Refugees have today launched a cross-party inquiry into the use of immigration detention.

    The inquiry, which will be chaired by Liberal Democrat MP Sarah Teather, will examine the use of detention in the UK immigration and asylum systems, with a particular focus on the conditions within detention centres, the impact on individual detainees and their families, the wider financial and social consequences, how detention is used in other countries, and the future role of detention within the immigration system.”

    tags:news

  • “The Modern Slavery Bill will receive its second reading in the House of Commons this Tuesday.

    The Modern Slavery Bill was introduced into the House of Commons in June 2014, following its mention in the 2014 Queen’s Speech. It has been informed by the findings of a Joint Committee in April 2014 on a draft version of the bill, which also gathered evidence from a range of NGOs and legal experts.”

    tags:news

  • “A consortium led by MOSAIC Centre for Research on Multilingualism, University of Birmingham, is conducting research on multilingualism in superdiverse neighbourhoods.

    The 4-year research project, Translation and Translanguaging: Investigating Linguistic and Cultural Transformations in Superdiverse Wards in Four UK Cities, is a collaboration between four universities. The interdisciplinary research programme will develop new understandings of multilingual interaction in cities in the UK, and communicate these to policy-makers and communities locally, nationally, and internationally. The research project, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) runs from 2014 – 2018.

    Globalisation and changing patterns of migration mean that ‘superdiverse’ cities are increasingly populated by speakers of multiple languages.Researchers from University of Birmingham, Birkbeck (University of London), University of Leeds, and Cardiff University will generate new knowledge about communication in changing urban communities.”

    tags:news

  • This is part of a series of Annual Reports and Accounts, which presents the Government’s outturn and planned expenditure for 2013-14.”

    tags:news reports

  • Latest edition of Border Force bulletin includes operational updates, a news round-up and details of border technology and transformation, detections and seizures and partnership working.”

    tags:news reports

  • This version of the Immigration Rule has been replaced by the current Immigration Rules.”

    tags:news reports

  • “Read this guide if you are considering on making a visa application, or sponsoring an applicant if they want to work in the UK.

    You should read the guidance before you apply.”

    tags:news reports

  • “Asylum support policy bulletin about how UKVI applies section 55 of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 to the consideration of applications made for asylum support.”

    tags:news reports

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Calls for Papers: Human Migration and the Environment: Futures, Politics, Invention

Calls for Papers: Human Migration and the Environment: Futures, Politics, Invention.

Human Migration and the Environment: Futures, Politics, Invention

28 June – 1 July 2015
Durham University
Durham, United Kingdom

Confirmed Keynote Speakers

Professor David Held (Master of University College, Durham University)
Professor Wendy Brown (Class of 1936 First Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley)
Professor Claire Colebrook (Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of English, Pennsylvania State University)

Abstract

Human migration and the environment are two of the most pressing issues of our times. Migration is a defining attribute of the human condition, and yet all across the world negative attitudes towards migration are intensifying. Meanwhile, our natural environment is undergoing such profound transformation that the future habitability of Earth is regularly called into question. But what is stake when these two phenomena – human migration and environmental catastrophe – are articulated as a singular relation? In popular media, this relation is often said to be one of mass migration which culminates in religious or ethnic violence, whereas contemporary liberalism poses it as a problem of international cooperation or state managerialism. But how else might we conceive of this relation? Is it enough to understand it as a binary between alarmist rhetoric and managerial reason? Or does our of understanding of human migration and the environment require entirely new concepts? Are we to conceptualise migration in the context of climate change as a matter of in/justice, law and sovereignty? Or does it pose something more fundamental to the human condition? What does it mean when future environmental catastrophe conjugates with prejudice, inequality and difference? What ontological, epistemological and methodological challenges arise when environmental change and migration are characterised as a single relation? How are we to conceive of the Human, Nature, the State, the migrant and the citizen when human migration and environmental change are conjoined? What political, sociological, cultural and legal challenges does this relation pose? And what futures does it make possible? How should we conceive of migration in the Anthropocene?

By asking these and many other questions, this conference provides a multidisciplinary forum for scholars, policymakers, practitioners and artists to chart out the next generation of research on human migration and the environment. Whereas the first generation of research on environmental migration focussed squarely on problems of causation and on questions of law and policy, our starting point for the conference is that the relation between environment and migration is multidimensional, touching on all aspects of human and non-human life, including economy, social institutions, politics and culture, as well as bio- and geo-physical processes. The aim of the conference is to expand the debate on human migration and the environment beyond its current configuration as a problem of causation, law and policy towards a more pluralist debate that acknowledges the multidimensional nature of environmental change and migration. The conference should appeal to social scientists, humanities and legal scholars as well as to scientists committed to working with and within the social sciences, humanities and law.

Submission Deadlines

Paper session submission deadline: 31 October 2014
Paper submission deadline: 27 March 2015

Further Information

www.climatemigration.eu

Organising Committee

Dr Andrew Baldwin, Durham University
Dr Francois Gemenne, University of Liège / University of Versailles Saint-Quentin
Dr Dimitra Manou, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

Sponsors

COST Action IS1101 Climate change and migration: knowledge, law and policy, and theory. www.climatemigration.eu
Durham University

 

Courses: Distance learning Masters in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies (University of London)

UNIVERSITY OF LONDON LAUNCHES THE FIRST EVER DISTANCE LEARNING MASTERS IN REFUGEE STUDIES

The University of London International Programmes will shortly welcome its first cohort of students to the newly launched Masters in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies.

This is the first distance learning course of its kind and was developed by the Refugee Law Initiative, a University of London research centre for refugee law. The lead academics will draw on their wide practical expertise in delivering the programme.

The Programme Director, Dr David James Cantor said, “This is the first ever distance learning postgraduate course to be run on refugee and forced migration studies. The course has a very strong academic component that is informed by the world-leading expertise of those designing and teaching the modules. Unlike many other postgraduate programmes, however, this is complemented by a consistent focus on developing students’ vocational skills in a way that will readily enable them to work in this field.”

He added, “Distance learning will ensure that the course will be an affordable option for students in the developing world, as well as the developed world. They won’t have to pay international student fees, deal with the bureaucracy and cost of visas, air fares, accommodation, or give up professional or domestic commitments. In this way we are hoping to create a virtual meeting place for students from all parts of the globe. Distance learning also means that we can more easily enrol leading specialists and practitioners who will provide expert knowledge. In these ways, we intend to offer democratic access to the course and recruit students and experts from around the world.”

Dr Cantor believes the MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies will enable students not only to think constructively about related policy and law, but to develop actual policy recommendations.

He commented, “Having worked for the last 15 years in the refugee field, I can say that law and policy are the meat and bread of what we use to try to improve the humanitarian situation of refugees and other displaced persons. A critique of current laws and policies by itself can be useful, but of far less value than the positive recommendations that need to be generated.”

He added, “Working in this field is unusual, because one not only wears the hat of an academic – a student of humanity, as it were – but also there’s the imperative to try to use that knowledge to improve the situation of the subjects of one’s own research.”

The application deadline is 1 September 2014. To find out more or to apply, please visit www.londoninternational.ac.uk/refugee-migration.

For media enquiries:
Kyla Njoku
External Relations, University of London
Tel: +44 (0) 20 7862 8014
E: kyla.njoku

For more information about the course please contact:
Dr David James Cantor
Refugee Law Initiative School of Advanced Study, University of London
Tel: +44 (0) 20 7862 8827
E: david.cantor

Dr Sarah Singer
Refugee Law Initiative School of Advanced Study, University of London
Tel: +44 (0)20 7862 8571
E: sarah.singer

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Note: The material contained in this communication comes to you from the
Forced Migration Discussion List which is moderated by Forced Migration
Online, Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Oxford Department of International
Development, University of Oxford. It does not necessarily reflect the
views of the RSC or the University. If you re-print, copy, archive or
re-post this message please retain this disclaimer. Quotations or
extracts should include attribution to the original sources.

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A conference call for papers: Anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms and the question of Palestine/Israel

A conference call for papers: Anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms and the question of Palestine/Israel

*Please circulate widely*

A conference call for papers: Anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms and the question of Palestine/Israel

This conference seeks to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are being constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel. In particular it seeks to examine how the histories of Zionist settlement, anti-colonial and nation-building struggles and 20th century warfare in the Middle East region are being transformed in the current historical conjuncture. Of particular importance in this context will be ideological and political alliances that have emerged locally, regionally and globally around notions such as the ‘New Antisemitism’, ‘Islamophobia’ and how these relate to racialised discourses against Jews and Muslims. Drawing on the expertise of scholars and activists from a variety of backgrounds, the aim of the conference will be to serve as a step for building a transversal anti-racist political vision that will aim to destabilize some of the oppositional dichotomies which are currently hegemonic in discourses around Jews, Muslims and Middle East politics.

Location: SOAS
Date: 10 February 2015 (tbc)
Call for Paper Deadline: 30th September 2014

Sponsors: Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging (UEL), Centre for the study of Human Rights (LSE), The Runnymede Trust, Centre for Palestine Studies, London Middle East Institute (SOAS).

Confirmed plenary speakers (listed alphabetically):

Prof. Gilbert Achcar (SOAS)
Dr. Muhammad Idrees Ahmad (University for the Creative Arts)
Prof. Chetan Bhatt (LSE)
Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL)
Prof. Haim Bresheeth (SOAS)
Dr. John Bunzl (OIIP)
Prof. Robert Fine (Warwick)
Prof. Yosefa Loshitzky (SOAS)
Dr. Dina Matar (SOAS)
Yasmin Rehman (Cross government working group on hate crimes)
David Rosenberg (Jewish Socialists’ Group)
Prof. Nira Yuval-Davis (UEL)
Prof. Sami Zubaida (Birkbeck)

Conference schedule

9-9.30 Coffee and registration

9.30-10 Welcome by organizers

10-11.15 Plenary panel 1: The Role of the Palestine/Israel Question in Racialised Discourses on Jews

11.15-12.30 Parallel sessions

12.30-1.30 Lunch

1.30-2.45 Plenary panel 2: The Role of the Palestine/Israel Question in Racialised Discourses on Muslims

2.45-4 Parallel discussion workshops

4-4.30 Tea break

4.30-6 Plenary panel 3: The Interrelationships between Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racialised Discourses

6-6.30 Final session: The Way Forward

We invite abstracts (500 words max.) for 20 minute presentations for the parallel sessions that address any aspect of the issues outlined above. Please send all abstracts to Jamie Hakim at j.hakim. Please include a short biographical note when sending the e-mail.

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Events: First Global Forum on Statelessness (reminder – 75 days to go)

First Global Forum on Statelessness: 15-17 September
The Hague, Netherlands

Tilburg Law School

75 days to go until the First Global Forum on Statelessness

The countdown to the First Global Forum on Statelessness has now truly begun. There are just 75 days to go before this landmark event kicks off at the Peace Palace in the Hague!

Never before has there been a global conference on statelessness, addressing such a broad spectrum of topics and bringing together such a diverse group of people to share their knowledge and exchange ideas. We are very excited about the programme which is taking shape: over 100 people from around the world will share their research, policy or practical experience on a panel or with a poster presentation. Full details of the line-up of speakers and topics can be found online here.

The countdown to the Global Forum is also the countdown to the launch of the most ambitious campaign ever undertaken on statelessness: to end statelessness within the next decade. UNHCR is spearheading this campaign and will officially launch it on the opening day of the Global Forum by setting out what action is needed to reach this bold but important objective. We hope that the Global Forum will mark the beginning of new dialogue and partnerships that will endure in the years to come and enable real progress to be achieved on statelessness.

Be a part of this exciting event: register now for the First Global Forum on Statelessness! Visit the Global Forum website for details and to register online: https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/research/institutes-and-research-groups/statelessness/news/forum/

The First Global Forum on Statelessness is organized in cooperation with UNHCR.

The First Global Forum is sponsored by the Municipality of The Hague, the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Hungarian Ministry of Interior.

The Book of Abstracts will be sponsored by Wolf Legal Publishers.

Website: www.tilburguniversity.edu/statelessness2014
E-mail: statelessness2014
Phone: +31 (0)13 466 8388

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Note: The material contained in this communication comes to you from the
Forced Migration Discussion List which is moderated by Forced Migration
Online, Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Oxford Department of International
Development, University of Oxford. It does not necessarily reflect the
views of the RSC or the University. If you re-print, copy, archive or
re-post this message please retain this disclaimer. Quotations or
extracts should include attribution to the original sources.

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New publications: UNHCR Handbook on Protection Stateless Persons

UNHCR is pleased to announce the launch of the Handbook on Protection of Stateless Persons. The Handbook sets out guidance on interpretation and implementation of the provisions of the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons. The 1954 Convention establishes the definition of a “stateless person” and sets out minimum standards for the treatment of stateless persons.

Today, 82 States are party to the 1954 Convention, with 17 accessions in the past three years as a result of intense work by UNHCR and NGOs in a range of countries around the world. The stepped-up efforts have also led to a rise in the number of countries establishing statelessness determination procedures. Whilst such procedures may only be appropriate for the minority of the world’s stateless persons who are in a migratory situation, they are nevertheless critical, providing a route to a status consistent with the standards of both the 1954 Convention and international human rights law. On the other hand, a different approach is called for in the case of stateless persons who are in their own country. They need to be granted a nationality based on their strong connection to a State through, for example, birth or longstanding residence.

The content of this Handbook was first published in 2012 in the form of three UNHCR Guidelines: (1) on the Definition of a Stateless Person, (2) on Statelessness Determination Procedures and (3) on the Status of Stateless Persons. In replacing these Guidelines, the text of the Handbook replicates their content with only minimal changes, principally to address minor gaps identified since publication of the Guidelines and to update references to other UNHCR publications. The Handbook does not include guidance on prevention and reduction of statelessness; these are dealt with instead in separate Guidelines (Guidelines on Ensuring Every Child’s Right to Acquire a Nationality through Articles 1-4 of the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness and forthcoming Guidelines on loss and deprivation of nationality).

The Handbook is now available on Refworld: http://www.refworld.org/docid/53b676aa4.html. It will also be accompanied by a new advocacy brochure on statelessness determination procedures, which will also be published by the end of July and made available on Refworld (http://refworld.org/statelessness.html).

We encourage you to disseminate the Handbook widely.

UNHCR Statelessness Team

[Moderator's note: Please click the link below for the Guidelines on Ensuring Every Child's Right to Acquire a Nationality through Articles 1-4 of the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness: http://refworld.org/docid/50d460c72.html]

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Note: The material contained in this communication comes to you from the
Forced Migration Discussion List which is moderated by Forced Migration
Online, Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Oxford Department of International
Development, University of Oxford. It does not necessarily reflect the
views of the RSC or the University. If you re-print, copy, archive or
re-post this message please retain this disclaimer. Quotations or
extracts should include attribution to the original sources.

E-mail: fmlist
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Calls for Papers: Refugee Review: ‘Re-conceptualizing Refugees and Forced Migration in the 21st Century’

2014 CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Refugee Review: Re-conceptualizing Refugees and Forced Migration in the 21st Century

Deadline for Submissions: 1 September 2014

Submit to: refugeereview. Please send questions to the same address.

[Moderator's note: Please see all relevant links at the end of this email.]

Refugee Review and the New Scholars Network (NSN)

The New Scholars Network is pleased to announce a call for submissions for the second volume of the Refugee Review. The Refugee Review, a publication of the New Scholars Network, is an open-access, peer-reviewed e-journal that features a range of submission styles as contributed by scholars, practitioners, activists, and those working and studying within the field of forced migration. The Refugee Review platform, based at no particular institution and tied to no particular location, offers a unique publishing opportunity for those in the early stages of their work and careers, as well as for established scholars that support this mission. Those who submit can expect dialogue with the NSN’s e-journal team throughout the publishing process, and are encouraged to work with the NSN to strengthen and promote the e-journal in the spirit of open scholarship and collaboration.

2014 Call for Submissions

The traditional definition of the refugee or forced migrant, as a category in forced migration studies and refugee law, has been steadily evolving. Push-pull factors have diversified. Asylum may be granted or denied regionally according to varying protocols and lack thereof. Calls for protections and supports for those that seek asylum have been both heralded and questioned in response to forced migration situations that the 21st century has created and inherited.

The realization that complex and overlapping factors influence the shape of migration prompts this call for a discussion of the evolving ‘category’ of refugee from a range of knowledgeable perspectives. Those that seek solutions for displacement situations must understand the nature and context of each particular and interrelated situation in order to react appropriately, combining the agency of forced migrants, NGOs, governments, and other bodies.

As refugees continue to flow across boundaries and borders, they contend with conceptualizations that not only attempt to define their lived experience but also directly and continually redefine their legal status and rights. For this reason, this call places the ‘category’ of refugee at the centre of its conversation, in order to 1) discuss the ways in which the refugee experience has been and can be reconceptualized in both theory and practice, and 2) what changes such a reconceptualization can effect.

The following focal questions may inform submissions for this volume: In what ways can the refugee and forced migrant be reconceptualized based on contemporary lived experiences? What new parameters, if any, are being established in the broadening of the definition of the refugee or forced migrant, and to what end? Do contemporary policies and regional practices challenge the legal definition of Convention refugee status? Who is, and has been, entitled to define ‘the refugee,” and why? How do we define the contemporary ethics of response to varied forced migration situations-from societal violence to environmental degradation, from responses to extraterritorialization to enacting durable solutions? What is the role of refugees in demonstrating their experience and leading or contributing to new responses to forced migration situations? What is the role of researchers and practitioners in the same?

Submission Categories:

We recognize and value the multidisciplinary nature of forced migration studies, and therefore encourage submissions from across various disciplines-including but not limited to political science, law, anthropology, ethics and philosophy, sociology, economics, public health, and media studies. You may submit to any submission category listed below, regardless of where you locate your study or practice.

Please identify which submission category your piece is being submitted under. We encourage you to consider the range of submission styles available in this Call for Submissions during the development of your piece and structure/develop your submission accordingly.

Submissions will go through a peer-review process and those selected will go through a peer-editing process before publication. The editing team may, when deemed appropriate, move your piece so a different submission section (for example from the Academic Article section to the Opinion Piece section) if they feel it is better suited to another category.

Academic Articles:

The Academic Articles section provides a space for thorough scholarship and serves as a forum for authors to engage critically with practical and theoretical issues relating to forced migration. In the Academic Articles section we seek submissions that interrogate the existing literature on forced migration, present in-depth research in a given area or offer original insights into a situation or trend. Submissions to the Academic Articles must not exceed 6000 words (including footnotes, which should be kept to a minimum). Articles are required to use Chicago style endnotes.

Opinion Papers and Practitioner Reports:

Opinion Papers and Practitioner Reports may be contributions that reflect on personal experiences of displacement as well as and reports from non-governmental organization (NGO) and CBO staff. This section presents an opportunity for those directly affected by the policies, laws and activities of governments and the agencies we evaluate to express their insights and perspectives. This may take the form of a discussion of particular problem that has not been given due attention or commentary on government policies in a specific country, region or locale. We seek critical, balanced analyses that allow the reader to gain an understanding of the context in which the report is written and that engages with wider implications of the situation described. Articles for the Opinion and Report Section should be approximately 2000 words and no more than 5000 words. At present we are only able to accept written submissions in English.

Multimedia Submissions:

Multimedia submissions may include, but are not limited to: videos, photos, artwork and spoken word pieces. Accompanying the multimedia submission should be a short blurb of approximately 300 words about the author and the piece itself. PLEASE ENSURE YOU HAVE PERMISSION TO PHOTOGRAPH OR VIDEO THE SUBJECT(S) YOU SUBMIT. Please note that videos, audio recordings, and photos must be sent as an attachment in a zipped file not exceeding 25 MB. Videos may also be submitted as links if they are also hosted privately on Vimeo or YouTube.

Links:

New Scholars Network: http://newscholarsnetwork.wordpress.com/

Refugee Review: http://refugeereview.wordpress.com/page/2/

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Note: The material contained in this communication comes to you from the
Forced Migration Discussion List which is moderated by Forced Migration
Online, Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Oxford Department of International
Development, University of Oxford. It does not necessarily reflect the
views of the RSC or the University. If you re-print, copy, archive or
re-post this message please retain this disclaimer. Quotations or
extracts should include attribution to the original sources.

E-mail: fmlist
Posting guidelines: http://www.forcedmigration.org/research-resources/discussion/forced-migration-discussion-list-posting-guidelines
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New publications: ‘Displacement and dispossession through land grabbing in Mozambique: the limits of international and national legal instruments’ (RSC Working Paper 101)

Displacement and dispossession through land grabbing in Mozambique: the limits of international and national legal instruments
By Hannah Twomey
July 2014
http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/publications/displacement-and-dispossession-through-land-grabbing-in-mozambique-the-limits-of-international-and-national-legal-instruments

A debate exists regarding the limits of international law to influence state behaviour. Some attribute these limits to the inability of law to compel states to incorporate norms into domestic legal frameworks. Others maintain that even if institutionalised, the incapacity of states to put those norms into action is where the problem lies. In examining displacement and dispossession through land grabbing in Mozambique, the author investigates what limits the ability of international and national law to address displacement and dispossession. She argues that the limits of law to address displacement and dispossession are not due to a lack of institutionalising international good governance norms into domestic-level legal frameworks. Rather, the limits of law lie within the norm implementation process, wherein norms are conditioned by the local Mozambican governance context to serve domestic interests. As such, the other frequently cited reason of lack of state capacity is not to blame. The author explains the gap between law and practice by examining the role that a decentralised land governance structure has had upon shaping the norm implementation process. The evidence points to a state that devolves power over norm implementation to local actors, who frequently interpret them to their advantage. This co-option cannot be attributed to a lack of state capacity, as the material benefits the state accrues in the process point to a state that is disinterested in seeing the norms implemented and has devised decentralisation as a strategic governance strategy to accumulate these benefits.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Note: The material contained in this communication comes to you from the
Forced Migration Discussion List which is moderated by Forced Migration
Online, Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Oxford Department of International
Development, University of Oxford. It does not necessarily reflect the
views of the RSC or the University. If you re-print, copy, archive or
re-post this message please retain this disclaimer. Quotations or
extracts should include attribution to the original sources.

E-mail: fmlist
Posting guidelines: http://www.forcedmigration.org/research-resources/discussion/forced-migration-discussion-list-posting-guidelines
Subscribe/unsubscribe
: http://tinyurl.com/fmlist-join-leave
List Archives: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/forced-migration.html
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Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/refugeestudies
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/refugeestudiescentre

Sending essential supplies to South Sudanese refugees

Originally posted on Voices from the Field:

A child arrives at Kakuma. Photo courtesy of Lutheran World Federation.

A child arrives at Kakuma. Photo courtesy of Lutheran World Federation.

Our Road to Kakuma shipment will soon be on its way, thanks to the support of Canadian Lutherans across the country. See below for a media release about the shipment’s departure:

Volunteers and staff members from Canadian Lutheran World Relief (CLWR) are sending supplies to refugees in Kenya’s Kakuma refugee camp.

The shipping container will be loaded Wednesday, July 16, from 8 a.m. to approximately 2 p.m. at 549 King Edward Street (CLWR’s Winnipeg warehouse).

The supplies are urgently needed. South Sudan’s crisis is swelling refugee camps like Kakuma beyond their normal capacity, and humanitarian agencies are struggling to provide services to everyone. The crisis has put nearly five million people in desperate need of aid.

“The people I met in Kakuma have gone through so much, and they continue to struggle,” says Heather Pryse, project officer for CLWR…

View original 166 more words

Tamil asylum seekers being held at sea in windowless locked rooms

Originally posted on Hazara Asylum Seekers:

July 16, 2014

The lower deck of the Australian Customs vessel Ocean Protector, where asylum seekers are held.
The lower deck of the Australian Customs vessel Ocean Protector, where asylum seekers are held. Photograph: Supplied

More than 150 Tamil asylum seekers on board an Australian border protection vessel are being detained in windowless locked rooms with men kept apart from their families against their will, newly released high court documents have revealed.

A statement of claim document submitted to the court by lawyers acting for 86 of the 153 asylum seekers also reveals that they have had no opportunity to deliver their protection claims – despite all claiming to be refugees – and had no access to a qualified translator despite almost all being unable to speak English.

The document shows that lawyers will challenge the legality of the detentions on the vessel, which Guardian Australia understands to be the customs ship Ocean Protector.

Lawyers will also argue that any decision to move the asylum…

View original 320 more words

The paradox beneath Strasbourg’s French veil ban decision

Originally posted on UK Human Rights Blog:

french-veil-ban-001S.A.S v France (Application no. 43835/11) – read judgment

The Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights has rejected a challenge to a French law which prohibits the wearing of veils in public. The ruling is, of course, of great political and media interest, but it is also significant from a legal perspective. In a lengthy and detailed judgment, the Court ultimately accepts that, as a matter of principle, a government can legitimately interfere with the rights of individuals in pursuit of social and cultural cohesion.

On 11th April 2011, Law no. 2010-1192 came into force in the French Republic. Subject to certain limited exceptions, the law prohibits anyone from wearing any clothing which conceals their face when in public places, on pain of a 150 euro fine, and/or compulsory citizenship classes. Whilst phrased in general terms, the most obvious effect of the law, and its clear…

View original 1,531 more words

“Whoever wants me will find me here. This is my home now”

Originally posted on Refugees International Japan Blog:

I came across this delightful article which narrates the blossoming hope within a refugee camp. Here at Zaatari camp, refugees are regaining control of their lives as they are stimulating their camp into a place like ‘home’.

http://www.trust.org/item/20140714184514-crdrn/source=search&utm_source=MailingList&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Weekly+16+July+2014

Zaatari refugee camp – Photo by Mohammad Hannon/APmp (Guardian Website)

This article was exciting for me as it reasserts the fact that refugees are the same group of people as us who desire to live normal lives. As Rifai (one of the refugees in Zaatari camp) says, despite the tough and unusual circumstances they are forced to live in, the refugees are able to rebuild their lives. 

By organising their own volunteer group among the camp’s youth, they are able to help the most vulnerable refugees and have also constructed equipped schools, supermarkets and playgrounds. This clearly shows that they have created a stronger and sustainable community which doesn’t have to rely…

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Rwandan Genocide: Our campaign marking 20 years since the genocide comes to an end

Originally posted on World Without Torture:

banner-website-rwanda-no-button-748

Over the past 100 days we have been marking one of the biggest, most damaging humanitarian atrocities in history – the 1994 Rwandan Genocide. Through the testimonies of ten brave women, we helped fulfil their goal — that their stories not only reach other women who are victims of rape but also the perpetrators.

They hoped that the men who have caused them and others so much pain may, through reading the stories, come to understand what their past actions have caused in terms of suffering among the women they violated.

In the space of 100 days over one-million civilians were tortured, raped and murdered in one of the largest examples of ethnic cleansing the world has ever seen as Hutus repeatedly and mercilessly attacked the Tutsi population following the death of Rwandan President Juvénal Habyarimana, himself a Hutu.

Special thanks to artist Yildiz Arslan who has supported us throughout this campaign Special thanks to artist Yildiz Arslan who has supported us throughout…

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Guest Post: The effect of negative labelling – Why are we still talking about ‘migrants’?

Originally posted on MIGRANTS AT SEA:

By Dr Melissa Phillips

As the number of people arriving by boat to Europe continues to rise, so does the rhetoric about an influx of ‘illegal migrants’, ‘boat migrants’ , ‘migrant boats’ and just plain ‘illegals’. Academics have long written about the impact of press reporting on asylum issues and the effect of labelling on refugees and asylum seekers.(1) Their findings show the way predominantly negative labels are repeated and entrenched having a detrimental consequence for how we understand asylum issues and perceive asylum seekers. Perhaps the most pernicious of these labels has been ‘illegal’ which human rights groups, refugee advocates and media organisations have been campaigning against as inaccurate and legally incorrect.(2)

More recently commentators have been at pains to distinguish between groups of migrants and refugees arriving in Europe by boat, noting that there are technical legal arguments to guide terminology as well as familiar tropes that we…

View original 616 more words

Whose sea? Mare Nostrum and the politics of migration in the Med

Originally posted on Postcards from ...:

By Nando Sigona, University of Birmingham

Cemetery of migrant boats in Capo Passero, Sicily. Photo by Nando Sigona

Cemetery of migrant boats in Capo Passero, Sicily. Photo by Nando Sigona

Thirty lifeless bodies found in the bow of a fishing boat carrying 600 migrants off the coast of Sicily have reignited the debate on illegal crossings in the Mediterranean and how the EU should respond. The Italian navy is facing an unprecedented flow of migrants across the sea, with the number intercepted in first half of 2014 already outnumbering those of the past year and at levels seen in 2011 during the Arab Spring.

To offset the moral panic that pervades this debate, it would be useful for everyone involved to remember that the high number of interceptions is not per se an indicator of an increasing number of illegal crossings and even less and indication of the number of irregular migrants in the EU. While a correlation can’t be…

View original 780 more words

New Journal Articles (weekly)

  • “This article examines the underlying intentions that guided the authors of Article 33, better known as the non-refoulement principle, of the 1951 Refugee Convention, from February 1950 until the signing of the Final Act in July 1951. I begin by explaining the diplomatic context within which the non-refoulement principle was inscribed into the text of the Convention, following the schism between the two opposing groups of member states present at the drafting table. Based on unpublished material from Israeli and UK archives, I then study four specific aspects of the drafting of the non-refoulement article. The first issue concerns the geographical scope of non-refoulement regarding refugees on the high seas. The second concerns the addition to non-refoulement in the first paragraph of Article 33 of the category of ‘a particular social group or political opinion’, in direct contemporary reference to political refugees from the Soviet bloc. The third issue studied here is the development of the text of paragraph 2 of Article 33, one of the major conditions restricting protective measures for refugees. This study uncovers how this paragraph was drafted, where it was initially intended to fit within the Convention text, and how it eventually became a qualifying condition for Article 33. Fourthly, this article considers the embedded meaning of the term ‘national security’ as it was inserted into Article 33 by the UK representatives who drafted it. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “School social workers and other school personnel can find meeting the educational and social needs of immigrant children a challenge, particularly if these children are also experiencing poverty and other educational barriers, including limited English language proficiency. Quality after-school programming has been associated with a variety of positive effects such as increased educational attainment and positive social and emotional development and could, therefore, prove significant in the lives of immigrant children. Yet, immigrant children participate less. The purpose of this article is to discuss ways in which school social workers can increase enrollment in after-school programming among immigrant children, six to 12 years of age, by becoming both advocates for children and families and leaders in developing and maintaining these services. School social workers are poised to play a number of roles related to practice, administration, research, and policy. Because this particular age group of children begins to look beyond the family for guidance and support, middle childhood is an opportune time for school social workers to work toward involving children in positive after-school experiences. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Events: Refugee Testimonies Workshop at Clark University September 19-21, 2014

Refugee Testimonies Workshop at Clark University September 19-21, 2014

The International Development, Community and Environment Department at Clark University is offering a three-day workshop entitled, Witnessing: Taking testimonies and constructing refugee narratives. Taught by Leora Kahn, Executive Director of PROOF: Media for Social Change, the workshop is geared towards professionals who work with refugees and other displaced people.

Workshop Description

Testimonies have different purposes. They can be used for refugee status determination (RSD), in journalistic accounts, for testimony in an international court, for policy research and academic articles, to teach, or to preserve history. Testimonies have also helped stimulate and shape social change, and can be an effective tool for policy change and social transformation.

This three-day, hands-on workshop will introduce methods and ethics of testimony-taking and will examine the uses and importance of refugee testimonies. Participants will learn to take testimonies and construct narratives through different techniques, and will become familiar with techniques of visual story-telling for advocacy and other purposes. The workshop will bring together refugee service professionals, community leaders, field practitioners in local and international agencies, representatives of government entities and academics in a collaborative environment. We will explore ethical questions in taking testimonies to illuminate human rights issues. During this workshop participants will actively practice taking testimonies based on the topics and methods discussed in each class. The workshop also includes a field trip to an oral history exhibit based on refugee testimony, and coincides with the opening of the exhibit, Picturing Moral Courage: The Rescuers at Clark University. Topics and examples will include: oral history projects with refugees from Bhutan, testimony from Syrian asylum seekers in Europe, and visual narratives from Guatemala, among others.

About the Workshop Convener

Leora Kahn is the founder and Executive Director of PROOF: Media for Social Justice, an award-winning organization that brings together photographers, documentarians, academics and activists to create visual documentary projects that become sustainable educational tools in regions riven by recent armed conflict and atrocities. Leora was previously the director of photography at Workman Publishing and at Corbis. She has also worked for Time, The New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, The New Yorker, and US News and World Report as well as for the Ford and Annie E. Casey Foundations. She has curated exhibitions for the Ford Foundation, ABC Television, Amnesty International, Women’s Refugee Commission, and the Holocaust Museum in Houston, and has held visiting appointments at the Genocide Studies Center at Yale University, where she conducted research on rescuers and rescuing behavior, and at Clark University’s Holocaust and Genocide Center.

Eligibility

This non-credit workshop is open to practitioners, researchers, and students in the field of refugees, displacement, and forced migration. The workshop will be limited to a maximum of 20 participants. The language of this workshop is English; we are unfortunately unable to offer translation services.

Venue

The workshop will be held in the beautiful Rose Library at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts. Map: http://goo.gl/maps/usfe2

Fees

Tuition for the workshop is US$550, which includes course material, lunch and coffee breaks on all three days, field trip to Boston, and the Picturing Moral Courage exhibit reception.

Scholarships

There are two available tuition-only scholarships for participants from refugee backgrounds. Please contact the workshop administrator for an application form.

Application Process

To apply for the workshop, please email a cover letter and a recent CV to workshop administrator Danielle Strandson (dstrandson@clarku.edu) by the deadline of August 20, 2014. A deposit of $150 is due by August 31. Please note that the deposit is non-refundable. More information on payment method will be provided to accepted participants. A list of recommended accommodations will be sent to all accepted participants.

 

 

New Journal Articles (weekly)

  • “The 2010 reform of the legal regime regulating Palestinians’ access to the labour market in Lebanon ignited a heated debate among Lebanese, Palestinians, and international political actors. This article analyses the advocacy initiatives preceding the reform to answer the following question: what signifiers of Palestinian-ness have Palestinian political entrepreneurs mobilised? In a nutshell, it shows how a group of non-governmental organizations working with Palestinian refugees in Lebanon re-shaped the references to “Return” and “Dignity” in order to create an intellectual environment favourable to their demands for legal reform. However, these two signifiers not only concern the issue of the work-related rights of Lebanon’s Palestinians, but they also envisage a specific form of emplacement of the Palestinian community in that country. From this perspective, they are the constitutive elements of a “diasporic project” of emplacement in which Palestinians collectively exist in an in-between (imagined) space situated somewhere between their host society and their homeland. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “How do return migrants’ experiences of legality abroad influence their attitudes and practices toward the law in their country of origin? Theoretically, I advance an argument that return migrants’ legal consciousness could be considered a form of social remittance. However, in response to valid criticisms of the concept, I innovate upon it in three ways. First, I give the social remittances a narrower focus by empirically examining the values, attitudes and practices of legality, both positive and negative. Secondly, to ensure that the social remittances could indeed be traced to migration-related transfers, I base my analysis on in-depth interviews with return migrants and family members of Ukrainian migrants regarding their personal experiences of legality abroad and ‘at home’. I thereby reveal the nuances and subtle differences in the collective ‘Ukrainian’ legal consciousness beyond the ‘national mainstream’: where return migrants’ fatalism about law’s potential for upholding justice coexists with a sense of agency about capacity to achieve change outside the formal state law. Thirdly, I posit that legal consciousness not only reflects how certain socio-legal practices flow across borders, but also the ways in which the migrants themselves (and their families) innovate upon and interpret such ‘remittances’ in different ways. The results elaborate upon Levitt’s and Lamba-Nieves’ (2010) observations that social remittances work in both directions and are thus shaped not only by people’s experiences prior to migration and in their respective host countries, but are also adapted to the conditions they encounter upon their return. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In this article it is argued that ‘the journey’—as an embodied form of travel from one place to the other—is a fruitful analytical starting point to bring migration and tourism studies in closer dialogue with each other. With our focus on the ‘en route’ behaviour and experiences of two prototypical mobile figures (the transient migrant and the backpacker), we go beyond the usual categorical divisions of human mobility based on temporality (temporary tourists vs. long-term migrants) and politicization (welcomed tourists vs. unwanted migrants). With our empirical findings on migrants’ journeys and our analysis of published articles in tourism studies, we identify three aspects (personal transformation, social networking and risk taking) along which we conceptually mirror and merge the embodied journeys of the prototypical travellers. The analysis identifies relevant commonalities of different mobility processes and illustrates that individuals on the move easily jump over the categorical divide of migrants/tourists across time and space. We finally use these insights to contribute further to a mobility-driven research agenda in migration studies. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article provides a simple framework for studying migrants’ incentives to acquire country-specific skills and proposes an optimal immigration policy from the host country’s point of view. The article focuses on the optimal cultural composition of migrants. It shows that as long as the integration costs are not too asymmetric among migrants of different countries of origin, cultural heterogeneity is beneficial to the host economy. To some extent, the model explains why immigration policies have changed over time and why they still differ across countries. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Wiener Library Event: The Forgiveness Project: A discussion about forgiveness, reconciliation and conflict resolution

The Wiener Library is the world’s oldest Holocaust archive and Britain’s largest collection on the Nazi era. The Wiener Library hosts an annual programme of free events and exhibitions.

Source: www.wienerlibrary.co.uk

The Forgiveness Project: A discussion about forgiveness, reconciliation and conflict resolution.Tue 24 Jun 2014

Time: 11.30am – 12.30pm

The Wiener Library is delighted to welcome Marina Cantacuzino to speak about the charity she founded called The Forgiveness Project. Marina began an initiative in 2003 in response to the imminent invasion of Iraq. She embarked on a personal project collecting stories of people who had lived through violence, tragedy or injustice and sought forgiveness/reconciliation rather than revenge. The resulting exhibition ‘The F Word’ led to Marina founding a charity called The Forgiveness Project. Crucial to the ethos of The Forgiveness Project is that it explores rather than propagates forgiveness and reflects the stories of real people rather than the opinions of experts. The charity has no political or religious affiliations.

 

Marina will be speaking about her own experiences and motivations behind The Forgiveness Project. The talk will be followed by a discussion with Marina about forgiveness, reconciliation and conflict resolution.

http://theforgivenessproject.com/

 

All visitors are invited to attend an optional behind-the-scenes tour of the Wiener Library’s exhibition and archives after the talk at 1pm.

Tea, coffee and biscuits provided.

 

Free but booking required due to limited places.

From ICMC: On World Refugee Day, ICMC Deployee, Magnolia Turbidy talks about possible durable solutions for Syrian Refugees

News story from the International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC), in Geneva, Switzerland documenting a recently recently published an interview with our Deployee, Magnolia Turbidy, on processing Syrians for the Humanitarian Admissions Programme (HAP) in Jordan:

On World Refugee Day, ICMC Deployee, Magnolia Turbidy talks about possible durable solutions for Syrian Refugees.

Copyright: ICMC.

GENEVA, 20 June 2014 (ICMC) - World Refugee Day on 20 June draws attention to the plight of over 51 million refugees worldwide. But rather than simply observe this important day, the international community must ask itself what are the concrete action steps?

As an international community we must assist refugees to find a durable solution to their plight. A durable solution can be the refugee’s integration into the host community, return to the country of origin, or resettlement in a third country. When the first two solutions are not attainable, resettlement can respond to the protection needs of the most vulnerable refugees. Yet for this to become a reality, resettlement requires the cooperation of multiple actors including international organizations, national governments, civil society organizations, and local authorities.

Under a joint agreement between ICMC and HIAS, ICMC deployed Magnolia Turbidy to UNHCR in Amman as a resettlement caseworker, referring Syrian refugees for the new Humanitarian Admissions Programme (HAP). During her interview with ICMC, Magnolia describes HAP, which enables Syrian refugees to be processed under a unique and expedited model of admission to some European countries.

Only Austria, Germany, the UK, and France have started accepting Syrian HAP cases. With the number of Syrian refugee numbers expected to escalate to four million by the end of 2014, more and more refugees will be in need of special programmes, such as HAP, as well as traditional resettlement.

For the full article, please visit the ICMC website at:  On World Refugee Day, ICMC Deployee, Magnolia Turbidy talks about possible durable solutions for Syrian Refugees.

Manus island Iraqi asylum seekers continue protests; IOM contradicts Minister – Iraq is unsafe : Refugee Action Coalition

Source: www.refugeeaction.org.au

Up to 25 Iraqi asylum seekers in Delta Compound in the Manus Island detention centre are maintaining their protest for “Freedom.”

The Iraqis who began their peaceful protest last week have been maintaining a 24 hour-protest, since Friday 20 June, sleeping outside on the grass near the gate to the compound.

 

The Iraqis’ protest began as full-blown sectarian conflict engulfed most of Iraq and following comments from Scott Morrison that the Australian government would continue to forcibly deport Iraqis to the war zone, and would not progress protection claims by Iraqis on Manus or in Australia.

 

But IOM (International Organisation of Migration) has directly contradicted Morrison’s stance and says it will not facilitate any removals of Iraqis.

 

IOM told a handful of Iraqis on Manus Island who asked about possible voluntary returns that Iraq is too dangerous and the IOM and Iraqis will not be sent from Manus to Iraq.

 

“The IOM’s stance makes a mockery of Scott Morrison’s position. His position is completely untenable,” said Ian Rintoul, spokesperson for the Refugee Action Coalition, “The Iraqis are now in the same position as the Syrian asylum seekers; trapped between the danger of war in their home country and the menace and impasse of Manus Island.

 

“It is imperative that the Iraqi asylum seekers on Manus (and Nauru) be brought are brought to Australia, and that those in the Australian community be given the protection they need.”

 

There are over 100 Iraqi asylum seekers on Manus Island, most held for almost a year without processing. Last Friday (20 June), there had been Iraqi protests in two compounds on Manus Island. However, the situation regarding protests in the other compounds was not known as of Monday (23 June) morning.

 

For more information contact Ian Rintoul 0417 275 713

Wars make over fifty million refugees

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:

This video is called More Than 50 Million Refugees Worldwide, Half Of Them Children.

By Patrick Martin:

Impact of war and persecution

More than 50 million displaced persons worldwide

21 June 2014

The total number of people displaced from their homes by war and political persecution now exceeds 50 million, the highest number since World War II, according to a report issued Friday. The report was released by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

The overall total of 51.2 million displaced people includes 16.7 million refugees, 33.3 million displaced inside their country of origin, and 1.2 million seeking asylum.

The report notes that if these 51.2 million were a separate nation, it would rank 26th in the world in population, just behind South Africa and ahead of South Korea. Half of all these displaced persons are children.

Some 10.7 million people were newly displaced in…

View original 638 more words

Conference: “Using Human Security as a legal framework to analyse the Common European Asylum System”, CLEER, T.M.C. Asser Instituut, The Hague, 4 July

Originally posted on MIGRANTS AT SEA:

The Centre for the Law of EU External Relations (CLEER) will hold conduct the following conference on 4 July in the Hague: ‘Using Human Security as a legal framework to analyse the Common European Asylum System.’ The event is free of charge, however registration is required. Please register here.

From the conference web page:  “The conference is the second event of CLEER’s project ‘Human Security: a new framework for enhanced human rights in the EU’s foreign security and migration policies’, implemented with the support of the Lifelong Learning Programme (LLP) of the European Union.

The project runs from 1 September 2013 until 31 August 2014 and aims at facilitating academic interaction in closely interrelated areas of EU external conduct, creating synergies between and raising awareness of global security concerns. The project will, specifically, integrate elements of EU external action in security, development and migration policies, through the paradigm of…

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UK Government News Releases (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Newly Published Books on Refugee and Forced Migration Related Issues (weekly)

  • Why, despite massive public concern, is child trafficking on the rise? Why are unaccompanied migrant children living on the streets and routinely threatened with deportation to their countries of origin? Why do so many young refugees of war-ravaged and failed states end up warehoused in camps, victimized by the sex trade, or enlisted as child soldiers? This book provides the first comprehensive account of the widespread but neglected global phenomenon of child migration, exploring the complex challenges facing children and adolescents who move to join their families, those who are moved to be exploited, and those who move simply to survive.

    Spanning several continents and drawing on the actual stories of young migrants, the book shows how difficult it is for children to reunite with parents who left them behind to seek work abroad. It looks at the often-insurmountable obstacles we place in the paths of adolescents fleeing war, exploitation, or destitution; the contradictory elements in our approach to international adoption; and the limited support we give to young people brutalized as child soldiers. Part history, part in-depth legal and political analysis, this powerful book challenges the prevailing wisdom that widespread protection failures are caused by our lack of awareness of the problems these children face, arguing instead that our societies have a deep-seated ambivalence to migrant children–one we need to address head-on.

    Child Migration and Human Rights in a Global Age offers a road map for doing just that, and makes a compelling and courageous case for an international ethics of children’s human rights.”

    tags:books

  • tags:books

  • “Imagine if the government one day ordered you and your neighbours to tear down your houses to make way for ‘progress’. You are all forced to leave behind your jobs, houses, and ways of life. This has already happened to millions of people in India, and it will happen to many more.

    Lat Does Not Exist is the story of one village in Chhattisgarh, called Lat, which was torn apart to make way for a pit mine meant to produce coal to fuel India’s growing economy. It consists primarily of the transcripts of 19 interviews, in which residents tell their own stories, in their own ways, at length.

    A series of portraits and photo essays completes the glimpse this book provides into the lives of those Lat residents still bitterly hanging onto their homes in a fragment of the village remaining just metres from the edge of the coal pit, as well those former residents who have already relocated.

    Co-editor Sam Tranum conceived this book while writing another: Powerless: India’s Energy Shortage and Its Impact. Researching the intersection of energy production and displacement, he searched for a book that would give unmediated, first-hand accounts of what it was like to be displaced. Unable to find it, he set out with Lois Kapila and Nikhil Roshan to produce it.

    It is coal from pits like the one featured in this book that is fueling the economic growth of urban north-western India. It is people like the ones who tell their stories through Lat Does Not Exist who are paying the price of keeping Mumbai glittering, and ensuring the lights stay on in Delhi’s halls of power.”

    tags:books

  • “Undocumented migration is a huge global phenomenon, yet little is known about the reality of life for those involved. Sans Papiers combines a contemporary account of the theoretical and policy debates with an in-depth exploration of the lived experiences of undocumented migrants in the UK from Zimbabwe, China, Brazil, Ukraine and Turkish Kurdistan.

    Built around their voices, the book provides a unique understanding of migratory processes, gendered experiences and migrant aspirations. Moving between the uniqueness of individual experience and the search for commonalities, the book explores the ambiguities and contradictions of being an undocumented migrant.

    With its insights into personal experiences alongside analysis of wider policy issues, Sans Papiers will have wide appeal for students, academics, policy-makers and practitioners.”

    tags:books

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Research and Publications (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

News Stories (weekly)

  • “Thank you for that introduction. And thank you to Comic Relief for organising this event.

    It’s nearly 30 years since Comic Relief was launched live on Noel Edmonds’ ‘Late, Late Breakfast Show’ from a refugee camp in Sudan. It hardly needs saying, that you have gone on to do the most incredible, life-changing work across Africa, aided by the enormous generosity of the British public.

    This government is a proud supporter of Comic Relief and the work you do. That’s why since 2011 my Department has matched some £52million of public donations to Comic’s Relief appeals, doubling the amount that some fantastic causes are receiving from the public. “

    tags:news government

  • “UK Visas and Immigration modernised guidance about how it decides applications for those who wish to enter or remain in the UK as a Tier 2 migrant.

    tags:news reports government

  • “13 June 2014 – A group of United Nations independent experts on slavery, migrants, trafficking, sale and sexual exploitation of children, and internally displaced persons today welcomed this week’s adoption of a legally binding international Protocol to tackle forced labour worldwide and end what they call ‘modern slavery.’

    The agreement agreement, adopted on Wednesday by the annual conference of the UN International Labour Organization (ILO), is an additional protocol to ILO Convention 29 on forced labour from 1930.

    According to the experts, it addresses existing gaps and strengthens the body of instruments on forced labour, including child labour, trafficking in persons, slavery and slavery-like practices and related human rights violations. “

    tags:news

  • “Officers from Border Force, the National Crime Agency (NCA), and Home Office Immigration Enforcement have taken part in a major European operation to tackle human trafficking from West Africa.

    The operation, which took place on Wednesday 11 June, focused on a number of inbound flights to Heathrow Airport, a major European transit hub for West African flights, with the aim of detecting potential victims and gaining intelligence on the organised crime groups involved in trafficking for the purpose of sexual exploitation.”

    tags:news

  • “In February, the full names, nationalities, locations, arrival dates, and boat arrival information of nearly 10,000 asylum seekers housed both on the Australian mainland and Christmas Island was accidentally published online by the department, and was only removed after alerted to the breach by The Guardian.

    Around 90 of the asylum seekers lodged cases in the Federal Court against the department claiming that the breach exposed them to persecution in their home countries, and therefore they were entitled to automatic protection. A number of those claims have so far been dismissed.

    In a report from KPMG’s investigation into the breach published (PDF) by the department this week, it was revealed that the Immigration Detention and Community Statistics Summary Word document was published on the department’s website in early February, and was accessed 123 times from 104 IP addresses before being pulled down.”

    tags:news

  • “Politicians have contributed to a rise in anti-immigrant sentiment because of a widening “disconnect” between the “liberal political class” and public opinion, the UK’s most authoritative barometer of public opinion suggests.

    Almost half the population now believes that a decade of mass migration has not only harmed the economy but undermined “British culture”, the annual British Social Attitudes survey shows. “

    tags:news

  • “This guidance explains how UK Visas and Immigration considers asylum, human rights claims or further submissions from EEA, EU and Swiss nationals.”

    tags:news reports government

  • “Conflict today is less often inter-state, and more predominantly internal, asymmetric, multi-layered. It is driven by a wide range of factors, some of the most recurrent being: economic and political exclusion, which denies a free future to all; corrupt or venal state institutions that curtail or abuse fundamental rights and freedoms; untrustworthy or inept security apparatuses that favour one or other segment of society.”

    tags:news

  • “The Post 2015 development agenda is a historic opportunity to tackle the causes, not only the symptoms, of poverty – building economies and societies which underpin fair and inclusive growth and accountable and responsive institutions. It also provides us with a unique chance to formulate a universal agenda – one that is relevant to all and that demonstrates the role we must all play in order to achieve poverty eradication in a sustainable way.”

    tags:news

  • “We remain deeply concerned about the security situation and growing humanitarian crisis in South Sudan. The agreement reached by the parties on 9 May seeks to end months of fighting, in which atrocities have been committed by both sides. Although the fighting on the ground has diminished, the ceasefire remains fragile. Regional leaders, led by Prime Minister Hailemariam of Ethiopia, have made clear that they will not stand by while South Sudan descends further into conflict. We continue fully to support regional efforts to broker inclusive and substantive peace talks leading towards a lasting political settlement.”

    tags:news

  • “The overwhelming majority of perpetrators of sexual violence in conflict are not held to account for the crimes they commit. This has led to a global culture of impunity for warzone rape.

    The new International Protocol, the first of its kind, aims to set an international standard for how to investigate and document sexual violence, as a way of increasing the number of prosecutions for these crimes worldwide and ensuring that victims are cared for.”

    tags:news

  • “The Charity Commission, the independent regulator of charities in England and Wales, has opened a statutory inquiry into My Community UK (registered charity number 1137137).

    The charity is based in Manchester and its objects include ‘to relieve poverty, advance education and promote good health of individuals in need’.

    Concerns were raised with the commission in December 2012 that the trustees were failing to properly manage conflicts of interest and that people closely connected to the trustees were obtaining unauthorised private benefits.”

    tags:news

  • “Across Europe, one in three voters chose protest parties and anti-establishment candidates in last month’s European Parliament elections.

    Populists did well in both creditor and debtor countries, showing that protest parties are thriving even where economic conditions are not so bad. Many of them straddle the old left/right political divide. In her criticism of the euro, for example, Front National leader Marine Le Pen sounds remarkably like French far-left leader Jean-Luc Mélenchon. But her anti-migrant and anti-Muslim stances are traditional of the far right.”

    tags:news

  • “Guidance and information on families and children for officers dealing with enforcement immigration matters within the UK.”

    tags:government news reports

  • “The Members of the Troika welcome the National Congress Party’s stated intent to undertake a process of national dialogue in Sudan. We have long shared the view of many Sudanese that a sustainable peace and a prosperous Sudan can only be achieved through a fundamental review—and reform—of national governance systems that concentrate power at the center and marginalize the regions. “

    tags:news

  • “All new settlement applications made in Bangladesh from Sunday 15 June 2014 onwards will be processed outside Bangladesh. To facilitate this process, if you apply in Bangladesh you must provide a full copy of any original passports submitted, including all pages of the passport, with your application. Your original passport will stay in Bangladesh and the copy will be sent to the decision making centre outside Bangladesh with your application form. This is a change in process only. There will be no difference to our customer service standards and your application will still be processed within the current standards for settlement applications made outside the UK. For further information on our visa services click here.”

    tags:news

  • “A few weeks ago, we were contacted by a lady called Margaret, who lives in South Wales. Margaret has worked for the past decade as a legal secretary for a private solicitors firm, earning £13,500 a year. However, her salary is not considered adequate in order to sponsor her Tunisian husband to enter the UK, and so they are living apart for the foreseeable future.”

    tags:news reports

  • “The briefings and counter briefings as well as Paddy Ashdown’s intervention the last fortnight suggested internal disharmony amongst the Coalition parties over the proposals to introduce a new Immigration Bill. The new bill would have sought powers to reduce the right of freedom of movement of nationals from new European Union accession states.

    Primary legislation of this kind would have been on a collision course with EU laws and governance but the internal wrangling between the Home Secretary and the Deputy Prime Minister could be interpreted as political posturing to galvanise their respective party bases, especially after the poor European and local election results for both parties.”

    tags:news

  • “In recent days, I’ve been thinking greatly about Nelson Mandela, who was undoubtedly the leading global symbol of the fight against racism in my lifetime. Mandela once said “No one is born hating another person because of the colour of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.””

    tags:news

  • “When the Home Secretary announced her intention to introduce new anti-slavery legislation in a Sunday Times article last August it took many of us almost by surprise. Just a few months before, the Government was resistant to any suggestion that existing legislation might need reforming, despite research that evidenced deficiencies in the law as it stands – offences that are unclear and scattered across several acts of parliament.”

    tags:news

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Journal Articles (weekly)

  • “This paper explores the challenges that arise when working with unaccompanied asylum-seeking children in the UK and discusses the conflict between government legislation and the values and ethics which inform social work practice. It highlights the distressing experiences young asylum seekers go through when faced with forced removal and how such traumatic events can affect their capacity to make informed decisions. The paper reflects upon the wider implications of how social workers (and other professionals) deliver the unique support unaccompanied young people require. It recommends working in partnership with young people and using an ecological approach to assessing their needs in order to positively inform future practice. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Considering a series of oil-driven economic booms, the use of inter-provincial and international migrant labour has become an important part of labour market policy in the Canadian province of Alberta. The increased use of temporary foreign workers is controversial. Narrative analysis of legislators’ statements in the legislature and the press between 2000 and 2011 reveals the government using three narratives to justify policies encouraging greater use of foreign migrant workers: (1) labour shortages require migrant workers, (2) migrants do not threaten Canadian jobs and (3) migrants are not being exploited. Close scrutiny of each narrative demonstrates them to be largely invalid. This suggests a significant disconnect between the real and espoused reasons for the significant changes to labour market policy, changes that advantage employers and disadvantage both Canadian and foreign workers. The findings are relevant to understand the political dynamics of economically related migration.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article demonstrates how monolingual Chinese seniors claimed Montreal’s Chinatown as home through exercising agency and working out paradoxes concerning their living conditions, familial relations and subjectivities. Chinatown authenticity is primarily created as a tourist spot for ephemeral consumption and circulation, but residents contested it by their rootedness and belonging. Their narratives further challenged the stereotypes of Chinatown residents as sojourners and the stigma of monolingual seniors as monocultural fixtures. These ground a theoretical discussion and policy suggestions by emphasising the importance of subjective integration and by identifying concrete areas of improvement for a better living quality in Montreal’s Chinatown.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Transnational mobility of internationally educated social workers has been on the rise for the past 20 years, with little empirical study regarding their experiences of professional adaptation. This paper contextualises and presents data from a study with 15 social workers who undertook their professional education outside Canada and have migrated to Canada within the past 10 years, regarding their professional acculturation and adaptation. The analysis focuses on elements that facilitated and mitigated their professional acculturation and the resulting adaptations participants have experienced in their practice in the Canadian context. The paper’s discussion outlines the importance of a stronger grounding in professional values of social work in order to facilitate professional acculturation and adaptation of internationally educated social workers.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This study explores how family characteristics affect the emigration of family members from the city of Fuqing, China, a major migrant-sending area in China. We focus our discussion on three related questions: how family demographic characteristics affect a family’s participation in emigration, the number of family members involved in emigration, and the locational diversification of family members overseas. Our findings show that family income is related to whether the family has any members overseas and their numbers. Second, a larger family is more likely to participate in migration. These findings are consistent with the argument that migration is a joint family decision. Third, effects of demographic characteristics of different generations on emigration indicate again that migration is a family matter. Finally, our Fuqing findings show no clear patterns of family members settling in the same country if more than one member is overseas.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “We examined to what extent ethnic diversity in neighborhoods and municipalities in the Netherlands is related to personal contacts at work and at school with the ethnic in- and out-groups, among the native majority as well as ethnic minorities. Constrict theory, ethnic competition theory, and contact theory are used to derive hypotheses. A unique Dutch dataset with an oversampling of two large minority groups is analyzed with three-level multilevel regression models. The results indicate that ethnic diversity at the municipality level is negatively related to personal contacts with native colleagues and schoolmates, but positively related to personal contacts with colleagues and schoolmates from other ethnic groups. Ethnic diversity at the neighborhood level is not related to personal contacts at work and at school. This applies equally to native respondents and Turks and Moroccans, rejecting Putnam’s hunkering down hypothesis and ethnic competition theory. Instead, ethnic diversity increases meeting opportunities with ethnic minorities while decreasing meeting opportunities with the native majority.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The Migration Debate is a comprehensive book on UK immigration law and policy. Sarah Spencer goes into detail in describing the often changing laws and regulations applicable to various “types” of migrants in the UK, including asylum seekers and refugees, economic migrant workers, international students, migrants for purposes of family reunification, and victims of trafficking. This delving into details, including types of visas, lengths of stay, and derivative rights of the visa holder, is both the strength and the weakness of this book, depending on what the reader is looking for. If one wishes to find a thesis on migration, rather than a review of British attitudes towards migrants and its reification in law and policy, one might be slightly disappointed.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This paper describes the cultural adaptation of American retirees living in two traditional retirement destinations in Mexico (Lake Chapala, state of Jalisco and San Miguel de Allende, state of Guanajuato). Based on 375 surveys and follow-up interviews, the authors discuss issues of adaptation, identity, and networking with the American and local community. Findings present a complex picture of adaptation and integration to the Mexican community as well as networking with other US residents. The comparative case study allows researcher to see the different social and economic dynamics taking place in the two destinations. This study contributes to understand a largely ignored migration flow that is directly related to the aging of the baby boomers generation.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “As a result of its political transformation, South Africa has become a victim of its own success, in that the shift in political power brought about a range of new discriminatory practices and victims. South Africa became a magnet for nationals from African countries who came to ‘the rainbow nation’ to share in the fruits of more stable governance and enjoy the benefits of a larger more dynamic economy, instead find themselves faced with xenophobia and racism. The aim of this paper is to analyse the development of immigration policy in post-apartheid South Africa in terms of the vulnerabilities and protections it has afforded migrants, as well as ways in which it has informed the behaviour of state officials from 1994 to 2008. It highlights trends and tensions surrounding immigration reform in the new South Africa and argues that legislation has made significant strides in informing the behaviour of high- and low-ranking officials in government and state departments but still has a long way to go.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The limited empirical evidence on sickness absence among immigrants indicates that non-Western immigrants have a higher incidence of sickness-related absence than natives. The purpose of this article is to examine whether health is a contributing factor to the immigrant-native sickness absence gap. The present article makes use of two data sources: register data (FD-trygd) with labour market and long-term sickness absence information linked to a cross-section questionnaire survey on health: The Oslo Health Study, which was conducted in 2000–2001 (N = 14,114). The findings in this article show that non-Western immigrants have a higher incidence of long-term sickness absence than natives. For both women and men, the differences in long-term sickness absence between non-Western immigrants and natives can be explained by poorer self-reported health among immigrants.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “While the booming market and policy incentives of China are reversing the pattern of talent flow across the Pacific, a large proportion of the mainland Chinese immigrant scientists currently in Canadian academia have decided not to return home; meanwhile, their interactions with China in terms of brain circulation are not extensive overall. This study attempts to explore the key factors for the paradox of China’s scientific brain drain through the lens of culture, drawing on data mainly from in-depth interviews with 14 mainland Chinese immigrant scientists in Canadian academia. The theoretical framework derives from the models of cultural negotiation (Sakamoto 2001) and bidimensional acculturation (Berry, Appl Psychol 46: 5–34, 1997). Data analysis reveals that cultural factors override everything else in shaping the leave–stay decision and brain exchange behavior of these Chinese scientists, who have gone through a cultural negotiation and construction process. With a transformed perspective, these academic migrants hold firmly the new culture’s beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors; therefore, the work styles, notions, and ethics of their counterparts in China have cultural limitations and are incongruent with their practice in Canada. Meanwhile, they have been significantly influenced by Chinese cultural values, notably group orientation, hierarchy loving, self-abasement, harmony seeking, face saving, etc. The findings should shed some light on public policies aiming to realize the full value of top talents for the benefits of China, Canada, and beyond.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The circular movement of migrants between their homelands and adopted countries has problematized the previous linear understanding of return migration. However, the concept of circular migration tends to apply to migrants whose movement is enabled by their extensive pre-migration connections with their homelands. In this paper, we report findings of a study on a group of new-generation Chinese–Canadian youth working in Hong Kong. Although, like many return migrants, this group of young people had economic reasons for moving to Hong Kong (their parents’ homeland), they do not position themselves as return migrants. Instead, they have kept a strong Canadian identity by maintaining unique friendship circles and perceiving Canada as a home to which they will one day return. We highlight in this paper some implications of their experiences for transnational migration studies.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article applies the term ‘migrant humanitarianism’ for the hitherto neglected humanitarian activities of migrant organisations (MOs). First, it assesses the state-of-the-art on MOs in migration research and recognises common shortcomings within the existing literature. Second, it reviews humanitarian studies literature on aid actors and shows that local or non-Western forms of aid, as well as MOs have so far received only limited attention. Third, it presents the development studies on MOs’ role in their members’ country of origin, which focus mainly on remittances and the migration-development nexus. Fourth, it examines organisational studies which offer frameworks for analysing MOs in multiple countries and crises. Fifth, it discusses how neo-institutional and associational theory, as well as the transnational approach, can help fill gaps in research on MOs in humanitarian action. It then applies these theories to the Islamic Community Milli Görüs (IGMG) as a case study of MOs in humanitarian action. It shows that IGMG is a strong, autonomous actor, despite the fact that it does not fully adhere to the traditional humanitarian principles. Finally, it indicates themes for further research.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “It is now over 15 years since the Human Rights Act was enacted in November 1998. Although in legal terms it is difficult to argue with the proposition that the Act is working in an effective manner, in political terms the Act remains one of the most highly debated pieces of legislation on the UK statute books. In recent years, there have been numerous calls for the repeal of the Act, and for its replacement with a ‘UK Bill of Rights’. Such calls led to the establishment of a Commission on a Bill of Rights, which issued its final report in December 2012. Little progress has since been made on the issue. One notable occurrence however was the introduction of the Human Rights Act 1998 (Repeal and Substitution) Bill, a Private Member’s Bill which was eventually withdrawn in March 2013. This article seeks to assess the current situation regarding the Bill of rights debate, and ultimately the question of the future prospects of the Human Rights Act, an issue of immense legal significance. Overall, it will be questioned whether the enactment of a UK Bill of Rights would constitute an improvement on the current position under the Human Rights Act. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Despite underlying regularities in the age profile of migration, there is mounting evidence of cross-national variations in the ages at which migration occurs. Explanations for these differences have variously been sought by reference to cultural, social, and economic factors, and through analysis of reasons for moving. There is also a growing body of work linking migration events to particular transitions in the life course. We set out a conceptual framework that links contextual factors to the age structure of migration through life-course transitions that act as proximate determinants of the age at migration. We propose metrics to capture the prevalence, timing, and spread of four key life-course transitions: education completion, labor force entry, union formation, and first childbearing. We then seek to quantitatively establish the link between these indicators and the age and intensity of internal migration at its peak for a global sample of 27 countries. Correlation and factor analysis reveal substantial diversity in the timing and spread of transitions to adult roles, and show that cross-national differences in the age profile of migration closely parallel variations in the age structure of the life course for over two-thirds of countries. Migration age profiles are aligned with transitions to adulthood for both sexes but most strongly among women.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This essay draws on an original cross-sectional survey of 1,010 children and their guardians in highly migratory regions of Anhui and Jiangxi provinces located in China’s interior. It uses propensity score matching, a technique that mitigates endogenity, to examine the impact of parental migration and post-migration guardianship arrangements on the children’s educational performance as measured by test scores for Chinese and mathematics. One core finding is that the educational performance of children is adversely affected by parental migration only when both parents migrate or when a non-parent guardian is the principal carer. Additionally, longer durations of parental absence are associated with poorer educational performance. The migration of two parents only significantly adversely affects the educational performance of boys. There is no significant effect on the educational performance of girls. On the basis of our findings we argue that rather than support left-behind children within the countryside, the long-term policy response should be to remove the institutional obstacles that prevent family resettlement in the cities.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Resilient in the Face of Adversity: World Refugee Day 2014

Originally posted on Refugees International Japan Blog:

“I see the potential that was locked in my people getting unlocked….When I move around my community monitoring progress, I see life.” This is a quote from a Ugandan villager who was among 200 families who were able to return to their ancestral home after having been refugees for many years. These villagers are just a few of millions of refugees worldwide who are working to rebuild their life after being displaced from their homes. As today is World Refugee Day, we want to not only reaffirm our resolve to continue RIJ’s programs across the globe, but also celebrate the organizations working tirelessly to help refugees regain control over their lives as well as the refugees themselves, who remain ever resilient in the face of great adversity.

Contrary to their popular image as helpless and stagnant, most refugees are in fact working to learn new skills and receive more education…

View original 517 more words

Protection visa cap ruled invalid by High Court, Immigration Minister Scott Morrison ordered to reconsider asylum seekers’ application

Originally posted on Hazara Asylum Seekers:

June 20, 2014

The High Court has struck down a law which allowed the Government to cap the number of protection visas it issues for refugees in Australia.

The ruling comes after two separate applications to the court from asylum seekers who were found to be refugees but were denied protection visas because of the cap.

One of the refugees, a 15-year-old boy from Ethiopia, came to Australia last year as a stowaway on a ship, and the second, a Pakistani man, arrived at Christmas Island in 2012.

Under the law, once refugee status has been determined, the Immigration Minister has 90 days to issue a protection visa.

Immigration Minister Scott Morrison capped the number of protection visas granted in the financial year at 2,773 after the Senate blocked the Government’s re-introduction of temporary protection visas.

The High Court found the Minister did not have the power to limit the number…

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Call for Editors: Asylum Access Refugee Rights Toolkit

Originally posted on New Scholars Network:

Image
“Dear all,
 
We are pleased to share with you the Refugee Rights Toolkit, an Asylum Access initiative. 
 
We invite you to have a look at this much re-vamped version of an ongoing project at www.refugeerightstoolkit.org.
 
Currently the Toolkit is being used by refugee rights leaders in India and Indonesia, who are in the process of establishing themselves as legal aid providers and human rights advocates. We are pleased to extend the Toolkit to a wider audience. To learn more about the approach of the Refugee Rights Toolkit, please visit the About the Toolkit section of the online platform. 
 
The Toolkit is primarily aimed at developing the leadership capacity and knowledge base of those establishing refugee rights initiatives in any country. It contains best practices, ‘how-tos’ and advice on both organizational start-up, scaling, operations and management, as well as on programmatic tools for achieving refugee rights…

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Conference on Human Security, Asylum and the EU

Originally posted on Interest Group on Migration and Refugee Law:

July 4, The Hague (the Netherlands)
Using Human Security as a Legal Framework to analyse the Common European Asylum System

The conference is the second event falling within the current CLEER (Centre for the Law of EU External Relations) research project titled ‘Human Security as a new operational framework for enhancing Human Rights protection in the EU’s Security & Migration Policies’. The conference will address a specific ambit in which human rights, EU security and foreign policy meet: EU asylum and migration policy.

The conference will address the role that Human Security can play in relation to the legal and political toolbox with which the EU responds to humanitarian crises such as conflicts and natural disasters. It shall take stock of recent developments in EU legislation, jurisprudence and doctrine whilst analysing the extent to which Human Security discourses can enrich protection standards within the Common European Asylum System (CEAS).

More information…

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New Journal Articles (weekly) (weekly)

  • “This article looks at the production and reception of music by Moroccan expatriates in Granada, Spain in the first 30 years after Franco, concentrating on musical genres associated with al-mūsīqā al-andalussiyya (al-Āla), flamenco and danza del vientre. These genres were performed by Moroccan musicians and heard by Spaniard audiences as part of the larger politically inflected, contextualizing meta-genres of ‘Early Music’, ‘World Music’ and ‘fusiones’. The social utility of these genre choices was demonstrated as part of a set of practices yielding some degree of social integration for Moroccans who might ‘cross over’ to positions of possibility in contemporary Spain, and, at the same time, they provided social insulation on the part of Spaniard maintenance of a political status quo. The article also points to disparate but converging types of cosmopolitan attitudes and behaviors, where the more privileged cosmopolitanism of many Spaniards contrasted with but also inflected a more pragmatic cosmopolitanism of immigrant Moroccans. Also informing the cultural and political negotiations across the divide between these two groups were conceptions of the historical backdrop of medieval-era, Muslim-dominated Andalusian Spain and the ideological legacies of ‘convivencia’ (peaceful coexistence) and ‘Las Tres Culturas’ (the three cultural complexes based on foundations of Christianity, Islam and Judaism), both of which still circulated in common discourse as reference points in modern, multiethnic Spain. “

    tags: newjournalarticles

  • “This study was designed to investigate the transformation in attitude of social work undergraduate students following the completion of a human rights module near the end of their academic programme in Taiwan. Twenty-five students who enrolled in the ‘Human Rights, Gender and Social Work’ module at a university in central Taiwan were evaluated by means of self-reported change in attitude towards human rights before and after participation in this semester-long module. Their attitude towards human rights was measured using a twenty-four-item, four-point Likert scale that was developed and previously validated by Xie and Dan (2003). Quantitative analysis was applied. Following an educational intervention of one semester’s duration, the participants self-reported a statistically significant change in their attitude towards human rights. The linkage of human rights with social work practice can be facilitated by adopting a specific teaching methodology. “

    tags: newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.