Tag Archives: call for papers

Call for Papers: “External and Internal Displacement: Impacts and Lessons Learned from Resettlement Processes”

Special Sessions – Winter 2016

New Pressures on Cities and Regions

Managing change in your local economy: have your views heard

Session organiser(s)

Andrew Beer, University of South Australia Business School

This meeting is part of an international research study looking at the ways in which key individuals and businesses at the local or regional level are involved in managing the processes of change in the economy.   Regions such as northern Adelaide are undergoing a substantial shift, with more change expected as production at Holden ends in 2017. This change will have knock on effects for other businesses, the community sector, the labour market and probably consumer confidence.  So what do business and community leaders do in response to these challenges?  How involved are you in driving this process of change, and what would you do if you had the capacity to reshape the economy?

This meeting covers these sorts of questions and looks at two scenarios: what happens when a large new business announces that it wants to enter your region, and what happens when they announce their closure.   We will discuss both possibilities, with the results written down and then included in the research.

The other nations participating in this study are Finland, the United Kingdom, Italy, Germany and the USA.  Our results will be compared with the outcomes from these places.  Once the project is finished, the results will be available on the web, or we can send them to you in hard copy or via email.

Submission guidelines

For more information: call Andrew Beer on 0409 696 485 or contact him on email on andrew.beer@unisa.edu.au

[ back to top ]

Interpreting long-term urban economic transformation in cities

Session organiser(s)

Ron Martin, University of Cambridge

More information to follow.

[ back to top ]

The Political Economy of Brexit

Session organiser(s)

David Bailey, Aston Business School and Leslie Budd, The Open University Business School

More information to follow.

[ back to top ]

External and Internal Displacement: Impacts and Lessons Learned from Resettlement Processes

Session organiser(s)

Dr. Yehya Serag, associate professor of urban and regional planning (Ain Shams University- Cairo) and Dr. Abeer Elshater, associate professor of urban design (Ain Shams University – Cairo)

This spatial session aims to provide a review of the resettlement processes and programs on the mass displacement of people throughout the contemporary era. Worldwide, this review can give a solid ground for further innovations for this kind of crises in terms of a better life for all; the hosted and comer. The primary focus is on both displaced people whether they are internally displaced persons (IDPs) or externally displaced persons (refugees) and their impacts on the host territory of displacement. The internally displaced persons, on one hand, have not crossed an international boundary, but have, for whatever reason, fled their homes, causing internal demographic flows. On the other hand, different nations witnessed (and are witnessing) several flows of refugees. Both types of flows have their impacts on the host communities that they end up settling, affecting, for example, their socio-economic aspects, their built environment and reshaping of Human settlements, to mention a few.

Most refugees (58%) now live in cities, not in refugee camps. In cities, refugees face hard conditions and often have their basic rights denied. It is extremely challenging to support refugees in urban settings. As such, one of the aims of this session is to attempt to give a precise morphological analysis and define the process and scenarios of settled accommodation in the host communities. In most resettlement cases, several interventions are made by the host countries as well as International organizations, to provide direct aid for the displaced persons, but of course, such interventions might have their positive and negative impacts of the host communities.

This session aims to start a process of knowledge sharing on how the crises of displacement was and is dealt with, by the host communities and what are the impacts, benefits, and disadvantages of the resettlement processes. Our aim is to invite speakers from Europe and the Middle East to share their experiences and studies on the resettlement process, from its different aspects. This should be done while, taking into consideration that Europe is currently witnessing a flux of refugees as a result of the Syrian unrest. Simultaneously, some Middle Eastern countries (mainly Egypt, Jordan and Lebanon) witnessed and are witnessing several flows of both types of displaced people as a result of regional wars, domestic unrest, and large-scale development projects. Meeting resettlement demands have been dealt with previously in several cases in these countries, thus having a proper experience for dealing with such demands.

The intended outcomes of this session are to collect contributions in various fields such as urban planning and housing approaches and practice, heterodox concepts highlighting local and social economies indicators, strategies of displacement, and others to enhance our knowledge in the following topical areas (and possibly others):

The socio-economic pressures that face the host countries to participate in the resettlements of refugees, and IDPs in their territories.
The socio-economic impacts of the displaced people in the host communities and human settlements.
The physical impact of the resettlement on the built environment and housing sector.
The impact of resettlement on the services sector in the host communities.
The assessment of what the gender-related impacts of resettlement have been.
The role of international aid organizations in the resettlement initiatives
Types of internal displacement, their causes, and their impacts.

Submission guidelines

We welcome both theoretical and empirical papers to this theme. If you are interested in participating in this special session, please send a title and abstract (between 400 and 500 words) to:

Dr. Yehya Serag, associate professor of urban and regional planning (Ain Shams University- Cairo): yehya_serag@eng.asu.edu.eg

Dr. Abeer Elshater, associate professor of urban design  (Ain Shams University-Cairo): abeer.elshater@eng.asu.edu.eg

http://www.regionalstudies.org/conferences/special-sessions/special-sessions-winter-2016#246

 

Advertisements

Call for Applications – (Forced) Migration and Media Workshop – 13th of June, University of Leicester

Call for Applications – (Forced) Migration and Media Workshop – 13th of June, University of Leicester

Call for Applications – Workshop (Forced) Migration and Media at the University of Leicester

13th and 14th of June, 2016

This workshop consists of two days: the first day is targeted on academic knowledge sharing whereas the second day is aimed at dialogue with community organisations in and around Leicester. 

For the first day of this workshop – Monday, the 13th of June – we are looking for applicants who conduct research on how media and forced migration intersect. The deadline to submit your abstract is on the Sunday, the 15th of May, 23.59 GMT.

Delegates are more than welcome to also attend the workshop of the 14th of June.  

Outline Day 1 – Interdisciplinary Workshop aimed at academic knowledge exchange

Digital technologies have “woven themselves into the everyday lives of refugees” (Wilding and Gifford , 2013), opening up new spaces for agency and creativity. For example, 96% of the refugees in Uganda use mobile phones, which is a much higher percentage than the general population (Betts, 2014). We aim to bring together established and upcoming scholars from different areas together in order to further understand and increase our knowledge on the mediation of (forced) migration.

The academic interest for (forced) migrants and media is very topical given the influence of the ‘refugee crisis in Europe’- for instance in dehumanizing language regarding refugees and other migrants in the British media or the confusion about the realization that refugees own smartphones.

But while ethnographic research has indeed shown that diasporic communities are often vanguards of digital technologies and it is clear that forced migration and mediated connectivity are increasingly intertwined, critical research in this area is still lacking. The few notable exceptions show that media (mass media and social media) can influence one’s feelings of security, but can also provide opportunities to strategise and negotiate one’s position of insecurity (Aouragh, 2011; Collyer, 2007; Dekker and Engersen, 2012; Horst, 2006; Moore and Clifford, 2007; Wilding and Gifford, 2013).

We are looking for applicants who conduct research to further the understanding on how media and forced migration intersect. New and old media play a crucial role in the lives of (forced) migrants. Within this workshop we aim to explore how we can understand the intersections between different media forms, including people’s own media use, and (forced) migration. We bracket the forced, as we recognise that the label ‘refugee’ can have its own difficulties, and could even be considered as a governing tool appropriated by nation-states. This workshop could therefore also be opened up to people who consider mixed migration or challenge the distinction between economic and forced migrations in regard to media.

The workshop (see a detailed program in the attachment) includes interactive activities in which established scholars, new career researchers and post-graduate students from a wide variety of fields are able to learn from each other and write together. 

After a general opening and key note speeches, the keynote speaker will be working within a small group of early career researchers (max. 5/6 people) on a specific subject which is related to the one of the 4 streams.
The 4 streams are:
1. Media representations of (forced) migration.
2. Methodology, media and migration.
3. Trajectories of (forced) migrants.
4. Media power in the politics of (forced) migration.
For a more detailed description of these streams, please have a look at the attachment or on our Facebook event-page: Workshop (Forced) Migration and Media.

The objective of the afternoon session is creating a more informal space where researchers working on similar subjects can present their work with people working on similar issues and to someone who has a tracked record in the field.

In the closing plenary session we will look for bridges, and consider how we as academics can best engage to policies and practices.

We ask you to submit the title of your work, an abstract of maximum 300 words and a short motivation of maximum 200 words why your works fits best in what particular stream by Sunday, the 15th of May, 23.59 GMT to mediamigrationworkshop@gmail.com.

Accepted participants will be notified by the 20th of May.

Costs: Attendees are asked to contribute £10 each, in order to contribute to the travel costs of attendees without funding. Those attendees who have to travel far within the UK and do not have funding to cover travel costs can contact us for additional funding.

Full details on the streams and program can be downloaded as follows: Streams and Program – Workshop Forced Migration and Media.

For more information or any questions, please contact mediamigrationworkshop@gmail.com, Mirjam Twigt, mat35@le.ac.uk or Zakaria Sajir: zs70@le.ac.uk or contact us through the Facebook event-page: Workshop (Forced) Migration and Media.

For more information on the Community Impact Event on the 14th of June, please contact Idil Osman io40@le.ac.uk or Mirjam Twigt: mat35@le.ac.uk.

EXTENDED Call for Papers Europe’s crisis: What future for immigration and asylum law and policy?

EXTENDED Call for Papers

Europe’s crisis:

What future for immigration andasylum law and policy?

Migration and Law Network 2016 Conference

27-28 June, London

in association with Queen Mary University of London

The European Union is today faced by significant movements of refugees and migrants from places which have experienced war or economic or environmental pressure. Combined with recent terrorist attacks, these developments have led some to doubt the viability of the EU migration framework. At the same time, they have led to arguments for new action by EU institutions and agencies, and by neighbouring countries. New forms of solidarity have been sought by some states and sections of public opinion, but rejected by others. Given the current sense of crisis, there are great uncertainties as to the future direction of the EU migration framework, as well as its content.

Against this background, we invite papers from any discipline addressing legal and policy aspects of the ongoing EU migration crisis. Among the questions papers may wish to address are the following:

  • What is the nature, and what are the sources, of the EU crisis concerning migration?
  • What should the legal, policy and operational responses to the crisis be?
  • Is solidarity among states and peoples possible inside the EU? Does solidarity apply also externally, towards non-EU countries?
  • What is, and what should be, the role of neighbouring and transit states in controlling migration towards the EU?
  • Are there lessons from elsewhere – including the Americas, South East Asia and Australia – for the experience in the EU and its surrounding region?
  • Are new international norms and approaches needed to accommodate contemporary migration flows?

We welcome submissions from academics, researchers with other organisations, and PhD students.

Abstracts of no more than 200 words alongside the author’s affiliation and contact details should be sent to MLNconference2016@qmul.ac.uk no later than 15 March 2016.

Plenary Speakers at the Conference include:

– Mark Camilleri (European Asylum Support Office)

– Tineke Strik (Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe)

– Madeline Garlick (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees) [tbc]

– Kris Pollet (European Council on Refugees and Exiles)

– Inmaculada Arnaez (FRONTEX Fundamental Rights Officer)

The 2016 conference is being organised by:

Prof. Valsamis Mitsilegas, Head of Law Department, Queen Mary

Prof. Elspeth Guild, Jean Monnet Professor, Queen Mary & Radboud University, Nijmegen

Prof. Bernard Ryan, University of Leicester

Dr. Prakash Shah, School of Law, Queen Mary

Dr. Violeta Moreno-Lax, School of Law, Queen Mary

Niovi Vavoula, School of Law, Queen Mary

 

The Migration and Law Network

The Migration and Law Network was set up in 2007 to promote migration law as a subject within United Kingdom universities. It is overseen by a steering committee of academics and other professionals in the immigration law field. It runs the Migration and Law mailing list for those who work in the field, for which subscription requests may be made at http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/migrationlaw. Further information about the network or mailing list may be obtained from the network’s co-chairs, Bernard Ryan (bernard.ryan@le.ac.uk) and Prakash Shah (prakash.shah@qmul.ac.uk).

Call for Papers: Migration, Security and Solidarity within Global Disorder

It is our pleasure to announce the Call for Proposals for the academic event of the 6th Belgrade Security Forum (BSF). This year’s BSF academic event will be held on 12 October 2016, with the title “Migration, Security and Solidarity within Global Disorder”. The aim of this conference is to explore how theories and theoretical frameworks within various fields of social sciences and humanities can contribute to the solution of the current migrant and refugee crisis.

 

We are kindly asking you to distribute the Call via your mailing list. All the details could be found at this link http://www.belgradeforum.org/Academicevent/Callforpapers2016.html

BELGRADE SECURITY FORUM 2016: CALL FOR PAPERS

Migration, Security and Solidarity within Global Disorder

Co-organized by the Belgrade Centre for Security Policy, the Belgrade Fund for Political Excellence and the European Movement in Serbia

12-14 October 2016, Hyatt Regency Hotel, Belgrade, Serbia

Deadline for applications: 20 March 2016

Open Call

The organizers of the Belgrade Security Forum (BSF) are pleased to invite scholars and researchers to submit paper proposals for the BSF academic event entitled “Migration, Security and Solidarity within Global Disorder”. This year’s academic event will be held on 12 October 2016, with the aim of exploring how theories and theoretical frameworks within various fields in the social sciences and humanities can contribute to the solution of the current migrant and refugee crisis.

In 2015, over a million migrants and refugees reached Europe in what has been estimated to be the worst refugee crisis since the aftermath of the Second World War. This humanitarian emergency – with a pronounced security dimension – marked 2015, and unfortunately it is unlikely to be resolved in 2016. The response of European countries to the wave of mass migration was not harmonized, and existing EU asylum legislation has proved inadequate to deal with a crisis of such magnitude. It is yet to be seen how the EU as a whole will cope with the urgency of the crisis. The xenophobic backlash against immigration in a number of European countries represents a serious challenge to the introduction of policies based on solidarity, and the systems of so called “burden sharing” among EU member states.

Regardless of whether they are fleeing war or severe economic hardship, the mass influx of migrants and refugees – especially in times of harsh austerity measures in Europe – has the potential to increase poverty and marginalization, which would consequently create new security challenges. The current migrant and refugee crisis therefore requires receiving countries to carefully rethink their approaches to combating poverty and tackling inequality.

Drawing on insights from Security Studies, Political Science, European Studies, Legal Studies, Migration Studies, Sociology, Anthropology and other disciplines, this conference will seek to address the following issues:

  • The implications of the current migrant and refugee crisis for the perception of the EU as a “Normative Power” and a “Community of Values” with high standards of human rights protection;
  • Conceptual challenges to the Common European Asylum System posed by the current crisis;
  • Securitization of immigration and the rise of right-wing populism and Islamophobia in the EU;
  • The migrant and refugee crisis between international, EU and member states’ asylum laws – the legal aspects and implications of the crisis;
  •    Migration, inequality and insecurity – new forms of marginalization; inequality as a security threat;
  • Immigration and integration – from identity politics to the politics of solidarity;
  • Problematizing the nexus between migration, radicalization and violent extremism.

 

Application process

Participants will be selected based on the quality of their application. All submissions are required to include the applicant’s CV (up to 2 pages) attached to his/her paper proposal (up to 300 words). Submissions should be made electronically to jrs@fpn.bg.ac.rs with the subject line: “Call for paper proposals for BSF 2016”.

The deadline for submissions is 20 March 2016. All successful candidates will be contacted by the end of April 2016.

Incomplete applications will be excluded from our review. The organizers will financially support the travel and accommodation expenses of a limited number of participants on a needs basis. Applicants should clearly state in their application whether they would like to be considered for the accommodation and travel grant.

All accepted papers will be presented during the academic event (12 October 2016) and, following the conference, the presented papers will be peer-reviewed for publication in the Journal of Regional Security (www.regionalsecurityjournal.com).

 

About the BSF

The BSF is the largest international security conference in Southeast Europe, bringing together several hundred top level policy and decision makers, think-tankers, academics and journalists each year. The forum is a combined event divided into two parts, with an academic event on the first day and a policy event taking place over the following two days. The aim of the academic part of the conference is to serve as a platform for theorizing current security and foreign policy issues, and thus feed scholarly insights into the policy part of the BSF. The general topic of this year’s Forum is “Will Democracy Survive the Global Disorder?”, while the theme of the academic event is “Migration, Security and Solidarity within Global Disorder”. The first five academic events (2011-2015) have proved this conference to be a relevant platform for scholarly discussion on pressing security issues and, even more importantly, a forum for dialogue between the academic and policy communities. As a part of a larger initiative, the BSF academic event enables interaction and the exchange of ideas between members of academia, policy-makers, civil society representatives and the media. Participants in the academic event are also a valuable part of discussions during the policy portion of the BSF, in which they take an active part by raising important questions and providing theoretical perspective for the policy debates.

Finally, the BSF academic event is followed by the Method Café (13-14 October) which enables young scholars to become familiar with the latest trends in social sciences research methodology. The Method Café is led by senior scholars with expertise in a range of research methods. The aim is for these experienced researchers to engage with the other participants in informal and unstructured but focused discussions about the methods in which they specialize.

 

SLS Migration and Asylum Law Section: Call for Papers/Posters

SLS Migration and Asylum Law Section: Call for Papers/Posters

2016 SLS Annual Conference at University of Oxford

 

This is the call for papers and posters for the Migration and Asylum Law Section of the 2016 SLS Annual Conference to be held at the University of Oxford from Tuesday 6th September to Friday 9th September.  This year’s theme is ‘Legislation and the Role of the Judiciary’.

The Migration and Asylum Section will meet in the second half of the conference on Thursday 8th and Friday 9th September and we are very pleased to announce that Professor Dora Kostakopoulou and Dr Cathryn Costello have already agreed to give a presentation.

If you are also interested in delivering a paper, please, submit an abstract of 250 words max. by midnight on Friday 18th March.  All abstracts must be submitted through the EasyChair conference system which can be accessed using the following link: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=sls2016. Full instructions on how to use the EasyChair system can be found here:  https://gallery.mailchimp.com/47624183ad52dd8428c97d3f6/files/Using_EasyChair_to_Submit_a_Paper_to_SLS_2016_02.pdf Please, contact Jed Meers at jed.meers@york.ac.uk if you experience any problems using EasyChair.

We would welcome proposals for papers on any issue relating to migration and asylum, including those addressing this year’s conference theme, whether from a doctrinal, critical, socio-legal or empirical perspective.  Alternatively, if you would like to propose a panel or roundtable discussion on a topic of current interest, please, do get in touch by e-mail to see if this can be arranged.

As the SLS is keen to ensure that as many members with good quality papers as possible are able to present, we discourage speakers from presenting more than one paper at the conference.  With this in mind, when you submit an abstract via EasyChair you will be asked to notify whether you are also responding to calls for papers from other sections.

Please, note that whilst you need only submit a proposed title and abstract at this stage, speakers will be asked to submit a copy of their draft paper no later than a week before the conference or, if that is not possible, their PowerPoint slides / handout or an extended abstract (two sides of A4).  This is to enable those who wish to read the papers in advance to do so, thereby enhancing the quality of feedback and discussion within the sessions.

We should also note that the SLS offers a Best Paper Prize which can be awarded to academics at any stage of their career.  The Prize carries a £250 monetary award and winning papers are published in Legal Studies.  To be eligible:

  • speakers must be fully paid-up members of the SLS;
  • papers must not exceed 11,000 words including footnotes (as counted in Word);
  • papers must be uploaded to EasyChair by midnight on Monday 29th August; and
  • papers must not have been published previously or have been accepted or be under consideration for publication.

Those wishing to present a poster should select ‘Submit a Poster’ within EasyChair. The SLS offers a Best Poster Prize, which carries a £250 monetary award and the winning poster will be displayed at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies in London.

We have also been asked to remind you that all speakers and poster presenters will need to register and pay to attend the conference.  As part of a new initiative this year, to reduce the number of late cancellations, speakers and poster presenters will be asked to register for the conference by the end of June in order to secure their place within the programme, though, please, do let us know if this is likely to pose any problems. Booking information will be circulated in due course.

We look forward to your submissions,

With best wishes,

Dr Diego Acosta Arcarazo   and Dr Violeta Moreno-Lax

d.acosta@bristol.ac.uk    and    v.moreno-lax@qmul.ac.uk

Co-convenors of SLS Migration and Asylum Law Section

Call for Papers Europe’s crisis: What future for immigration and asylum law and policy?

Call for Papers

Europe’s crisis: What future for immigration and asylum law and policy?

Migration and Law Network 2016 Conference: 27-28 June, in association with Queen Mary University of London

The European Union is today faced by significant movements of refugees and migrants from places which have experienced war or economic or environmental pressure. Combined with recent terrorist attacks, these developments have led some to doubt the viability of the EU migration framework. At the same time, they have led to arguments for new action by EU institutions and agencies, and by neighbouring countries. New forms of solidarity have been sought by some states and sections of public opinion, but rejected by others. Given the current sense of crisis, there are great uncertainties as to the future direction of the EU migration framework, as well as its content.

Against this background, we invite papers from any discipline which address legal and policy aspects of the ongoing EU migration crisis. Among the questions that papers may wish to address are the following:

·      What is the nature, and what are the sources, of the EU crisis concerning migration?

·      What should be the legal, policy and operational responses to the European migration crisis?

·      Is solidarity among states and peoples possible inside the EU? Does solidarity apply also externally, towards non-EU countries?

·      What is, and what should be, the role of neighbouring and transit states in controlling migration towards the EU?

·      Are there lessons from elsewhere – including the Americas, South East Asia and Australia – for the experience in the EU and its surrounding region?

·      Are new international norms and approaches needed to accommodate contemporary migration flows?

We welcome papers from academics, researchers with other organisations, and from advanced PhD students.

Abstracts of no more than 200 words alongside the author’s affiliation and contact details should be sent to MLNconference2016@qmul.ac.uk no later than 15 February 2016.

The 2016 conference is being organised by

Prof. Valsamis Mitsilegas, Head of Law Department, Queen Mary

Prof. Elspeth Guild, Jean Monnet Professor, Queen Mary & Radboud University, Nijmegen

Prof. Bernard Ryan, University of Leicester

Dr. Prakash Shah, School of Law, Queen Mary

Dr. Violeta Moreno-Lax, School of Law, Queen Mary

Niovi Vavoula, School of Law, Queen Mary

The Migration and Law Network

The Migration and Law Network was set up in 2007 to promote migration law as a subject within United Kingdom universities. It is overseen by a steering committee of academics and other professionals in the immigration law field. It runs the Migration and Law mailing list for those who work in the field, for which subscription requests may be made at http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/migrationlaw. Further information about the network or mailing list may be obtained from the network’s co-chairs, Bernard Ryan (bernard.ryan@le.ac.uk) and Prakash Shah (prakash.shah@qmul.ac.uk).

Call for Papers: Precarious citizenship: Young people who are undocumented, separated and settled in the UK

Birkbeck University of London & Migrant and Refugee Children’s Legal Unit. 

Call for Papers Precarious citizenship: Young people who are undocumented, separated and settled in the UK

 A one-day conference at Birkbeck, University of London to be held on June 1st 2015 for academics, practitioners and activists interested in how precarious citizenship impacts on separated youth as they live and transition to adulthood in the UK. Organised by the Department of Geography, Environment and Development Studies and Pears Institute for the Study of Anti-Semitism at Birkbeck, and Migrant and Refugee Children’s Legal Unit.

Please submit a title and abstract (150 words) and a brief bio (150 words) to k.wells@bbk.ac.uk by 5 pm on March 15th 2016.

We welcome papers that: 

  • Focus on young people who were not aware of their precarious citizenship until State intervention in their lives (going into LA Care; family proceedings; removal/detention of family; police involvement/checks) or when they attempt to access post-school opportunities and services (housing, employment, benefits, higher education etc.) and who were/are Looked After Children by the Local Authority or whose families do not have high levels of economic and/or social capital with which to secure their immigration status and/or who are estranged from their family
  • Focus on the political mobilisation of young people around citizenship and immigration rights (we are particularly interested in papers from activists and/or those young people)
  • We welcome papers from academics, campaigners, activists and practitioners.

Background 

Significant numbers of young people who are settled in the UK (some 120,000) do not have British citizenship. Many have no ‘lawful’ status to remain in the UK whilst cuts to legal aid and fast-paced changes to immigration laws fuelled by a hostile anti-immigrant climate mean that this trend may indeed get worse with numbers rising. Many of these young people may have lived in the UK for many years and consider themselves to be British. Indeed, they may not be aware of their precarious citizenship until they leave school and try to apply for bank accounts, jobs, benefits or university or when they are leaving care or following a family breakdown. Their precarious status arises from the combination of their transition out of childhood, which gave them a degree of protection or insulation from immigration laws, and the discriminatory character of immigration law that means for many of these young people, despite being settled in the UK for many years, once they reach adulthood they cannot secure their British citizenship.

The purpose of this conference is to increase awareness of the precarious citizenship of this group of young people in the UK; to share empirical and theoretical knowledge about contemporary and historical forms of precarious citizenship at the intersection of youth and immigration; to develop a network of academics and practitioners who can take forward the study of precarious citizenship in young people’s lives, and to contribute to theoretical and policy development focused on this group; to engage with activists on effective political mobilisation of youth.

The conference is financially supported by Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, and Migrant and Refugee Children’s Legal Unit.