New Journal Articles (weekly)

  • “An urgently needed resource for peacebuilding is a professional and skilled workforce, however, this is lacking in many post-conflict countries. In this article it is suggested that although fewer refugees in developing countries have access to the level of education required for such professions, countries engaged in peacebuilding can benefit from the returnees with such skills. This study therefore, examines the differences in the levels of higher education of 40 Liberian returnees from Ghana and Guinea and the deployment of their skills towards their integration which have links to the broader peacebuilding agenda of Liberia. While the number of returnees with post-secondary education was generally low, the data indicate that comparatively those from Guinea had limited higher education opportunities to those who were in Ghana. Following from these cases, the article argues that insecurity and non-conducive asylum policies and programmes are the major challenges towards the provision of and refugee access to higher education skills training. Some examples of returnees’ deployment of asylum acquired profession and skills towards peacebuilding are discussed as evidence that the provision of higher education for refugees is not simply a tool for empowering refugees, but also an investment in future peacebuilding. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “If a person enters an embassy or consulate and claims asylum, is there a legal obligation under international refugee law or human rights law to consider that claim and, if the requirements are satisfied, grant protection? Previous research on this question has concluded that no such obligation exists pursuant to the non-refoulement obligations in the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, the Convention against Torture and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. However, case-law over the past decade has shifted and strengthened the reach of non-refoulement under international refugee law and human rights law. This article will demonstrate that this more recent jurisprudence provides strong grounds to argue that embassies and consulates are, in certain circumstances, obligated to consider a claim for asylum and, if the requirements are met, grant protection. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Based on qualitative interviews conducted between 2011 and 2013 with urban refugees in the first asylum ports of Hong Kong and Thailand, this study examines three inter-related dimensions in refugee migration: aspirations, practices and embodiment. It demonstrates what actually happens in the asylum seeking process, from home to host destinations, and the cultural process of “becoming a refugee”. Travelling abroad is not merely a matter of crossing “the border” at an immigration checkpoint. Rather, the participants in this research have to “fashion” themselves as potential “legitimate” travellers or smuggled persons in the making of exits and entrances. This article shows how they make use of their local and transnational social connections for making both “legal” and “illegal” exits and entrances, and how the embodied experience of cross-border movement influence their perception of being refugee. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “For over 65 years, protracted Palestinian refugees have been largely excluded from participating in the Lebanese labour market and rare are the studies that examined the socio-economic implications of such exclusion. This article is concerned with how the lack of rights for the Palestinian graduate women affects their (un)employment status. It will use data from a tracer survey among 201 young graduated Palestinian women who received the Scholarship Fund for Palestinian Refugee Women in Lebanon, as well as secondary data from the International Labour Organization and the American University of Beirut/United Nations Relief and Works Agency surveys. Our findings reveal that, first, the better is education for Palestinian women, the more likely they are to be employed; second, while State exclusionary policies have not been successful at completely barring Palestinian women from participating in the Lebanese labour market this participation took the form of segregation into low-paid segments of the Lebanese economy and into black labour market where work conditions are very harsh. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The multiple geographies approach, which combines the spatial-analytic and sociospatial perspectives, highlights the lack of homogenous experience for internally displaced persons across places. After laying out the significance of the multiple geographies approach, we show how geographical perspectives on the economic, material, and social circumstances of internally displaced persons in Georgia cast a different light on creating visibility for their experiences, possibilities for amelioration of circumstances, and the creation of spaces of displacement. We argue that data presentation in a categorical manner is useful for highlighting the forced migrant experience but that adding the sociospatial lens provides deeper insight into human security and people’s lived experiences. We do this through a discussion of the material and social life of internally displaced persons in collective centres as compared to those in private accommodation, by gender, and in different locations in Georgia. We argue that we are ultimately able to improve human security by refining our knowledge of the internally displaced persons’ experiences by highlighting spatial processes. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article examines the impact of UN-imposed sanctions on the stability of the Eritrean regime, with a focus on the reaction of the diaspora. It explores the transnational nature of Eritrean society and examines the history and structure of the Eritrean diaspora as well as its transformation since the political crisis of 2001. The article demonstrates that the government, as well as both its supporters and its opponents in the diaspora, have all instrumentalized sanctions for their own purposes. The government has used sanctions to rally supporters “around the flag”, calling on the diaspora to raise funds to negate their effect. By contrast, opposition activists have campaigned against the 2 percent “diaspora tax” levied by the government, arguing that it may be used for illicit military purposes in breach of the sanctions regime. In this sense, the sanctions have destabilized a core component of the regime’s resource base. However, the failure of the diasporic opposition to organize a joint campaign to persuade host governments to outlaw the collection of the tax has undermined its efforts. Funds raised through the diaspora tax thus continue to flow into government coffers, playing a stabilizing role in spite of the UN sanctions regime. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article analyses the relationship between migration duration and occupational changes, using the case of Indian expatriates in the Gulf states. Based on the Kerala (India) Migration Survey 2008 and the Return Migration Survey 2009, this analysis investigates whether the length of stay in the Gulf depends on migrants’ occupational trajectories before, during, and after the migration experience. We find inter alia that a prospect of acquiring an occupation which entails upward social mobility (mainly in the public sector or as self-employees) seems to be associated with a shorter stay in the Gulf states, whereas the prospect of post-return labour market dropout significantly increases migration duration. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The expanded refugee definition in the 1969 African Refugee Convention has been widely praised for its broad scope, its humanitarian aspirations, and for inspiring the liberalization of refugee protection elsewhere. Paradoxically, relatively little is known or understood about its practical effect on refugee protection within Africa. While many African states have incorporated the expanded definition into their domestic refugee legislation, a lack of literature on its implementation makes it hard to assess the extent to which the definition has expanded protection in practice. In addition, a near total absence of available case law from African courts and tribunals means that even a basic understanding of its operation is difficult to establish.

    Addressing this gap, this article considers the expanded refugee definition’s implementation in two case study countries – South Africa and Kenya. Drawing on fieldwork undertaken in both countries in late 2012, the article analyzes the definition’s incorporation into domestic law and the crucial step of its implementation within refugee status determination procedures. As two of the main refugee-receiving countries in Africa, the case studies provide a basis on which to assess whether the expanded protection envisaged by the definition is being realized in practice. To the extent that such protection is not being realized, this article offers some preliminary thoughts on why this is and how it might be improved. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Despite the economic crisis, Spain is still a country with a large presence of foreign population, which requires the adjustment and adaptation of public services social services among them to this reality. Our objective is to understand and analyse the Intercultural Sensitivity levels of social workers in public social services in Andalusia (Spain), and relate them to elements of intercultural competence. Participants include 298 professionals from Andalusian community social services; 163 were social workers, on which this study focused. We have used the Intercultural Sensitivity Scale (IS) in the context of a larger survey that measured other aspects such as the degree of intercultural contact and intercultural competence through different means. We analyse correlations between the dimensions of the IS and other variables, associations and comparisons of means (Student’s t-test and ANOVA) for the whole sample and different variables considering only social workers. The data obtained show high SI, with significant differences related to previous training on cultural diversity, age and relationships with foreign people. The level of knowledge about diversity management in the surveyed population is very relevant, as well as training and relationships with immigrants. However, we think it is necessary to strengthen both training and interaction to advance the implementation of theoretical contents on the practice and interaction that take place in professional intervention. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Table of Contents Alert: Refugee Survey Quarterly (Vol. 33, No. 4 December 2014)

Oxford Journals has published their latest table of contents alert for the journal Refugee Survey Quarterly.  Further details of the articles included in Volume 33, Number 4 (December 2014) can be detailed as follows:

The Multiple Geographies of Internal Displacement: The Case of Georgia
Peter Kabachnik, Beth Mitchneck, Olga V. Mayorova, and Joanna Regulska
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2014 33: 1-30
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Employment of Palestinian Refugee Women in Lebanon: Opportunities and Hurdles
Sari Hanafi
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2014 33: 31-49
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Refugees’ Transnational Mobility: A Study of Asylum Seeking in Hong Kong and Urban Thailand
Terence C.T. Shum
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2014 33: 50-80
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Protection Closer to Home? A Legal Case for Claiming Asylum at Embassies and Consulates
Kate Ogg
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2014 33: 81-113
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Filling in the Gap: Refugee Returnees Deploy Higher Education Skills to Peacebuilding
Amanda Coffie
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2014 33: 114-141
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

 

Refugee Council Archive Weekly Bulletin: Issue Number 3

uel-logo

Refugee Archives News

The Refugee Council Archives at UEL Weekly Bulletin

Issue: 3

Introduction

Many apologies for the slightly belated circulation of this the third  issue of Refugee Archive News: The Refugee Council Archives at UEL (hopefully) Weekly Bulletin.

This bulletin has the aim of providing both the latest news and developments on the Refugee Council Archive at the University of East London whilst also providing additional information on issues of concern to refugee and forced migration studies more generally. This I hope will include details of news stories, calls for papers, conferences and seminars, and online resources of potential interest. This bulletin, I hope, will aim to provide useful information to both students and academics on both UEL undergraduate courses in International Development and postgraduate students on our courses in Refugee Studies; Refugee Studies and Community Development and Conflict, Displacement and Human Security, whilst also being hopefully of interest to a wider readership represented by our Twitter and Blog followers.

This bulletin will be circulated via our Refugee Archive WordPress blog and also via our Refugee-Research Jiscmail email list. We would welcome any feedback that you may have on this bulletin and we would also welcome any input that you may have in terms of current and future content for both this bulletin and also our WordPress blog more generally. Please Contact Paul Dudman via email (library-archvies@uel.ac.uk) or Twitter (@PaulDudman) with any feedback or thoughts that you may have.

There are also some general Archive details included at the end of this and every bulletin posting for your reference.

Archive, CMRB and Course-Related News

In the News

Amnesty International – Racism, segregation, and rejection: The reality for Romani children in the Czech Republic.

British Red Cross – Asylum seekers sent to hotels without essentials or medicine.

Electronic Immigration Network – Court of Appeal warns over asylum legacy cases, saying commonly repeated arguments are now “laid to rest”.

Electronic Immigration Network – Very private lives: “acceptable questioning” in sexual orientation asylum cases.

Electronic Immigration Network – Control and restraint techniques used on people being removed from UK are lawful, says Court of Appeal.

Electronic Immigration Network – New UN guidelines on the rights of women asylum seekers and refugees.

The Compas Blog – Schooling, mobility and belonging.

UNHCR – UNHCR warns of winter crisis ahead for almost a million displaced people in Iraq, Syria.

UNHCR – Education Above All Launches Multi-Sector Education Project in Kenyan Refugee Camp.

UNHCR – UNHCR welcomes new General Recommendation on refugee and stateless women.

BBC News – Syria crisis: Istanbul misery for desperate refugees.

BBC News – Syria war refugees’ key role in telling the story.

BBC News – Inside a supermarket for Syrian refugees in Jordan.

Daily Mail Online – Paddy Ashdown accuses government of policy ‘to drown more refugees in the Mediterranean’ by blocking rescue efforts.

Guardian Online – Scapegoating immigrants is the oldest trick in the book.

Guardian Online – More immigration – but managed much better. That’s what the UK needs.

Guardian Online – Theresa May downgrades Cameron pledge to reduce net migration.

Guardian Online – Serco shares crash after latest profits warning.

Guardian Online – Sandwich maker goes ahead with Hungary hire drive.

Guardian Online – A good mix: why ethnic minority pupils boost school achievement.

Guardian Online – Bordergame review – immersive theatre show casts audience as refugees.

UK Climate Change and Migration Coalition – Trapped Populations – Hostages of Climate Change and other stories.

DW – ‘Triton’ sets out to rescue refugees.

Telegraph OnlineWealthy foreign tourists and business people to be given fast track British visa.

Telegraph Online – Britain must now curb migrant tax credits, Iain Duncan Smith says.

Telegraph Online – Earl of Sandwich says migrant workers can make ‘good or better’ sandwiches.

Telegraph Online – Romania and Bulgaria migrants reach record high.

Telegraph Online – We can’t control our borders until we control those judges.

Telegraph Online – Immigration: the real cost to Britain.

Telegraph OnlineImmigration report too ‘narrow’, says minister James Brokenshire.

UNHCR – Sharp increase in number of Eritrean refugees and asylum-seekers in Europe, Ethiopia and Sudan.

The Guardian – Riot police deployed after violence against refugees in Rome.

The Guardian – David Cameron backs John Major’s warning on future of UK in Europe.

Free Movement – Legacy cases “laid to rest” by Court of Appeal.

New Additions to the Archive

Lives in transition : experiences of migrants living in Morocco and Algeria / research by Andrew Galea Debono based on interviews with migrants in Casablanca, Rabat and Tangiers in Morocco, and in Algiers, Oran and Tamanrasset in Algeria.

After the Arab Spring : new paths for human rights and the internet in European foreign policy / by the European Parliament Directorate General for External Policies Policy Department.

Desperate choices : conditions, risks and protection failures affecting Ethiopian migrants in Yemen / a joint report by the Danish Refugee Council (Regional Office for the Horn of Africa and Yemen) with the Regional Mixed Migration Secretariat, (RMMS).

Statelessness and the benefits of citizenship : a comparative study / [edited] by Brad K. Blitz and Maureen Lynch.

Access to healthcare in Europe in times of crisis and rising Xenophobia : an overview of the situation of people excluded from healthcare systems / by Dr. Pierre Chauvin, Nathalie Simonnot and Frank Vanbiervliet.

Refugees in Europe / Danièle Joly with Clive Nettleton.

Romania’s ethnic Hungarians / George Schöpflin and Hugh Poulton.

Minorities in southeast Europe : inclusion and exclusion / $$c by Hugh Poulton.

Minorities in Central and Eastern Europe / edited by Minority Rights Group and TWEEC.

At fortress Europe’s moat : the “Safe Third Country” concept / [written by Steven Edminster.].

The uprooted : agony and triumph among the debris of war / [by] Kanty Cooper

Refugees; the work of the League / by C. A. Macartney.

Aftermath : France, Germany, Austria, Yugoslavia, 1945 and 1946 / Francesca M. Wilson.

“Safe third country” policies in European countries / edited by Nina Lassen and Jane Hughes.

Quest for quality educational guidance for refugees in Europe / by Ayten Sinkil.

Refugees included : a survey of refugee involvement in refugee-assisting non-governmental organisations in the European Union / by Hildegard Dumper.

The common foreign and security policy and conflict prevention : priorities for the intergovernmental conference / [by Reinhardt Rummel]

Developing transnational partnerships : a guide for voluntary organisations working on EC funded projects / Ute Kowarzik and Maggie MacDonald.

Proceedings of the 2nd Colloquy on the European Convention on Human Rights and the Protection of Refugees, Asylum-seekers and Displaced Persons : consolidation and development of the asylum-related jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights / organised jointly by the Council of Europe and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Strasbourg, 19-20 May 2000.

UNHCR’s dialogues with refugee women / Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Survivors, protectors, providers : refugee women speak out / Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

A global review : UNHCR’s engagement with displaced youth / By Rosalind Evans and Claudia Lo Forte with Erika McAsian Fraser.

An introduction to cash-based interventions in UNHCR operations / Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

UNHCR’s mental health and psychosocial support for persons of concern : global review – 2013 / Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

The implementation of UNHCR’s policy on refugee protection and solutions in urban areas : global survey – 2012 / MaryBeth Morand, Katherine Mahoney, with Shaula Bellour and Janice Rabkin.

Passages and junior passages : an awareness game confronting the plight of refugees / Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Carly / Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Not just numbers : [educational pack] / Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Through the eyes of refugees : looking to the future / Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Ageways: Practical Issues to Ageing and Development. Issue 82, March 2014.

Australian Journal of Emergency Management. Volume 29 Number 2, (April 2014).

ARC Magazine. Number 297, (May 2014).

 

New Off Air Recordings

The following TV programmes have been requested for the Refugee Council Archive:

Saturday 15th November

0430-0500: BBC News 24: Our World –  Rojava: Syria’s Secret Revolution. Series Recording.

Monday 17th November

2235-2320: BBC1: Panorama – Ebola Frontline.

Friday 21st November

1935-2000: Channel 4: (8/8) Unreported World – 15 and Learning to Speak. Series Recording.

 

Archive Opening Hours

The current Opening Hours for our Archival collections are detailed as follows. The Refugee Council Archive and the British Olympic Association Archive are currently located on our Docklands Campus Library whilst the Hackney Empire Archive is currently located in our Stratford Campus Library.

The opening hours for both Docklands and Stratford Archives are as follows:

Docklands Archive

Mondays:  1pm – 6pm*

Tuesdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Wednesdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Thursdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Fridays: 1pm – 6pm*

Sat/Sun:  Both Archives Closed

Access to the Stratford Archive for the Hackney Empire Archive is by prior appointment only.

* Morning appointments between 10am and 12pm are available by prior appointment.  The Archive will be closed between 12pm and 1pm for lunch.

We would recommend that, especially for external users, that you contact us in advance of your trip in order to make an appointment to use the Archives.  This enables us to ensure that a member of staff will be on hand to assist you.

To make an appointment, please click on the link to our Make an Appointment page.

 

Archive Web Resources and Email List

Please find details below of our various online and social media resources which are currently available online and please do take a look. We would also welcome any feedback that you may have on how these can be improved:

Blogs

We have created several blogs to help support the archival work that we undertake and these are highlighted as follows:

Facebook

Please join and Like Us on Facebook, links are as follows:

Twitter

Please follow us on Twitter by selecting one of the options below:

Refugee-Research Email Mailing List

Please also consider joining our Refugee Research Jiscmail e-mail list which is managed in conjunction with this blog.  To subscribe to the mail group
www.jiscmail.ac.uk, type REFUGEE‐RESEARCH into the ‘find lists’ box, or use the alphabetical index to scroll down to R. and then follow the instructions on our REFUGEERESEARCH homepage to ‘join or leave the list’. Most users need only enter their email address and name. Alternatively, email the Archivist, Paul Dudman on p.v.dudman@uel.ac.uk, requesting to join the mail group.

Please let us know of any further links that you would like to see added.

 

Contact Details

Paul Dudman is currently the Archivist responsible for all of the physical Archives located here at the University of East London Library and Learning Services: Archives. Paul is happy to receive and respond to any questions or queries that you may have in response to both our Archival collections and also our social media presence.

If you wish to contact the Archive, please contact Paul Dudman via one of the contact methods detailed below:

By email at: library-archives@uel.ac.uk

By telephone at: +44 (0) 20 8223 7676

Online at: uelarchivesportal.wordpress.com/contact-us/

On Twitter at: @refugee_archive

By post to:

Paul V. Dudman
Archivist
Library and Learning Services
University of East London
Docklands Campus
4-6 University Way
London, E16 2RD
United Kingdom.

Up to 5m undocumented migrants to be protected from deportation, says Obama

Originally posted on Postcards from ...:

President Obama announced a much anticipated executive order that will protect up to 5m undocumented migrants from deportation. It isn’t perfect and it is not a long term regularisation as it doesn’t offer a pathway to citizenship. But it is nonetheless a very good news.

ObamaThe opposition of the Republican Party has repeatedly obstructed over the last decade any proposals for a comprehensive immigration reform.

Fascinating to listen to the range of historical, pragmatic, and moral arguments that Obama lists in the speech to justify his decision to protect those undocumented migrants who have been in the US for a minimum of 5 years, fit a number of criteria and ‘come out of the shadow’ from deportation (temporarily): America is a land of immigrants and always will be, America is a meritocratic society, America is a country where everyone is equal and has the right to have a chance and the…

View original 318 more words

Hunger strike in Amygdaleza detention centre

Originally posted on clandestina:

“Hunger strike until freedom”*

On November 17th, 2014 hundreds of refugees detained administratively in
the pre-removal centre of Amygdaleza started to protest massively
against the prolonged detention of more than 18 months, against the
detention of dozens of minors and the detention conditions that amongst
others recently led to the death of two detainees.

“They coop us up here like sheep and then don’t care anymore about us. (…)”
“There are persons detained 26 months. (…)”
“When we say ‘my stomach hurts’, they’d answer ‘my balls hurt’.”

Only on November 6th the 26-year-old Mohammed Asfak died of the
consequences of beating by law enforcement officers in Corinth detention
centre during one of the uprisings of migrants there 5-6 months ago. His
injuries had not been taken care of adequately. He was only transferred
to hospital after a break down. For 15 days he had been begging the
police to bring…

View original 719 more words

World’s largest collection of documents on torture still a well-kept secret

Originally posted on World Without Torture:

Only 15 minutes from Copenhagen’s city centre lies a library that, despite a collection that makes others pale in comparison, remains a well-kept secret.

The Documentation Centre and Library holds the world's most extensive collection of published documents on torture and related subjects.

The Documentation Centre and Library holds the world’s most extensive collection of published documents on torture and related subjects.

The DIGNITY Documentation Centre and Library holds the world’s most extensive collection of published documents on torture and related subjects. In fact, the library boasts more than 40,000 items, ranging from books and articles to journals and images.

“We probably receive around one hundred new items each month,” says the library’s documentalist, Ion Iacos. “On top of that, we also monitor around 300 bibliographical sources on a regular basis so there is plenty of material for our visitors.”

The Documentation Centre and Library is open to the public and visitors are very welcome to use its modern facilities.

“We have study areas, media rooms and user terminals…

View original 194 more words

Justice in Syria: If not the ICC, then What?  

Originally posted on Justice in Conflict:

Proponents of international criminal justice seem to be searching in vain for perfect justice in Syria. Iva Vukusic joins JiC for this timely post exploring the options for justice in Syria. Iva is an analyst and researcher based in The Hague. She previously worked for the Research and Documentation Centre and Special War Crimes Department of the Prosecutor’s office in Sarajevo.

Fruit vendors in Aleppo, Syria, in July 2014 (Photo: Jalal Al-Mamo / Reuters)

Fruit vendors in Aleppo, Syria, in February 2014 (Photo: Jalal Al-Mamo / Reuters)

Since March 2011, estimates suggest that 200,000 people have died in Syria but the crisis shows no signs of winding down and the future is uncertain. In these circumstances, planning a response to mass human rights violations and war crimes is difficult. But many believe Syria will need justice in order to move towards some sort of recovery. A referral of Syria to the International Criminal Court (ICC) is off the table for the time being…

View original 1,065 more words

News Stories (weekly)

  • “Like Monty Python before us, we have reached a moment in the national discourse when the time has come to ask: “What have migrants ever done for us?” The answer, according to some, is precisely nothing, and that they represent a net drain on the economy, claiming benefits, abusing public services, thieving and generally loafing around in parks.

    This does not accord with common sense or experience, the fact that immigrants were coming to Britain long before the welfare state was invented, or that everyone who has ever used a minicab, visited a hospital or called a plumber will most likely have found themselves in the company of a hard-working individual who has travelled halfway around the world simply to make a better life for themselves and their family. That is not an ignoble thing.”

    tags:news

  • “Not long after the Moroccan government decided to mount a campaign of regularisation, over 8,000 migrants have already been regularised (3,000 based on applications and another 5,000 women and children as priority cases) and are trying to make a new life in Morocco. Counter-intuitively, there has also been an increase in the number of instances of migrants trying to scale the fence en masse to make it into Melilla, a Spanish city bordering Morocco, in crowds of hundreds at a time. Indeed, only a few months ago, 400 irregular sub-Saharan migrants made it into Melilla by storming the 7 metre high border fence. It is one of several attempts that have taken place this year. This raises two main questions. First, is the new Moroccan regularisation policy unappealing, compared with the lure of a better life in Europe? Or, second, are these migrants who are attempting to cross the border unable to satisfy the criteria for regularisation (eg two years of Moroccan residence) and therefore have no option but to try their luck or face deportation?”

    tags:news

  • “France will pump three million euros per year to convert a children’s holiday camp into a day centre for migrants in Calais that hope to reach Britain in the New Year, the country’s interior minister has confirmed.

    The plan sparked strong criticism from migrant help groups, who claim it will create a “ghetto” and resemble Sangatte – the notorious Red Cross welcome centre closed in 2002. “

    tags:news

  • “Polish people living in Britain are almost 20 per cent more likely to have a job than those born in the UK, a study of official figures shows.

    New Analysis of findings from the 2011 Census by the Office for National Statistics shows that Polish-born residents of England and Wales have the highest employment rate of any other group when analysed by birth.

    It also shows that migrants from EU countries have dramatically higher levels of employment than those from non-European countries. “

    tags:news

  • “Immigrants who came to live in Britain from outside Europe cost the public purse nearly £120 billion over 17 years, a new report has shown.

    The major academic study also found, however, that recent immigration from Europe – driven by the surge in arrivals from eastern European – gave the economy a £4.4 billion boost over the same period. “

    tags:news

  • “British police should patrol the port at Calais to solve the “tremendous problem” of migrants trying to cross the Channel, a senior French minister has said.

    Bernard Cazeneuve, France’s interior minister, told the BBC he has had “lots of rendezvous” with his counterpart at Westminster, Home Secretary Theresa May and stressed the need for British officers’ help. “

    tags:news

  • “So when another hefty economic study says that the arrival of those Europeans has been a net positive to the public finances, it would be easy for me to write another piece lauding the study as another triumph of reason over prejudice, proof positive that a free market for labour is a good thing just as it is for goods and services. In other words, to say I told you so. “

    tags:news

  • “On Tuesday, parliament will scrutinise the modern slavery bill for its third reading in the House of Commons. Although the bill – which the government trumpets as “the first of its kind in Europe” – is broadly welcomed for forcing the issue on to the political agenda, there is dismay from charities working with the victims of trafficking. Campaigners say the bill is tilted too heavily towards prosecuting traffickers, without providing enough support for their victims.”

    tags:news

  • “European migrants to the UK are not a drain on Britain’s finances and pay out far more in taxes than they receive in state benefits, a new study has revealed.

    The research by two leading migration economists at University College also reveals that Britain is uniquely successful, even more than Germany, in attracting the most highly skilled and highly educated migrants in Europe.

    The study, the Fiscal Impact of Immigration to the UK, published in the Economic Journal, reveals that more than 60% of new migrants from western and southern Europe are now university graduates. The educational levels of east Europeans who come to Britain are also improving with 25% of recent arrivals having completed a degree compared with 24% of the UK-born workforce.”

    tags:news

  • “The positive impact of recent European migration to Britain is highlighted by the fact that the UK now attracts the highest number of university-educated migrants of any country in the European Union, according to new research from University College London.

    The study, published in the Economic Journal on Wednesday shows that 62% of migrants from western Europe – the A15 countries such as France, Italy and Spain – who come to Britain each year have a university degree compared with 24% of the British labour force.

    The authors put a figure of £6.8bn on the value of the overseas education received before their arrival by migrants who have come to Britain since 2000.”

    tags:news

  • “esterday, the UN refugee agency (UNHCR) launched its campaign to end statelessness by 2024 – a revival of the dream first conceived by US lawyer and judge Manley Ottmer Hudson in 1952. This is an ambitious task, almost bold, yet feasible considering UNHCR’s achievements in the last three years and its awareness of the need to build an international social movement to “champion” the cause of statelessness, on a par with the work being done on landmines, child soldiers and rape in armed conflict.”

    tags:news

  • “A dust cloud from the US air strike drifts across the border from Kobani and blurs our view from the overlooking Turkish hilltop. Most if not all of those watching – all Kurds, it seems, from both Syria and Turkey – agree that the damage caused to the city by air strikes is a price worth paying. Many believe the city’s defence, led by Syrian Kurdish fighters, would have collapsed without them.

    “My home may get destroyed but if it forces out Da’esh”, as the armed group which calls itself the Islamic State (IS) is usually referred to locally, “then I am happy,” says one.”

    tags:news

  • “Today’s conviction of three men following a brutal racist attack on a Roma woman and her nephew is a “first step towards justice”, said Amnesty International and Greek Helsinki Monitor – the NGO that provided free legal representation to the victims.

    A court in the town of Messolonghi today handed eight-month jail sentences – suspended for three years – to the three men over the attack on Paraskevi Kokoni and her nephew Kostas Theodoropoulos in October 2012. “

    tags:news

  • The Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion is a newly established, independent non-profit organisation dedicated to leading an integrated, inter-disciplinary response to the injustice of statelessness and exclusion. Two of our co-founders – Laura van Waas and Amal de Chickera were founding steering committee members of ENS, currently sitting on the ENS Advisory Committee. We believe that the issue of statelessness has an impact on many fields, and that it is only through a concerted effort across all such fields, that we will be able to ultimately end statelessness. Thus, we hope reach out to colleagues working on related issues and draw them into the discourse, campaign and movement to end statelessness. Below is the note we prepared to demonstrate why a campaign to end statelessness should matter to those working on related issues. Your cooperation in disseminating it widely would be most appreciated. This can also be viewed on the website of the Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion.

    04 November 2014

    Why a campaign to end statelessness matters

    Dear friends and colleagues,

    It is not easy to imagine what life would be like if you did not hold any nationality. In fact, it is not easy to even imagine this even being possible. Everyone has a birthplace, a family, a home, a community: surely everyone has a nationality? Sadly, no. Millions of people around the world are stateless. They are perpetual foreigners, disenfranchised, not recognised as or able to exercise the rights of citizens in any country. This is a serious problem – for those affected, but also for those of us who do enjoy a nationality and can make a difference, as people who care about and want our children to grow up in a free, fair, safe and democratic world.

    We welcome, admire and support the ambitious campaign launched today by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to end statelessness by 2024. Statelessness fundamentally and unequivocally deserves more attention than it has received to date and the time has come for it to take its rightful place amongst other pressing and worrying issues that are already vying for international attention. We are not powerless in the face of statelessness. Citizenship is our own modern-day creation and we set the rules. Bad laws can be amended. Discriminatory policies can be repealed. We believe that with greater awareness of the issue, stronger collaboration and a firm commitment to act, statelessness can be solved. Indeed, we not only believe that statelessness can be tackled, we believe that it must. Statelessness matters, to all of us, for many reasons. Here are just some of them…

    If people matter…

    Stateless persons are among the world’s most vulnerable. They are seen and treated as foreigners by every country in the world, including the country in which they were born, the country of their ancestors, the country of their residence, the country they happen to find themselves in today and any country they may find themselves expelled to tomorrow. Stateless persons face an extreme form of exclusion that impacts their sense of dignity and identity, as well as their ability to do all sorts of everyday things that most of us take for granted, like go to school, get a job, be treated by a doctor, get married or travel.

    So, if people matter, statelessness matters.

    If children matter…

    Many of the world’s stateless persons are children. In fact, in every region of the world, children continue to be born into statelessness and grow up never knowing the protection and recognition that comes with a nationality. Some children inherit their statelessness from stateless parents, creating an intergenerational problem. Others aren’t able to acquire their parents’ or any other nationality due to discriminatory laws and policies or the failure of governments to implement simple legal safeguards that prevent childhood statelessness. Without a nationality, children can have difficulty exercising their rights, become outcasts in their own country, struggle to feel like they belong and grow up to be disenfranchised and excluded adults.

    So, if children matter, statelessness matters.

    If human rights matter…

    The contemporary human rights framework is premised on notions of equality, liberty, dignity and universality: we all hold basic rights because we are human beings. But the human rights system also recognises that states may reserve some rights for their citizens, such as the right to vote or be elected, placing these out of reach for stateless people. And in practice, statelessness is a proven barrier to the exercise a wide range of other rights. So the very universality of human rights rests on the premise that everyone enjoys a nationality – laid down, for that reason, as a right in most major human rights instruments. Until statelessness is eradicated, the fundamental aspiration of universal human rights remains just that, an aspiration.

    So, if human rights matter, statelessness matters.

    If development matters…

    Difficulties accessing education and employment; restricted property rights; lack of opportunities to own or register a business; limited access to a bank account or a loan; and, in some cases, the threat of extortion, detention or expulsion; these factors can trap stateless persons in poverty and make it extremely challenging for them to improve their circumstances. Where statelessness affects whole communities over several successive generations – as it often sadly does – such communities can be neglected by development actors and processes. Statelessness means a waste, of individual potential, of human capital and of development opportunities.

    So, if development matters, statelessness matters.

    If democracy matters…

    Nationality is the gateway to political participation. Stateless persons have no right to vote, stand for election or effect change through regular political channels. Their statelessness suppresses their voices and renders their opinions obsolete. In countries with large stateless populations, whole sectors of the constituency are disenfranchised. Elsewhere, statelessness is a tool in the arsenal of those who would seek to manipulate the democratic process, with deprivation of nationality a means of silencing the opposition. To ensure a level and inclusive democratic playing field, stateless persons must also be heard.

    So, if democracy matters, statelessness matters.

    If addressing displacement matters…

    Statelessness is a recognised root cause of forced displacement, with stateless persons fleeing their homes and often countries in order to find protection elsewhere. Preventing cases of statelessness is vital for the prevention of refugee flows – a link that has been a key motivation for UNHCR to further operationalise its statelessness mandate and now call to end statelessness. Addressing nationality disputes and tackling statelessness where it arises can also be a key tool in resolving existing refugee situations because it can pave the way for successful voluntary repatriation and reintegration.

    So, if addressing displacement matters, statelessness matters.

    If peace and security matter…

    The vulnerability, exclusion, despair, frustration and sometimes persecution experienced by stateless persons can spark other problems. Casting a group as “others” or “outsiders” by denying them access to nationality – in spite of clear and lasting ties to the country – can contribute to attitudes of suspicion and discrimination. This can cause a dangerous build-up of tension within and between communities that may lead to conflict. Disputes surrounding nationality, membership, belonging and entitlement can also hamper peace-building efforts.

    So, if peace and security matter, statelessness matters.

    If size matters…

    Many millions of people are affected by statelessness around the world today. UNHCR estimates that there are at least 10 million stateless persons under its mandate and if stateless refugees and stateless Palestinians under UN Relief and Works Agency mandate are added to this tally, the figure is higher still. This means that there are enough stateless persons to create a medium-sized country (although this is not suggested as a solution). Moreover, these numbers do not include the many more who feel the impact of statelessness, for instance because a close family member lacks any nationality.

    So, if size matters, statelessness matters.

    What can you do?

    The launch of the campaign led by the UNHCR to end statelessness by 2024 is a great opportunity to reach out to all individuals, communities and organisations, who have it within their capacity to help address statelessness. Please take a moment to reflect on statelessness and its many impacts. Is it relevant to your field of work? Does it affect people in your country? Do people near you experience the vulnerability and exclusion of statelessness?

    Sign up to UNHCR’s #ibelong campaign to end statelessness: http://ibelong.unhcr.org/. Start a conversation, discuss the issue, raise awareness and try to use your position and expertise to help. Share this note on ‘Why Statelessness Matters’ with people in your network; watch and share this short video too. If you would like to learn more about statelessness, if you want to do something but are not sure what, or if you are looking for partners to collaborate with, get in touch with us and we will try to help. If you think your organisation can better integrate statelessness into its work but would like to brainstorm ideas to make this happen, we will support you. If you want to further study the link between your field of expertise and statelessness, we welcome your plans. Together, we can end statelessness. We can also, in the interim, protect and include the stateless. This issue matters.

    Amal de Chickera, Laura van Waas and Zahra Albarazi – Founders of the Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion

    The Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion is a newly established, independent non-profit organisation dedicated to leading an integrated, inter-disciplinary response to the injustice of statelessness and exclusion. In December 2014, the Institute will release its first publication, “The World’s Stateless”, assessing the challenge of ending statelessness by 2024 by taking a closer look at what we know (and what we don’t know) about who is stateless and where. To find out more or support the Institute’s work, please visit http://www.InstituteSI.org or contact us at info@InstituteSI.org.
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    tags:news

  • “It is not easy to imagine what life would be like if you did not hold any nationality. In fact, it is not easy to even imagine this even being possible. Everyone has a birthplace, a family, a home, a community: surely everyone has a nationality? Sadly, no. Millions of people around the world are stateless. They are perpetual foreigners, disenfranchised, not recognised as or able to exercise the rights of citizens in any country. This is a serious problem – for those affected, but also for those of us who do enjoy a nationality and can make a difference, as people who care about and want our children to grow up in a free, fair, safe and democratic world. “

    tags:news

  • “Back in 1993, a survey showed that Somali refugees were popular among natives, in comparison with Iranians and Palestinians. However, only a few years later, the perception of Somalis had dramatically changed. According to a 1999 study, Somalis experienced more discrimination than any other ethnic minority group in Denmark. This shift followed aggressive media campaigns and political rhetoric at the time, which systematically portrayed Somali refugees as “unwanted immigrants” who caused “problems.” Today many Somalis feel that they are still associated with negative images and stereotypes.”

    tags:news

  • “People who continue to vote for Ukip will end up with a Labour government and “no immigration control at all”, David Cameron has said, as he insisted he can reform EU migration rules despite German opposition.

    The Prime Minister acknowledged he faces opposition from European leaders over his plan to further restrict benefits and freedom of movement to European migrants, saying it would be a “tough negotiation”. “

    tags:news

  • “Chuka Umunna is starting to break the rules. Up until recently Labour’s shadow business secretary had become a byword for political caution and calculation. “He’s good, but it’s not clear what he stands for”, a shadow cabinet colleague told me a few month’s ago.

    Well, Umunna is taking a stand now. Last week he wrote an article in the South London Press on Ukip. And it was definitely not a pat repetition of the current Labour line to take. “

    tags:news

  • “British people are concerned that growing numbers of foreigners are reducing their access to roads, the Government’s immigration minister has said.

    James Brokenshire said a report suggesting that EU migrants contribute more to the UK economy than they receive in benefits had a very “narrow focus”, and had failed to take into account the impact that migration has on public services.

    His comments amount to a rejection of a report that found that immigration from Europe has contributed £20 billion to the public purse between 2000 and 2011, with migrants contributing more in tax than they withdraw in services. “

    tags:news

  • “The new European commission starts work this week at a time when relations with Britain are more fraught than for some months.

    For much of this year YouGov has found a narrow but persistent preference for the UK remaining in the EU. However, two surveys in the past week find that the public has turned against Brussels again. Our latest poll for the Sunday Times shows that if a referendum were held now, 43% would vote to leave and just 37% to stay in.

    Three particular issues have been causing concern at Westminster. First, the European arrest warrant. A few months ago, Britain exercised its right to opt out of a set of EU justice arrangements. Ministers said that they would then decide which particular EU rules they would opt back into. One of these is the arrest warrant: in effect a standard system for extraditing people facing criminal charges that carry a significant prison sentence.”

    tags:news

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Journal Articles (weekly)

  • “Because of the secularity of sociology, religion remains a relatively marginal field of study and the insights of the sociology of religion are generally ignored or overlooked within other subfields. But religion can be a force that deeply influences personal, community, and national life in nonobvious ways through shaping the social and political structures of society. Consequently, including an analysis of religion as a fundamental factor of social life could greatly enrich and even transform many subfields of sociology. In this essay, I focus on the sociology of migration and immigration, my area of research, and show how religion plays a central role in social, economic, and political processes surrounding migration. Drawing on case studies of migration and immigration of groups from India based on my research and that of others, I discuss how religion, through a variety of indirect and direct mechanisms, shapes migration patterns, remittance use, social incorporation into receiving societies, and forms of political mobilization. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The study focused on the experiences and everyday lives of migrant children who, through a range of different routes and circumstances, happen to reside in the United States without legal residence status as well as citizen children who live with at least one unauthorized parent. It aimed to show the multiple ways in which lack of legal status affects the lives of young migrants both directly and through their parents, shaping their social worlds and, more importantly, their chances for the future. Through exploration of services and resources available to these youngsters the study aimed at shedding light on migrant children’s encounter with public services and the complexities and idiosyncrasies of the immigration system at a time of economic downturn and radical reform of public services. Regarding education, the research centered primarily on access to and experiences with formal schooling. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Although it is now increasingly recognized that the stratification of immigrant populations according to legal status has an important impact on integration outcomes, theoretical models and empirical tests of this linkage are rare. This article theorizes how legal-status differences and the corresponding differential treatment by the host government might impact on immigrants’ life chances generally, and on immigrant children’s educational opportunities in particular. In an empirical part of the article, Germany serves as an example of pronounced and highly differentiated legal stratification. For the immigrant cohorts of 1987 to 2003, an institutional analysis characterizes different dimensions of group-specific governmental reception with regard to their direct or indirect relevance for educational opportunities. Based on nationally representative data of the German Mikrozensus, multivariate statistical analyses show the effect of legal status on the types of German school diplomas attained by 1.5-generation immigrants. Though family background including parental education also plays an important part in explaining intergroup disparities, I can demonstrate that a favourable legal status and an inclusive reception by the state are associated with lower educational risks. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Labour mobility has been extensively studied in China and the European Union (EU). However, there has been very little attempt to compare internal migration in the EU and China. This article provides an account of an initial exploratory quantitative comparison of EU and Chinese internal migration. The article first makes the case for comparing the EU and China in the context of the growing literature on international comparisons of migration. Problems of data and definition are then explored, and a review of the literature undertaken to identify which determinants could be used as the basis of comparative study. Mobility patterns are measured by comparing selected indicators including inequality, dispersion and effectiveness. The migration process is then measured in terms of the elasticities of internal migration responses to various contributing factors, among which spatial adjacency, distance, economic prospects, labour market, migrant networks, and immigration policy are filtered out and employed for the study. Gross migration flow models are calibrated to produce initial comparative results, using fixed-effect negative binomial regression methods and a variety of sources of data. The conclusion discusses how this initial exploration has helped identify some potential research directions for future work. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article seeks to understand the politics of emigrants’ home country engagements, with a particular focus on experiences in the USA. Long-distance emigrant politics, I argue, reflects the paradox of migration, which while inherently entailing mobility, is impelled by the unequal, territorial containment of resources, a feature of social life that both gives the migrants new found leverage over states and peoples left behind and constrains their capacity to maintain cross-border connections. As I will show, the processes by which international migrations extend political ties across states collide with those that progressively bring migrants into the polities of the states on which they have converged; consequently, over the long term, the pursuit of emigrant politics turns into immigrant politics, embedding the former foreigners in the political life of the country where they actually reside. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The concept of the migration system, first popularized in the 1970s, has remained a staple component of any review of migration theory. Since then, it has been cast somewhat adrift from its conceptual moorings; today in the literature migration systems are generally either conflated with migrant networks or elevated to the heights of macro-level abstraction which divorces them from any empirical basis. At the same time, by taking on board more sophisticated notions of agency, emergence, and social mechanisms, the broader concept of the social system has moved on from the rather discredited structural−functionalist marina where it was first launched. In recent years, having been rejected by many social theorists, the social system has been subject to major reconstruction prior to its relaunch as a respectable and valuable area of social enquiry. This article argues that, for the most part, these developments in systems theory have been ignored by those applying the concept of systems to the analysis of migration. It addresses the question of how the concept of the migration system can be reformulated in the light of these theoretical advances and what implications this may have for our research and analysis. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “During 2014 migration has remained at the very forefront of public debates around the world. Against the background of ongoing global economic crisis and political instability, anti-immigrant sentiment has been on the rise, and political divisions in the transatlantic English-speaking world were indicative of this wider pattern. Moral panic around immigration to the UK first waxed and then waned once the feared floods from newly acceded EU states failed to materialize, and the scramble for the anti-immigration vote is set to remain a defining feature of the forthcoming 2015 UK General Election. In the USA, once the 2014 mid-term elections are out of the way, the Obama Administration looks likely to impose some immigration reforms by using executive orders to push through the political gridlock that has prevented Congress from acting earlier. Large sections of both main US political parties recognize that their political destinies are bound to the youthful demography of the country’s Latino population, and feel increasingly uncomfortable about the plight of undocumented migrant children, who arrived in record numbers this year. Things have changed remarkably since the Cold War days when immigration was seen as a pillar of Western economic strength and a vindication of its values: in 2014 the UN reported Russia as the world’s second largest stock of immigrants, followed by Germany. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The three books under review fill important gaps in the literature on irregular migration, borders and migration policy; they significantly expand empirical knowledge and offer new interpretations as well as provide essential conceptual and theoretical tools for further research. Anna Triandafyllidou and Thanos Maroukis’ Migrant Smuggling: Irregular Migration from Asia and Africa to Europe presents unique data and empirical evidence on human smuggling in southern Europe. Leanne Weber and Sharon Pickering’s conceptually rich, more normative and global work in Globalization and Borders: Death at the Global Frontier focuses on the location of human smuggling, state borders and in particular deaths related to irregular entry, human smuggling and law enforcement operations. Finally, Gregory Feldman’s The Migration Apparatus: Security, Labor and Policymaking in the European Union not only provides an ethnography of the wider policies of the European migration apparatus that determine the above issues, but also offers some inspiring Foucauldian interpretation about the securitization of migration”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article analyses the link between irregular migration and duration of stay, using household and regional development data from Moldova by running a duration model. Our principal result is that the total duration of migration to a foreign country is the same for regular and irregular migrants. On the other hand the duration of each migration episode is statistically longer for irregular migrants. This means that irregular migrants move less. In addition the duration of migration is mainly determined by individual and household characteristics, and by migration monetary costs. The article, like an increasing number of migration literature papers arriving at the same conclusions, contributes further to the argument for defining more effective and coherent migration policies. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This study employs a select ethnography of Palestinian workers in the field of international law and human rights to explore how an epistemic community gives content and meaning to international law in its professional and personal life. Through a series of interviews conducted in the West Bank in the wake of the Palestinian attempt to gain full United Nations membership in September 2011, the article constructs a meta-narrative about the nature of international legal discourse as spoken on the Palestinian periphery. It shows how speakers of international law are required to restate or over-state the distinction between law and politics so as to sustain their hope and desire for Palestinian statehood in the face of despair about its protracted denial. The article then is an exploration about the politics of meaning making through international law and a call for methodological hybridity within the discipline of international law. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “An urgently needed resource for peacebuilding is a professional and skilled workforce, however, this is lacking in many post-conflict countries. In this article it is suggested that although fewer refugees in developing countries have access to the level of education required for such professions, countries engaged in peacebuilding can benefit from the returnees with such skills. This study therefore, examines the differences in the levels of higher education of 40 Liberian returnees from Ghana and Guinea and the deployment of their skills towards their integration which have links to the broader peacebuilding agenda of Liberia. While the number of returnees with post-secondary education was generally low, the data indicate that comparatively those from Guinea had limited higher education opportunities to those who were in Ghana. Following from these cases, the article argues that insecurity and non-conducive asylum policies and programmes are the major challenges towards the provision of and refugee access to higher education skills training. Some examples of returnees’ deployment of asylum acquired profession and skills towards peacebuilding are discussed as evidence that the provision of higher education for refugees is not simply a tool for empowering refugees, but also an investment in future peacebuilding. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “For over 65 years, protracted Palestinian refugees have been largely excluded from participating in the Lebanese labour market and rare are the studies that examined the socio-economic implications of such exclusion. This article is concerned with how the lack of rights for the Palestinian graduate women affects their (un)employment status. It will use data from a tracer survey among 201 young graduated Palestinian women who received the Scholarship Fund for Palestinian Refugee Women in Lebanon, as well as secondary data from the International Labour Organization and the American University of Beirut/United Nations Relief and Works Agency surveys. Our findings reveal that, first, the better is education for Palestinian women, the more likely they are to be employed; second, while State exclusionary policies have not been successful at completely barring Palestinian women from participating in the Lebanese labour market this participation took the form of segregation into low-paid segments of the Lebanese economy and into black labour market where work conditions are very harsh. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Joseph Carens has long been considered the doyen of normative scholars writing on immigration. Beginning with a highly influential article defending open borders in 1987, Carens has produced a steady stream of pieces on citizenship, refugees, economic migration and irregular migration that have informed almost all serious ethical theorizing on migration. The Ethics of Immigration is his magnum opus. It brings together scholarly reflections honed over three decades, often significantly changed from their original form as articles or book chapters, into a coherent whole. Carens has produced a work that is precise without using technical philosophical language and sensitive to practical empirical consequences without losing sight of moral principles. The Ethics is indispensable reading for anyone interested in the morality of immigration and it will be of value both to philosophers and to empirical social scientists. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Contemporary studies on return migration express a growing interest in the cultural and social dimensions of its economic development. In this article we aim to extend this interest by focusing on economic values returning migrants bring back with them to their countries of origin, captured in what we call the ‘entrepreneurial spirit’. The article is based on in-depth ethnographic fieldwork with Sub-Saharan African labor migrants both in Israel and after their return to their country of origin. Utilizing a Weberian perspective on the connection between values and economic action, we illustrate that even though African migrants work in menial jobs in Israel and very few acquire professional training, they come to utilize Israel as an informal space for the enhancement of a ‘spirit of entrepreneurship’. This spirit contains three valuative transformations: a transformation concerning time (including a valuing of the future over the present); a transformation concerning individual action (replacing the primacy of community with a focus on individual flourishing); and a transformation in social relations (extending trust beyond friends and family to economic partners). These transformations are in line with economic values underlying a capitalist economic system. The expression of these value orientations acts as an important factor through which African countries have become increasingly interlinked and influenced by neoliberal culture. Yet, as the testimonies of African labor migrants reveal, local social structures reside side by side with this imported spirit of entrepreneurship. This hybridity may lead to increased opportunities, but also to feelings of estrangement and frustration. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Central American migrants confront intensifying violence along the unauthorized routes through Mexico into the United States. Under these increasingly violent conditions, are some migrants better prepared to undertake clandestine journeys? Building on research on the social processes of migration, I initially expected to observe an accumulation of resources and safety advantage for migrants from a town with a long migration history, and I expected to find a role for market reputation in the stabilization of smuggling markets in that community. However, ethnographic fieldwork on human smuggling markets in two communities in El Salvador yielded surprising results. Between towns with divergent migration histories, I did not find differences in the information available to migrants or first hand reports from migrants about violence. I observed greater variation in financial resources at the level of the family than at the level of the community. Furthermore, social mechanisms played a greater enforcement role in migrant−smuggler contracts than did market mechanisms. To explain these surprising findings, I explore the social conditions of the hometowns and the dynamic conditions of the route. I argue that distrust undermines reciprocity in Salvadoran hometowns, thereby impeding the accumulation of financial resources for migration at the level of the community. I further argue that the rapidly changing landscape of the Mexican drug war exacerbates informational problems for migrants, eroding the utility of information passed even within trusted family networks. In so doing, I probe the limits of social capital under conditions of violent uncertainty. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article will consider whether contemporary international law has evolved to a point where there is now an individual right to receive asylum opposable to the state’s right to expel. In the literature, it is commonly understood that no such right to receive asylum exists. Instead, where treaties might provide for a ‘right to asylum’, the usual interpretation is not that the person has a right to receive asylum but rather a right to apply for it. This article questions whether this conclusion is still correct in the light of contemporary developments in the law.

    There are a significant number of considerations pointing to a right to receive asylum. In the drafting of Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Refugee Convention, there was already considerable disagreement over whether there should be a right to receive asylum but in the end a more conservative wording was adopted. However, some subsequent human rights treaties following the UDHR have explicitly provided for the right to receive asylum. The practice of states has also evolved, partly under the influence of these treaty regimes. States are increasingly providing for a right to receive asylum in their domestic law and assimilating refugees to asylum seekers, often granting asylum as the automatic result of a positive refugee status determination. The bulk of these practices are converging into a widespread and consistent practice with strong opinio juris on point. These trends suggest a crystallizing customary international law right to receive asylum, albeit limited to refugees. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The absence of protection from persecution is a precondition to qualifying as a refugee. However, protection is not solely provided by states and may stem from non-state actors (NSAs) such as international organizations. This article will examine whether such protection may be substituted for ‘protection of that country’ and, if so, under what circumstances, and whether it may thus preclude the application of the Refugee Convention. The focus will be on the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees owing to its significant role in the protection of Internally Displaced Persons, persons who often go on to make a refugee claim upon fleeing the state. The article will first put forward an interpretation of the term ‘protection of that country’, by examining the refugee definition, in particular the meaning of the terms ‘that country’ and ‘protection’; by analysing relevant principles of EU law; and by outlining how these concepts have been elaborated by relevant jurisprudence on international organizations. The second half of the article will analyse the legal basis and scope of UNHCR’s mandate with IDPs, and will conclude by illustrating the reasons why the activities of UNHCR cannot constitute ‘protection of that country’ for the purposes of precluding the application of the refugee definition. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Event: Displacement and development in the Somalia context

Event: Displacement and development in the Somalia context

How does the Somalia New Deal Compact address displacement? Danish Refugee Council and Solutions Alliance Somalia will host a joint side-event on November 18 to the Somalia New Deal Compact High Level Partnership Forum.

Together with UNHCR, the side-event will discuss the ways in which the New Deal Compact accounts for displacement and more broadly discuss displacement as a development challenge in the Somalia context.

The event will have opening remarks from the Danish Minister of Trade and Development, Mogens Jensen, and consist of a panel with representatives from the Somali Ministry of Interior, World Bank, UNHCR, UNDP and Regional Durable Solutions Secretariat (ReDSS).

The event is open to all. It is currently advertised on the Danish Refugee Council and Solutions Alliance websites.

Time and Venue:
16:30-18:30 on 18 November 2014 at Kosmopol, Fiolstræde 44, Copenhagen

Registration:
http://goo.gl/tmLlBQ

Any questions related to the side-event can be directed to Ms. Alice Anderson-Gough, alice.anderson-gough@drc.dk

Table of Contents Alert: Migration Studies Volume 2, Number 3, (November 1, 2014)

Oxford Journals have released their latest table of Content alert for the journal Migration Studies.  This alert covers  Volume 2, Number 3, (November 1, 2014), and details of the articles included in this volume are highlighted below:

Editorial

Editorial: Celebrating excellence in migration studies
Alan Gamlen
Migrat Stud 2014 2: 295-299
[Extract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Articles

Relaunching migration systems
Oliver Bakewell
Migrat Stud 2014 2: 300-318
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Engaging from abroad: The sociology of emigrant politics
Roger Waldinger
Migrat Stud 2014 2: 319-339
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Comparing inter-migration within the European Union and China: An initial exploration
Jianquan Cheng, Craig Young, Xiaonan Zhang, and Kofi Owusu
Migrat Stud 2014 2: 340-368
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Symposium: The Impacts of Irregular Status

How legal status contributes to differential integration opportunities
Janina Söhn
Migrat Stud 2014 2: 369-391
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

To dream or not to dream: The effects of immigration status, discrimination, and parental influence on Latino children’s access to education
Elżbieta M. Goździak
Migrat Stud 2014 2: 392-414
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Should we stay or should we go? Irregular migration and duration of stay: The case of Moldovan migrants
Daniela Borodak and Ariane Tichit
Migrat Stud 2014 2: 415-447
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Supplementary Data] [Request Permissions]

Review

Human smuggling, border deaths and the migration apparatus
Franck Düvell
Migrat Stud 2014 2: 448-454
[Extract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

 

Human rights documentary “Beatrice Mtetwa & The Rule of Law” on television and internet

Originally posted on Hans Thoolen on Human Rights Defenders:

On 13 November KCETLink, a US national independent public media organization, presents the television premiere of “BEATRICE MTETWA & THE RULE OF LAW“, chronicling the courageous human rights defender and her fight against social and political inequalities in Zimbabwe. Through interviews with Mtetwa and some of her clients, the film tells the story of what happens when leaders place themselves above the law and why defense of the rule of law is the cornerstone of society in which human rights are respected. Although Mtetwa’s platform is centered in Zimbabwe, her message and bravery are universal.

The television broadcast of BEATRICE MTETWA & THE RULE OF LAW coincides with the Ivan Allen Jr. Prize for Social Courage presented by Georgia Tech honoring Beatrice Mtetwa on Thursday, 13 November, 2014. The Ivan Allen Jr. Prize for Social Courage recognizes individuals around the world who, by asserting moral principle, have positively…

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News Stories (Daily) 11/06/2014

  • “Like Monty Python before us, we have reached a moment in the national discourse when the time has come to ask: “What have migrants ever done for us?” The answer, according to some, is precisely nothing, and that they represent a net drain on the economy, claiming benefits, abusing public services, thieving and generally loafing around in parks.

    This does not accord with common sense or experience, the fact that immigrants were coming to Britain long before the welfare state was invented, or that everyone who has ever used a minicab, visited a hospital or called a plumber will most likely have found themselves in the company of a hard-working individual who has travelled halfway around the world simply to make a better life for themselves and their family. That is not an ignoble thing.”

    tags:news

  • “Not long after the Moroccan government decided to mount a campaign of regularisation, over 8,000 migrants have already been regularised (3,000 based on applications and another 5,000 women and children as priority cases) and are trying to make a new life in Morocco. Counter-intuitively, there has also been an increase in the number of instances of migrants trying to scale the fence en masse to make it into Melilla, a Spanish city bordering Morocco, in crowds of hundreds at a time. Indeed, only a few months ago, 400 irregular sub-Saharan migrants made it into Melilla by storming the 7 metre high border fence. It is one of several attempts that have taken place this year. This raises two main questions. First, is the new Moroccan regularisation policy unappealing, compared with the lure of a better life in Europe? Or, second, are these migrants who are attempting to cross the border unable to satisfy the criteria for regularisation (eg two years of Moroccan residence) and therefore have no option but to try their luck or face deportation?”

    tags:news

  • “France will pump three million euros per year to convert a children’s holiday camp into a day centre for migrants in Calais that hope to reach Britain in the New Year, the country’s interior minister has confirmed.

    The plan sparked strong criticism from migrant help groups, who claim it will create a “ghetto” and resemble Sangatte – the notorious Red Cross welcome centre closed in 2002. “

    tags:news

  • “Polish people living in Britain are almost 20 per cent more likely to have a job than those born in the UK, a study of official figures shows.

    New Analysis of findings from the 2011 Census by the Office for National Statistics shows that Polish-born residents of England and Wales have the highest employment rate of any other group when analysed by birth.

    It also shows that migrants from EU countries have dramatically higher levels of employment than those from non-European countries. “

    tags:news

  • “Immigrants who came to live in Britain from outside Europe cost the public purse nearly £120 billion over 17 years, a new report has shown.

    The major academic study also found, however, that recent immigration from Europe – driven by the surge in arrivals from eastern European – gave the economy a £4.4 billion boost over the same period. “

    tags:news

  • “British police should patrol the port at Calais to solve the “tremendous problem” of migrants trying to cross the Channel, a senior French minister has said.

    Bernard Cazeneuve, France’s interior minister, told the BBC he has had “lots of rendezvous” with his counterpart at Westminster, Home Secretary Theresa May and stressed the need for British officers’ help. “

    tags:news

  • “So when another hefty economic study says that the arrival of those Europeans has been a net positive to the public finances, it would be easy for me to write another piece lauding the study as another triumph of reason over prejudice, proof positive that a free market for labour is a good thing just as it is for goods and services. In other words, to say I told you so. “

    tags:news

  • “On Tuesday, parliament will scrutinise the modern slavery bill for its third reading in the House of Commons. Although the bill – which the government trumpets as “the first of its kind in Europe” – is broadly welcomed for forcing the issue on to the political agenda, there is dismay from charities working with the victims of trafficking. Campaigners say the bill is tilted too heavily towards prosecuting traffickers, without providing enough support for their victims.”

    tags:news

  • “European migrants to the UK are not a drain on Britain’s finances and pay out far more in taxes than they receive in state benefits, a new study has revealed.

    The research by two leading migration economists at University College also reveals that Britain is uniquely successful, even more than Germany, in attracting the most highly skilled and highly educated migrants in Europe.

    The study, the Fiscal Impact of Immigration to the UK, published in the Economic Journal, reveals that more than 60% of new migrants from western and southern Europe are now university graduates. The educational levels of east Europeans who come to Britain are also improving with 25% of recent arrivals having completed a degree compared with 24% of the UK-born workforce.”

    tags:news

  • “The positive impact of recent European migration to Britain is highlighted by the fact that the UK now attracts the highest number of university-educated migrants of any country in the European Union, according to new research from University College London.

    The study, published in the Economic Journal on Wednesday shows that 62% of migrants from western Europe – the A15 countries such as France, Italy and Spain – who come to Britain each year have a university degree compared with 24% of the British labour force.

    The authors put a figure of £6.8bn on the value of the overseas education received before their arrival by migrants who have come to Britain since 2000.”

    tags:news

  • “esterday, the UN refugee agency (UNHCR) launched its campaign to end statelessness by 2024 – a revival of the dream first conceived by US lawyer and judge Manley Ottmer Hudson in 1952. This is an ambitious task, almost bold, yet feasible considering UNHCR’s achievements in the last three years and its awareness of the need to build an international social movement to “champion” the cause of statelessness, on a par with the work being done on landmines, child soldiers and rape in armed conflict.”

    tags:news

  • “A dust cloud from the US air strike drifts across the border from Kobani and blurs our view from the overlooking Turkish hilltop. Most if not all of those watching – all Kurds, it seems, from both Syria and Turkey – agree that the damage caused to the city by air strikes is a price worth paying. Many believe the city’s defence, led by Syrian Kurdish fighters, would have collapsed without them.

    “My home may get destroyed but if it forces out Da’esh”, as the armed group which calls itself the Islamic State (IS) is usually referred to locally, “then I am happy,” says one.”

    tags:news

  • “Today’s conviction of three men following a brutal racist attack on a Roma woman and her nephew is a “first step towards justice”, said Amnesty International and Greek Helsinki Monitor – the NGO that provided free legal representation to the victims.

    A court in the town of Messolonghi today handed eight-month jail sentences – suspended for three years – to the three men over the attack on Paraskevi Kokoni and her nephew Kostas Theodoropoulos in October 2012. “

    tags:news

  • The Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion is a newly established, independent non-profit organisation dedicated to leading an integrated, inter-disciplinary response to the injustice of statelessness and exclusion. Two of our co-founders – Laura van Waas and Amal de Chickera were founding steering committee members of ENS, currently sitting on the ENS Advisory Committee. We believe that the issue of statelessness has an impact on many fields, and that it is only through a concerted effort across all such fields, that we will be able to ultimately end statelessness. Thus, we hope reach out to colleagues working on related issues and draw them into the discourse, campaign and movement to end statelessness. Below is the note we prepared to demonstrate why a campaign to end statelessness should matter to those working on related issues. Your cooperation in disseminating it widely would be most appreciated. This can also be viewed on the website of the Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion.

    04 November 2014

    Why a campaign to end statelessness matters

    Dear friends and colleagues,

    It is not easy to imagine what life would be like if you did not hold any nationality. In fact, it is not easy to even imagine this even being possible. Everyone has a birthplace, a family, a home, a community: surely everyone has a nationality? Sadly, no. Millions of people around the world are stateless. They are perpetual foreigners, disenfranchised, not recognised as or able to exercise the rights of citizens in any country. This is a serious problem – for those affected, but also for those of us who do enjoy a nationality and can make a difference, as people who care about and want our children to grow up in a free, fair, safe and democratic world.

    We welcome, admire and support the ambitious campaign launched today by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to end statelessness by 2024. Statelessness fundamentally and unequivocally deserves more attention than it has received to date and the time has come for it to take its rightful place amongst other pressing and worrying issues that are already vying for international attention. We are not powerless in the face of statelessness. Citizenship is our own modern-day creation and we set the rules. Bad laws can be amended. Discriminatory policies can be repealed. We believe that with greater awareness of the issue, stronger collaboration and a firm commitment to act, statelessness can be solved. Indeed, we not only believe that statelessness can be tackled, we believe that it must. Statelessness matters, to all of us, for many reasons. Here are just some of them…

    If people matter…

    Stateless persons are among the world’s most vulnerable. They are seen and treated as foreigners by every country in the world, including the country in which they were born, the country of their ancestors, the country of their residence, the country they happen to find themselves in today and any country they may find themselves expelled to tomorrow. Stateless persons face an extreme form of exclusion that impacts their sense of dignity and identity, as well as their ability to do all sorts of everyday things that most of us take for granted, like go to school, get a job, be treated by a doctor, get married or travel.

    So, if people matter, statelessness matters.

    If children matter…

    Many of the world’s stateless persons are children. In fact, in every region of the world, children continue to be born into statelessness and grow up never knowing the protection and recognition that comes with a nationality. Some children inherit their statelessness from stateless parents, creating an intergenerational problem. Others aren’t able to acquire their parents’ or any other nationality due to discriminatory laws and policies or the failure of governments to implement simple legal safeguards that prevent childhood statelessness. Without a nationality, children can have difficulty exercising their rights, become outcasts in their own country, struggle to feel like they belong and grow up to be disenfranchised and excluded adults.

    So, if children matter, statelessness matters.

    If human rights matter…

    The contemporary human rights framework is premised on notions of equality, liberty, dignity and universality: we all hold basic rights because we are human beings. But the human rights system also recognises that states may reserve some rights for their citizens, such as the right to vote or be elected, placing these out of reach for stateless people. And in practice, statelessness is a proven barrier to the exercise a wide range of other rights. So the very universality of human rights rests on the premise that everyone enjoys a nationality – laid down, for that reason, as a right in most major human rights instruments. Until statelessness is eradicated, the fundamental aspiration of universal human rights remains just that, an aspiration.

    So, if human rights matter, statelessness matters.

    If development matters…

    Difficulties accessing education and employment; restricted property rights; lack of opportunities to own or register a business; limited access to a bank account or a loan; and, in some cases, the threat of extortion, detention or expulsion; these factors can trap stateless persons in poverty and make it extremely challenging for them to improve their circumstances. Where statelessness affects whole communities over several successive generations – as it often sadly does – such communities can be neglected by development actors and processes. Statelessness means a waste, of individual potential, of human capital and of development opportunities.

    So, if development matters, statelessness matters.

    If democracy matters…

    Nationality is the gateway to political participation. Stateless persons have no right to vote, stand for election or effect change through regular political channels. Their statelessness suppresses their voices and renders their opinions obsolete. In countries with large stateless populations, whole sectors of the constituency are disenfranchised. Elsewhere, statelessness is a tool in the arsenal of those who would seek to manipulate the democratic process, with deprivation of nationality a means of silencing the opposition. To ensure a level and inclusive democratic playing field, stateless persons must also be heard.

    So, if democracy matters, statelessness matters.

    If addressing displacement matters…

    Statelessness is a recognised root cause of forced displacement, with stateless persons fleeing their homes and often countries in order to find protection elsewhere. Preventing cases of statelessness is vital for the prevention of refugee flows – a link that has been a key motivation for UNHCR to further operationalise its statelessness mandate and now call to end statelessness. Addressing nationality disputes and tackling statelessness where it arises can also be a key tool in resolving existing refugee situations because it can pave the way for successful voluntary repatriation and reintegration.

    So, if addressing displacement matters, statelessness matters.

    If peace and security matter…

    The vulnerability, exclusion, despair, frustration and sometimes persecution experienced by stateless persons can spark other problems. Casting a group as “others” or “outsiders” by denying them access to nationality – in spite of clear and lasting ties to the country – can contribute to attitudes of suspicion and discrimination. This can cause a dangerous build-up of tension within and between communities that may lead to conflict. Disputes surrounding nationality, membership, belonging and entitlement can also hamper peace-building efforts.

    So, if peace and security matter, statelessness matters.

    If size matters…

    Many millions of people are affected by statelessness around the world today. UNHCR estimates that there are at least 10 million stateless persons under its mandate and if stateless refugees and stateless Palestinians under UN Relief and Works Agency mandate are added to this tally, the figure is higher still. This means that there are enough stateless persons to create a medium-sized country (although this is not suggested as a solution). Moreover, these numbers do not include the many more who feel the impact of statelessness, for instance because a close family member lacks any nationality.

    So, if size matters, statelessness matters.

    What can you do?

    The launch of the campaign led by the UNHCR to end statelessness by 2024 is a great opportunity to reach out to all individuals, communities and organisations, who have it within their capacity to help address statelessness. Please take a moment to reflect on statelessness and its many impacts. Is it relevant to your field of work? Does it affect people in your country? Do people near you experience the vulnerability and exclusion of statelessness?

    Sign up to UNHCR’s #ibelong campaign to end statelessness: http://ibelong.unhcr.org/. Start a conversation, discuss the issue, raise awareness and try to use your position and expertise to help. Share this note on ‘Why Statelessness Matters’ with people in your network; watch and share this short video too. If you would like to learn more about statelessness, if you want to do something but are not sure what, or if you are looking for partners to collaborate with, get in touch with us and we will try to help. If you think your organisation can better integrate statelessness into its work but would like to brainstorm ideas to make this happen, we will support you. If you want to further study the link between your field of expertise and statelessness, we welcome your plans. Together, we can end statelessness. We can also, in the interim, protect and include the stateless. This issue matters.

    Amal de Chickera, Laura van Waas and Zahra Albarazi – Founders of the Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion

    The Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion is a newly established, independent non-profit organisation dedicated to leading an integrated, inter-disciplinary response to the injustice of statelessness and exclusion. In December 2014, the Institute will release its first publication, “The World’s Stateless”, assessing the challenge of ending statelessness by 2024 by taking a closer look at what we know (and what we don’t know) about who is stateless and where. To find out more or support the Institute’s work, please visit http://www.InstituteSI.org or contact us at info@InstituteSI.org.
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    tags:news

  • “It is not easy to imagine what life would be like if you did not hold any nationality. In fact, it is not easy to even imagine this even being possible. Everyone has a birthplace, a family, a home, a community: surely everyone has a nationality? Sadly, no. Millions of people around the world are stateless. They are perpetual foreigners, disenfranchised, not recognised as or able to exercise the rights of citizens in any country. This is a serious problem – for those affected, but also for those of us who do enjoy a nationality and can make a difference, as people who care about and want our children to grow up in a free, fair, safe and democratic world. “

    tags:news

  • “Back in 1993, a survey showed that Somali refugees were popular among natives, in comparison with Iranians and Palestinians. However, only a few years later, the perception of Somalis had dramatically changed. According to a 1999 study, Somalis experienced more discrimination than any other ethnic minority group in Denmark. This shift followed aggressive media campaigns and political rhetoric at the time, which systematically portrayed Somali refugees as “unwanted immigrants” who caused “problems.” Today many Somalis feel that they are still associated with negative images and stereotypes.”

    tags:news

  • “People who continue to vote for Ukip will end up with a Labour government and “no immigration control at all”, David Cameron has said, as he insisted he can reform EU migration rules despite German opposition.

    The Prime Minister acknowledged he faces opposition from European leaders over his plan to further restrict benefits and freedom of movement to European migrants, saying it would be a “tough negotiation”. “

    tags:news

  • “Chuka Umunna is starting to break the rules. Up until recently Labour’s shadow business secretary had become a byword for political caution and calculation. “He’s good, but it’s not clear what he stands for”, a shadow cabinet colleague told me a few month’s ago.

    Well, Umunna is taking a stand now. Last week he wrote an article in the South London Press on Ukip. And it was definitely not a pat repetition of the current Labour line to take. “

    tags:news

  • “British people are concerned that growing numbers of foreigners are reducing their access to roads, the Government’s immigration minister has said.

    James Brokenshire said a report suggesting that EU migrants contribute more to the UK economy than they receive in benefits had a very “narrow focus”, and had failed to take into account the impact that migration has on public services.

    His comments amount to a rejection of a report that found that immigration from Europe has contributed £20 billion to the public purse between 2000 and 2011, with migrants contributing more in tax than they withdraw in services. “

    tags:news

  • “The new European commission starts work this week at a time when relations with Britain are more fraught than for some months.

    For much of this year YouGov has found a narrow but persistent preference for the UK remaining in the EU. However, two surveys in the past week find that the public has turned against Brussels again. Our latest poll for the Sunday Times shows that if a referendum were held now, 43% would vote to leave and just 37% to stay in.

    Three particular issues have been causing concern at Westminster. First, the European arrest warrant. A few months ago, Britain exercised its right to opt out of a set of EU justice arrangements. Ministers said that they would then decide which particular EU rules they would opt back into. One of these is the arrest warrant: in effect a standard system for extraditing people facing criminal charges that carry a significant prison sentence.”

    tags:news

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

The Refugee Council Archives at UEL Weekly Bulletin: Issue: 2, (5th November 2014)

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Refugee Archives News

The Refugee Council Archives at UEL Weekly Bulletin

Issue: 2, (5th November 2014).

Introduction

Welcome to the first/latest issue of Refugee Archive News: The Refugee Council Archives at UEL (hopefully) Weekly Bulletin.

This bulletin has the aim of providing both the latest news and developments on the Refugee Council Archive at the University of East London whilst also providing additional information on issues of concern to refugee and forced migration studies more generally. This I hope will include details of news stories, calls for papers, conferences and seminars, and online resources of potential interest. This bulletin, I hope, will aim to provide useful information to both students and academics on both UEL undergraduate courses in International Development and postgraduate students on our courses in Refugee Studies; Refugee Studies and Community Development and Conflict, Displacement and Human Security, whilst also being hopefully of interest to a wider readership represented by our Twitter and Blog followers.

This bulletin will be circulated via our Refugee Archive WordPress blog and also via our Refugee-Research Jiscmail email list. We would welcome any feedback that you may have on this bulletin and we would also welcome any input that you may have in terms of current and future content for both this bulletin and also our WordPress blog more generally. Please Contact Paul Dudman via email (library-archvies@uel.ac.uk) or Twitter (@PaulDudman) with any feedback or thoughts that you may have.

There are also some general Archive details included at the end of this and every bulletin posting for your reference.

Archive, CMRB and Course-Related News

Archive News

Forthcoming Archive Closures

Please note, the Refugee Council Archive will be closed on the following dates due to the Archivist, Paul Dudman, being unavailable. Please contact us if you have any further enquiries, my contact details are at the end of this bulletin:

Thursday 6th November – Archivist on a course in the afternoon.

Monday 10th November – Archivist on a course all day.

Thursday 13th November – Archivist at Stratford Campus for meeting with Hackney Empire.

Monday 17th November – Tuesday 18th November – Archivist at the Digital Preservation Coalition event  ‘Investing in Opportunity: Policy Practice and Planning for a Sustainable Digital Future’ at Wellcome Trust in London

Thursday 20th November – Archive closed for induction / training sessions.
CMRB News

News on the latest CMRB Seminar:

Between Innocence and Deviance:

figuring the asylum-seeker child in Australia

Dr. Carly McLaughlin

(University of Potsdam)

This seminar will take place in

EB.1.04, Docklands Campus, University of East London, E16 2RD, nearest tube: Cyprus DLR

(http://www.uel.ac.uk/campuses/docklands/)

4-6pm, Monday 10th November 2014

The event is free but spaces are limited so please reserve a place by following the below link https://betweeninnocenceanddeviance.eventbrite.co.uk

Abstract: In Australia, the depiction of asylum seekers as monstrous parents who throw their children into the sea or force their children to take part in protests in detention centres has rightly been identified as part of the government’s campaign to dehumanise asylum seekers. So far, however, little focus has been placed on the children and the discourses which form around them. This paper examines the way in which the figure of the child asylum seeker has been produced and instrumentalised in different discursive contexts. Across the political divide, asylum-seeker children have invariably been figured as victims, an image which has not only served the government’s cause of demonising adult asylum seekers, but has also been used as powerful political currency for those campaigning on behalf of asylum seekers. The instrumentalisation of this figure hinges on universal ideas about childhood as a universal, apolitical state of innocence and vulnerability. The paper explores how this leads to the image and behaviour of asylum seeker children in Australia being contained within normative ideas about childhood, thus ensuring that the figure of the innocent and vulnerable asylum-seeker child remains intact. Ultimately, this abstracts children from the highly politicised context of Australia’s mandatory detention regime and renders them invisible as political subjects.

Carly McLaughlin is a lecturer in literary and cultural studies in the Department of English and American Studies at the University of Potsdam, Germany. In her research, she is interested in how the politics of childhood influences how child migrants are perceived, especially within the context of ‘illegal’ migration. She is currently working on her post-doctoral project which is concerned with the legal, social and cultural production of the figure of the asylum seeker child in Australia and Great Britain.

See www.euborderscapes.eu for more information on the EU Borderscapes project, www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/borderscapes for details of the UEL Borderscapes team and www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb for information on CMRB

In the News

The Independent – Ten things that immigration has done for Britain

The Guardian – France wants British police in Calais to help with migrants

The Guardian – Statelessness is an evil that has been hidden for too long

The Guardian – UK is magnet for highly educated EU migrants, research shows

The Guardian – UK gains £20bn from European migrants, UCL economists reveal

The Telegraph – Immigration from outside Europe ‘cost £120 billion’

The Telegraph – Shouting about the economic benefits of immigration isn’t the way to persuade people

The Telegraph – Make Leicester British review, Channel 4: ‘uncomfortable’

The Guardian – ‘I came to the UK and I was turned into a prostitute’ – trafficked women share their horrific stories

The Telegraph – France to spend €3m per year on Calais migrant centre

Refugee Council – A catalogue of failures: watchdog’s review of immigration detention.

The Telegraph – David Cameron to push ahead with freedom of movement curbs, George Osborne insists.

The Telegraph – Do or die for the wannabe Britons.

Migrants’ Rights Network – Refugees on the Mediterranean: Violence and war are driving flows – not people traffickers.

The Telegraph – Leaving the EU wouldn’t solve our immigration problem.

The Guardian – Please, Britain, don’t lose your sense of common humanity.

The Guardian – Angela Merkel warns David Cameron over freedom of movement.

BBC News – EU migrants: Merkel v Cameron.

The Independent – Auf wiedersehen, Britain: ‘Merkel ready to cast UK adrift’ over quotas on migrant workers.

The Guardian – Archbishop of Canterbury: ‘don’t demonise immigrants’

The Independent – Tory MP Michael Fallon says claims immigrants are ‘swamping’ towns were ‘a little careless’

UN Human Rights News – Europe / Migrants: “Let them die, this is a good deterrence” – UN human rights expert.

The Age – Australia needs long term policy to handle immigration, says major new report.

BBC News – Mo Asumang: Confronting racism face-to-face.

Czech Republic/Slovakia. Slovakia’s National Memory Institute, which administers files of former Slovak communist regime, says that the Czech Republic has not lived up to a 2007 agreement to provide Slovakia with the files related to Slovakia that were maintained by Czechoslovakia’s communist era secret police. http://spectator.sme.sk/articles/view/55338/10/files_of_slovak_communist_agents_still_in_czech_republic.html

(Source: Human Rights Working Group at the International Council on Archives: Newsletter, September 2014).

Iraq/Kurdistan/United States. The University of Colorado issued a press release, announcing that a Kurdish delegation would receive an electronic copy of the Captured Iraqi Secret Police Files held by the university. http://www.colorado.edu/news/releases/2014/09/22/visiting-kurdish-delegation-receive-iraqi-secret-police-documents-cu
(Source: Human Rights Working Group at the International Council on Archives: Newsletter, September 2014).

Lithuania/United States. The New York-based YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and Lithuania’s Central State Archives and National Library announced a project to digitize and merge online their pre-war archives about the life of Eastern European Jews, delft.lt reported. http://en.delfi.lt/lithuania/society/american-and-lithuanian-institutions-to-merge-jewish-archives-online.d?id=65926444
(Source: Human Rights Working Group at the International Council on Archives: Newsletter, September 2014).

United Kingdom/Former colonies. A reporter for VICE interviewed Mandy Banton, a former employee of the U.K. National Archives, about the records that the Foreign and Commonwealth Office had concealed from and not transferred to the National Archives—a breach of the U.K. Public Records Act. For background see HRWG News 2014-05. http://www.vice.com/read/katie-engelhart-britains-secrets-mandy-banton-321
(Source: Human Rights Working Group at the International Council on Archives: Newsletter, September 2014).

Bosnia. “The Sense news agency, which covers war crimes trials, opened the new archive of case documents, witness testimonies and forensic evidence at the Srebrenica genocide memorial centre in Potocari,” BIRN reported. http://www.balkaninsight.com/en/article/news-agency-sense-s-archive-on-srebrenica-in-potocari?utm_source=Balkan+Transitional+Justice+Daily+Newsletter&utm_campaign=124d57661d-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_561b9a25c3-124d57661d-311109073

 

Events and Call for Papers

Organising and migration(s): moving borders, enacting transformative spatialities, creating mobile commons

For general information about the conference: http://www2.le.ac.uk/conference/cms15

Organising and migration(s): moving borders, enacting transformative spatialities, creating mobile commons

Stream conveners

  • Margherita Grazioli, University of Leicester, UK
  • Martina Martignoni, University of Leicester, UK
  • Claire English, University of Leicester, UK

In the last decade, Critical Management Studies and Alternative Organisational Studies have increasingly engaged with the issue of migration management. Questions of mobility have gained a renewed centrality in the globalised, post-Fordist capitalist moment for both capital and the State. Capital, demanding maximum flexibility in the transporation of goods, and an equally malleable mobility of workers, according to just-in-time and to-the-point patterns, and the State; in its production of tools capable of selecting and managing each labour force in order to compete in the global market.

We invite contributions that deal with, but are not limited to, the following areas and questions, in order to hybridise and mutually nurture the aforementioned fields of studies:

  • Migrants’ organisation and creation of safe places for fostering mobility, settlement and border-crossing through varying spatialities;
  • Theories and practices of organising as the act of moving borders/moving borders as act of creation;
  • Rethinking political subjectivation in the light of the struggles enacted by migrant and ‘native’ urban dwellers together for the right to the city.

Any contribution that aims to transform, subvert and rethink the boundaries between different disciplines is warmly welcome!

Submission details

Abstracts of 500 words max need to be submitted to by 31 January 2015, including your name, affiliation and contact details, to the address migstreamcms2015@gmail.com. No extended deadlines can be catered for due to the organizational timeline of the conference. All abstracts will be reviewed by the convenors and participants will be notified of acceptance of their papers by 10 March. Conference papers or extended abstract in the range of 1,000-4,000 words will be expected by 22 June 2015. If you have further questions or enquiries, please address your queries to the email address above.

Online Resources

Dissertation Reviews – Social Networks and Online Media for Migration Scholars:

“In the last few months there have been a number of blog posts and articles in circulation about academics using social networks and online media. One of the more prominent ones includes an article about academic social networks in the journal Nature. In this post, I will discuss how I use social networks and online media as a migration researcher. These tools have helped build my career by giving me an additional way to engage with my professional communities. They have also helped to improve my research itself, by challenging me to explain it to different kinds of audiences.”

Link to Full Article – http://dissertationreviews.org/archives/9938
Online Publications

Country Information and Guidance Iraq: The security situation in the ‘contested’ areas of Iraq.
A new report published by the UK Home Office.
Link: www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/347269/CIG_Iraq_security_situation_v2_0.pdf

Country Profile : FGM in Mali.
A new report by the charity 28 Too Many.
Link : http://www.28toomany.org/media/uploads/mali_final.pdf

See the Article in the Women’s Asylum News Newsletter, Issue 125 at : http://www.asylumaid.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/WAN125.pdf

Reforming the UK border and immigration system
http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201415/cmselect/cmpubacc/584/584.pdf

Human Rights Risk Atlas 2014. Maplecroft, a global analytics company, produced the seventh annual Human Rights Risk Atlas. http://maplecroft.com/portfolio/new-analysis/2013/12/04/70-increase-countries-identified-extreme-risk-human-rights-2008-bhuman-rights-risk-atlas-2014b/
(Source: Human Rights Working Group at the International Council on Archives: Newsletter, September 2014).

Prosecution for grave crimes in Syria and Iraq. “Western governments have begun private talks aimed at coming up with fresh strategies to speed the process of judging those responsible for grave crimes in the conflicts in Syria and Iraq,” reported the New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/22/world/spurred-by-isis-violence-nations-mull-how-to-press-for-justice-in-conflicts.html?_r=0
(Source: Human Rights Working Group at the International Council on Archives: Newsletter, September 2014).

National courts and universal justice. Human Rights Watch (HRW) issued a major report on the need for national “criminal justice authorities” to work closely with immigration officials “to identify potential suspects [of war crimes and crimes against humanity] on their soil.” http://www.hrw.org/news/2014/09/18/eu-asylum-and-war-criminals-no-place-hide   http://www.hrw.org/reports/2014/09/16/long-arm-justice
(Source: Human Rights Working Group at the International Council on Archives: Newsletter, September 2014).

Syrian female refugees. The International Rescue Committee (IRC) published a report detailing the “chronic abuse and harassment experienced by [Syrian refugee] women and girls over the past three years.” http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2014/sep/18/women-girls-failed-international-response-syria?mkt_tok=3RkMMJWWfF9wsRouv6zJZKXonjHpfsX96uUkXrHr08Yy0EZ5VunJEUWy2YMJRMB0aPyQAgobGp5I5FEKS7nYUbZ1t6MJWA%3D%3D; for the report see http://www.rescue-uk.org/report/are-we-listening.html
(Source: Human Rights Working Group at the International Council on Archives: Newsletter, September 2014).

The Humanitarian Law Center (HLC) in Belgrade released its research report, Analysis of the War Crimes Prosecution in Serbia in the period 2004-2013. http://www.hlc-rdc.org/?lang=de   The HLC also released the second issue of its newsletter “Through Accession towards Justice.”
(Source: Human Rights Working Group at the International Council on Archives: Newsletter, September 2014).

South Africa’s Right2Know Campaign issued a report, “Secret State of the Nation 2014.” http://www.r2k.org.za/wp-content/uploads/R2K-secrecy-report-2014.pdf
(Source: Human Rights Working Group at the International Council on Archives: Newsletter, September 2014).

New Additions to the Archive

Reproduced below are some of the latest items we have catalogued and added to the Refugee Council Archive collection. All of these are now available via the UEL Library Search online discovery tool. Search for these items and others on the library catalogue.

Forced Migration Review
Issue 47: The Syria Crisis, Displacement and Protection
Full Text: http://www.fmreview.org/syria

Forced Migration Review
Supplement: Innovation and Refugees
Full Text: http://www.fmreview.org/innovation

Protection in Europe for Refugees from Syria.
By Cynthia Orchard and Andrew Miller.
RSC Policy Briefing 10, September 2014.

Ensuring Quality Education for Young Refugees from Syria (12-25 years): A Mapping Exercise.
By Dawn Chatty (and others).
RSC Research Report, September 2014.

The Culture of Disbelief: An Ethnographic Approach to Understanding an Under-theorised Concept of the UK Asylum System.
By Jessica Anderson (and others).
RSC Working Paper 102, July 2014.

Reluctant to Return? The Primacy of Social Networks in the Repatriation of Rwandan Refugees in Uganda.
By Cleophas Karooma.
RSC Working Paper 103, July 2014.

The equality implications of being a migrant in Britain.
Eleonore Kofman … [et al.].

The impact of a human rights culture on public sector organisations : lessons from practice.
Equality and Human Rights Commission.

Public perceptions of human rights.
Kully Kaur-Ballagan … [et al.].

Social housing allocation and immigrant communities.
by Jill Rutter and Maria Latorre.

Evaluating the impact of selected cases under the Human Rights Act on public services provision.
by Alice Donald, Elizabeth Mottershaw, Philip Leach and Jenny Watson.

The role and experience of inspectorates, regulators and complaints-handling bodies in promoting human rights standards in public services : final report for the Equality and Human Rights Commission.
Office for Public Management.

Human rights inquiry : report of the Equality and Human Rights Commission.
Equality and Human Rights Commission.

EU guidelines : human rights and international humanitarian law.
Council of the European Union.

Demography report 2010 : older, more numerous and diverse Europeans.
European Commission, Directorate General for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion, D.4 unit.

Mobility in Europe : analysis of the 2005 Eurobarometer survey on geographical and labour market mobility.
authors: Tom Vandenbrande … [et al.].

Migration and its impact on the work of ombudsmen : Paphos, Cyprus, 4-7 April 2009.
European Network of Ombudsmen.

Study on improving the efficiency of workers’ remittances in Mediterranean countries.
European Investment Bank Facility for Euro-Mediterranean Investment and Partnership, (FEMIP).

HIV/AIDS surveillance in Europe : 2010.
European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control and the WHO Regional Office for Europe.

Migrant health : epidemiology of HIV and AIDS in migrant communities and ethnic minorities in EU/EEA countries.
European Centre for Disease Prevention.

Migrant health : HIV testing and counselling in migrant populations and ethnic minorities in EU/EEA/EFTA member states.
European Centre for Disease Prevention.

Migrant health : access to HIV prevention, treatment and care for migrant populations in EU/EEA countries.
European Centre for Disease Prevention.

Migrant health : background note to the `ECDC report on migration and infectious diseases in the EU.
European Centre for Disease Prevention.

Understanding society : findings 2012.
edited by Stephanie L. McFail with Nick Buck, Heather Laurie, Christine Garrington and Victoria Nolan.

The liberty deficit : long-term detention and bail decision-making : a study of immigration bail hearings in the First Tier Tribunal.
by Adeline Trude.

No longer invisible : the Latin American community in London.
by Cathy McIlwaine, Juan Camilo Cock and Brian Linneker.

No longer invisible : the Latin American community in London : key findings.
by Cathy McIlwaine, Juan Camilo Cock and Brian Linneker.

Detained and denied : the clinical care of immigration detainees with HIV.
by Jon Burnett, Eden Fessahaye, and Anna Stopes.

“The second torture ” : the immigration detention of torture survivors.
by Natasha Tsangarides.

Campaigning toolkit : an aid to understanding the asylum and immigration systems in the UK, and to campaigning for the right to stay.
published by the National Coalition of Anti-Deportation Campaigns, (NCADC).

There are alternatives : a handbook for preventing unnecessary immigration detention.
published by the International Detention Coalition.

A terrorist group with different faces : a survey of terrorist nature of MEK, NCR, NCRI and NLA.
published by MKO Watch.

When women are silenced : a documentation of the methodology and findings of action research carried out by journalists and citizen journalists on gender based violence and inequality in Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo.
published by ADRA Denmark.

Psychological first aid : guide for field workers.
by the World Health Organization, War Trauma Foundation and World Vision International.

New Off Air Recordings

New off-air recording requests for the Refugee Council Archive for the week beginning Saturday 8th November:

Saturday 8th November

0430-0500: BBC News 24: Our World –  Iran’s Sex Change Solution. Series Recording.

Friday 7th November

1935-2000: Channel 4: (7/8) Unreported World – Tripoli Burning. Series Recording.

 

Archive Opening Hours

The current Opening Hours for our Archival collections are detailed as follows. The Refugee Council Archive and the British Olympic Association Archive are currently located on our Docklands Campus Library whilst the Hackney Empire Archive is currently located in our Stratford Campus Library.

The opening hours for both Docklands and Stratford Archives are as follows:

Docklands Archive

Mondays:  1pm – 6pm*

Tuesdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Wednesdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Thursdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Fridays: 1pm – 6pm*

Sat/Sun:  Both Archives Closed

Access to the Stratford Archive for the Hackney Empire Archive is by prior appointment only.

* Morning appointments between 10am and 12pm are available by prior appointment.  The Archive will be closed between 12pm and 1pm for lunch.

We would recommend that, especially for external users, that you contact us in advance of your trip in order to make an appointment to use the Archives.  This enables us to ensure that a member of staff will be on hand to assist you.

To make an appointment, please click on the link to our Make an Appointment page.

 

Archive Web Resources and Email List

Please find details below of our various online and social media resources which are currently available online and please do take a look. We would also welcome any feedback that you may have on how these can be improved:

Blogs

We have created several blogs to help support the archival work that we undertake and these are highlighted as follows:

Facebook

Please join and Like Us on Facebook, links are as follows:

Twitter

Please follow us on Twitter by selecting one of the options below:

Refugee-Research Email Mailing List

Please also consider joining our Refugee Research Jiscmail e-mail list which is managed in conjunction with this blog.  To subscribe to the mail group
www.jiscmail.ac.uk, type REFUGEE‐RESEARCH into the ‘find lists’ box, or use the alphabetical index to scroll down to R. and then follow the instructions on our REFUGEERESEARCH homepage to ‘join or leave the list’. Most users need only enter their email address and name. Alternatively, email the Archivist, Paul Dudman on p.v.dudman@uel.ac.uk, requesting to join the mail group.

Please let us know of any further links that you would like to see added.

 

Contact Details

Paul Dudman is currently the Archivist responsible for all of the physical Archives located here at the University of East London Library and Learning Services: Archives. Paul is happy to receive and respond to any questions or queries that you may have in response to both our Archival collections and also our social media presence.

If you wish to contact the Archive, please contact Paul Dudman via one of the contact methods detailed below:

By email at: library-archives@uel.ac.uk

By telephone at: +44 (0) 20 8223 7676

Online at: uelarchivesportal.wordpress.com/contact-us/

On Twitter at: @refugee_archive

By post to:

Paul V. Dudman
Archivist
Library and Learning Services
University of East London
Docklands Campus
4-6 University Way
London, E16 2RD
United Kingdom.

 

The ICC and its Impact: More Known Unknowns

Originally posted on Justice in Conflict:

(Photo: Still Burning)

(Photo: Still Burning)

As I mentioned yesterday, OpenDemocracy is hosting a symposium on the trials and tribulations of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Today’s article is my contribution to the debate and focuses on the impact of the ICC on the conflicts in which it intervenes. Here’s a snippet:

Given the amount of ink spilled on elaborating the ICC’s impacts, it may be surprising that we actually know very little about the Court’s effects on peace processes and conflict resolution. Indeed, as the former Chief Prosecutor of the International Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the former Director of the International Crisis Group, Louise Arbour, observed: “We all repeat the mantra that there can be no lasting peace without justice; and that’s true enough. But I don’t think that we have yet resolved the inevitable tensions between the two in a workable fashion.”

This is at least in part…

View original 545 more words

Human Rights Committee finds Australian immigration proposals violate international law

Originally posted on Autonomous Action Radio:

Republished from the Age

Sarah WhyteNovember 02, 2014

Proposed Abbott government changes to the Migration Act are incompatible with Australia’s human rights obligations, says a parliamentary committee on human rights chaired by a Liberal senator.

The report, delivered by the Parliamentary Committee into Human Rights, is scathing of nearly all of the government’s proposed changes to the act, saying they would put Australia at odds with international human rights law.

It is particularly critical of a proposal to cut the time in which asylum seekers’ refugee claims would be assessed, warning it could lead to genuine refugees being sent home to face persecution or torture.

Chaired by Senator Dean Smith, the committee comprises five Coalition, four Labor and one Greens members. Their report is used to advise senators how they make their decision on the proposed bill.

The changes proposed by Immigration Minister Scott Morrison would re-introduce temporary protection visas to be…

View original 472 more words

Border Criminologies: Special seminar on migrant detention with Tings Chak, Monday, 8 December 2014

Border Criminologies (University of Oxford) and the School of Architecture (Oxford Brookes University) are pleased to invite you to a special seminar with multidisciplinary artist Tings Chak. Tings will discuss her new book, Undocumented: The Architecture of Migrant Detention, and her work organising around immigration detention in Canada.

When: Monday, 8 December 2014, 15:00 to 17:00
Where: Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, Manor Road
Download Flyer: Tings Chak Seminar_8 December 2014

About the seminar: Over 80,000 people have been jailed indefinitely, without charge or trial—this is the invisibilized reality of immigration detention in Canada. Undocumented: The Architecture of Migrant Detention (Architecture Observer, 2014) documents the banality and violence of the architecture in contrast to the stories of daily resistance among immigration detainees. This graphic novel explores the growing industry of immigration detention in Canada, and questions the role of architectural design in such spaces. Using the conventional architectural tools of representation, Undocumented situates, spatializes, and confronts the silenced voices of those who are detained and the anonymous individuals who design spaces of confinement.

About the speaker: Tings Chak is a multidisciplinary artist and architect based in Toronto. She holds a Master of Architecture from the University of Toronto, where she was awarded the Kuwabara-Jackman Thesis Gold Medal for her research on immigration detention centres. Her work draws inspiration from anti-colonial, migrant justice, and spatial justice struggles. The graphic novel grew out of the collective organizing work through No One is Illegal—Toronto and the End Immigration Detention Network.

For more information and updates, join the event on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/630037523771890/.

News Stories (Daily) 11/04/2014

  • “GENEVA (30 October 2014) – Allowing people to die at Europe’s borders just because of their administrative status is a complete disregard for the value of human life, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the human rights of migrants, François Crépeau, said today urging the British authorities to reconsider its decision not support search and rescue operations in the Mediterranean.

    The United Kingdom Government announced earlier this week they will not support any future search and rescue operations to prevent migrants and refugees drowning in the Mediterranean, stating that such operations can encourage more people to attempt the dangerous sea crossing to enter Europe.

    “Governments that do not support the search and rescue efforts have reduced themselves to the same level as the smugglers,” the human rights expert stressed. “They are preying on the precariousness of the migrants and asylum seekers, robbing them of their dignity and playing with their lives.””

    tags:news

  • “Parts of the UK could be “swamped” by EU migrants unless rules change, the defence secretary has claimed.

    Michael Fallon said it was vital to impose some restrictions on the free movement of people in the EU, as many towns feel “under siege” by workers and those claiming benefits.

    His language attracted criticism, with Labour saying it was “desperate”.

    A Downing Street source later said Mr Fallon “accepts he should have chosen his words better”.”

    tags:news

  • “Defence Secretary Michael Fallon has said he “misspoke” when warning that some areas of the UK could be “swamped” by immigrants without changes to European Union rules on movement.

    He told BBC Radio 5 live he had “used words I wouldn’t normally have used”.

    His comments came after Germany appeared to rule out David Cameron’s plan to limit EU arrivals in the UK.

    Labour called the remark “desperate”, while the Liberal Democrats said they were “not based on the facts”.”

    tags:news

  • “Michael Fallon has been forced by Downing Street to take to the airwaves to withdraw his claims that British towns are being “swamped” by immigrants and their residents are “under siege”.

    The defence secretary said on television and radio that he had been careless and had used words he would not usually use when defending David Cameron’s plans for a renegotiation with the EU over the freedom of movement of workers. However, he stood by the thrust of his argument – that mass immigration from Europe is putting pressure on local services in many British towns.”

    tags:news

  • “But he also insisted the “large number” of migrant workers from the European Union was piling pressure on housing and other essential services.

    The Minister was slapped down by Downing Street last night after he made his initial comments in a television interview.”

    tags:news

  • “David Blunkett has praised the defence secretary, Michael Fallon, for warning that some communities in the UK are being swamped by migrants from eastern Europe.

    The former Labour home secretary, who faced severe criticism when he used similar language in 2002 over the dispersal of asylum seekers in northern communities, said that Fallon had been right to voice the “concerns of ordinary voters”.

    “For all [the] condemnation, I believe that both Michael Fallon and I were right to speak out on this issue and to voice the concerns of ordinary voters,” Blunkett wrote in a Daily Mail article. “Just because immigration is deeply controversial, that cannot mean that we should avoid talking about it.””

    tags:news

  • “The UK should not view immigration as a “deep menace”, the Archbishop of Canterbury has warned.

    Part of the country’s “strength and brilliance” lay in its long tradition of welcoming foreigners, the Most Reverend Justin Welby said.

    But the process of immigration must be managed “prudently” to avoid “over-burdening our communities”, he added.

    He also said clergy had noticed a rise in “minor-racist, anti-foreigner, anti-Semitic, anti-Islamic” sentiment.

    Criticising the language often used when debating the issue, Dr Welby said people had to be “realistic” about the pressures of immigration.

    But the heart of Christian belief was that “all human beings are of absolute equal and infinite value”, he added.”

    tags:news

  • “The archbishop of Canterbury has warned politicians not to demonise immigrants a day after a Cabinet minister suggested some parts of the country felt “swamped” by foreign arrivals.

    Justin Welby said on Monday that he was worried about the language used in the debate amid an upsurge of racist abuse noted by clergy across Britain.

    The intervention of the Church of England’s leader will deepen the embarrassment for Michael Fallon. The defence secretary said on Sunday that David Cameron must challenge the freedom of movement of Europeans “to prevent whole towns and communities being swamped by huge numbers of migrant workers”.”

    tags:news

  • “Aside from pleasant surprise that CNN had picked up on our campaign, it struck me as a pretty good description of what we as a Network have managed to achieve over the last year since the launch of our campaign in October 2013.”

    tags:news

  • “Just as Clacton recedes into memory so Rochester looms up as the next thing to get excited about. It brings with it the dreadful thought that the entire run-up to the 2015 general election will be made up of a series by-elections provoked by Tory defections to the UKIP insurgents, ensuring a steady draft of oxygen to keep the embers of anti-Europeanism glowing fresh and bright for months to come.

    What will this mean for the public conversation on immigration policy? Funnily enough their historic victory in the Essex seaside town earlier in the month could open up some interesting tensions even within UKIP’s seemingly intransigent ranks. The victorious defector from the Conservatives, Douglas Carswell, seems to have been at pains to make the point that strident anti-immigration is not really his bag during his interview in the Guardian last week. “

    tags:news

  • “IPPR’s new report ‘Shared Ground’ explores how to support migrants and British people to live well together. The report argues for a more coherent integration strategy in areas characterised by increasing diversity and ongoing, high inflows of immigration.

    The report authors make eight specific recommendations, focussed on:

    improving data at the local level
    steps to combat exploitation in housing and employment
    strategies to improve negotiation and compromise within communities
    inclusive preschool provision
    transparent funding for groups and activities that promote inclusivity
    funding for ‘exclusive’, single-group schemes or organisations provided they are fulfilling a ‘public good’
    a new Settlement Support Fund, financed from existing citizenship and visa fees and channelled towards high-immigration areas
    incentivising would-be citizens to volunteer in their community, as part of a more localised citizenship process.”

    tags:news

  • “La Strada International (LSI) together with 28 European partner organisations, has launched ‘Used in Europe’, a campaign to raise awareness on the issue of labour exploitation and human trafficking – on the occasion of the EU anti-trafficking day, 18 October 2014. The campaign ‘Used in Europe’ provides an online overview of major cases from the last decade in Europe, highlighted by NGOs, researchers and the media and gives insight into the situation in each country in Europe.

    In 2013, a total of 1823 trafficked persons were directly assisted by the eight member organisations of La Strada International. Thousands more exploited workers were assisted by campaign partners in different parts of Europe. In 2012, the International Labour Organisation estimated that 880,000 people are in a situation of forced labour in the EU alone. In some countries, the migration model and procedures reinforce the dependency and exploitation of migrant workers.”

    tags:news

  • “Public debate on the crisis in the Mediterranean has this week presented a dismaying and misleading image of the people who are making desperate efforts to get to the safety of Europe. This seems to be deeply embedded in the viewpoints of government ministers who last week announced they would be abandoning future rescue efforts to save those in trouble on Europe’s seas.

    Immigration minister James Brokenshire told the Commons last week that Italian efforts to prevent the sort of disasters occurring off the shores of Lampedusa during the late summer of last year, had had the unintended effect of placing more lives at risk. Apparently, search and rescue efforts have encouraged people traffickers to place migrants and refugees in more unseaworthy boats in the expectation that someone will pick them up if it all goes wrong. But the notion that the attempted flight across dangerous seas undertaken by hundreds of thousands is driven by a bunch of unscrupulous businessmen looking for the opportunity to cash in on a human tragedy seems perverse in the light of what is really known about the reasons why people are packing into these rickety vessels.”

    tags:news

  • “The Parliamentary Accounts Committee has published its report on the government’s record in reforming the immigration control system since its dramatic action of abolishing the UK Border Agency in March 2013. The functions of the executive agency were returned to the Home Office.

    In a damning statement on what has happened since that date committee chair Margaret Hodge MP said:

    “The Home Office scrapped the UK Border Agency in March 2013 partly because its performance in dealing with backlog cases was not good enough.”

    tags:news

  • “The UK government has today caused controversy by confirming that it will not be providing support to future search and rescue operations in the Mediterranean, aimed at saving the lives of those irregular migrants trying to enter Europe.

    The Italian-led search and rescue operation Mare Nostrum was today wound up, having saved the lives of 150,000 migrants who would have otherwise drowned at sea, over the past year. The crossing has a notoriously high death rate, with many migrants setting sail in unseaworthy vessels organised by people-smugglers and traffickers. Debate is currently underway in Brussels among the EU member states regarding the future response to this humanitarian challenge. In the meantime, the EU border agency Frontex will launch a significantly more limited programme to police the Mediterranean, called Operation Triton, which will not have a search and rescue mandate.”

    tags:news

  • “George Osborne has insisted David Cameron will seek changes to how European Union freedom of movement operates and downplayed reports that Germany has warned such a move could lead the UK towards the exit.

    The chancellor said he has had good discussions with the Germans and they were receptive to UK proposals.”

    tags:news

  • “How do you define a great country? Tony Blair once offered a decent test: ask if people are trying to get into it, or leave it. On this basis, David Cameron’s government has been a roaring success – people have been settling in Britain at the rate of 1,200 a day since he took office. For the first time in years, there are problems in Calais because people who have crossed half the globe don’t want to stop at France. And while this can be a nuisance, it’s hard to fault their logic: if you’ve come so far, why compromise? “

    tags:news

  • “(Madrid) – The Spanish government should immediately drop its plans to provide a legal basis for summary returns from its enclaves in North Africa, 13 human rights groups said today.

    The Spanish and international organizations wrote to the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of migrants, François Crépeau, and the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights, Nils Muižnieks, urging them to press the Spanish government to withdraw a proposed amendment to Spain’s immigration law.”

    tags:news

  • “Adnan Khan has just one aim: to get to Britain. In the past few weeks, the 25-year-old has made 13 attempts to jump aboard a lorry bound for Dover. He has, so far, been unsuccessful, but plans to keep trying despite the risks.

    “I tried to go down the side of one lorry, I could easily be crushed. But I have no option, this is do or die,” said Mr Khan, who is from Pakistan but is now living in a migrant camp in Calais. “

    tags:news

  • “It was cold. That much I remember well. We’d watch our breath make clouds in the freezing air and cling on to flasks of coffee to keep warm while we waited to get started. Then we’d hack off the render back to bare brick and break the ice off buckets of water to mix the sand and cement. I was in my early twenties, working as a labourer and happy to be earning a living. “

    tags:news

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

UEL International Development Undergraduate Conference: Defining Global Citizenship: Development, Politics and Social Changes

The University of East London’s 4th Undergraduate Conference

This conference will be taking place on Saturday, 8th of November 2014 at the University of East London, Docklands Campus in London, England (for more information please see Venue).

The theme of the conference is “Defining Global Citizenship: Development, Politics and Social Changes”

Students have been invited to write papers on the topics they feel are current today, and to give their views on where development work needs to change.

The Conference is a one day event, and will provide varying forms of review and feedback to suit the varying levels of work that will be submitted. We welcome presentations in different forms, for example poster presentations and short documentaries. All accepted works will be presented, and some of the works will be selected for review by a panel of academic experts, charity executives and journal publishers. All participants and attendees will receive certificates for their attendance, and the participants will be given a book containing all the works that were presented at the conference.

THE AIMS OF THE CONFERENCE ARE:

  • To improve the skills and confidence of all the students involved as they write papers to deadline, debate their work in a public forum and receive feedback from academics from various backgrounds and industry leaders.
  • To allow students the chance to gain recognition of their work from people outside of their universities.
  • To network and develop links with students from other universities.
  • To expose the students to publishers and leaders in their field.

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE CONFERENCE:

  • Keynote speaker;
  • Film screening;
  • Photo competition;
  • Plenary sessions;
  • Writing and publication workshop from the Reinvention Team;
  • Saturday evening networking event for the opportunity to network with other students, speakers, members of the panels and NGOs.

Further details:

Website:  www.uel-undergraduate-conference.co.uk/about-the-conference.php

Mare Nostrum, Triton and the UK

Originally posted on Postcards from ...:

Yesterday night (30 October) I spoke on BBC Radio 5 Live on why the UK government decision to opt out of rescue operations in the Med is not only morally wrong but also grounded on a false understanding of the causes of migration. Here the link to the podcast: bbc.in/1E6RTVv22.38-29.44]

View original

24 bodies found as migrant boat sinks in Istanbul’s Bosphorus strait

Originally posted on clandestina:

At least 24 people have died after a boat believed to have been carrying illegal immigrants capsized in Istanbul’s Bosphorus Strait on Monday.

Seven people were rescued and 24 dead bodies were recovered, the Istanbul governor’s office announced.

Sources said there were around 43 people on the boat.

Most of those who died were children, the Hurriyet news website reported rescuers as saying.

View original 81 more words

The ICC to the Rescue… Kind of, Maybe.

Originally posted on Justice in Conflict:

ICC in the New YorkerI received the above snippet from a friend (and friend of the blog) and wanted to share it with readers. It appeared in a recent New Yorker article entitled “The Preist, the Killers, and a Looming Genocide” which covers how civilians are coping with ongoing violence and instability in the Central African Republic.

For observers, practitioners and scholars of international criminal justice, it is a fascinating anecdote for a number of reasons. First, it is a small but notable piece of evidence that individuals mired in the context of political violence view the International Criminal Court (ICC) as a tool with which they can leverage their security and safety. Second, and just as notably, it suggests that even those individuals who use the ICC as a means to prevent violence or atrocities don’t actually believe it is particularly effective (i.e. “It was a lie” that the antibalaka leader…

View original 155 more words

Seminars: London Migration Research Group (LMRG) Seminars, 2014-15 – Talking Across Disciplines

London Migration Research Group (LMRG) Seminars, 2014-15 – Talking Across Disciplines

Convenors: Fiona Adamson & Kristin Surak (SOAS), Claire Dwyer (UCL) and Eiko Thielemann (LSE)

When: Tuesdays, 17.30 – 19.00
Where: New York University in London, 6 Bedford Square, WC1B 3RA, Room tbc

Link:- http://lmrg.org.uk/

4 Nov Ruben Anderson<http://rubenandersson.com/>(LSE)
Rescued and caught: the humanitarian paradox at Europe’s maritime frontiers

18 Nov Nadia Jaworsky<http://www.muni.cz/fss/people/370423/publications> (Yale/Masaryk University)
A Cultural Sociology of Cyberactivism: The U.S. Immigrant Rights Movement Online

2 Dec Gregor Noll<http://works.bepress.com/gregor_noll/> (University of Lund)
Junk Science: The Politics of Age and Unaccompanied Asylum Seekers

To attend, please join the respective event on our facebook page<https://www.facebook.com/pages/London-Migration-Research-Group-LMRG/108613799294580> or send an email to e.thielemann@lse.ac.uk<mailto:e.thielemann@lse.ac.uk>.

News Stories (weekly)

  • “In early September, according to eyewitnesses, Egyptian smugglers deliberately sunk a boat carrying aout 450 migrants, most of them Palestinians fleeing Gaza after this summer’s war. The UN’s human rights chief called it “mass murder in the Mediterranean.””
    A ‘mass murder in the Mediterranean’ leaves nearly 450 lost at sea, including this man’s family http://t.co/4wpPnX0pZT @hratsea

    tags:news

  • “In the past four weeks alone, the Minister of Justice and Security in the Netherlands was blamed for deporting failed asylum seekers with severe medical conditions to countries in which their health treatment cannot be guaranteed; the chief of the national police in Melilla, Spain, was charged by a judge for illegally performing ‘pushback’ operations of migrants into Morocco; and the Israeli High Court ordered the dismantling of the biggest detention center and revoked a recent law that permitted the imprisonment of asylum seekers for one year without trial. I could go on providing more examples from other countries that illustrate the formal and informal mess that overwhelmingly characterizes the running of modern state deportation regimes.”

    tags:news

  • “By: Sarah Spencer, Open Society Fellow, and Nicola Delvino (Nicola is a lawyer and worked as a researcher and co-authored the COMPAS report “Irregular Migrants in Italy: Law and Policy on Entitlements to Services”)

    This month sees the first anniversary of Italy’s Mare Nostrum operation, launched to reinforce rescue capacity in the Mediterranean following the drowning of 368 migrants off the coast of Lampedusa in October last year. In the intervening months many lives have still been lost but many saved. A consequence for Italy has been that thousands more people from the Middle East and parts of Africa are reaching its shores in need of help.”

    tags:news

  • “David Needham knows first hand the struggle French police and border officials face in preventing illegal immigrants from crossing the Channel into Britain.

    The experienced British lorry driver runs the gauntlet of desperate gangs daily as he passes through Calais on his route between Kent and Belgium.

    An estimated 2,300 people live in squalid camps near the French port just waiting for the opportunity to sneak onto a vehicle such as his.

    Mr Needham is one of a growing number of British road hauliers who will not stop in Calais, even to refuel his vehicle, nevermind to rest overnight.

    “We all used to park on the seafront and never have any trouble, now you wouldn’t dare to stop in Calais,” he told The Telegraph. “

    tags:news

  • ““Ordre, ordre. Je veux te – si je peux be so bold – welcomer ici. It is not souvent que the Lady Mayor de Calais gets to meet moi,” said Keith Vaz in the pre-rehearsed speed-dating routine he usually reserves for his mirror. Natacha Bouchart looked startled, as much by the sound of her native language being badly mauled as by the nature of her welcome. She had made the day trip on Eurostar to give evidence to the home affairs committee on immigration only to find herself treated like an illegal immigrant.”

    tags:news

  • “Evidence of waste and poor management within Britain’s immigration system has been laid bare by a parliamentary report which reveals that failed IT systems are to cost up to £1bn while officials cannot find 50,000 rejected asylum seekers.

    The Commons public accounts committee (PAC) also discloses that 11,000 asylum seekers in the UK have been waiting for at least seven years to hear whether they can stay and that officials have still not resolved 29,000 asylum applications dating back to at least 2007.”

    tags:news

  • “Courtesy of Natacha Bouchart, the mayor of Calais, Britain’s rightwing press has had a field day. Speaking before the home affairs select committee in London yesterday, Bouchart also gave the immigration-obsessed Westminster village a run for its money. Even by Ukip standards, her comments were inflammatory. Nigel Farage must have thought that the French politician was the most effective recruiter ever for his cause. The media used a rather loose translation of her words to make them sound more dramatic than they actually were.”

    tags:news

  • “We are under siege from great hordes of immigrants as we wave around our “lavish” benefits. They climb over huge fences erected to protect politicians from protestors. They dangle on spikes of barbed wire, half-gone from exhaustion. No one can stop them. All the systems that are meant to control their numbers are in disarray.”

    tags:news

  • “As the construction boom in the West Asian (Gulf) countries continues, including building of the World Cup related structures in Qatar and the complex of international museums in Abu Dhabi, there is increasing attention and growing concern in the world’s media and human rights organisations about the situation of migrants recruited for low-skilled, low-paid work in these countries. Recent reports estimate that over 90% of the total workforce in some Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries is made up of non-nationals. While most of the migrants in the construction sector, and some in the service sector, are male, there is a continuing influx of female domestic workers in the region. In contrast to workers in high-skilled, high-paid jobs who largely tend to come from richer countries in the global north, the majority of migrants recruited for low-skilled jobs are from South and South East Asia.”

    tags:news

  • “The great majority of labour immigration programmes (and almost all temporary labour migration programmes) in high-income countries operate “labour market tests”, which aim to ensure that employers recruit migrant workers only after having made every reasonable effort to recruit “local workers”. Labour market tests usually require employers to advertise their vacancies for a minimum period of time before applying for a work permit for a migrant worker. For example, the UK’s “resident labour market test” for employing non-EU workers is explained here (pages 83-91) and Ireland’s version is here.”

    tags:news

  • “Many commentators, especially those who are broadly “pro-migration”, blame the media for creating a public discourse of hostility to immigration through its use of inflamed language and scare-mongering statistics. Others, especially those who are broadly “anti-migration”, defend the media as simply responding to public fears and concerns, reflecting back an issue on which voters feel passionate. But what evidence is there about the content of media messages on migration?”

    tags:news

  • “The investigation was ordered following an exposé by the Observer newspaper which uncovered evidence of an asylum seeker being asked inappropriate and sexually explicit questions by a Home Office case worker.”

    tags:news

  • “The UK Government has shamefully refused to support search and rescue efforts, aimed at saving the lives of people who are forced to take perilous journeys across the Mediterranean Sea as they try to reach safety in Europe.

    This week, the Italian-funded search and rescue operation focused on helping people whose boats get into difficulty in the Mediterranean is due to come to an end.”

    tags:news

  • “An influential group of MPs has criticised the Government for a mounting backlog of asylum cases, blaming in part the decision to downgrade asylum decision makers at the Home Office.

    The Public Accounts Committee (PAC) has slammed the Home Office for failing to resolve 29,000 asylum applications dating back to at least 2007, of which 11,000 have not even received an initial decision on their claim.”

    tags:news

  • “Pantomime season began early this week, set to the beat of a calypso drum. And part of the soap-opera drama of UK immigration politics – all dodgy peerages and unpaid bills this week – surely stems from the ease with which the “truth” is bent to our own convenience. So Migration Watch has ‘improved public understanding’ of immigration; Sir Andrew Green has ‘no political axes to grind’. In this world-turned-upside down, this is Democracy in Action: not the loss of a measured, meaningful debate on migration in favour of prejudice. “

    tags:news

  • ” 366 refugees died off Lampedusa on 3 October 2013. One year later, refugees still have no other choice but to risk their lives in order to seek protection. One year later, despite much talk, there is still no legal and safe access to Europe for people fleeing war and persecution. One year later, a truly European response to guarantee sustainable and effective search and rescue in the Mediterranean is still missing. It’s high time the EU acts. NGOs call on the EU to open up legal and safe routes for refugees and step up search and rescue efforts in the Mediterranean.”

    tags:news

  • “More than 140,000 Syrian refugees have fled across the border to southern Turkey. CARE is assessing needs and coordinating with the Turkish authorities and other organisations to distribute food, blankets and hygiene items to newly arrived refugees most in need. Here are some of their stories.

    Alan Abraka* is a lawyer from a village 50km from Kobane, Syria. He is helping CARE to carry out assessments in Turkey.”

    tags:news

  • “The last thing I remember about Syria is my last day at school. It was the hardest day of my life. I have always been very ambitious and one of the top students in my class. I had only four weeks left to finish ninth grade when my father told my sister, my two brothers and me that we would have to flee to Jordan. I was yelling at him and screaming. He explained to us that it was not safe anymore, that people were getting killed and arrested. I did not care about our safety and told my parents that I preferred to stay in the middle of the bombings rather than having to leave my country. But in the end I kept quiet. I knew that if I made my family stay and anything would happen, I could never ever forgive myself. The only thing I knew about Jordan I knew from TV. I had seen videos of Zaatari Camp on the news, and I was horrified.”

    tags:news

  • “His neat uniform holds the emblem of a private security company. In the moonlight I could see the rolling hills with their bare, small patches of grass and bush in a sea of stones and dust. No houses, street lamps, or mosques in sight. Not even a moving car. At least nowhere near the perimeter that marks the boundaries of what could turn into one of the biggest refugee camps in the world.”

    tags:news

  • “Sri Lanka must stop making empty promises to the international community and the Sri Lankan people on improving the country’s still desperate human rights situation, Amnesty International said ahead of a UN review of the country’s rights record.

    The UN Human Rights Committee (HRC) in Geneva, Switzerland, will on 7 and 8 October 2014 be reviewing Sri Lanka’s respect for rights enshrined in the key human rights treaty: the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR). This is the first such assessment since 2003.”

    tags:news

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Journal Articles (weekly)

  • “Young people subject to immigration control frequently draw a link between their own subjective wellbeing and whether or not they have a projected sense of self within a clear future trajectory. Building on previous work by the authors, this article explores young people’s lived experiences of constructing futures while subject to immigration control as they transition to ‘adulthood’. More specifically, it examines how young people perceive and respond to time as a tactic of immigration control used in chronological age markers, time-limited legal statuses and bureaucratic process rhythms. It is argued that, in order to sustain a sense of moving forward, young people strive to counter such tactics of immigration control with tactics of their own. The article explores how young people describe working creatively to secure access to a range of often contested rights and entitlements in order to sustain the possibility of futures of their own making in Britain. It concludes by highlighting an overlooked divide between young people’s intentions and aims in securing their futures and the intentions of an immigration control system which arguably underestimates the power of some young people’s agency and determination. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In independent India, national development has been largely equated with economic growth and surplus. Most tribal people in India lead a hard, materially poor life. Multiple natural sources along with strong community ties make their life possible, even under difficult circumstances. Adivasis are by far the most vulnerable and marginalized socio-economic group in India; gaps in poverty, literacy and mortality between tribal and non-tribal groups are widening, despite the economic changes sweeping India. These challenges have been compounded in recent years by the arrival of global mining giants, for whom governments have used the colonial Land Acquisition Act of 1894 to forcibly displace millions from their ancestral lands. India today has over 4000 dams; more than 3000 of them built after independence in 1947. At least 500 more dams are under construction. Adivasis constitute 8.08 percent of India’s population as per 1991 census figures. According to an Indian government working group, fifty percent of those displaced by development projects are adivasis. It clearly shows that the adivasis have faced a disproportionate share of displacement. The women folk of their community suffer the most. The resource rich areas are consequently most likely to be dammed or mined. Many tribal belts have now been identified as ‘development sites’ ideally suited for building large multi-purpose river valley projects such as mines, thermal power stations or paper factories. The article will critically analyse the impacts of the destructive development on adivasi peoples of India today. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • @ecre @refugee_archive @Franceterdasile see also some recent analysis by @MigObs on UK media & Calais http://t.co/asN1fnK3eR

    tags:newjournalarticles news

  • “On 14 July 1877 workers on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad in Martinsburg, West Virginia, blocked the tracks in response to wage cuts. Within a week, cities from New York to San Francisco were swept into a pitched confrontation between wage earners and property owners. The Great Strike of 1877 gave vent to broad hostility towards the capitalist order that had consolidated in the fifteen years following the Civil War. The railroads had become the most visible symbol of a great transformation towards corporate power and sharp class divides in America.1 In California violent confrontation with railroad authorities was averted because the managers rescinded the wage reduction, and rioters in San Francisco redirected their hostility towards the residents of Chinatown.2 Yet of all the great upheavals in Pittsburgh, Indianapolis, Syracuse, Chicago and Baltimore, only in California did the rebellion sparked in July 1877 take sustained political form. In the months following the Great Railroad Strike, men meeting in the vacant ‘Sand Lots’ next to San Francisco’s City Hall rallied around the newly organized Workingmen’s Party of California, led by an Irish drayman, Dennis Kearney. Welding together critiques of corporate capitalism, the role of Chinese labour and the corruption of politics in California using the language of anti-slavery, the Workingmen’s movement in the state proved pivotal in pushing the national parties to support the exclusion of Chinese labourers from further immigration in 1882. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The depth and wealth of information that Merlin Schaeffer’s book ‘Ethnic Diversity and Social Cohesion: Immigration, Ethnic Fractionalization and Potentials for Civic Action’ provides is unquestionably impressive. As Merlin Schaeffer relates in the introductory parts, the literature on the subject of diversity and social capital is vast and yet it continues to grow progressively. To offer a coherent, lucid, and analytical summary of the divergent studies, the methodologies involved and the buzzing beehive of results, thus, look almost like a Herculean task in which Schaeffer however succeeds. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “For many years legal scholars have sought to elaborate on the notion of culture in the context of cultural rights. Various expressions of the concept can be found scattered in different international instruments. The multiple meanings that the concept evokes can sometimes be confusing and the variations easily affect the obligations that States are required to comply with. This article gives an account of how these different understandings of culture evolved, as well as their legal consequences. It further seeks to identify an emerging concept of culture that is currently embodied in the works of the United Nations human rights treaty bodies, that is, the concept of culture as collective memories. The significance of this development will be highlighted. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article considers the rights of those displaced by armed conflict to their property and to return home under general international law in light of Demopoulos and Others v Turkey and its impact on subsequent cases. The European Court of Human Rights dismissed the case as inadmissible on the ground that the Immovable Property Commission established by the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus was an effective domestic remedy that should first have been exhausted. Significantly, the Court concluded that the lapse of time and the political nature of the dispute should influence its decision, and that property restitution is not the only remedy available to those displaced. This article is critical of these conclusions. It emphasises the significance of property restitution and the right to return home and argues that the decision, as evident from post-Demopoulos developments, fundamentally undermines the established rights of the displaced, giving primacy to political realism. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Immigrant students are commonly assumed lower performers in US schools. Their inadequate English language skills and adaptation to the mainstream US school norms are often seen as obstacles to their successful school learning. However, whether and to what extent this assumption is sustainable for immigrant students’ performances in mathematics is the question that has not been empirically explored. Proper answer to the question would help verify the popular assumption about the immigrant students and their learning in the mainstream US schools. Guided by the straight-line, segmented assimilation and cultural capital theories, this study examined this issue using US grades 4 and 8 datasets of Trend in International Mathematics and Science Study 2007 and 15-year-old dataset of Program for International Student Assessment 2009. It was found that there were substantial differences in the mathematics performances of students across different racial groups. Being immigrant students does not always mean they are lower performers than their mainstream peers. The immigrant students coming to the USA earlier did not always show worse mathematics performance over their immigrant peers who came to the USA later. These findings challenge the popular assumption that immigrant students’ inadequate English language skills and adaptation to the mainstream US school norms are obstacles to their successful school learning and call for a deeper understanding about the academic performance of immigrant students in different content areas and at various stages of immigration across different racial groups.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This study examines the influence of immigrants’ economic experiences on the degree of their attachment to Canada, against the background of two prevalent explanations of immigrant integration into host societies: the ‘assimilation’ and ‘structural–historical’ approaches—both of which treat integration as rigid, linear and inevitable. The findings of our study suggest that integration is a dynamic process, the content and outcome of which is determined by the nature of the interaction between immigrants and the host society. When such interactions are pleasant and consistent with immigrants’ expectations, the final outcome is a strong sense of attachment to the host society. Also, with changes in the former, there will be changes in the latter. In this study, we use the data from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada to examine the validity of a relational perspective of immigrant integration, by measuring the impact of immigrants’ economic experiences on the strength of their attachment to Canada. Adopting such a perspective particularly questions the validity of a ‘prescriptive assimilationist’ approach, which asks immigrants to start their lives in the new countries with an intention to assimilate. Viewing the integration process from the relational perspective implies that assimilation could not be suggested as an intentional goal; rather, it should be seen as a possible by-product of the nature of immigrants’ experiences, materialized only when such experiences are pleasant and consistent with immigrants’ expectations. Built on this alternative view, we then discuss the theoretical and policy implications of the study.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This paper provides empirical evidence of the “embedded connectedness” of highly skilled migrants with their home country through the Philippine case in New Zealand and Australia. This challenges the findings in other studies that show the weak connection between them and the home country which is generally explored more in terms of economic remittances. While the majority of the participants in the study are already citizens of the host country, they remain emotionally tied and culturally connected to the Philippines as evidenced by their information-seeking behaviour, feeling of nostalgia, sending of remittances, taking of dual citizenship, attendance in Philippine-related events and the country they perceived as home. One interesting finding in the study is that most of them have taken citizenship for pragmatic reasons, that is, for the benefits and security that it could bring them. It concludes by emphasising the relevance of capitalising on these strong diasporic ties to entice the skilled diaspora to return to their home country and/or be involved in development activities back home.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Post-2005 migration movements from Zimbabwe to South Africa have included a growing number of children. These children face considerable difficulties in accessing the South African educational system. School attendance rates are significantly lower amongst migrant than South African children. This paper is based on recent interviews with Zimbabwean parents and guardians in Cape Town and Johannesburg and shows the levels and types of discrimination they and their children face as well as their powerlessness to effect change. The exclusion of migrant children from education contravenes South Africa’s international human rights obligations as well as its own Bill of Rights and Department of Education directives. The Department of Home Affairs, however, makes schools sites for the enforcement of the draconian provisions of the 2002 Immigration Act. School authorities therefore operate with conflicting mandates. The evidence suggests that most prefer to side with the Department of Home Affairs and make their schools unwelcoming spaces for Zimbabwean children.
    Journal of International Migration and Integration Journal of International Migration and Integration Look
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    Introduction
    The Right to an Education
    Study Methodology
    Barriers to Admission
    Discrimination and Xenophobia
    Conclusion
    References
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    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This exploratory study examines the ways in which immigrants in the USA utilize a domestic public policy, the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), for transnational purposes. We analyzed semi-structured qualitative interviews with 32 immigrants in the Boston area to investigate whether and how they spend the refund transnationally. Our analysis showed that most immigrant EITC recipients do not explicitly use their refunds for transnational purposes but about 2/3 of families we analyzed used some form of family income to send cash remittances and gifts to the country of origin, as well as purchase goods and services in, or travel to the country of origin. The 12 study participants who explicitly stated using the EITC for transnational purposes most commonly used it for economic smoothing, with a few using the refund to build assets in the country of origin. We also found evidence of EITC-specific expenditures for travel to the country of origin and the sending of gifts. Based on these descriptive findings, we find that the amounts of money being spent transnationally are generally quite small, with less than a $1,000 being sent to the country of origin annually in most cases. We argue that domestic social policy appears to play a transnational role, albeit a small one, and could potentially impact the economic development of immigrant sending countries and even alter immigrant flows from those countries. However, a larger study is necessary to draw definitive conclusions.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Each year, Canada attracts thousands of skilled workers from ‘South Asia’; yet, relatively little is known about the complex reasons for and processes of migration of this immigrant cohort. The situation becomes even more acute when research ignores the internal diversities within this complex group and portrays a homogenised picture. Focussing on the experiences of 80 South Asian households who have entered Canada as skilled workers, this paper concludes that migration experiences differ between and within national groups (Indian, Bangladeshi and Sri Lankan). Various factors, including pre-migration political, economic and social contexts, transnational ties and social identities and hierarchies play an important role in motivating this highly mobile group and creating specific migration channels. In order to develop a wholistic and nuanced understanding of migration, the study advocates that, conceptually, it is imperative to move away from meta-narratives and models of migration, and methodologically, it is necessary to continue using mixed research methods.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This study examines the nature of wage theft among Latino day laborers who participated in post-Katrina construction work. It addresses three important issues: (a) Is wage theft more prevalent in circumstances where there is very little enforcement of labor law? (b) Are professional contractors more likely to commit wage theft than other employers such as homeowners and small businesses? And (c) Do contractors and non-contractors who commit wage theft vary in the reasons given to justify their crime? Through survey interviews with 304 Latino day laborers conducted at four procurement sites across the city, respondents indicate that 78 % were victims of wage theft over the previous year (2008). Comparisons of wage theft across multiple studies expose the need for the development of a common conceptualization of a rate of wage theft and the benefit of using similar sampling frames to facilitate cross-comparison. Analysis reveals that there was no significant variation in the incidence of wage theft by employer type. Contractors and non-contractors did not differ significantly in the average dollar amount of wage theft, in the number of days worked before wage theft was committed, or in the hourly wage promised to employees. Contractors were, however, much more likely to justify wage theft by citing lack of funds than non-contractors.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This paper uses wealth attainment as an indicator of economic integration and assesses how educational–occupational mismatch (i.e., over/underqualification) and race/ethnicity affect the wealth attainment of a sample of legal permanent residents in the USA. Using data from the New Immigrant Survey, this paper finds that overqualification is positively associated with wealth attainment, but below the rate for adequately qualified workers in the same occupation. Underqualified immigrants are associated with a pattern of wealth attainment that is equivalent to the adequately qualified. Racial/ethnic wealth inequality among legal permanent residents generally reflects the well-documented pattern among the U.S. native-born. This paper concludes with a discussion that places these results alongside previous research that examines the relationship between educational–occupational mismatch and income among immigrants.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In this paper, we present the estimates of the fiscal transfer to immigrants from native-born Canadians. The fiscal transfer is the amount of money that immigrants absorb in public services less the amount that they pay in taxes, suitably adjusted for scale effects in public provision of services, life cycle effects in tax payment, and so on. Our work builds on previous works in the literature, updating from the last scholarly work in this area by Akbari (Can Public Policy 15(4): 424–435, 1989) with new and richer data. Akbari found on the basis of the 1981 Census data a small fiscal transfer from immigrants to the native-born amounting to about $500 per year per immigrant. Over time, the composition and income attainment of immigrants has evolved somewhat unfavorably for immigrants, and we find on the basis of the 2006 census data, a small fiscal transfer from the native-born to immigrants of about $500 per year per immigrant.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Focusing on the significance of biological, cultural, and linguistic diversity, Education and Sustainability presents the results of the author’s 20 years of research on Tibetan educational issues in various contexts such as Canada, the USA, and India. Organized into three parts, the book examines diversity, sustainability challenges, and education for sustainability development. Although multiple examples are drawn throughout the book, the main focus is on Tibetan data because according to the author, Tibetans’ diverse lifestyle and contexts could be applied to “other groups and the global context broadly” (p. 15).

    Part one (chapters 1–4) focuses on biodiversity, biolinguistic diversity, and biocultural diversity, highlighting the importance of linguistic, cultural, and biological sustainability for the evolution of the Earth and human species. Part one also compares and contrasts the Western and Tibetan enlightenment and critiques of reason and provides implications for education and …”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Immigration and its effects on crime, social disorder and community tensions remains a pervasive feature of public, government and academic discourse. This discourse often considers immigration, and immigrants themselves, as a threat to the community’s existing moral and social order. This article presents the findings of a case study that used quantitative and qualitative methods to explore the experiences of social order following a recent wave of Polish migration in a small working class town in the North West of England. The key findings show that the assumed association of migration with a disruption to social order receives little support. Rather, the social order in the studied locale is predominantly managed and maintained through ‘civilised relationships’ between migrants and established residents, thus failing to culminate into conflict between the two groups. This situation of ‘civility’ provides an alternative to the preponderance of previous research telling a ‘gloomy tale’ of immigration and its impact on local communities. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

News Stories (Daily) 10/31/2014

  • “In early September, according to eyewitnesses, Egyptian smugglers deliberately sunk a boat carrying aout 450 migrants, most of them Palestinians fleeing Gaza after this summer’s war. The UN’s human rights chief called it “mass murder in the Mediterranean.””
    A ‘mass murder in the Mediterranean’ leaves nearly 450 lost at sea, including this man’s family http://t.co/4wpPnX0pZT @hratsea

    tags:news

  • “In the past four weeks alone, the Minister of Justice and Security in the Netherlands was blamed for deporting failed asylum seekers with severe medical conditions to countries in which their health treatment cannot be guaranteed; the chief of the national police in Melilla, Spain, was charged by a judge for illegally performing ‘pushback’ operations of migrants into Morocco; and the Israeli High Court ordered the dismantling of the biggest detention center and revoked a recent law that permitted the imprisonment of asylum seekers for one year without trial. I could go on providing more examples from other countries that illustrate the formal and informal mess that overwhelmingly characterizes the running of modern state deportation regimes.”

    tags:news

  • “By: Sarah Spencer, Open Society Fellow, and Nicola Delvino (Nicola is a lawyer and worked as a researcher and co-authored the COMPAS report “Irregular Migrants in Italy: Law and Policy on Entitlements to Services”)

    This month sees the first anniversary of Italy’s Mare Nostrum operation, launched to reinforce rescue capacity in the Mediterranean following the drowning of 368 migrants off the coast of Lampedusa in October last year. In the intervening months many lives have still been lost but many saved. A consequence for Italy has been that thousands more people from the Middle East and parts of Africa are reaching its shores in need of help.”

    tags:news

  • “David Needham knows first hand the struggle French police and border officials face in preventing illegal immigrants from crossing the Channel into Britain.

    The experienced British lorry driver runs the gauntlet of desperate gangs daily as he passes through Calais on his route between Kent and Belgium.

    An estimated 2,300 people live in squalid camps near the French port just waiting for the opportunity to sneak onto a vehicle such as his.

    Mr Needham is one of a growing number of British road hauliers who will not stop in Calais, even to refuel his vehicle, nevermind to rest overnight.

    “We all used to park on the seafront and never have any trouble, now you wouldn’t dare to stop in Calais,” he told The Telegraph. “

    tags:news

  • ““Ordre, ordre. Je veux te – si je peux be so bold – welcomer ici. It is not souvent que the Lady Mayor de Calais gets to meet moi,” said Keith Vaz in the pre-rehearsed speed-dating routine he usually reserves for his mirror. Natacha Bouchart looked startled, as much by the sound of her native language being badly mauled as by the nature of her welcome. She had made the day trip on Eurostar to give evidence to the home affairs committee on immigration only to find herself treated like an illegal immigrant.”

    tags:news

  • “Evidence of waste and poor management within Britain’s immigration system has been laid bare by a parliamentary report which reveals that failed IT systems are to cost up to £1bn while officials cannot find 50,000 rejected asylum seekers.

    The Commons public accounts committee (PAC) also discloses that 11,000 asylum seekers in the UK have been waiting for at least seven years to hear whether they can stay and that officials have still not resolved 29,000 asylum applications dating back to at least 2007.”

    tags:news

  • “Courtesy of Natacha Bouchart, the mayor of Calais, Britain’s rightwing press has had a field day. Speaking before the home affairs select committee in London yesterday, Bouchart also gave the immigration-obsessed Westminster village a run for its money. Even by Ukip standards, her comments were inflammatory. Nigel Farage must have thought that the French politician was the most effective recruiter ever for his cause. The media used a rather loose translation of her words to make them sound more dramatic than they actually were.”

    tags:news

  • “We are under siege from great hordes of immigrants as we wave around our “lavish” benefits. They climb over huge fences erected to protect politicians from protestors. They dangle on spikes of barbed wire, half-gone from exhaustion. No one can stop them. All the systems that are meant to control their numbers are in disarray.”

    tags:news

  • “As the construction boom in the West Asian (Gulf) countries continues, including building of the World Cup related structures in Qatar and the complex of international museums in Abu Dhabi, there is increasing attention and growing concern in the world’s media and human rights organisations about the situation of migrants recruited for low-skilled, low-paid work in these countries. Recent reports estimate that over 90% of the total workforce in some Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries is made up of non-nationals. While most of the migrants in the construction sector, and some in the service sector, are male, there is a continuing influx of female domestic workers in the region. In contrast to workers in high-skilled, high-paid jobs who largely tend to come from richer countries in the global north, the majority of migrants recruited for low-skilled jobs are from South and South East Asia.”

    tags:news

  • “The great majority of labour immigration programmes (and almost all temporary labour migration programmes) in high-income countries operate “labour market tests”, which aim to ensure that employers recruit migrant workers only after having made every reasonable effort to recruit “local workers”. Labour market tests usually require employers to advertise their vacancies for a minimum period of time before applying for a work permit for a migrant worker. For example, the UK’s “resident labour market test” for employing non-EU workers is explained here (pages 83-91) and Ireland’s version is here.”

    tags:news

  • “Many commentators, especially those who are broadly “pro-migration”, blame the media for creating a public discourse of hostility to immigration through its use of inflamed language and scare-mongering statistics. Others, especially those who are broadly “anti-migration”, defend the media as simply responding to public fears and concerns, reflecting back an issue on which voters feel passionate. But what evidence is there about the content of media messages on migration?”

    tags:news

  • “The investigation was ordered following an exposé by the Observer newspaper which uncovered evidence of an asylum seeker being asked inappropriate and sexually explicit questions by a Home Office case worker.”

    tags:news

  • “The UK Government has shamefully refused to support search and rescue efforts, aimed at saving the lives of people who are forced to take perilous journeys across the Mediterranean Sea as they try to reach safety in Europe.

    This week, the Italian-funded search and rescue operation focused on helping people whose boats get into difficulty in the Mediterranean is due to come to an end.”

    tags:news

  • “An influential group of MPs has criticised the Government for a mounting backlog of asylum cases, blaming in part the decision to downgrade asylum decision makers at the Home Office.

    The Public Accounts Committee (PAC) has slammed the Home Office for failing to resolve 29,000 asylum applications dating back to at least 2007, of which 11,000 have not even received an initial decision on their claim.”

    tags:news

  • “Pantomime season began early this week, set to the beat of a calypso drum. And part of the soap-opera drama of UK immigration politics – all dodgy peerages and unpaid bills this week – surely stems from the ease with which the “truth” is bent to our own convenience. So Migration Watch has ‘improved public understanding’ of immigration; Sir Andrew Green has ‘no political axes to grind’. In this world-turned-upside down, this is Democracy in Action: not the loss of a measured, meaningful debate on migration in favour of prejudice. “

    tags:news

  • ” 366 refugees died off Lampedusa on 3 October 2013. One year later, refugees still have no other choice but to risk their lives in order to seek protection. One year later, despite much talk, there is still no legal and safe access to Europe for people fleeing war and persecution. One year later, a truly European response to guarantee sustainable and effective search and rescue in the Mediterranean is still missing. It’s high time the EU acts. NGOs call on the EU to open up legal and safe routes for refugees and step up search and rescue efforts in the Mediterranean.”

    tags:news

  • “More than 140,000 Syrian refugees have fled across the border to southern Turkey. CARE is assessing needs and coordinating with the Turkish authorities and other organisations to distribute food, blankets and hygiene items to newly arrived refugees most in need. Here are some of their stories.

    Alan Abraka* is a lawyer from a village 50km from Kobane, Syria. He is helping CARE to carry out assessments in Turkey.”

    tags:news

  • “The last thing I remember about Syria is my last day at school. It was the hardest day of my life. I have always been very ambitious and one of the top students in my class. I had only four weeks left to finish ninth grade when my father told my sister, my two brothers and me that we would have to flee to Jordan. I was yelling at him and screaming. He explained to us that it was not safe anymore, that people were getting killed and arrested. I did not care about our safety and told my parents that I preferred to stay in the middle of the bombings rather than having to leave my country. But in the end I kept quiet. I knew that if I made my family stay and anything would happen, I could never ever forgive myself. The only thing I knew about Jordan I knew from TV. I had seen videos of Zaatari Camp on the news, and I was horrified.”

    tags:news

  • “His neat uniform holds the emblem of a private security company. In the moonlight I could see the rolling hills with their bare, small patches of grass and bush in a sea of stones and dust. No houses, street lamps, or mosques in sight. Not even a moving car. At least nowhere near the perimeter that marks the boundaries of what could turn into one of the biggest refugee camps in the world.”

    tags:news

  • “Sri Lanka must stop making empty promises to the international community and the Sri Lankan people on improving the country’s still desperate human rights situation, Amnesty International said ahead of a UN review of the country’s rights record.

    The UN Human Rights Committee (HRC) in Geneva, Switzerland, will on 7 and 8 October 2014 be reviewing Sri Lanka’s respect for rights enshrined in the key human rights treaty: the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR). This is the first such assessment since 2003.”

    tags:news

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

The New Refugee Council Archive at UEL (hopefully) Weekly Bulletin

Refugee Archives News
The Refugee Council Archives at UEL (hopefully) Weekly Bulletin
Issue: 1, 30 October 2014.

Introduction

dscf5929Welcome to the first/latest issue of Refugee Archive News: The Refugee Council Archives at UEL (hopefully) Weekly Bulletin.

This bulletin has the aim of providing both the latest news and developments on the Refugee Council Archive at the University of East London whilst also providing additional information on issues of concern to refugee and forced migration studies more generally. This I hope will include details of news stories, calls for papers, conferences and seminars, and online resources of potential interest. This bulletin, I hope, will aim to provide useful information to both students and academics on both UEL undergraduate courses in International Development and postgraduate students on our courses in Refugee Studies; Refugee Studies and Community Development and Conflict, Displacement and Human Security, whilst also being hopefully of interest to a wider readership represented by our Twitter and Blog followers.

This bulletin will be circulated via our Refugee Archive WordPress blog and also via our Refugee-Research Jiscmail email list. We would welcome any feedback that you may have on this bulletin and we would also welcome any input that you may have in terms of current and future content for both this bulletin and also our WordPress blog more generally. Please Contact Paul Dudman via email (library-archvies@uel.ac.uk) or Twitter (@PaulDudman) with any feedback or thoughts that you may have.

There are also some general Archive details included at the end of this and every bulletin posting for your reference.

Archive, CMRB and Course-Related News

News from the UEL Archives

Details of UEL Libraries Christmas and New Year Opening Hours for 2014/15 have just been published on the UEL Library website. Further details are available here: http://www.uel.ac.uk/lls/about/openinghours/christmas2014/

News from the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB) at UEL.

CMRB Seminar Announcement: CMRB is pleased to announce as part of its Borders and Bordering Seminar Series:

‘Between Innocence and Deviance: figuring the asylum-seeker child in Australia’, Dr. Carly McLaughlin (University of Potsdam)

This seminar will take place 4–6pm, Monday 10th November 2014,  in EB 1.04, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD
http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

IF YOU ARE COMING FROM OUTSIDE UEL PLEASE RESERVE A PLACE BEFORE 12PM ON FRIDAY 7TH NOVEMBER SO WE CAN ENSURE YOU HAVE ACCESS TO THE SEMINAR ROOM. WHEN YOU ARRIVE, PLEASE REGISTER AT THE RECEPTION OF DOCKLANDS CAMPUS AND YOU WILL BE ISSUED WITH A VISITOR’S PASS.

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at
https://betweeninnocenceanddeviance.eventbrite.co.uk

All queries to be directed to Jamie Hakim, CMRB Administrator, on j.hakim@uel.ac.uk.

CMRB Conference Announcement:

We are delighted to announce that registration is now open for the following conference:

‘Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel’

Date: Monday 9th February 2015
Time: 09.00–18.30
Place: School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG on  between

To register use the following link: ajamrqpisoas.eventbrite.co.uk

Early bird registration (ends 30 Nov 2014) – £15
Concessionary (All students; Staff associated with sponsoring organisations) – £15
Full price – £20

This conference seeks to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are being constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel. In particular it seeks to examine how the histories of Zionist settlement, anti-colonial and nation-building struggles and 20th century warfare in the Middle East region are being transformed in the current historical conjuncture. Of particular importance in this context will be ideological and political alliances that have emerged locally, regionally and globally around notions such as the ‘New Antisemitism’, and ‘Islamophobia’ and how these relate to racialised discourses against Jews and Muslims. Drawing on the expertise of scholars and activists from a variety of backgrounds, the aim of the conference will be to serve as a first step for building a transversal anti-racist political vision that will aim to destabilize some of the oppositional dichotomies which are currently hegemonic in discourses around Jews, Muslims and Middle East politics.

The conference is sponsored by University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging, SOAS’s Centre for Palestine Studies (London Middle East Institute), the Runnymede Trust and the LSE Centre for the Study of Human Rights.

All queries to be directed to Jamie Hakim, CMRB Administrator, on j.hakim@uel.ac.uk.
In the News

News Stories of Interest from this week – UK and Europe:

News on the UK’s decision to no longer support future search and rescue operations to prevent migrants drowning in the Mediterranean Sea and Italy’s decision to end Mare Nostrum:

BBC News – UK opposes future migrant rescues in Mediterranean

The Independent – UK axes support for Mediterranean migrant rescue operation

The Independent – Italy’s decision to end Mare Nostrum will put the lives of thousands of migrants and refugees at risk

Amnesty International – Is there ever a justification for leaving people to drown in the Med?

The Telegraph – Drown an immigrant to save an immigrant: why is the Government borrowing policy from the BNP?

The Guardian – Italian navy says it will continue refugee rescue mission despite plan to scrap it

The Guardian – Migrants’ tales: ‘I feel for those who were with me. They got asylum in the sea’

The Independent – European governments must come to the rescue of asylum-seekers

ECRE – ECRE and UNHCR Concerned over the ending of Mare Nostrum without European rescue initiative to replace it.

ECRE – Mare Nostrum to end – New Frontex operation will not ensure rescue of migrants in international waters

UNHCR – UNHCR concerned over ending of rescue operation in the Mediterranean

Other UK and International News

BBC News – 29,000 asylum cases still unresolved from 2007, say MPs.

BBC News – UK benefits a magnet to migrants, says Calais mayor

The Migration Observatory at Oxford University – Calais and clandestine migration into the UK: Concerns and context

The Telegraph – Trafficking gang offered ‘a la carte’ routes to UK.

BBC News – London asylum seekers moved to Folkestone hotel

The Huffington Post – Thousands Of Asylum Seekers Wait Seven Years To Learn Their Fate

The Guardian – Better integration is the best way to quell immigration fears

The Guardian – Don’t dismiss public fears about migration as mere bigotry

The Independent – Britain admits nearly three times more migrants from outside the EU than anyother member state, statistics show

The Independent – Cutting EU immigration will backfire, say employers

The Independent – Sir Andrew Green peerage: A highly misguided Lords appointment forthe Migration Watch founder

The Telegraph – Migrants fight in Calais for control of routes to Britain, say police

The Telegraph – Migrants storm UK-bound lorries at Calais

The Guardian – Gay asylum seekers face ‘intrusive’ sexual questions

The Independent – More than 10,000 asylum-seekers ‘left in limbo’

The Telegraph – Britain’s schools need more resources for ‘influx’ of immigrant children, chief schools inspector warns

The Huffington Post – The Secret Gardens Of Syria’s Refugee Camps

The Guardian – Tamil Nadu’s exploited garment workers need help from British justice. See details of report below.

Events and Call for Papers

Events

News from the London Migration Research Group (LMRG) about their upcoming Seminars for 2014-15, entitled `Talking Across Disciplines.’ Convenors: Fiona Adamson & Kristin Surak (SOAS), Claire Dwyer (UCL) and Eiko Thielemann (LSE)
When: Tuesdays, 17.30 – 19.00
Where: New York University in London, 6 Bedford Square, WC1B 3RA, Room tbc

4 Nov Ruben Anderson<http://rubenandersson.com/>(LSE)
Rescued and caught: the humanitarian paradox at Europe’s maritime frontiers

18 Nov Nadia Jaworsky<http://www.muni.cz/fss/people/370423/publications> (Yale/Masaryk University)
A Cultural Sociology of Cyberactivism: The U.S. Immigrant Rights Movement Online

2 Dec Gregor Noll<http://works.bepress.com/gregor_noll/> (University of Lund)
Junk Science: The Politics of Age and Unaccompanied Asylum Seekers

To attend, please join the respective event on our facebook page<https://www.facebook.com/pages/London-Migration-Research-Group-LMRG/108613799294580> or send an email to e.thielemann@lse.ac.uk
Calls for Papers

Special Issue of the: Journal of Human Trafficking, Fall 2015:

Traffickers and Slaveholders: Human Rights Violators in Comparative Perspective

Guest Editor: Austin Choi Fitzpatrick
Link:- http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/cfp/uhmtcfp.pdf

Citizenship  Studies

Call for Papers for two special issues of the journal: Citizenship  Studies to be published in 2016.
Further details: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/pdf/ccst-2016-special-issues.pdf

Online Publications

Publications reproduced from Minority Ethnic Matters Overview (MEMO), Issue 413, (20th October 2014). Available to [Download here]

Chasing status: the ‘surprised Brits’ who find they are living with irregular immigration status
http://www.lag.org.uk/media/186917/small_chasing_status.pdf

This is how it feels to be lonely
http://migrantforum.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Loneliness-report_The-Forum_UPDATED.pdf

Mid-term report on the implementation of the EU strategy towards the eradication of trafficking in human beings
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/home-affairs/what-is-new/news/news/docs/20141017_midterm_report_on_the_2012-2016_eu_strategy_on_trafficking_in_human_beings_en.pdf

Trafficking in human beings
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/home-affairs/what-isnew/news/news/docs/20141017_working_paper_on_statistics_on_trafficking_in_human_beings_en.pdf

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament on the application of Directive 2004/81 on the residence permit issued to third country nationals who are victims of trafficking in human beings or who have been the subject of an action to facilitate illegal immigration, who cooperate with the competent authorities
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/home-affairs/e-library/documents/policies/immigration/irregularimmigration/docs/communication_on_the_application_of_directive_2004-81_en.pdf

Human trafficking in the EU: infographic
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/home-affairs/e-library/docs/infographics/thb/thb_en.pdf

New Off Air Recordings

The following off-air recording requests have been made for the Refugee Council Archive for the week beginning Saturday, 1st November:

Saturday 1st November

0430-0500: BBC News 24: Our World – Switzerland: Stolen Childhoods with Kavita Puri. Series Recording.

Sunday 2nd November

2100-2200: BBC2: (2/2) Afghanistan: the Lion’s Last Roar.

Monday 3rd November

2100-2235: Channel 4: Make Leicester British.

Thursday 6th November

0310-0400: Channel 5: Black Market Britain: Undercover Sting – Sham Wedding Crashers.

Friday 7th November

0305-0330: Channel 4: (5/8) Unreported World – India’s Electric Dreams. Series Recording.

1935-2000: Channel 4: (6/8) Unreported World – The Kids of Murder High. Series Recording.

Archive Opening Hours

The current Opening Hours for our Archival collections are detailed as follows. The Refugee Council Archive and the British Olympic Association Archive are currently located on our Docklands Campus Library whilst the Hackney Empire Archive is currently located in our Stratford Campus Library.

The opening hours for both Docklands and Stratford Archives are as follows:

Docklands Archive

Mondays:  1pm – 6pm*
Tuesdays:  1pm – 6pm*
Wednesdays:  1pm – 6pm*
Thursdays:  1pm – 6pm*
Fridays: 1pm – 6pm*
Sat/Sun:  Both Archives Closed

Access to the Stratford Archive for the Hackney Empire Archive is by prior appointment only.

* Morning appointments between 10am and 12pm are available by prior appointment.  The Archive will be closed between 12pm and 1pm for lunch.

We would recommend that, especially for external users, that you contact us in advance of your trip in order to make an appointment to use the Archives.  This enables us to ensure that a member of staff will be on hand to assist you.

To make an appointment, please click on the link to our Make an Appointment page.

Archive Web Resources and Email List

Please find details below of our various online and social media resources which are currently available online and please do take a look. We would also welcome any feedback that you may have on how these can be improved:

Blogs

We have created several blogs to help support the archival work that we undertake and these are highlighted as follows:

Facebook

Please join and Like Us on Facebook, links are as follows:

Twitter

Please follow us on Twitter by selecting one of the options below:

Refugee-Research Email Mailing List

Please also consider joining our Refugee Research Jiscmail e-mail list which is managed in conjunction with this blog.  To subscribe to the mail group
www.jiscmail.ac.uk, type REFUGEE‐RESEARCH into the ‘find lists’ box, or use the alphabetical index to scroll down to R. and then follow the instructions on our REFUGEERESEARCH homepage to ‘join or leave the list’. Most users need only enter their email address and name. Alternatively, email the Archivist, Paul Dudman on p.v.dudman@uel.ac.uk, requesting to join the mail group.

Please let us know of any further links that you would like to see added.

Contact Details

Paul Dudman is currently the Archivist responsible for all of the physical Archives located here at the University of East London Library and Learning Services: Archives. Paul is happy to receive and respond to any questions or queries that you may have in response to both our Archival collections and also our social media presence.

If you wish to contact the Archive, please contact Paul Dudman via one of the contact methods detailed below:

By email at: library-archives@uel.ac.uk

By telephone at: +44 (0) 20 8223 7676

Online at: uelarchivesportal.wordpress.com/contact-us/

On Twitter at: @refugee_archive

By post to:

Paul V. Dudman
Archivist
Library and Learning Services
University of East London
Docklands Campus
4-6 University Way
London, E16 2RD
United Kingdom.

News: ECRE and UNHCR Concerned over the ending of Mare Nostrum without European rescue initiative to replace it.

Extract:

ECRE and UNHCR have warned that ending Italy’s rescue operation Mare Nostrum without replacing it by a well-resourced European search and rescue initiative would mean more deaths at sea.

One year ago, just a few days after more than 300 people drowned off the coast of Lampedusa, Italy launched the Mare Nostrum operation to ensure search and rescue of migrants in the Mediterranean. Since then, Mare Nostrum has saved around 150,000 people.

“Everyone was horrified at the loss of lives off Lampedusa one year ago. Italy did something about it. Now this life-saving Mare Nostrum operation is at stake. Refugees, many fleeing war in Syria and oppression in Eritrea, cannot stay in lawless Libya and it is not possible for them to reach a safe place legally and safely. If Mare Nostrum ends without being replaced by a well-resourced operation whose priority is to save lives, more people will die in their attempt to reach our shores. A European effort is urgently needed, if the EU is really serious about putting an end to the deaths in the Mediterranean,” said ECRE’s Secretary General Michael Diedring.

Read the full article online via the ECRE website here: ECRE and UNHCR Concerned over the ending of Mare Nostrum without European rescue initiative to replace it.

Further news and social media coverage of this story are available via the following links:

BBC News – UK opposes future migrant rescues in Mediterranean

The Independent – UK axes support for Mediterranean migrant rescue operation

The Independent – Italy’s decision to end Mare Nostrum will put the lives of thousands of migrants and refugees at risk

Amnesty International – Is there ever a justification for leaving people to drown in the Med?

The Telegraph – Drown an immigrant to save an immigrant: why is the Government borrowing policy from the BNP?

The Guardian – Italian navy says it will continue refugee rescue mission despite plan to scrap it

The Guardian – Migrants’ tales: ‘I feel for those who were with me. They got asylum in the sea’

The Independent – European governments must come to the rescue of asylum-seekers

ECRE – Mare Nostrum to end – New Frontex operation will not ensure rescue of migrants in international waters

UNHCR – UNHCR concerned over ending of rescue operation in the Mediterranean

 

German scholarship programme for Syrian refugees

The (ab)normality of migration and the legal position of migrants under international law

Originally posted on Interest Group on Migration and Refugee Law:

Call for blog submissions

The ESIL Interest Group on Migration and Refugee Law seeks to organize a blog symposium in the Fall/Winter of 2014 on the topic of the (ab)normality of migration.

Migration is a normal part of life, and always has been. Cells migrate, birds migrate and, of course, humans migrate. Human migration is a constant in the history of the world. Migrants make up a steady 3% of the world’s population. As the world’s population grew, the number of migrants grew with it. But this has not changed the percentage: it continues to be roughly 3%. People have always sought new and better homes, for varying reasons. Of course, some of the underlying reasons for migration should not be accepted as normal, such as persecution, war and natural disasters. However, such forced migration only accounts for a small percentage of overall migration. Moreover, the causes of a phenomenon…

View original 323 more words

CMRB Seminar: Between Innocence and Deviance: figuring the asylum-seeker child in Australia

CMRB (The Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) at the University of East London is pleased to announce as part of its Borders and Bordering Seminar Series:

Between Innocence and Deviance:
figuring the asylum-seeker child in Australia
Dr.
Carly McLaughlin
(University of Potsdam)

 This seminar will take place in

EB.1.04, Docklands Campus, University of East London, E16 2RD, nearest tube: Cyprus DLR
(
http://www.uel.ac.uk/campuses/docklands/)
4-6pm, Monday 10th November 2014

The event is free but spaces are limited so please reserve a place by following the below link https://betweeninnocenceanddeviance.eventbrite.co.uk

Abstract: In Australia, the depiction of asylum seekers as monstrous parents who throw their children into the sea or force their children to take part in protests in detention centres has rightly been identified as part of the government’s campaign to dehumanise asylum seekers. So far, however, little focus has been placed on the children and the discourses which form around them. This paper examines the way in which the figure of the child asylum seeker has been produced and instrumentalised in different discursive contexts. Across the political divide, asylum-seeker children have invariably been figured as victims, an image which has not only served the government’s cause of demonising adult asylum seekers, but has also been used as powerful political currency for those campaigning on behalf of asylum seekers. The instrumentalisation of this figure hinges on universal ideas about childhood as a universal, apolitical state of innocence and vulnerability. The paper explores how this leads to the image and behaviour of asylum seeker children in Australia being contained within normative ideas about childhood, thus ensuring that the figure of the innocent and vulnerable asylum-seeker child remains intact. Ultimately, this abstracts children from the highly politicised context of Australia’s mandatory detention regime and renders them invisible as political subjects.

Carly McLaughlin is a lecturer in literary and cultural studies in the Department of English and American Studies at the University of Potsdam, Germany. In her research, she is interested in how the politics of childhood influences how child migrants are perceived, especially within the context of ‘illegal’ migration. She is currently working on her post-doctoral project which is concerned with the legal, social and cultural production of the figure of the asylum seeker child in Australia and Great Britain.

See www.euborderscapes.eu for more information on the EU Borderscapes project, www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/borderscapes for details of the UEL Borderscapes team and www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb for information on CMRB

 

Registration Open for CMRB Conference: Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel

University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging, SOAS’s Centre for Palestine Studies (London Middle East Institute), the Runnymede Trust, and the LSE Centre for the Study of Human Rights are delighted to announce:

Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel

This conference will take place at: School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG
Map and directions here:

Monday 9th February 2015, 09.00–18.30

To register use the following link: ajamrqpisoas.eventbrite.co.uk

Registration details
Early bird (ends 30 Nov 2014) – £15
Concessionary (All students; Staff associated with sponsoring organisations) – £15
Full price – £20
All enquiries to be directed to j.hakim@uel.ac.uk

This conference seeks to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are being constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel. In particular it seeks to examine how the histories of Zionist settlement, anti-colonial and nation-building struggles and 20th century warfare in the Middle East region are being transformed in the current historical conjuncture. Of particular importance in this context will be ideological and political alliances that have emerged locally, regionally and globally around notions such as the ‘New Antisemitism’, and ‘Islamophobia’ and how these relate to racialised discourses against Jews and Muslims. Drawing on the expertise of scholars and activists from a variety of backgrounds, the aim of the conference will be to serve as a first step for building a transversal anti-racist political vision that will aim to destabilize some of the oppositional dichotomies which are currently hegemonic in discourses around Jews, Muslims and Middle East politics.

Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel
Programme
09.00-09.30 Coffee and registration
09.30-10.00 Welcome by organizers
10.00-11.15 Plenary panel 1: The Role of the Palestine/Israel Question in Racialised Discourses on Jews
Speakers: David Rosenberg (Jewish Socialist Group); Yasmin Rehman (Cross government working group on hate crimes); Prof. Robert Fine (Warwick); Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL)
11.15-12.30 Parallel sessions
12.30-13.30 Lunch
13.30-14.45 Plenary panel 2: The Role of the Palestine/Israel Question in Racialised Discourses on Muslims
Speakers: Prof. Haim Bresheeth (SOAS); Dr. Muhammad Idrees Ahmad (University of Stirling); Dr. Dina Matar (SOAS); Dr. Subir Sinha (SOAS)
14.45-16.00 Parallel discussion workshops
16.00-16.30 Tea break
16.30-17.30 Plenary panel 3: The Interrelationships between Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racialised Discourses
Speakers: Prof. Gilbert Achcar (SOAS); Prof. Yosefa Loshitzky (SOAS); Prof. Sami Zubaida (Birkbeck);
17.30-18.30 Final session: The Way Forward
A booklet containing full paper titles, abstracts and speaker’s bios will shortly be downloadable from: http://ajamrqpisoas.eventbrite.co.uk

Opting out of Mediterranean rescue condemns desperate migrants to death

Originally posted on Postcards from ...:

By Nando Sigona, University of Birmingham

[This article was originally published on The Conversation, 29 October 2014]

Strait_of_gibraltarThe UK government is seeking to defend its decision not to support rescue missions for migrants making the dangerous crossing to Europe via the central Mediterranean. And even though Europe professes to be stepping up to the plate, the emphasis is now being placed on monitoring European waters rather than actually helping those in trouble. Unless all of Europe faces what is, in reality, a shared problem, many more tragic deaths are likely to follow the thousands that have occurred in the past few years.

According to a recent report by the International Organization for Migration, more than 3,000 have died trying to cross the Mediterranean in 2014 alone. Before then, in October 2013, 366 migrants drowned in a single incident when a boat taking them from Libya to Italy…

View original 438 more words

UNHCR: Significant Increase in Deaths at Sea Off Yemen Coincides with Increasing Numbers of Migrants Reaching Yemen by Boat

Originally posted on MIGRANTS AT SEA:

Excerpts from UNHCR press statement 17 Oct. 2104: “[T]here has been a sharp increase this year in the number of migrants and asylum-seekers losing their lives in attempts to get to Yemen, mainly from the Horn of Africa, with more deaths at sea in 2014 than in the last three years combined. One of the recent tragic incidents took place on 2 October when 64 migrants and three crew died when their vessel, sailing from Somalia, sank in the Gulf of Aden. Since, then five more deaths bring the yearly tally for 2014 to 215, exceeding the combined total for 2011, 2012 and 2013 of 179….

The latest deaths come amidst a dramatic increase in the number of new arrivals to Yemen by boat in September. At 12,768, it marks the single biggest month for arrivals since current records began to be kept in 2002. Most of the migrants are…

View original 70 more words

OHCHR to Issue Recommended Principles and Guidelines on Human Rights at International Borders (22 Oct-Brussels; 23 Oct-New York)

Originally posted on MIGRANTS AT SEA:

The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights next week will launch Recommended Principles and Guidelines on Human Rights at International Borders. The Guidelines will be released and discussed at events in Brussels on 22 October 2014 and New York on 23 October.

From OHCHR: “These Guidelines are offered by OHCHR to states and other relevant stakeholders to develop human-rights respecting border governance measures; and thus improve the respect, protection and fulfilment of migrants at international borders.”

“OHCHR has been working on these principles and guidelines since 2012, together with multiple stakeholders. They accompany the report of the Secretary-General on the Protection of Migrants (A/69/277) (also available here) and will be provided to the 69th session of the General Assembly (GA).”

“International borders are not zones of exclusion or exception of human rights obligations. States have the duty to comply with their human rights obligations and all of…

View original 164 more words

Iranian Woman Fights Off a Rapist, But She’s the One Who Receives the Unimaginably Horrific Sentence

Originally posted on ~~Defender of Faith~Guardian of Truth~~:

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In Iran, a woman has received the worst possible sentence after stabbing a man who tried to rape her.

On Saturday, 27-year-old Reyhaneh Jabbari was hung at dawn for what Iranian officials concluded was “premeditated murder.” Amnesty International said the sentence is another “bloody stain” on Iran’s human rights record.

The event that led to Jabbari’s execution took place in 2007. A man approached Jabbari in a cafe who happened to be an Iranian intelligence agent. He told her that he wanted to discuss business with her at his office.

However, when Jabbari arrived the man had no intention to talk business. He tried to drug and rape her. Fearing for her life, Jabbari grabbed a pocketknife and stabbed the man.

What any American court would likely dismiss as self-defense, an Iranian court declared cold-blooded murder.

Before her hanging, Jabbari was given a chance to make one last call to her mother Sholeh…

View original 229 more words

Plan UK launch 2014 ‘Because I Am a Girl’ report

Originally posted on Raluca Enescu:

Yesterday Plan UK launched the 2014 edition of the “Because I am a Girl”/State of the World’s girls report; which contains all the newest research behind world’s leading global campaign for adolescent girls’ empowerment. This year’s topic is “Pathways to Power: Creating Sustainable Change for Adolescent Girls”.

There is a lot to be said about it, and I will definitely dedicate it a few blog posts; for now, I only wanted to say that I am immensely proud to have been part of the team who made this happen.

report

I worked for Plan UK as a research intern for 6 months, between November 2013 and April this year. This is where i learned how to do serious qualitative research, how to code in-depth interviews, how to work with surveys in Nvivo and make it spit out pretty graphs and various others such interesting geeky things; but most importantly, I have…

View original 72 more words

Calls for papers: Forced Migraton Review issue 49: ‘Climate change, disasters and displacement’

Call for Papers:

Forced Migration Review issue 49 – to be published in May 2015 – will include a major feature on ‘Climate change, disasters and displacement’.

Deadline for submission of articles: Monday 12th January 2015
www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters

(Please circulate to anyone you think might be interested.)

This forthcoming issue of FMR aims to discuss the linkages between climate change, disasters and displacement; the impact of both internal and cross-border displacement; measures to prevent or reduce the likelihood of displacement; and approaches to ensure the protection of those who are displaced (or who are unable to move).

In 2015 the Nansen Initiative, led by the Governments of Norway and Switzerland, will bring together states to discuss a protection agenda addressing the needs of people displaced in the context of disasters caused by natural hazards, including those linked to climate change. While some articles in the FMR issue will emanate from the Nansen Initiative’s regional consultations and civil society meetings that have been taking place since 2013, additional articles would be welcomed, in particular those that address the Arctic, Central Asia, Europe, West Africa, the Caribbean and Central Asia.

For more background please see full call for articles online at www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters

The FMR Editors are looking for practice-oriented submissions reflecting a diverse range of perspectives which address questions such as the following:

  • What have been the most significant developments in relation to a better understanding of the linkages between climate change, disasters and displacement since publication of FMR issue 31 in 2008?
  • What measures can be taken to prevent, or reduce the likelihood of, displacement in the context of climate change and disasters?
  • What gaps remain in national, regional and international legal regimes in terms of providing protection for individuals and communities displaced internally or across borders, or facing displacement, in the context of disasters caused by natural hazards, including those linked to climate change?
  • How can the operational response be improved, with roles and responsibilities better clarified, when providing protection and assistance for those displaced by disasters and the effects of climate change? What examples exist of states admitting displaced people in the context of disasters?
  • Are new methods of data collection, analysis and the use of quantitative modelling proving useful in predicting, planning for and responding to displacement in the context of disasters caused by natural hazards, including those linked to climate change?
  • Are there examples of good practice in supporting resilience, adaptation and coping strategies that can be replicated elsewhere?
    What evidence is there of improved guidelines and practice in disaster risk reduction and management, relating to displacement, disasters and climate change?
  • To what extent is human mobility included within national adaptation plans?
  • How can governments, civil society and the international community work together to help boost the adaptive capacities of local host communities and communities affected by displacement?
  • What are potentially affected local communities saying and doing about climate change, disasters and displacement? How can their expertise and insights feed in effectively to planning and responses at the local, national, regional and international level?
  • How can pre-emptive voluntary migration or planned relocation, and/or admission to another country to provide temporary protection, be facilitated?
  • In what circumstances will both affected citizens and non-citizens have access to humanitarian assistance?
  • What is needed in terms of international and regional cooperation and coordination?
  • What good practice currently exists?
  • How should governments and other actors respond in order to guard against protracted displacement and avoid premature return?

If you are interested in submitting an article, please email the Editors fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk with a proposed outline. (There is no deadline for this but of course you will need to leave time then to prepare the full article.)

Deadline for submission of articles: 12th January 2015

Maximum length: 2,500 words.
Please note that space is always at a premium in FMR and that published articles are usually shorter than this maximum length. Your article, if accepted for publication, may well be shortened but you will of course be consulted about any editing changes. Please consult our Guidelines for authors at: www.fmreview.org/writing-fmr

Authors are reminded that FMR seeks to include articles with a gendered approach or a gender analysis as part of them. We are also particularly keen to reflect the experiences and knowledge of communities and individuals directly affected by these questions. If you can put us in touch with displaced people and/or local organisation representatives who might be interested in writing, please do email us; we are happy to work with individuals to help them develop an article.

Please note that we also welcome articles on other subjects relating to forced migration for consideration for publication in the ‘general articles’ section of the issue.

If your contact details have recently changed, or if you would like us to remove you from our email alerts list, please let us know. Thank you.

Best wishes

Marion Couldrey & Maurice Herson
FMR Editors
fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Forced-Migration-Review/105563989479431?v=wall&ref=ss
Twitter: @FMReview

Forced Migration Review | +44 (0)1865 281700 | fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk | skype: fmreview
www.fmreview.org
Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford
Oxford Department of International Development
3 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TB

Workshop: ‘Undesirable and Unreturnable’: the UK’s response to excluded asylum seekers and other migrants suspected of serious criminality

Workshop: ‘Undesirable and Unreturnable’: the UK’s response to excluded asylum seekers and other migrants suspected of serious criminality

Thursday 23rd October, 16:30-18:30pm

Chancellor’s Hall, Senate House

Speakers: Dr Mariagiulia Giuffré, Edge Hill University, Jerome Phelps, Detention Action and Dr Sarah Singer, Refugee Law Initiative, School of Advanced Study

Attendance is free. Register for a ticket here.

 

Abstract: The question of migrants suspected of serious criminality regularly generates storms of political controversy. Human rights law is pushed to its limits here, as governments grapple with the political and legal implications of unwanted (criminal) foreigners on their territory. Human rights protections and practical considerations mean that such individuals can often not be removed to their country of origin nor a third State. Faced with these unreturnable yet undesirable migrants, governments have in some cases nevertheless pursued removal on the basis of diplomatic assurances and other forms of agreement with third states. However, such assurances have been heavily criticised as ineffective in practice, and been subject to considerable judicial challenge. In the absence of impending removal from the host state, such individuals are left in an uncertain legal limbo, subject to various counter-terrorism measures, (indefinite) detention and precarious forms of leave. This workshop explores the UK’s response to unreturnable asylum seekers and other migrants suspected of serious criminality, and questions how far human rights law can survive in an area so far towards the edges of protection, where human rights are celebrated by so few and contested by many.

 

Speakers: Jerome Phelps has been working with people in immigration detention since 2003.  In that time he has led Detention Action’s transformation from a local service-delivering organisation, London Detainee Support Group, to taking on a national role in challenging immigration detention in the UK.  He is the lead author of Detention Action’s reports: Detained Lives: the real cost of indefinite immigration detention (2009), No Return No Release No Reason (2011) and The State of Detention (2014), and co-author of Fast Track to Despair (2012) and Point of No Return: the futile detention of unreturnable migrants (2014).  Jerome writes regularly on detention and migration issues, including for the New Internationalist, Huffington Post, Forced Migration Review and openDemocracy.  He is the Western Europe representative of the International Detention Coalition.

 

Dr Mariagiulia Giuffré joined the Department of Law and Criminology at Edge Hill University as a Lecturer in Law in October 2013. She received her PhD (with the Doctor Europaeus Certificate) from the School of International Studies of the University of Trento in May 2014. She holds an LLM in Human Rights Law from the Queen Mary University of London, and she has been a Visiting Fellow at the Centre of Migration Law at the Radboud University of Nijmegen. She has served as an Intern at the Italian Consulate in London, and has both worked and volunteered for human rights NGOs. She is an Affiliate to the Refugee Law Initiative (RLI), School of Advanced Study, University of London, and a Member of the Lund/Uppsala Migration Law Network (L/UMIN). Thanks to a Scholarship awarded by the Swedish Institute, Mariagiulia has been a Visiting Researcher at the Faculty of Law, Lund University, where she has taught, since October 2010, on the LLM programs in Maritime Law and International Human Rights Law. Mariagiulia’s research interests are in International and European Law, Refugee Law and Policy, Human Rights and Migration Law. Her articles on refugees’ access to protection, migration by sea, readmission agreements, extraterritorial human rights obligations and diplomatic assurances have been published on the International and Comparative Law Quarterly, the International Journal of Refugee Law, and the Refugee Survey Quarterly, among others.

 

Dr Sarah Singer is an academic at the Refugee Law Initiative and Lecturer in Human Rights Law at the School of Advanced Study, University of London. Sarah is also Managing Editor of the International Community Law Review, a peer reviewed academic journal published by Brill; Martinus Nijhoff. She is Programme Director of the MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies (launching October 2014), the first postgraduate distance learning programme of its kind, run by the Refugee Law Initiative and delivered through the prestigious University of London International Programmes. She also teaches the law component of the MA in Understanding and Securing Human Rights at the Human Rights Consortium, School of Advanced Study, University of London.

Sarah’s research interests are in refugee law and policy, human rights and migration. She specialises in and has a number of publications on the topic of exclusion from refugee status. Her current research addresses the challenges posed to national and international public policy by asylum seekers who are suspected of serious criminality but cannot be removed from the territory of the host State. Sarah previously worked as an immigration caseworker at the House of Commons and has received a number of awards for her research including the prestigious Modern Law Review Scholarship.

News Stories (weekly)

  • “‘Whatever you thought of him, he was certainly ahead of his time.’ That, in sum, is what it took Aasmah Mir twenty-eight minutes to say in her recent Radio 4 broadcast, produced by Martin Williams, on The Lessons of Ray Honeyford. Recounting the intense, bitter furore surrounding the Bradford headteacher for a few years in the 1980s, the ‘Honeyford affair’, she argued, has come to represent ‘a kind of contemporary parable’ when looked at some three decades later. It ‘is a story upon which different people have different claims’, Aasmah Mir suggests, ‘[with] its meaning chang[ing] depending on who is telling it’. And she is assiduously fair in her attempts to portray them. Equal weight was given in the programme to competing perspectives on a man described as a hero for the Right and hate figure for the Left. Her quintessentially liberal account, however, is unfortunately devoid of any historical or contemporary meaning. And as such is little more than an appendage to the ongoing revisionist attempt to rehabilitate Honeyford.”

    tags:news

  • “Your readers would be forgiven for thinking the UK is being flooded by asylum seekers. This couldn’t be further from the truth, with asylum applications around the 23,000 mark a year the UK is home to less than 1 per cent of the world’s refugees and takes proportionately below the EU average.

    To characterise the people housed in Folkestone as having a ‘lovely break’ by the sea that Brits would be envious of is hugely misleading and dangerous.”

    tags:news

  • “GENEVA — Human traffickers rammed a boat filled with migrants they were smuggling from North Africa to Europe, making it sink in the open sea and “deliberately drowning” hundreds of the migrants, the International Organization for Migration said Monday.

    Christiane Berthiaume, a spokeswoman for the migration organization, said the traffickers rammed the boat with another vessel off the coast of Malta on Wednesday after an argument broke out between the traffickers and the migrant passengers. Ms. Berthiaume cited accounts by two Palestinians who had survived the sinking and had been rescued. Only nine people are known to have survived the disaster, the group said, out of as many as 500 who were said to have been on the boat.”

    tags:news

  • “The Home Office is investigating a disturbance at an immigration removal centre which began following the death of a detainee.

    Staff at Morton Hall, in Swinderby, Lincolnshire, had to find a “place of safety” when about 30 men reportedly refused to go into their rooms.

    The disorder was eventually brought under control on Saturday evening.

    A Home Office spokesman said there were no reported injuries to staff or detainees.

    Earlier, officers in riot gear were seen going into the site and there were reports alarms were sounding inside the complex.

    Immigration and Security Minister James Brokenshire said an investigation was taking place following the man’s death.”

    tags:news

  • “The scenes at Calais over the past few days raise the question of why Britain is the “favoured destination” for illegal/irregular entrants to the European Union. Several people asked me that on Twitter yesterday. For the Mail and Express, and indeed the Mayor of Calais, there is no doubt, it is the lure of our “generous benefit system” that makes us an “El Dorado”. For more rational analysts, it is “Britain’s extensive informal economy.”

    Except this is the wrong question. Look more closely at the Mail article:

    Meanwhile, the number of migrants arriving in Italy is rising daily. So far this year, 91,000 Africans have landed at Lampedusa..or after being rescued at sea by the Italian navy. Numbers are expected to reach 100,000 by the end of August. In just 24 hours, between Wednesday and Thursday this week, 2,500 Africans, Syrians and Egyptians landed in Italy.”

    tags:news

  • “Foreign students should no longer be labelled as “immigrants” because restrictions on studying in the UK are damaging universities and the economy, ministers have been told.

    Leading vice-chancellors called on the government to dramatically overhaul its policies towards overseas students amid claims existing rules are driving them towards countries such as the United States and Australia. “

    tags:news

  • “Following a critical Supreme Court judgment on the Home Office’s use of controversial language analysis tests to determine the nationality of asylum seekers, Aisha Maniar asks: why does the government insist on using these tests?

    Language is a crucial element of the identity of each and every one of us, and a marker of social and cultural inclusion. Over the past twenty years, it has increasingly been used by western states as a means of determining political and bureaucratic identity – nationality – and consequently to reject the claims of undocumented asylum seekers on the basis that the language they speak is not that of their claimed country of origin. And where a language analysis places the claimant’s linguistic origin elsewhere than the country from which they are seeking asylum, not only is the asylum claim rejected, but removal is, in many cases, to the wrong country, which the language analysis deems them to come from.”

    tags:news

  • “Matt Carr reflects on the complicity of Britain and France in the horrific situation for migrants in Calais.

    For millions of British tourists, Calais is a gateway for continental driving holidays and the pleasures of the Summer. For others it’s a city of designer shops, of the massive Euroshopping mall Cité Europe, where the Daily Mail and P&O ferries were offering £1 fares for foot passengers to do their Christmas shopping last year.

    There is of course another Calais, the city that has become a trap and another of the world’s border bottlenecks, where Europe’s unwanted migrants come each year in the hope of getting onto a truck that can take them to the UK. Most of them have endured astonishingly harsh and difficult journeys to escape poverty and political, religious or gender oppression, only to find themselves living in derelict squats, tent camps or on the streets, constantly watched, harrassed, arrested and often beaten by the contingents of the Republican Security Companies[1] who have been deployed there especially to make their lives hell.”

    tags:news

  • “At the weekend, a group of stowaways were found at Tilbury Docks desperately trying to escape a container they had been sealed into. By the time it was opened, one of the migrants, 40-year-old Meet Singh Kapoor was already dead.

    Thirty-four migrants, Sikhs from Afghanistan, were found in the container, ten men, nine women and fifteen children, with their ages ranging from one to 72. Among them were Meet Singh Kapoor’s children and wife. Apparently they had had to watch him die.”

    tags:news

  • “A new Institute for Research into Superdiversity (IRiS) Working Paper has been published which analyses the link between poverty and refugees and asylum seekers in the UK from the 1980s to the present. Focusing on three main groups: asylum seekers; refugees; and refused asylum seekers, it also examines the impact on women, children, unaccompanied asylum seeking minors, families, elderly people, Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) people, disabled people and members of cultural and religious minorities.”

    tags:news

  • “The Guardian newspaper has responded to a complaint set out in a recent joint letter headed by Right to Remain and supported by other groups including MRN, which complained about the use of the term ‘illegal migrants’ in a recent article.”

    tags:news

  • “Have you ever sought advice? Because you have paid too much income tax? For clarification with an issue at work? A landlord doesn’t want to return your deposit? You have had a dispute with a neighbour? Problems with your health and you can’t find a GP to register with? Have you had complications in dealing with a government department such as the Department for Work and Pensions? Or, maybe you require support settling back into the UK if you are an expat that has lived abroad the last 10 years of your life.”

    tags:news

  • “In the wake of recent armed attacks by the Islamic State (IS) group in Nineveh, which have had a devastating effect on vulnerable religious minorities, Iraq’s multi-ethnic future is now at grave risk, warns Minority Rights Group International (MRG).

    ‘The latest events in Nineveh have now proved beyond doubt that the Iraqi government is incapable of protecting its minority communities, including Christians, Yezidi and Shabak,’ says Mark Lattimer, MRG’s Executive Director. ‘The process of expelling Iraq’s minorities from their homelands that began some ten years ago is now being completed,’ he added.”

    tags:news

  • “Does this open the door to millions of people who might be displaced by climate change in the future?

    In June, New Zealand granted residency to a family from the Pacific island state of Tuvalu.

    Last week the Washington Post asked “Has the era of the ‘climate change refugee’ begun?”

    I spoke to a number of experts who say the media headlines have misrepresented the case.”

    tags:news

  • “New service standards introduced by UK Visas and Immigration have given customers greater transparency regarding the time taken to complete different types of visa application. The Department has also prioritized clearing backlogs of cases, and made additional resource available to do so.

    Progress in clearing the backlogs varies, however. UK Visas and Immigration has cleared all straightforward cases in the areas of temporary and permanent migration but, as at March 2014, the Department had around 301,000 open cases. These comprise some 85,000 which are in hand and remain within the timescales for reaching a decision in the temporary and permanent migration area; and other specific backlogs, most notably over 25,000 claims for asylum.”

    tags:news

  • “While it is an unprecedented crisis, Gervais Appave, special policy adviser to the International Organisation for Migration’s director general, frames it “within a more general global trend”, which could be defined as “survival migration”.

    Children travelling from the Horn of Africa to European countries, through Malta and Italy, or seeking to reach Australia by boat from Afghanistan, Iran and Sri Lanka, are just two examples.”

    tags:news

  • “In May, Ioane Teitiota, from the South Pacific island nation of Kiribati, had his bid to become the world’s first climate change refugee rejected. But later this summer, New Zealand granted a Tuvalu family residency on humanitarian grounds that referred to climate change. Keen to avoid opening ‘floodgates’ (their term) to similar claims, the tribunal stressed this family’s connections to New Zealand. It appears headlines like ‘the era of climate refugees has begun’ are misleading, but it is a case to watch.

    There’s a small thread of anti-immigration green politics, and environmental rhetoric gets used by anti-immigration groups (even climate sceptic ones) but the problem is usually larger than that. More broadly, the issue of immigration is a good example of how climate change can intersect with other political controversies. Climate change aggravates already heated immigration rhetoric; likewise, immigration can disrupt climate discussion.”

    tags:news

  • “Titi wants better for his family. At the age of 13 he moved from an outer island to South Tarawa, the capital of Kiribati, to accompany his older sister who had found employment with the Government. Titi’s family moved with him in the hope of better opportunities for the family, however, like many small islanders, Titi never found formal employment which would allow him to create a secure environment for his family.

    Already in a difficult situation due to a lack of economic opportunities, his family also feels the pressures of climate change as rising water levels reclaim and diminish useable space on the island. Without the resources to move off his sister’s property, Titi, his wife and his four children constructed a small one-room home (about five metres by five metres in size) where the land meets the ocean. During King tides, the waves roll in and out of his home, and with United Nations predictions that global sea levels will rise up to 82 cm by 2100 (mean figure) that situation seems unlikely to improve.”

    tags:news

  • “The populations of small tropical islands are particularly vulnerable to climate change. Over the past decade, a number of media outlets and organizations have presented various figures showing that rising sea levels or changing weather conditions will force millions of people in low-lying areas and small island states to migrate.

    Research Associate Himani Upadhyay of The Energy and Resources Institute in India is sceptical of such calculations.

    “There are so many figures circulating which speculate [on] the number of future climate refugees, without giving due attention to understanding the term climate refugee,” says Upadhyay.”

    tags:news

  • “This project aims to better understand how aid agencies engage with armed non-state actors (ANSAs), and how humanitarian engagement ultimately affects access to protection and assistance for vulnerable populations. It will seek to examine various issues and country case studies that illuminate this engagement in difficult political and security environments. This includes what lessons can be learned from experiences of negotiations and dialogue with ANSAs to ensure that vulnerable populations are better able to access assistance and protection. It will also explore the risks inherent to this engagement, including the moral dilemmas that often arise and the compromises that agencies make in order to gain access.”

    tags:news

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Items Archive (weekly)

  • “This article examines academic achievements of immigrant youths in four new immigration countries: Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain. The analysis based on the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) of 2009 and 2012 reveals large educational achievement gaps between immigrant children and natives in all four south European countries. The achievement gaps shrink substantially after accounting for differences in family backgrounds. The drawbacks faced by immigrant children in these four new immigration countries are due to fewer economic and material resources being available to them. On the other hand, the educational background of parents does not account for immigrant−native differences in academic performance. This stands in contrast to many traditional European immigration countries in which a lack of educational resources explains larger parts of the educational disadvantages of immigrant children. Our findings provide empirical evidence for the very precarious socio-economic integration of adult immigrants in new destination countries who, despite their relatively strong educational credentials, are placed into the lowest occupational positions. Such weak occupational attainments among the parental generation translate into a lack of material resources and investments available to families to foster their children’s education. “

    tags:newitemsarchive

  • “Immigrant female and also male workers are increasingly involved in the supply of care services in the countries of the Global North, and they are especially so in elderly care. In the countries of southern Europe, but to an increasing extent also in countries like Germany and Austria, the care work of immigrants is embedded in a specific care regime. It is undertaken mainly in the recipients’ households, often around the clock, and on a live-in basis, so that it supports a system in which the family remains the central locus of care delivery to frail people. Secondly, it employs a large number of workers irregular in regard to the employment relationship, and often also to their legal status. The paper will present the results of various research studies on the topic carried out in Italy within the time-span of a decade (2002–2012). It will discuss how irregular migration is in fact tolerated, when inserted in care work at the service of the growing needs of native families; how the system that I call “invisible welfare” works; and how immigrant care workers find possibilities of agency, despite the constraints of the legal order and the exploitation they often experience at work. “

    tags:newitemsarchive

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Journal Articles (weekly)

  • “Proponents’ claims regarding the empowering potential of participatory development have been challenged by critics who maintain that the practice of participation is constrained by structural inequities and hence is not as radically transformative as the rhetoric would suggest. This article shows how the transformative potential of participatory approaches can be limited by even slight variations in socioeconomic indicators among members of seemingly homogeneous marginalized groups, thus peeling back an often unrecognized layer of complexity in participatory development practice. A more reflexive approach that attempts to systematically address underlying structural barriers to the exercise of individual agency in Southern development contexts is necessary to achieve more equitable participation and inclusive empowerment. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Although witnesses are indispensable to the operation and success of war crimes courts, little is known about their motivations for agreeing to testify. This article advances existing knowledge by drawing on findings from interviews conducted with 200 witnesses after they gave evidence in the Special Court for Sierra Leone. Participants were asked to describe their reasons for testifying. Content analysis was used to examine the variety and frequency of responses. Overall, 18 conceptually distinct motivations were mentioned, with most witnesses reporting multiple motivations. The response given most frequently was ‘to denounce wrongs committed against me during the war,’ followed by ‘to contribute to public knowledge about the war.’ Desires for retributive justice (e.g., accountability, punishment), and to fulfill a moral duty to other victims, were each mentioned by approximately one in four witnesses. Other key motivations included establishing the truth and narrating their stories. Motivations differed by gender, age, victimization status, side (prosecution versus defense) and trial. The results support the idea that witnesses value the opportunity to publicly denounce atrocities committed against themselves and others. The findings point to both congruities and incongruities between the aims of witnesses and the goals of war crimes courts. Further, the findings suggest that there may be two broad, overarching aspects of the decision to testify: those that are primarily geared toward helping oneself and those that are primarily geared toward helping others. Pragmatically, the findings can enhance efforts to support witnesses in preparing for and completing their testimonies. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Judicial empowerment has traditionally been explained as a response to political uncertainty. This article applies this insight to the international context to explain patterns of support for the empowerment of supranational courts. Our analysis of the negotiations that produced the International Criminal Court suggests that the relationship between democratic consolidation and support for empowering such courts is curvilinear. States with no recent experience with the type of autocratic regime particularly likely to commit serious human rights violations generally favored a somewhat weaker Court. In this respect their positions sometimes aligned with those of autocracies. Conversely, states that had recently emerged from the shadow of autocratic rule, for whom the sovereignty costs associated with the Court were countervailed by the benefit of insurance against backsliding toward autocracy, generally favored a stronger Court. Thus, just as uncertainty drives judicial empowerment in domestic contexts, it also drives judicial empowerment in the international context. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article examines the impact of international criminal tribunals (ICTs) on the perception of justice. From the legal perspective, the perception of ICTs as just partly stems from their impartiality in dealing with perpetrators of different nationalities/ethnicities. In contrast, social identity theory suggests that the perception of ICTs as just is determined by the group membership, as people tend to pass more lenient judgments on perpetrators from their in-group. In order to resolve this dilemma, we developed an experimental vignette that manipulated international versus national courts, in-group versus out-group perpetrators and a jail sentence versus no jail sentence. The vignette was embedded in a representative survey conducted in Croatia in 2008 and combines with a natural experiment on the Radovan Karadžić arrest. The findings reveal biased perceptions of justice, conditional support for the ICTY, the dual impact of deterrent effect and the positive effect of the apprehension of war criminals. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article discusses the largely under-researched anti-poverty work of Migrant and Refugee Community Organizations (MRCOs) in Glasgow. The role of MRCOs as a source of social capital and critical coping and survival mechanism in exile has received notable attention since the introduction of dispersal policy in 1999. The practices outlined in this article contribute to this growing body of research by presenting examples of collective action developed from within migrant community organizations. The discussion is contextualized by broader ideological and political debates on entitlement and deservedness as they relate to migrants generally and asylum seekers specifically. Whilst offering tangible acts of financial support, MRCO strategies are also driven by social, cultural and political objectives which challenge structural constraints on self-determination. Varied in terms of risk and formality, their collective action is woven through with discourses of solidarity, belonging, resistance and empowerment. The informal nature of much of this work means that it is often missing from the broader picture of anti-poverty action and scholarship. The article concludes with a number of recommendations that suggest ways forward for bringing this action to the attention of academic researchers, practitioners and policy makers with an aim for developing better community-focused research. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The three books under review fill important gaps in the literature on irregular migration, borders and migration policy; they significantly expand empirical knowledge and offer new interpretations as well as provide essential conceptual and theoretical tools for further research. Anna Triandafyllidou and Thanos Maroukis’ Migrant Smuggling: Irregular Migration from Asia and Africa to Europe presents unique data and empirical evidence on human smuggling in southern Europe. Leanne Weber and Sharon Pickering’s conceptually rich, more normative and global work in Globalization and Borders: Death at the Global Frontier focuses on the location of human smuggling, state borders and in particular deaths related to irregular entry, human smuggling and law enforcement operations. Finally, Gregory Feldman’s The Migration Apparatus: Security, Labor and Policymaking in the European Union not only provides an ethnography of the wider policies of the European migration apparatus that determine the above issues, but also offers some inspiring Foucauldian interpretation about the securitization of migration. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Who is an indigenous migrant and how do processes of claiming an indigenous identity vary as people move from one location to another? How do politics and labor conditions in one country affect the experience of migrants in another? What kinds of racial/ethnic hierarchies are indigenous migrants inserted into and how? What forms of discrimination do indigenous immigrants experience? What is the role of culture in providing positive venues for asserting indigenous ethnicity in immigrant communities? What forms of collective action and organizing can be successfully mobilized to redefine immigrant indigenous ethnicity from a point of agency? What happens as multiple generations of indigenous people born in one country are socialized in another? Do they continue to identify as indigenous or do they combine that identity with others? “

    tags:newjournalarticles

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Council of Europe anti-torture Committee publishes report on Greece

Originally posted on clandestina:

Read the report: 2014-26-inf-eng

Strasbourg, 16.10.2014 – The Council of Europe’s Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT) has published today the report on its eleventh visit to Greece. The visit took place two years after the CPT had issued a public statement in which it had expressed serious concerns regarding the lack of effective action to tackle systemic deficiencies concerning the conditions of detention of irregular migrants and the situation in the prisons. Regrettably, the findings of the 2013 visit demonstrate clearly that the situation has not improved. Further, the problem of ill-treatment by the police appears to be growing and there is little evidence that allegations of ill-treatment are investigated promptly and thoroughly, leading to some police officers believing they can act with impunity.

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Research report launched

Originally posted on precariouslives:

Research report launch – 2 July 2013

The Precarious Lives research report was launched in Leeds on 2nd July, 3-5pm, Refugee Council, Hurley House, 1 Dewsbury Rd, Leeds.

Forty asylum and refugee organisations, trade union representatives, local authority officers, the police, academics, researchers and people seeking asylum/refugees attended to hear about the research findings and recommendations. There were contributions from national experts and opportunity for discussion. We were especially pleased that Klara Skřivánková, Trafficking Programme Coordinator at Anti-Slavery International, Beryl Randall, Director of the Employability Forum and Andrew Lawton, Refugee Employment Services Manager at the Refugee Council joined us to be part of a panel to respond to the findings.

We also heard about the launch of the Platform on Forced Labour and Asylum which will bring together academics, policy-makers and practitioners to take forward the research findings to develop strategies to tackle forced labour among refugees and asylum seekers.

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Towards a sociology of statelessness

Originally posted on Postcards from ...:

In the first week at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies (EUI) I’m finalising an article for a special issue on ‘Markers of Identity’ linked to the Oxford Diasporas Programme and its sister programme at the University of Leicester. The article draws on the work I have done for the ‘Stateless Diasporas in the EU’ project. I’ve presented a draft version of the paper last June in Oxford and was very well received. I’m now in the process of polishing the empirical sections. It’s now a couple of weeks overdue and I’m hoping to send it to the editors (Professor Joanna Story and Dr Iain Walker) by tomorrow or at the latest Sunday night.

I’ll post the abstract of the paper next week, once the article is sent out.

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January-September 2014: 3,072 migrant deaths in the Mediterranean…

Originally posted on clandestina:

MissingMigrantsProject2014

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News Stories (Daily) 10/16/2014

  • “‘Whatever you thought of him, he was certainly ahead of his time.’ That, in sum, is what it took Aasmah Mir twenty-eight minutes to say in her recent Radio 4 broadcast, produced by Martin Williams, on The Lessons of Ray Honeyford. Recounting the intense, bitter furore surrounding the Bradford headteacher for a few years in the 1980s, the ‘Honeyford affair’, she argued, has come to represent ‘a kind of contemporary parable’ when looked at some three decades later. It ‘is a story upon which different people have different claims’, Aasmah Mir suggests, ‘[with] its meaning chang[ing] depending on who is telling it’. And she is assiduously fair in her attempts to portray them. Equal weight was given in the programme to competing perspectives on a man described as a hero for the Right and hate figure for the Left. Her quintessentially liberal account, however, is unfortunately devoid of any historical or contemporary meaning. And as such is little more than an appendage to the ongoing revisionist attempt to rehabilitate Honeyford.”

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  • “Your readers would be forgiven for thinking the UK is being flooded by asylum seekers. This couldn’t be further from the truth, with asylum applications around the 23,000 mark a year the UK is home to less than 1 per cent of the world’s refugees and takes proportionately below the EU average.

    To characterise the people housed in Folkestone as having a ‘lovely break’ by the sea that Brits would be envious of is hugely misleading and dangerous.”

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  • “GENEVA — Human traffickers rammed a boat filled with migrants they were smuggling from North Africa to Europe, making it sink in the open sea and “deliberately drowning” hundreds of the migrants, the International Organization for Migration said Monday.

    Christiane Berthiaume, a spokeswoman for the migration organization, said the traffickers rammed the boat with another vessel off the coast of Malta on Wednesday after an argument broke out between the traffickers and the migrant passengers. Ms. Berthiaume cited accounts by two Palestinians who had survived the sinking and had been rescued. Only nine people are known to have survived the disaster, the group said, out of as many as 500 who were said to have been on the boat.”

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  • “The Home Office is investigating a disturbance at an immigration removal centre which began following the death of a detainee.

    Staff at Morton Hall, in Swinderby, Lincolnshire, had to find a “place of safety” when about 30 men reportedly refused to go into their rooms.

    The disorder was eventually brought under control on Saturday evening.

    A Home Office spokesman said there were no reported injuries to staff or detainees.

    Earlier, officers in riot gear were seen going into the site and there were reports alarms were sounding inside the complex.

    Immigration and Security Minister James Brokenshire said an investigation was taking place following the man’s death.”

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  • “The scenes at Calais over the past few days raise the question of why Britain is the “favoured destination” for illegal/irregular entrants to the European Union. Several people asked me that on Twitter yesterday. For the Mail and Express, and indeed the Mayor of Calais, there is no doubt, it is the lure of our “generous benefit system” that makes us an “El Dorado”. For more rational analysts, it is “Britain’s extensive informal economy.”

    Except this is the wrong question. Look more closely at the Mail article:

    Meanwhile, the number of migrants arriving in Italy is rising daily. So far this year, 91,000 Africans have landed at Lampedusa..or after being rescued at sea by the Italian navy. Numbers are expected to reach 100,000 by the end of August. In just 24 hours, between Wednesday and Thursday this week, 2,500 Africans, Syrians and Egyptians landed in Italy.”

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  • “Foreign students should no longer be labelled as “immigrants” because restrictions on studying in the UK are damaging universities and the economy, ministers have been told.

    Leading vice-chancellors called on the government to dramatically overhaul its policies towards overseas students amid claims existing rules are driving them towards countries such as the United States and Australia. “

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  • “Following a critical Supreme Court judgment on the Home Office’s use of controversial language analysis tests to determine the nationality of asylum seekers, Aisha Maniar asks: why does the government insist on using these tests?

    Language is a crucial element of the identity of each and every one of us, and a marker of social and cultural inclusion. Over the past twenty years, it has increasingly been used by western states as a means of determining political and bureaucratic identity – nationality – and consequently to reject the claims of undocumented asylum seekers on the basis that the language they speak is not that of their claimed country of origin. And where a language analysis places the claimant’s linguistic origin elsewhere than the country from which they are seeking asylum, not only is the asylum claim rejected, but removal is, in many cases, to the wrong country, which the language analysis deems them to come from.”

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  • “Matt Carr reflects on the complicity of Britain and France in the horrific situation for migrants in Calais.

    For millions of British tourists, Calais is a gateway for continental driving holidays and the pleasures of the Summer. For others it’s a city of designer shops, of the massive Euroshopping mall Cité Europe, where the Daily Mail and P&O ferries were offering £1 fares for foot passengers to do their Christmas shopping last year.

    There is of course another Calais, the city that has become a trap and another of the world’s border bottlenecks, where Europe’s unwanted migrants come each year in the hope of getting onto a truck that can take them to the UK. Most of them have endured astonishingly harsh and difficult journeys to escape poverty and political, religious or gender oppression, only to find themselves living in derelict squats, tent camps or on the streets, constantly watched, harrassed, arrested and often beaten by the contingents of the Republican Security Companies[1] who have been deployed there especially to make their lives hell.”

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  • “At the weekend, a group of stowaways were found at Tilbury Docks desperately trying to escape a container they had been sealed into. By the time it was opened, one of the migrants, 40-year-old Meet Singh Kapoor was already dead.

    Thirty-four migrants, Sikhs from Afghanistan, were found in the container, ten men, nine women and fifteen children, with their ages ranging from one to 72. Among them were Meet Singh Kapoor’s children and wife. Apparently they had had to watch him die.”

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  • “A new Institute for Research into Superdiversity (IRiS) Working Paper has been published which analyses the link between poverty and refugees and asylum seekers in the UK from the 1980s to the present. Focusing on three main groups: asylum seekers; refugees; and refused asylum seekers, it also examines the impact on women, children, unaccompanied asylum seeking minors, families, elderly people, Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) people, disabled people and members of cultural and religious minorities.”

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  • “The Guardian newspaper has responded to a complaint set out in a recent joint letter headed by Right to Remain and supported by other groups including MRN, which complained about the use of the term ‘illegal migrants’ in a recent article.”

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  • “Have you ever sought advice? Because you have paid too much income tax? For clarification with an issue at work? A landlord doesn’t want to return your deposit? You have had a dispute with a neighbour? Problems with your health and you can’t find a GP to register with? Have you had complications in dealing with a government department such as the Department for Work and Pensions? Or, maybe you require support settling back into the UK if you are an expat that has lived abroad the last 10 years of your life.”

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  • “In the wake of recent armed attacks by the Islamic State (IS) group in Nineveh, which have had a devastating effect on vulnerable religious minorities, Iraq’s multi-ethnic future is now at grave risk, warns Minority Rights Group International (MRG).

    ‘The latest events in Nineveh have now proved beyond doubt that the Iraqi government is incapable of protecting its minority communities, including Christians, Yezidi and Shabak,’ says Mark Lattimer, MRG’s Executive Director. ‘The process of expelling Iraq’s minorities from their homelands that began some ten years ago is now being completed,’ he added.”

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  • “Does this open the door to millions of people who might be displaced by climate change in the future?

    In June, New Zealand granted residency to a family from the Pacific island state of Tuvalu.

    Last week the Washington Post asked “Has the era of the ‘climate change refugee’ begun?”

    I spoke to a number of experts who say the media headlines have misrepresented the case.”

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  • “New service standards introduced by UK Visas and Immigration have given customers greater transparency regarding the time taken to complete different types of visa application. The Department has also prioritized clearing backlogs of cases, and made additional resource available to do so.

    Progress in clearing the backlogs varies, however. UK Visas and Immigration has cleared all straightforward cases in the areas of temporary and permanent migration but, as at March 2014, the Department had around 301,000 open cases. These comprise some 85,000 which are in hand and remain within the timescales for reaching a decision in the temporary and permanent migration area; and other specific backlogs, most notably over 25,000 claims for asylum.”

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  • “While it is an unprecedented crisis, Gervais Appave, special policy adviser to the International Organisation for Migration’s director general, frames it “within a more general global trend”, which could be defined as “survival migration”.

    Children travelling from the Horn of Africa to European countries, through Malta and Italy, or seeking to reach Australia by boat from Afghanistan, Iran and Sri Lanka, are just two examples.”

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  • “In May, Ioane Teitiota, from the South Pacific island nation of Kiribati, had his bid to become the world’s first climate change refugee rejected. But later this summer, New Zealand granted a Tuvalu family residency on humanitarian grounds that referred to climate change. Keen to avoid opening ‘floodgates’ (their term) to similar claims, the tribunal stressed this family’s connections to New Zealand. It appears headlines like ‘the era of climate refugees has begun’ are misleading, but it is a case to watch.

    There’s a small thread of anti-immigration green politics, and environmental rhetoric gets used by anti-immigration groups (even climate sceptic ones) but the problem is usually larger than that. More broadly, the issue of immigration is a good example of how climate change can intersect with other political controversies. Climate change aggravates already heated immigration rhetoric; likewise, immigration can disrupt climate discussion.”

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  • “Titi wants better for his family. At the age of 13 he moved from an outer island to South Tarawa, the capital of Kiribati, to accompany his older sister who had found employment with the Government. Titi’s family moved with him in the hope of better opportunities for the family, however, like many small islanders, Titi never found formal employment which would allow him to create a secure environment for his family.

    Already in a difficult situation due to a lack of economic opportunities, his family also feels the pressures of climate change as rising water levels reclaim and diminish useable space on the island. Without the resources to move off his sister’s property, Titi, his wife and his four children constructed a small one-room home (about five metres by five metres in size) where the land meets the ocean. During King tides, the waves roll in and out of his home, and with United Nations predictions that global sea levels will rise up to 82 cm by 2100 (mean figure) that situation seems unlikely to improve.”

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  • “The populations of small tropical islands are particularly vulnerable to climate change. Over the past decade, a number of media outlets and organizations have presented various figures showing that rising sea levels or changing weather conditions will force millions of people in low-lying areas and small island states to migrate.

    Research Associate Himani Upadhyay of The Energy and Resources Institute in India is sceptical of such calculations.

    “There are so many figures circulating which speculate [on] the number of future climate refugees, without giving due attention to understanding the term climate refugee,” says Upadhyay.”

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  • “This project aims to better understand how aid agencies engage with armed non-state actors (ANSAs), and how humanitarian engagement ultimately affects access to protection and assistance for vulnerable populations. It will seek to examine various issues and country case studies that illuminate this engagement in difficult political and security environments. This includes what lessons can be learned from experiences of negotiations and dialogue with ANSAs to ensure that vulnerable populations are better able to access assistance and protection. It will also explore the risks inherent to this engagement, including the moral dilemmas that often arise and the compromises that agencies make in order to gain access.”

    tags:news

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

“The Endorois decision” – Four years on, the Endorois still await action by the Government of Kenya

Originally posted on minorities in focus:

RebeccaRebecca Marlin is currently the Legal Fellow at Minority Rights Group International (MRG) in London. She earned her B.A. from Wellesley College and her J.D. from Fordham University School of Law. During her time at MRG she will be working extensively with the Endorois to achieve implementation of the 2010 African Commission decision granting them rights to Lake Bogoria.

For the Endorois of Kenya’s Lake Bogoria, the process of reclaiming their land from the government of Kenya has been one step forwards and two steps back. In 2003, MRG and partner organisation Centre for Minority Rights Development (CEMIRIDE), acting on behalf of the Endorois Welfare Council, went before the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights to demand that the Kenyan government recognise the rights of the Endorois to Lake Bogoria.

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Lake Bogoria is of great cultural significance to the Endorois. Copyright MRG

The Endorois had inhabited Lake Bogoria for…

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Europe: Minorities are protected, but by whom?

Originally posted on minorities in focus:

alexAlexandra Veloy, MRG’s Fundraising Intern, muses on the shifting patterns of minority rights protection in Europe.

On 3rd September, an event entitled ‘Citizenship, Minority Rights and Justice’ took place at the University of Sussex. The event was part of a series of workshops organised by the Sussex European Institute, New Europeans and the Sussex Centre for Responsibilities, Rights and the Law, to discuss current issues affecting minorities in Europe.

The workshop was divided into two sessions. The first, ‘Minority Rights and European Integration Debates’, explored integration in Europe and its effect on the respect of minority rights. This session analysed, for example, the recent and very polemic decision of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) SAS v. France (also known as the ‘burqa ban case’,), where the ECtHR upheld the ‘burqa ban’ in France since it concluded that the applicant’s rights had not been violated. According to…

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Publication: the Israeli Supreme Court’s decision on detention of asylum seekers

Originally posted on Interest Group on Migration and Refugee Law:

Second Strike and You are (Finally) out? The Quashing of the Prevention of Infiltration Law (Amendment No. 4)
by Reuven (Ruvi) Ziegler
(this article has been cross-posted on the Oxford Human Rights Hub Blog)

Introduction

On 22 September 2014, the Israeli Supreme Court sitting as a High Court of Justice quashed in a 217-page judgment (HCJ 8425/13 Anon v. Knesset et al,full text in Hebrew) the Prevention of Infiltration Law (Amendment no. 4) (full text in Hebrew). The amendment enacted two schemes: first, section 30A, authorising the detention for one year of any ‘infiltrator’ (the term was introduced by the above law, and shall be used in quotation marks in this discussion) entering Israel after the amendment’s coming into force. Second, Chapter D, authorising the holding in an ‘open’ residency centre of ‘infiltrators’ whose removal from Israel (according to the State’s official determination) proves…

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Syrian refugees stage hunger strike

Originally posted on clandestina:

Refugees from Syria camped out in front of the Greek parliament have begun a hunger strike.
More than 150 people are taking part in the sit-in which began on Wednesday, in a protest calling for the government to speed up the asylum process and provide food and shelter.
“My money is almost finished and we all here have to deal with the mafia. We don’t have legal papers, we can’t rent a house, we can’t do anything,” said one protester.
Another said: “I’m trying to go out of here, to leave Greece and go to other countries in Europe because in Greece there is no chance for me, or even for the Greek people. I came here as a refugee 10 months ago, and I tried many times to get out of Greece and I cannot.”
A woman said: “The only countries that support you so that you can be  comfortable, give you a salary and give you accommodation, are the  European countries.”

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‘What is narrative research?’ – new book!

Originally posted on Centrefornarrativeresearch's blog:

‘What is narrative research?’ is out now! Co-writing with 6 others – Mark Davis, Cigdem Esin, Molly Andrews, Barbara Harrison, Lars-Christer Hyden, and Margareta Hyden – was wonderful…Thanks to National Centre for Research Methods for the opportunity to contribute to the ‘What is..?’ series. Here’s a link to the paperback page: http://bit.ly/1zp2vMG

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