Tag Archives: UNHCR

New UNHCR report: 2014 Global Trends: World at War

New Publication from UNHCR:

UNHCR are pleased to announce that the following report has been published and is available for download via the UNHCR statistics website at:  www.unhcr.org/statisics

2014 Global Trends – World at War

UNHCRThe report provides an overview of the statistical trends and changes in global populations of concern to UNHC, i.e. refugees, returnees, stateless persons, and certain groups of internally displaced persons (IDPs), place din the context of major humanitarian developments and displacement during the year.

Some of the key findings of the report:

  • Global forced displacement has seen accelerated growth in 2014, once again reaching unprecedented levels. The year saw the highest displacement on record. By end-2014, 59.5 million individuals were forcibly displaced worldwide as a result of persecution, conflict, generalized violence, or human rights violations. This is 8.3 million persons more than the year before (51.2 million) and the highest annual increase in a single year.
  • Some 19.5 million persons were refugees, 14.4 million under UNHCR’s mandate and 5.1 million Palestinian refugees registered by UNRWA. The global figure included 38.2 million internally displaced persons and nearly 1.8 million asylum-seekers. If these 59.5 million persons were a nation, they would make up the 24th largest in the world.
  • An estimated 13.9 million individuals were newly displaced due to conflict or persecution in 2014. This includes 11.0 million persons newly displaced within the borders of their own country, the highest figure on record. The other 2.9 million individuals were new refugees.
  • For the first time, Turkey became the largest refugee-hosting country worldwide, with 1.59 million refugees. Turkey was followed by Pakistan (1.51 million), Lebanon (1.15 million), the Islamic Republic of Iran (982,000), Ethiopia (659,500), and Jordan (654,100).
  • More than half (53%) of all refugees worldwide came from just three countries: the Syrian Arab Republic (3.88 million), Afghanistan (2.59 million), and Somalia (1.11 million).
  • Over the course of 2014,some 126,800 refugees returned to their countries of origin. This figure was the lowest level of refugee returns since 1983.
  • A record high of nearly 1.7 million individuals submitted applications for asylum or refugee status in 2014. UNHCR offices registered 245,700 or 15 per cent of these claims. With 274,700 asylum claims, the Russian Federation was the world’s largest recipient of new individual applications, followed by Germany (173,100), the United States of America (121,200), and Turkey (87,800).
  • Children below 18 years of age constituted 51 per cent of the refugee population in 2014, up from 41 per cent in 2009 and the highest figure in more than a decade.

 

News: UNHCR statement on the future of Kenya’s Dadaab Refugee Camps

This is a summary of what was said by UNHCR spokesperson Karin de Gruijl to whom quoted text may be attributed at the press briefing, on 14 April 2015, at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.

The Government of Kenya has announced that the Dadaab refugee camps should be closed within three months and the 350,000 Somali refugees living there returned to their country. The Government’s decision was announced this past weekend following the horrific attack at Garissa University earlier this month.

UNHCR too has been shocked and appalled by the Garissa attack. High Commissioner António Guterres and his staff stand in solidarity with the people of Kenya. We reiterate our condolences to the families of all the victims.

Kenya has been generously hosting and protecting refugees from violence and persecution in neighbouring Somalia for more than two decades. UNHCR works closely with the Government of Kenya and we understand well the current regional security situation and the seriousness of the threats Kenya is facing. We also recognize the obligation of the Government to ensure the security of its citizens and other people living in Kenya, including refugees.

For full article, please visit:  www.unhcr.org/552d0a8a9.html

 

New Publication: UNHCR report: 2014 Mid-Year Trends

UNHCR are pleased to announce the release of the 2014 Mid-Year Trends report, which is now available and may be downloaded from the UNHCR statistics website at: www.unhcr.org/statistics.

The report provides a statistical overview of refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced persons (IDPs), returnees, stateless persons and other persons of concern to UNHCR for the period of 1 January to 30 June 2014. It is the second time only UNHCR is able to provide a global update at mid-year thanks to increased efforts put in place by both Headquarters and field colleagues.

The purpose of the report is to provide a snapshot of main trends in the number of persons of concern to UNHCR over this period, rather than providing a comprehensive overview of global trends in forced displacement. The report’s key findings show a dramatic deterioration in forced displacement during the first half of the year:

–       The total population of concern to UNHCR stood at 46.3 million at mid-2014, the highest level on record;

–       The global number of refugees at mid-2014 was estimated at 13.0 million, 1.3 million more than at the end of 2013;

–       The number of IDPs protected/assisted by UNHCR stood at 26 million, the highest on record;

–       The total number of persons of concern to UNHCR seeking protection within or outside the borders of their countries during the first half of 2014 exceeded 5.5 million individuals; and

–       Syrians have become the largest refugee population under UNHCR’s mandate, overtaking Afghans, who had held that position for more than three decades. At more than 3 million as of June 2014, Syrian refugees account for 23 per cent of all refugees under the organization’s mandate.

I hope that you will find the 2014 Mid-Year Trends report useful and interesting.

 

Event: Displacement and development in the Somalia context

Event: Displacement and development in the Somalia context

How does the Somalia New Deal Compact address displacement? Danish Refugee Council and Solutions Alliance Somalia will host a joint side-event on November 18 to the Somalia New Deal Compact High Level Partnership Forum.

Together with UNHCR, the side-event will discuss the ways in which the New Deal Compact accounts for displacement and more broadly discuss displacement as a development challenge in the Somalia context.

The event will have opening remarks from the Danish Minister of Trade and Development, Mogens Jensen, and consist of a panel with representatives from the Somali Ministry of Interior, World Bank, UNHCR, UNDP and Regional Durable Solutions Secretariat (ReDSS).

The event is open to all. It is currently advertised on the Danish Refugee Council and Solutions Alliance websites.

Time and Venue:
16:30-18:30 on 18 November 2014 at Kosmopol, Fiolstræde 44, Copenhagen

Registration:
http://goo.gl/tmLlBQ

Any questions related to the side-event can be directed to Ms. Alice Anderson-Gough, alice.anderson-gough@drc.dk

News: ECRE and UNHCR Concerned over the ending of Mare Nostrum without European rescue initiative to replace it.

Extract:

ECRE and UNHCR have warned that ending Italy’s rescue operation Mare Nostrum without replacing it by a well-resourced European search and rescue initiative would mean more deaths at sea.

One year ago, just a few days after more than 300 people drowned off the coast of Lampedusa, Italy launched the Mare Nostrum operation to ensure search and rescue of migrants in the Mediterranean. Since then, Mare Nostrum has saved around 150,000 people.

“Everyone was horrified at the loss of lives off Lampedusa one year ago. Italy did something about it. Now this life-saving Mare Nostrum operation is at stake. Refugees, many fleeing war in Syria and oppression in Eritrea, cannot stay in lawless Libya and it is not possible for them to reach a safe place legally and safely. If Mare Nostrum ends without being replaced by a well-resourced operation whose priority is to save lives, more people will die in their attempt to reach our shores. A European effort is urgently needed, if the EU is really serious about putting an end to the deaths in the Mediterranean,” said ECRE’s Secretary General Michael Diedring.

Read the full article online via the ECRE website here: ECRE and UNHCR Concerned over the ending of Mare Nostrum without European rescue initiative to replace it.

Further news and social media coverage of this story are available via the following links:

BBC News – UK opposes future migrant rescues in Mediterranean

The Independent – UK axes support for Mediterranean migrant rescue operation

The Independent – Italy’s decision to end Mare Nostrum will put the lives of thousands of migrants and refugees at risk

Amnesty International – Is there ever a justification for leaving people to drown in the Med?

The Telegraph – Drown an immigrant to save an immigrant: why is the Government borrowing policy from the BNP?

The Guardian – Italian navy says it will continue refugee rescue mission despite plan to scrap it

The Guardian – Migrants’ tales: ‘I feel for those who were with me. They got asylum in the sea’

The Independent – European governments must come to the rescue of asylum-seekers

ECRE – Mare Nostrum to end – New Frontex operation will not ensure rescue of migrants in international waters

UNHCR – UNHCR concerned over ending of rescue operation in the Mediterranean

 

New Resources: UNHCR online Protection Manual

UNHCR is pleased to announce the launch of its online Protection Manual, UNHCR’s repository of protection policy and guidance documents.

The Protection Manual is updated whenever a new protection policy or guidance document is published and can thus be relied upon to represent the current state of UNHCR protection policy / guidance.

This new tool is accessible directly from the Refworld home screen (www.refworld.org, top right of the screen) and from the UNHCR website (www.unhcr.org, click “Protection Manual” under “resources”), or directly at www.refworld.org/protectionmanual.html.

UNHCR guidance and policy documents are organized by theme/subject, as reflected in the Protection Manual’s Table of Contents. Subjects include legal topics (reflecting, for example, UNHCR guidance on the different elements of the refugee definition) and operational protection guidance (for example, on ‘asylum-seekers at sea’, or ‘age, gender and diversity’).

Under each heading, documents are arranged in reverse chronological order; with each document individually accessible through a hyperlink. Documents from non-UNHCR sources are generally not included, unless they provide guidance on protection-related topics that also applies to or has specifically been endorsed by UNHCR (such as interagency guidance). At the bottom of several of the subject headings, relevant related sources are listed, containing older guidance and documents which serve as background reading.

The Protection Manual contains at present over 1,000 guidance and policy documents. We expect it to be a helpful tool for, amongst others, government officials responsible for asylum decision-making, lawyers, legal aid providers, academics and students, and operational agencies working with refugees or IDPs.

Any questions or remarks relating to the Protection Manual or user experiences, both positive and negative, can be sent to refworld@unhcr.org. We appreciate your feedback!

We hope the Protection Manual will be useful to you in your work.

The Refworld (and Protection Manual) Team

 

Publication: UNHCR Report: Asylum Trends 2013

UNHCR Report: Asylum Trends 2013

This is to inform you that the following report has been published today and can be downloaded from the UNHCR website at http://www.unhcr.org/532afe986.html.

– Asylum Trends 2013 (Levels and Trends in Industrialized Countries)

Key findings:

Copyright: UNHCR

A.  An estimated 612,700 asylum applications were registered in 2013 in the 44 industrialized countries covered by the report, some 133,000 claims more than the year before (+28%). This is the third consecutive annual increase and the second highest annual level of the past 20 years.

B.  With 109,600 new asylum applications registered during 2013, Germany was for the first time since 1999 the largest single recipient of new asylum claims among the group of industrialized countries. The United States of America was second with an estimated 88,400 asylum applications, followed by France (60,100), Sweden (54,300), and Turkey (44,800). The top five receiving countries together accounted for six out of ten new asylum claims submitted in the 44 industrialized countries.

C.  The Syrian Arab Republic, the Russian Federation, Afghanistan, Iraq, and Serbia (and Kosovo: Security Council resolution 1244 (1999))  were the five top source countries of asylum-seekers in the 44 industrialized countries in 2013. Among the top-10 countries of origin six are currently experiencing violence or conflict – Syria, Afghanistan, Eritrea, Somalia, Iraq and Pakistan.

D.  The Syrian Arab Republic became for the first time the main country of origin of asylum-seekers in the 44 industrialized countries. Provisional data indicate that some 56,400 Syrians requested refugee status in 2013, more than double the number of 2012 (25,200 claims) and six times more than in 2011 (8,500 claims). The 2013 level is the highest number recorded by a single group among the industrialized countries since 1999.