Tag Archives: call for papers

Call for Papers: “External and Internal Displacement: Impacts and Lessons Learned from Resettlement Processes”

Special Sessions – Winter 2016

New Pressures on Cities and Regions

Managing change in your local economy: have your views heard

Session organiser(s)

Andrew Beer, University of South Australia Business School

This meeting is part of an international research study looking at the ways in which key individuals and businesses at the local or regional level are involved in managing the processes of change in the economy.   Regions such as northern Adelaide are undergoing a substantial shift, with more change expected as production at Holden ends in 2017. This change will have knock on effects for other businesses, the community sector, the labour market and probably consumer confidence.  So what do business and community leaders do in response to these challenges?  How involved are you in driving this process of change, and what would you do if you had the capacity to reshape the economy?

This meeting covers these sorts of questions and looks at two scenarios: what happens when a large new business announces that it wants to enter your region, and what happens when they announce their closure.   We will discuss both possibilities, with the results written down and then included in the research.

The other nations participating in this study are Finland, the United Kingdom, Italy, Germany and the USA.  Our results will be compared with the outcomes from these places.  Once the project is finished, the results will be available on the web, or we can send them to you in hard copy or via email.

Submission guidelines

For more information: call Andrew Beer on 0409 696 485 or contact him on email on andrew.beer@unisa.edu.au

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Interpreting long-term urban economic transformation in cities

Session organiser(s)

Ron Martin, University of Cambridge

More information to follow.

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The Political Economy of Brexit

Session organiser(s)

David Bailey, Aston Business School and Leslie Budd, The Open University Business School

More information to follow.

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External and Internal Displacement: Impacts and Lessons Learned from Resettlement Processes

Session organiser(s)

Dr. Yehya Serag, associate professor of urban and regional planning (Ain Shams University- Cairo) and Dr. Abeer Elshater, associate professor of urban design (Ain Shams University – Cairo)

This spatial session aims to provide a review of the resettlement processes and programs on the mass displacement of people throughout the contemporary era. Worldwide, this review can give a solid ground for further innovations for this kind of crises in terms of a better life for all; the hosted and comer. The primary focus is on both displaced people whether they are internally displaced persons (IDPs) or externally displaced persons (refugees) and their impacts on the host territory of displacement. The internally displaced persons, on one hand, have not crossed an international boundary, but have, for whatever reason, fled their homes, causing internal demographic flows. On the other hand, different nations witnessed (and are witnessing) several flows of refugees. Both types of flows have their impacts on the host communities that they end up settling, affecting, for example, their socio-economic aspects, their built environment and reshaping of Human settlements, to mention a few.

Most refugees (58%) now live in cities, not in refugee camps. In cities, refugees face hard conditions and often have their basic rights denied. It is extremely challenging to support refugees in urban settings. As such, one of the aims of this session is to attempt to give a precise morphological analysis and define the process and scenarios of settled accommodation in the host communities. In most resettlement cases, several interventions are made by the host countries as well as International organizations, to provide direct aid for the displaced persons, but of course, such interventions might have their positive and negative impacts of the host communities.

This session aims to start a process of knowledge sharing on how the crises of displacement was and is dealt with, by the host communities and what are the impacts, benefits, and disadvantages of the resettlement processes. Our aim is to invite speakers from Europe and the Middle East to share their experiences and studies on the resettlement process, from its different aspects. This should be done while, taking into consideration that Europe is currently witnessing a flux of refugees as a result of the Syrian unrest. Simultaneously, some Middle Eastern countries (mainly Egypt, Jordan and Lebanon) witnessed and are witnessing several flows of both types of displaced people as a result of regional wars, domestic unrest, and large-scale development projects. Meeting resettlement demands have been dealt with previously in several cases in these countries, thus having a proper experience for dealing with such demands.

The intended outcomes of this session are to collect contributions in various fields such as urban planning and housing approaches and practice, heterodox concepts highlighting local and social economies indicators, strategies of displacement, and others to enhance our knowledge in the following topical areas (and possibly others):

The socio-economic pressures that face the host countries to participate in the resettlements of refugees, and IDPs in their territories.
The socio-economic impacts of the displaced people in the host communities and human settlements.
The physical impact of the resettlement on the built environment and housing sector.
The impact of resettlement on the services sector in the host communities.
The assessment of what the gender-related impacts of resettlement have been.
The role of international aid organizations in the resettlement initiatives
Types of internal displacement, their causes, and their impacts.

Submission guidelines

We welcome both theoretical and empirical papers to this theme. If you are interested in participating in this special session, please send a title and abstract (between 400 and 500 words) to:

Dr. Yehya Serag, associate professor of urban and regional planning (Ain Shams University- Cairo): yehya_serag@eng.asu.edu.eg

Dr. Abeer Elshater, associate professor of urban design  (Ain Shams University-Cairo): abeer.elshater@eng.asu.edu.eg

http://www.regionalstudies.org/conferences/special-sessions/special-sessions-winter-2016#246

 

Call for Applications – (Forced) Migration and Media Workshop – 13th of June, University of Leicester

Call for Applications – (Forced) Migration and Media Workshop – 13th of June, University of Leicester

Call for Applications – Workshop (Forced) Migration and Media at the University of Leicester

13th and 14th of June, 2016

This workshop consists of two days: the first day is targeted on academic knowledge sharing whereas the second day is aimed at dialogue with community organisations in and around Leicester. 

For the first day of this workshop – Monday, the 13th of June – we are looking for applicants who conduct research on how media and forced migration intersect. The deadline to submit your abstract is on the Sunday, the 15th of May, 23.59 GMT.

Delegates are more than welcome to also attend the workshop of the 14th of June.  

Outline Day 1 – Interdisciplinary Workshop aimed at academic knowledge exchange

Digital technologies have “woven themselves into the everyday lives of refugees” (Wilding and Gifford , 2013), opening up new spaces for agency and creativity. For example, 96% of the refugees in Uganda use mobile phones, which is a much higher percentage than the general population (Betts, 2014). We aim to bring together established and upcoming scholars from different areas together in order to further understand and increase our knowledge on the mediation of (forced) migration.

The academic interest for (forced) migrants and media is very topical given the influence of the ‘refugee crisis in Europe’- for instance in dehumanizing language regarding refugees and other migrants in the British media or the confusion about the realization that refugees own smartphones.

But while ethnographic research has indeed shown that diasporic communities are often vanguards of digital technologies and it is clear that forced migration and mediated connectivity are increasingly intertwined, critical research in this area is still lacking. The few notable exceptions show that media (mass media and social media) can influence one’s feelings of security, but can also provide opportunities to strategise and negotiate one’s position of insecurity (Aouragh, 2011; Collyer, 2007; Dekker and Engersen, 2012; Horst, 2006; Moore and Clifford, 2007; Wilding and Gifford, 2013).

We are looking for applicants who conduct research to further the understanding on how media and forced migration intersect. New and old media play a crucial role in the lives of (forced) migrants. Within this workshop we aim to explore how we can understand the intersections between different media forms, including people’s own media use, and (forced) migration. We bracket the forced, as we recognise that the label ‘refugee’ can have its own difficulties, and could even be considered as a governing tool appropriated by nation-states. This workshop could therefore also be opened up to people who consider mixed migration or challenge the distinction between economic and forced migrations in regard to media.

The workshop (see a detailed program in the attachment) includes interactive activities in which established scholars, new career researchers and post-graduate students from a wide variety of fields are able to learn from each other and write together. 

After a general opening and key note speeches, the keynote speaker will be working within a small group of early career researchers (max. 5/6 people) on a specific subject which is related to the one of the 4 streams.
The 4 streams are:
1. Media representations of (forced) migration.
2. Methodology, media and migration.
3. Trajectories of (forced) migrants.
4. Media power in the politics of (forced) migration.
For a more detailed description of these streams, please have a look at the attachment or on our Facebook event-page: Workshop (Forced) Migration and Media.

The objective of the afternoon session is creating a more informal space where researchers working on similar subjects can present their work with people working on similar issues and to someone who has a tracked record in the field.

In the closing plenary session we will look for bridges, and consider how we as academics can best engage to policies and practices.

We ask you to submit the title of your work, an abstract of maximum 300 words and a short motivation of maximum 200 words why your works fits best in what particular stream by Sunday, the 15th of May, 23.59 GMT to mediamigrationworkshop@gmail.com.

Accepted participants will be notified by the 20th of May.

Costs: Attendees are asked to contribute £10 each, in order to contribute to the travel costs of attendees without funding. Those attendees who have to travel far within the UK and do not have funding to cover travel costs can contact us for additional funding.

Full details on the streams and program can be downloaded as follows: Streams and Program – Workshop Forced Migration and Media.

For more information or any questions, please contact mediamigrationworkshop@gmail.com, Mirjam Twigt, mat35@le.ac.uk or Zakaria Sajir: zs70@le.ac.uk or contact us through the Facebook event-page: Workshop (Forced) Migration and Media.

For more information on the Community Impact Event on the 14th of June, please contact Idil Osman io40@le.ac.uk or Mirjam Twigt: mat35@le.ac.uk.

EXTENDED Call for Papers Europe’s crisis: What future for immigration and asylum law and policy?

EXTENDED Call for Papers

Europe’s crisis:

What future for immigration andasylum law and policy?

Migration and Law Network 2016 Conference

27-28 June, London

in association with Queen Mary University of London

The European Union is today faced by significant movements of refugees and migrants from places which have experienced war or economic or environmental pressure. Combined with recent terrorist attacks, these developments have led some to doubt the viability of the EU migration framework. At the same time, they have led to arguments for new action by EU institutions and agencies, and by neighbouring countries. New forms of solidarity have been sought by some states and sections of public opinion, but rejected by others. Given the current sense of crisis, there are great uncertainties as to the future direction of the EU migration framework, as well as its content.

Against this background, we invite papers from any discipline addressing legal and policy aspects of the ongoing EU migration crisis. Among the questions papers may wish to address are the following:

  • What is the nature, and what are the sources, of the EU crisis concerning migration?
  • What should the legal, policy and operational responses to the crisis be?
  • Is solidarity among states and peoples possible inside the EU? Does solidarity apply also externally, towards non-EU countries?
  • What is, and what should be, the role of neighbouring and transit states in controlling migration towards the EU?
  • Are there lessons from elsewhere – including the Americas, South East Asia and Australia – for the experience in the EU and its surrounding region?
  • Are new international norms and approaches needed to accommodate contemporary migration flows?

We welcome submissions from academics, researchers with other organisations, and PhD students.

Abstracts of no more than 200 words alongside the author’s affiliation and contact details should be sent to MLNconference2016@qmul.ac.uk no later than 15 March 2016.

Plenary Speakers at the Conference include:

– Mark Camilleri (European Asylum Support Office)

– Tineke Strik (Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe)

– Madeline Garlick (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees) [tbc]

– Kris Pollet (European Council on Refugees and Exiles)

– Inmaculada Arnaez (FRONTEX Fundamental Rights Officer)

The 2016 conference is being organised by:

Prof. Valsamis Mitsilegas, Head of Law Department, Queen Mary

Prof. Elspeth Guild, Jean Monnet Professor, Queen Mary & Radboud University, Nijmegen

Prof. Bernard Ryan, University of Leicester

Dr. Prakash Shah, School of Law, Queen Mary

Dr. Violeta Moreno-Lax, School of Law, Queen Mary

Niovi Vavoula, School of Law, Queen Mary

 

The Migration and Law Network

The Migration and Law Network was set up in 2007 to promote migration law as a subject within United Kingdom universities. It is overseen by a steering committee of academics and other professionals in the immigration law field. It runs the Migration and Law mailing list for those who work in the field, for which subscription requests may be made at http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/migrationlaw. Further information about the network or mailing list may be obtained from the network’s co-chairs, Bernard Ryan (bernard.ryan@le.ac.uk) and Prakash Shah (prakash.shah@qmul.ac.uk).

Call for Papers: Migration, Security and Solidarity within Global Disorder

It is our pleasure to announce the Call for Proposals for the academic event of the 6th Belgrade Security Forum (BSF). This year’s BSF academic event will be held on 12 October 2016, with the title “Migration, Security and Solidarity within Global Disorder”. The aim of this conference is to explore how theories and theoretical frameworks within various fields of social sciences and humanities can contribute to the solution of the current migrant and refugee crisis.

 

We are kindly asking you to distribute the Call via your mailing list. All the details could be found at this link http://www.belgradeforum.org/Academicevent/Callforpapers2016.html

BELGRADE SECURITY FORUM 2016: CALL FOR PAPERS

Migration, Security and Solidarity within Global Disorder

Co-organized by the Belgrade Centre for Security Policy, the Belgrade Fund for Political Excellence and the European Movement in Serbia

12-14 October 2016, Hyatt Regency Hotel, Belgrade, Serbia

Deadline for applications: 20 March 2016

Open Call

The organizers of the Belgrade Security Forum (BSF) are pleased to invite scholars and researchers to submit paper proposals for the BSF academic event entitled “Migration, Security and Solidarity within Global Disorder”. This year’s academic event will be held on 12 October 2016, with the aim of exploring how theories and theoretical frameworks within various fields in the social sciences and humanities can contribute to the solution of the current migrant and refugee crisis.

In 2015, over a million migrants and refugees reached Europe in what has been estimated to be the worst refugee crisis since the aftermath of the Second World War. This humanitarian emergency – with a pronounced security dimension – marked 2015, and unfortunately it is unlikely to be resolved in 2016. The response of European countries to the wave of mass migration was not harmonized, and existing EU asylum legislation has proved inadequate to deal with a crisis of such magnitude. It is yet to be seen how the EU as a whole will cope with the urgency of the crisis. The xenophobic backlash against immigration in a number of European countries represents a serious challenge to the introduction of policies based on solidarity, and the systems of so called “burden sharing” among EU member states.

Regardless of whether they are fleeing war or severe economic hardship, the mass influx of migrants and refugees – especially in times of harsh austerity measures in Europe – has the potential to increase poverty and marginalization, which would consequently create new security challenges. The current migrant and refugee crisis therefore requires receiving countries to carefully rethink their approaches to combating poverty and tackling inequality.

Drawing on insights from Security Studies, Political Science, European Studies, Legal Studies, Migration Studies, Sociology, Anthropology and other disciplines, this conference will seek to address the following issues:

  • The implications of the current migrant and refugee crisis for the perception of the EU as a “Normative Power” and a “Community of Values” with high standards of human rights protection;
  • Conceptual challenges to the Common European Asylum System posed by the current crisis;
  • Securitization of immigration and the rise of right-wing populism and Islamophobia in the EU;
  • The migrant and refugee crisis between international, EU and member states’ asylum laws – the legal aspects and implications of the crisis;
  •    Migration, inequality and insecurity – new forms of marginalization; inequality as a security threat;
  • Immigration and integration – from identity politics to the politics of solidarity;
  • Problematizing the nexus between migration, radicalization and violent extremism.

 

Application process

Participants will be selected based on the quality of their application. All submissions are required to include the applicant’s CV (up to 2 pages) attached to his/her paper proposal (up to 300 words). Submissions should be made electronically to jrs@fpn.bg.ac.rs with the subject line: “Call for paper proposals for BSF 2016”.

The deadline for submissions is 20 March 2016. All successful candidates will be contacted by the end of April 2016.

Incomplete applications will be excluded from our review. The organizers will financially support the travel and accommodation expenses of a limited number of participants on a needs basis. Applicants should clearly state in their application whether they would like to be considered for the accommodation and travel grant.

All accepted papers will be presented during the academic event (12 October 2016) and, following the conference, the presented papers will be peer-reviewed for publication in the Journal of Regional Security (www.regionalsecurityjournal.com).

 

About the BSF

The BSF is the largest international security conference in Southeast Europe, bringing together several hundred top level policy and decision makers, think-tankers, academics and journalists each year. The forum is a combined event divided into two parts, with an academic event on the first day and a policy event taking place over the following two days. The aim of the academic part of the conference is to serve as a platform for theorizing current security and foreign policy issues, and thus feed scholarly insights into the policy part of the BSF. The general topic of this year’s Forum is “Will Democracy Survive the Global Disorder?”, while the theme of the academic event is “Migration, Security and Solidarity within Global Disorder”. The first five academic events (2011-2015) have proved this conference to be a relevant platform for scholarly discussion on pressing security issues and, even more importantly, a forum for dialogue between the academic and policy communities. As a part of a larger initiative, the BSF academic event enables interaction and the exchange of ideas between members of academia, policy-makers, civil society representatives and the media. Participants in the academic event are also a valuable part of discussions during the policy portion of the BSF, in which they take an active part by raising important questions and providing theoretical perspective for the policy debates.

Finally, the BSF academic event is followed by the Method Café (13-14 October) which enables young scholars to become familiar with the latest trends in social sciences research methodology. The Method Café is led by senior scholars with expertise in a range of research methods. The aim is for these experienced researchers to engage with the other participants in informal and unstructured but focused discussions about the methods in which they specialize.

 

SLS Migration and Asylum Law Section: Call for Papers/Posters

SLS Migration and Asylum Law Section: Call for Papers/Posters

2016 SLS Annual Conference at University of Oxford

 

This is the call for papers and posters for the Migration and Asylum Law Section of the 2016 SLS Annual Conference to be held at the University of Oxford from Tuesday 6th September to Friday 9th September.  This year’s theme is ‘Legislation and the Role of the Judiciary’.

The Migration and Asylum Section will meet in the second half of the conference on Thursday 8th and Friday 9th September and we are very pleased to announce that Professor Dora Kostakopoulou and Dr Cathryn Costello have already agreed to give a presentation.

If you are also interested in delivering a paper, please, submit an abstract of 250 words max. by midnight on Friday 18th March.  All abstracts must be submitted through the EasyChair conference system which can be accessed using the following link: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=sls2016. Full instructions on how to use the EasyChair system can be found here:  https://gallery.mailchimp.com/47624183ad52dd8428c97d3f6/files/Using_EasyChair_to_Submit_a_Paper_to_SLS_2016_02.pdf Please, contact Jed Meers at jed.meers@york.ac.uk if you experience any problems using EasyChair.

We would welcome proposals for papers on any issue relating to migration and asylum, including those addressing this year’s conference theme, whether from a doctrinal, critical, socio-legal or empirical perspective.  Alternatively, if you would like to propose a panel or roundtable discussion on a topic of current interest, please, do get in touch by e-mail to see if this can be arranged.

As the SLS is keen to ensure that as many members with good quality papers as possible are able to present, we discourage speakers from presenting more than one paper at the conference.  With this in mind, when you submit an abstract via EasyChair you will be asked to notify whether you are also responding to calls for papers from other sections.

Please, note that whilst you need only submit a proposed title and abstract at this stage, speakers will be asked to submit a copy of their draft paper no later than a week before the conference or, if that is not possible, their PowerPoint slides / handout or an extended abstract (two sides of A4).  This is to enable those who wish to read the papers in advance to do so, thereby enhancing the quality of feedback and discussion within the sessions.

We should also note that the SLS offers a Best Paper Prize which can be awarded to academics at any stage of their career.  The Prize carries a £250 monetary award and winning papers are published in Legal Studies.  To be eligible:

  • speakers must be fully paid-up members of the SLS;
  • papers must not exceed 11,000 words including footnotes (as counted in Word);
  • papers must be uploaded to EasyChair by midnight on Monday 29th August; and
  • papers must not have been published previously or have been accepted or be under consideration for publication.

Those wishing to present a poster should select ‘Submit a Poster’ within EasyChair. The SLS offers a Best Poster Prize, which carries a £250 monetary award and the winning poster will be displayed at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies in London.

We have also been asked to remind you that all speakers and poster presenters will need to register and pay to attend the conference.  As part of a new initiative this year, to reduce the number of late cancellations, speakers and poster presenters will be asked to register for the conference by the end of June in order to secure their place within the programme, though, please, do let us know if this is likely to pose any problems. Booking information will be circulated in due course.

We look forward to your submissions,

With best wishes,

Dr Diego Acosta Arcarazo   and Dr Violeta Moreno-Lax

d.acosta@bristol.ac.uk    and    v.moreno-lax@qmul.ac.uk

Co-convenors of SLS Migration and Asylum Law Section

Call for Papers Europe’s crisis: What future for immigration and asylum law and policy?

Call for Papers

Europe’s crisis: What future for immigration and asylum law and policy?

Migration and Law Network 2016 Conference: 27-28 June, in association with Queen Mary University of London

The European Union is today faced by significant movements of refugees and migrants from places which have experienced war or economic or environmental pressure. Combined with recent terrorist attacks, these developments have led some to doubt the viability of the EU migration framework. At the same time, they have led to arguments for new action by EU institutions and agencies, and by neighbouring countries. New forms of solidarity have been sought by some states and sections of public opinion, but rejected by others. Given the current sense of crisis, there are great uncertainties as to the future direction of the EU migration framework, as well as its content.

Against this background, we invite papers from any discipline which address legal and policy aspects of the ongoing EU migration crisis. Among the questions that papers may wish to address are the following:

·      What is the nature, and what are the sources, of the EU crisis concerning migration?

·      What should be the legal, policy and operational responses to the European migration crisis?

·      Is solidarity among states and peoples possible inside the EU? Does solidarity apply also externally, towards non-EU countries?

·      What is, and what should be, the role of neighbouring and transit states in controlling migration towards the EU?

·      Are there lessons from elsewhere – including the Americas, South East Asia and Australia – for the experience in the EU and its surrounding region?

·      Are new international norms and approaches needed to accommodate contemporary migration flows?

We welcome papers from academics, researchers with other organisations, and from advanced PhD students.

Abstracts of no more than 200 words alongside the author’s affiliation and contact details should be sent to MLNconference2016@qmul.ac.uk no later than 15 February 2016.

The 2016 conference is being organised by

Prof. Valsamis Mitsilegas, Head of Law Department, Queen Mary

Prof. Elspeth Guild, Jean Monnet Professor, Queen Mary & Radboud University, Nijmegen

Prof. Bernard Ryan, University of Leicester

Dr. Prakash Shah, School of Law, Queen Mary

Dr. Violeta Moreno-Lax, School of Law, Queen Mary

Niovi Vavoula, School of Law, Queen Mary

The Migration and Law Network

The Migration and Law Network was set up in 2007 to promote migration law as a subject within United Kingdom universities. It is overseen by a steering committee of academics and other professionals in the immigration law field. It runs the Migration and Law mailing list for those who work in the field, for which subscription requests may be made at http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/migrationlaw. Further information about the network or mailing list may be obtained from the network’s co-chairs, Bernard Ryan (bernard.ryan@le.ac.uk) and Prakash Shah (prakash.shah@qmul.ac.uk).

Call for Papers: Precarious citizenship: Young people who are undocumented, separated and settled in the UK

Birkbeck University of London & Migrant and Refugee Children’s Legal Unit. 

Call for Papers Precarious citizenship: Young people who are undocumented, separated and settled in the UK

 A one-day conference at Birkbeck, University of London to be held on June 1st 2015 for academics, practitioners and activists interested in how precarious citizenship impacts on separated youth as they live and transition to adulthood in the UK. Organised by the Department of Geography, Environment and Development Studies and Pears Institute for the Study of Anti-Semitism at Birkbeck, and Migrant and Refugee Children’s Legal Unit.

Please submit a title and abstract (150 words) and a brief bio (150 words) to k.wells@bbk.ac.uk by 5 pm on March 15th 2016.

We welcome papers that: 

  • Focus on young people who were not aware of their precarious citizenship until State intervention in their lives (going into LA Care; family proceedings; removal/detention of family; police involvement/checks) or when they attempt to access post-school opportunities and services (housing, employment, benefits, higher education etc.) and who were/are Looked After Children by the Local Authority or whose families do not have high levels of economic and/or social capital with which to secure their immigration status and/or who are estranged from their family
  • Focus on the political mobilisation of young people around citizenship and immigration rights (we are particularly interested in papers from activists and/or those young people)
  • We welcome papers from academics, campaigners, activists and practitioners.

Background 

Significant numbers of young people who are settled in the UK (some 120,000) do not have British citizenship. Many have no ‘lawful’ status to remain in the UK whilst cuts to legal aid and fast-paced changes to immigration laws fuelled by a hostile anti-immigrant climate mean that this trend may indeed get worse with numbers rising. Many of these young people may have lived in the UK for many years and consider themselves to be British. Indeed, they may not be aware of their precarious citizenship until they leave school and try to apply for bank accounts, jobs, benefits or university or when they are leaving care or following a family breakdown. Their precarious status arises from the combination of their transition out of childhood, which gave them a degree of protection or insulation from immigration laws, and the discriminatory character of immigration law that means for many of these young people, despite being settled in the UK for many years, once they reach adulthood they cannot secure their British citizenship.

The purpose of this conference is to increase awareness of the precarious citizenship of this group of young people in the UK; to share empirical and theoretical knowledge about contemporary and historical forms of precarious citizenship at the intersection of youth and immigration; to develop a network of academics and practitioners who can take forward the study of precarious citizenship in young people’s lives, and to contribute to theoretical and policy development focused on this group; to engage with activists on effective political mobilisation of youth.

The conference is financially supported by Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, and Migrant and Refugee Children’s Legal Unit.

Call for Papers IASFM 2016: Documentation, Preservation and Researching the History of Forced Migration

Call for Panel Participation: Documentation, Preservation and Researching the History of Forced Migration: IASFM 2016

Dear All,

As part of our commitment to the working group of International Association for the Study of Forced Migration (IASFM), we are organizing a panel for the 16th Conference of the IASFM, to be hosted by the Centre for Migration Studies, the Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology, and the Faculty of Law and Public Administration at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Poland, July 12-15, 2016.

The title of our proposed panel is:

“Documentation, Preservation and Researching the History of Forced Migration: Ethical and methodological developments”.                       

This panel seeks to examine some ethical and methodological considerations for documentation and preservation of refugee voices and history of forced migration. We recognise that there is a need to work on how knowledge in the field of forced migration is created/ produced and maintained. This panel will also address the growing critique of the divide between the knowledge of experts and migrants/ refugees. We would like to link the proposed panel into the conference theme 9, “Researching forced migration: engagements, methodologies and ethics.” This means that we are looking forward to papers which would cover ethical and methodological developments in relation to collating, researching and documenting testimonies of refugees and migrants for the purposes of constructing and documentation of social and political history of forced migration.

The proposals for papers will cover the below (and more) issues as relevant to the conference theme:

*  Could original stories of refugees and migrants be sufficiently digitised and documented without harming the participant? Or

*  Are digital archives an appropriate way to preserve and document the history of forced migration?

*  How do/can we document oral history of refugees and migrants without breaching confidentiality and sensibility of data?

*  How important is it to engage with ‘local’ refugee and migrants communities for understanding and documentation of history of forced migration?

*  Which ways could community archives, oral histories and digitised archives of (refugee and migrants) promote the preservation of history of forced migration?

*  What is the significance of diverse narrative methodology in understanding and researching history of forced migration?

*  What are the best practices for collating and archiving refugee and migrants’ testimonies, and how do we deal with major challenges in collating data on forced migration?

*  What are the high standards of collection care and long-term preservation of `refugee archives’, and how this could be maintained?

In addition to the above, papers addressing ethical and methodological issues, including the below are also welcome: who can/should collect documents of forced migration and testimonies of refugee? Who has the rights to document those collated narratives? Who can be researched? Whose voices should be heard and preserved in archives in the field of forced migration and refugee studies? How can we adequately document and preserve history of forced migration and refugees? We invite papers to examine these and further issues (should you wish) through the proposed panel.

If you are interested in joining us in this panel, please do contact Paul V Dudman (p.v.dudman@uel.ac.uk) or Dr. Rumana Hashem (r.hashem@uel.ac.uk) with abstracts of 200-300 words by 07 January 2016.

As panel proposals for the conference must be submitted by 01 February 2016,  we invite proposal of papers for this panel by no later than January 03, 2016.

If you have any question regarding this panel, please feel free to email me (Rumana on r.hashem@uel.ac.uk).

Details of the Full IASFM 2016 Call for Papers is available online here:  http://iasfm.org/conference/call-papers/

Thanks and Best wishes,

Rumana and Paul

Call for Papers: ‘Trafficking Representations’, Anti-Trafficking Review issue 7, Submissions due 8 January 2015

Call for Papers: ‘Trafficking Representations’, Anti-Trafficking Review issue 7, Submissions due 8 January 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS
Trafficking Representations
Anti-Trafficking Review
Guest Editors: Rutvica Andrijasevic and Nicola Mai

———————————————————————————————
Deadline for Submission: 8 January 2016

The Anti-Trafficking Review calls for papers for a themed issue entitled ‘Trafficking Representations.’

Work that migrants do in the sex industry and other irregular employment sectors is increasingly characterized as exploitation and trafficking. Representations of trafficking and forced labour are pervasive within media, policymaking, and humanitarian debates, discourses and interventions. Of late, the notion of ‘modern slavery’ is on show in campaigns aiming to raise funds and awareness about anti-trafficking among corporate and local enterprises and the general public. Celebrity interventions, militant documentaries, artistic works and fiction films have all become powerful vectors of distribution of the trafficking and ‘modern slavery’ rhetoric. These offer simplistic solutions to complex issues without challenging the structural and causal factors of inequality. They also tend to entrench racialised narratives; present a narrow depiction of an ‘authentic victim;’ and confuse sex work with trafficking. Such representations play a key role in legitimising oftentimes problematic rescue operations that can involve criminalisation, detention and arrest of both non-trafficked and trafficked persons as well a justifying restrictive labour and migration laws that exacerbate migrants’ precarious living and work situations.

This issue of the Anti-Trafficking Review will seek to explore the specific ways in which different forms of representation erase the complexity of the life trajectories of people who have experienced trafficking, as well as those of migrants, women, sex workers and others who are labelled as trafficked according to the rhetoric of neoliberal humanitarianism. At the same time, the special issue is interested in ways in which popular representations of trafficking and modern slavery have weakened the efforts to gain a better understanding of how social, economic and political inequalities and labour exploitation are produced and maintained in various locations.

In addition, this issue also welcomes alternative artistic, scholarly and activist attempts to produce counter-representations of trafficking and ‘modern slavery’ in films, literature, art, theatre and social media, as well as reflections on those.

Authors may be interested in addressing the following themes:

* The embedding of anti-trafficking campaigns within corporate marketing and social responsibility campaigns including the creation of goods made by formerly trafficked persons
* The use of interactive technology to promote anti-trafficking representations and fundraising
* Political representations of trafficking and anti-trafficking, including in social activism
* The impact of the reframing of trafficking as ‘modern slavery’ in popular discourse on trafficked persons and on others also affected by anti-trafficking campaigns and interventions
* The human rights implications of the representations of sex workers only as victims of trafficking
* The politics, aesthetics, and ethics of documentary and artistic representations and counter-representations of trafficking
* Fictional and documentary representations of trafficking being used as evidence in public debates and in court
* Resisting anti-trafficking through art, celebrity and other spectacular forms of anti-trafficking humanitarianism
* The disjuncture between representations of trafficking and the everyday lived realities of potentially and actually trafficked persons including their own self-representations.

The Review promotes a human rights based approach to anti-trafficking, exploring anti-trafficking in a broader context including gender analyses and intersections with labour and migrant rights. Academics, practitioners, trafficked persons and advocates are invited to submit articles. Contributions from those living and working in developing countries are particularly welcome. The journal is a freely available, open access publication with a readership in over 100 countries. The Anti-Trafficking Review is abstracted/indexed/ tracked in: ProQuest, Ebsco Host, Ulrich’s, Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association, Directory of Open Access Journals, WorldCat, Google Scholar and CrossRef.

Deadline for submission: 8 January 2016

Word count for submissions: 4,000 – 6,000 words, including footnotes, author bio and abstract

Special Issue to be published in Autumn 2016

We advise those interested in submitting to follow the Review’s style guide and submission procedures, available at www.antitraffickingreview.org<http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001U1c5r215YjQpGW4IcWzKU6ChGvzIxVj0c_KV2X98m1pkTeDkCgGAJ9NxEIAYfuEPVu4bSEUu7lJJGQ1zIHzRggORXJTf70lixiUlEy1USyyJAGUGFfaITfuVYxXIEn_dewUNW_p1FOKsU-d2FzfZVuy8i4ukCFZ791kdSgLyDxzzyJPVzLtrCCRhubfJhCCD&c=wy2v_p-3jFya6Fk4RC_FnHLzRf5Mz_msr8OFnvkH1PVZ-PE6OdKx2A==&ch=K8U30L9kDjvzdUyvDUn3OX2T7vL9bDlQ6oBj7nvGLOOZBRraCm0L5g==>>. Manuscripts should be submitted in line with the issue’s theme. Email the editorial team at atr@gaatw.org<mailto:atr@gaatw.org> with any queries.

Thematic Issue Guest Editors: Rutvica Andrijasevic, University of Bristol, and Nicola Mai,
Kingston University London

Editor: Rebecca Napier-Moore

www.antitraffickingreview.org<http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001U1c5r215YjQpGW4IcWzKU6ChGvzIxVj0c_KV2X98m1pkTeDkCgGAJ0Ze62AKkEnBM52d8ccZa5HZcPjO9_GFgQPBVtr_yuXvlQZnhrCWsRQpFWrrtRu0fH5QAq-hp693fW-AoMJyy5el0Ia2biTF-GXHMq31ZHAkO6-pkOSQ13YtHll_pGGpvJwo5G0ZztrIovm3KPt4epT4FMjbxl5TrTxMyN5lZ2Uh&c=wy2v_p-3jFya6Fk4RC_FnHLzRf5Mz_msr8OFnvkH1PVZ-PE6OdKx2A==&ch=K8U30L9kDjvzdUyvDUn3OX2T7vL9bDlQ6oBj7nvGLOOZBRraCm0L5g==>

Call for papers, Final: Children and War: Past and Present – Deadline 31 Oct

Children and War: Past and Present

Third international multidisciplinary conference to be held at the University of Salzburg, Austria, on 13-15 July 2016

Organized by the University of Salzburg and the University of Wolverhampton, in association with the UN Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict.

This conference is planned as a follow-up to the two successful conferences, which took place at the University of Salzburg in 2010 and 2013. It will continue to build on areas previously investigated, and also open up new fields of academic enquiry.

All research proposals which focus on a topic and theme related to ‘Children and War’ are welcome, ranging from the experience of war, flight, displacement and resettlement, to relief, rehabilitation and reintegration work, gender issues, persecution, trafficking, sexual violence, trauma and amnesia, the trans-generational impact of persecution, individual and collective memory, educational issues, films and documentaries, artistic and literary approaches, remembrance and memorials, and questions of theory and methodology. Specific conference themes anticipated are:

– Children as victims, witnesses and participants in armed conflicts.
– Holocaust, genocide and forced labour.
– Deportation and displacement, refugees and asylum seekers.
– War crimes, trials and human rights.
– Reflexions on research in politically and culturally diverse contexts.
– Sources produced by NGOs and their public and academic use.

Please send an abstract of 200-250 words, together with biographical background information of 50-100 words by 31 October 2015 to: J.D.Steinert@wlv.ac.uk. Panel proposals are welcome.

All proposals are subject to a review process. Successful candidates will be informed at the end of 2015 and will be asked to send in their papers by the end of May 2016 for distribution among conference participants on a CD. Further information will be made available in due time.

Fee for speakers: EUR 160. The fee includes admission to all panels, lunches, coffees, teas, and evening events.
Participants need to secure their own funding to participate in this conference.

Conference language: English.

The organising team:
Wolfgang Aschauer (Salzburg)
John Buckley (Wolverhampton)
Helga Embacher (Salzburg)
Albert Lichtblau (Salzburg)
Grazia Prontera (Salzburg)
Johannes-Dieter Steinert (Wolverhampton)

Final Call for Papers: Children and War: Past and Present — Deadline 31 Oct

Thanks to H-Migration for the link – https://networks.h-net.org/node/8382/discussions/88790/final-cfp-children-and-war-past-and-present-deadline-31-oct

Children and War: Past and Present

Third international multidisciplinary conference to be held at the University of Salzburg, Austria, on 13-15 July 2016

Organized by the University of Salzburg and the University of Wolverhampton, in association with the UN Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict.

This conference is planned as a follow-up to the two successful conferences, which took place at the University of Salzburg in 2010 and 2013. It will continue to build on areas previously investigated, and also open up new fields of academic enquiry.

All research proposals which focus on a topic and theme related to ‘Children and War’ are welcome, ranging from the experience of war, flight, displacement and resettlement, to relief, rehabilitation and reintegration work, gender issues, persecution, trafficking, sexual violence, trauma and amnesia, the trans-generational impact of persecution, individual and collective memory, educational issues, films and documentaries, artistic and literary approaches, remembrance and memorials, and questions of theory and methodology. Specific conference themes anticipated are:

– Children as victims, witnesses and participants in armed conflicts.
– Holocaust, genocide and forced labour.
– Deportation and displacement, refugees and asylum seekers.
– War crimes, trials and human rights.
– Reflexions on research in politically and culturally diverse contexts.
– Sources produced by NGOs and their public and academic use.

Please send an abstract of 200-250 words, together with biographical background information of 50-100 words by 31 October 2015 to: J.D.Steinert@wlv.ac.uk. Panel proposals are welcome.

All proposals are subject to a review process. Successful candidates will be informed at the end of 2015 and will be asked to send in their papers by the end of May 2016 for distribution among conference participants on a CD. Further information will be made available in due time.

Fee for speakers: EUR 160. The fee includes admission to all panels, lunches, coffees, teas, and evening events.

Participants need to secure their own funding to participate in this conference.

Conference language: English.

The organising team:
Wolfgang Aschauer (Salzburg)
John Buckley (Wolverhampton)
Helga Embacher (Salzburg)
Albert Lichtblau (Salzburg)
Grazia Prontera (Salzburg)
Johannes-Dieter Steinert (Wolverhampton)

Call for Papers: Critical Approaches to Irregular Migration Facilitation: Dismantling the Human Smuggler Narrative

Thanks to H-Migration for the link – https://networks.h-net.org/node/8382/discussions/89049/call-papers-critical-approaches-irregular-migration-facilitation

Call for Papers: Critical Approaches to Irregular Migration Facilitation: Dismantling the Human Smuggler Narrative

European University Institute
Florence, Italy
April 5-6, 2016

In contemporary mainstream narratives of migration, the human smuggler has earned a privileged if infamous spot as one of the most widely recognized and despised global predators. Smugglers are often referred to as orchestrators of senseless human tragedies along migration corridors, masterminds behind sexual exploitation rings, or amassers of untold riches made at the expense of asylum seekers, migrants and their families –in turn often narrowly portrayed as infantile and ignorant. Constructed as racialized, hypersexual and greedy males from the global South, facilitators of irregular migration have earned widespread notoriety in narratives of human and national security, particularly in the context of migration control efforts.   Scholarship on the facilitation of irregular migration often draws from the experiences of law enforcement or of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers, especially those who have been the target of threats, scams or violence, further obscuring the perspectives of those playing a role in their transits (often migrants and asylum seekers themselves). As a result, our knowledge of irregular migration facilitation is often plagued with fragmented perspectives on the socio-cultural dynamics of the migratory journey, the facilitator-traveler relationship and their community dimensions.

Simultaneously, there is a growing corpus of empirical and critical work on the facilitation or brokerage of irregular migration within migration regimes that deserves to be fostered and strengthened. With that goal in mind we invite abstracts on the theme of irregular migration/ human mobility facilitation for an international workshop to be held on April 5-6, 2016 at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy.  We seek critical and empirical engagements on the topic of the facilitation and brokerage of irregular migration as witnessed regionally and comparatively. Aware of the multiple processes involved in the facilitation of irregular migration efforts, facilitation is broadly conceived to include those who may not be explicitly recognized as facilitators/smugglers, but who also develop paths conducive to human mobility that takes place outside of legal/ized and/or state sponsored mechanisms.

Themes to consider include:
1. Representations of human smuggling
2. The social organization of human smuggling/facilitation of irregular migration
3. Gender/ed dimensions within the facilitation of irregular migration
4. Human smuggling and its encounters with other extra-legal, criminalized, illicit markets or activities
5. Ethics of irregular/clandestine migration research
6. Criminalization of irregular migration facilitation and its implications
7. New theoretical approaches to irregular migration/human mobility
8. Historical and community dimensions of human smuggling facilitation
9. Irregular migration economies

OUTCOMES
Selected contributions will be part of a proposal for the publication of a special issue and/or edited collection on the facilitation of irregular migration/human mobility with an international journal or publishing house. Every effort will be made to select works that allow for breadth across and within regions. We will further aim for collaborative opportunities among participants. Preference will be given to work that draws on ethnographic research.
SUBMISSIONS
Please submit a 200-300 word abstract to smugglingworkshop@gmail.com by November 15th, 2015. Participants will be notified of their acceptance by December 31, 2015. Final papers are due on March 21st, 2016. In the meanwhile, questions can be addressed to the organizers, Luigi Achilli at the European University Institute (Luigi.Achilli@eui.eu) and Gabriella Sanchez at the University of Texas at El Paso (gesanchez4@utep.edu).

https://www.academia.edu/16460314/Dismantling_the_Human_Smuggler_Narrative

Call for papers for a session at: Association of Critical Heritage Studies Third Biennial Conference Montreal, Canada, 6-10th June 2016

Please circulate widely.

Call for papers for a session at:
Association of Critical Heritage Studies Third Biennial Conference
Montreal, Canada, 6-10th June 2016

Session Title: Changing places, changing people? Critical heritage(s) of diaspora, migration and belonging.

Session Organizers: Dr Susannah Eckersley (Newcastle University, England, UK), Professor Ullrich Kockel, Dr Katherine Lloyd, Professor Máiréad Nic Craith (all Heriot-Watt University, Scotland, UK)

http://achs2016.uqam.ca/en/submissions/open-sessions.html#os067-changing-places-changing-people-critical-heritage-s-of-diaspora-migration-and-belonging

Session Abstract:
Much is being made of the perceived breakdown of the nation state, which was historically configured as a “container” of heritage formations, adopting and perusing local traditions where possible but oppressing them where deemed unsuitable. Migration is seen as eroding the rigid boundaries of this configuration, potentially liberating identities and heritages in the process. This session addresses the relationship between critical heritage and redefinitions of self, other, community and place within the contemporary global reality of movement and flux. Diversity and hybridization are usually regarded positively, displacement, alienation, conflict and normative repression negatively; yet is that necessarily so? Heritage can be seen as a tool for discursively drawing boundaries of inclusion and exclusion, but who is doing the drawing, for what purpose, and what difference does that make? Challenging conventional heritage discourses projecting heritage as sited in place(s), and/or attached to specific groups and communities, we invite contributions exploring the various, sometimes conflicting “imagined communities” of heritage by raising critical issues, such as:

·        How do ideas of place and place attachment shape or limit the positions individuals and groups may adopt? What roles do auto-biography, memory and history play in shaping such ideas?

·        How are scales of identity, place and belonging exhibited or influenced differently by both heritage and politics? What transitional identities and redefinitions of self, community, other and place develop in relation to the heritage practices, mediated memories and “past-presencing” of migrants?

·        How do displaced people negotiate community and place in tension between the “here and now” and the “there and then” that shapes their heritage discourse as much as the elite discourse they are confronted with in everyday life?

·        How are contested heritage practices, discourses and associations of ‘authenticity’ negotiated between communities, and what role do official discourses and practices play in alleviating or aggravating these contestations?

·        As displacement is becoming a common experience, what significance do memorates of “roots and routes” have in various socio-historical or geo-political contexts for shaping journeys of return, (re)discovery, pilgrimage or ‘closure’ that figure in heritage tourism?

·        How compatible are notions of cultural citizenship based on parity of esteem with the coexistence of perhaps conflicting heritage discourses? Why is conceptualising conflict as heritage so difficult?

·        Given the continued reality of multi-facetted place attachment, how may migration and displacement be turned into opportunities for re-placing communities and heritages while avoiding the trap of a shallow essentialism, and sanitization of uncomfortable heritages?

·        What is needed to make critical heritage sustainable in a social, political and economic environment in radical flux (migration, climate change, financial crisis, political upheaval and conflict)? How do we decide which heritages should be sustained, who legitimizes these decisions, and to what extent are such questions about merely replacing one elite with the power of definition by another?

We are keen to examine issues such as these from multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives combining theoretical explorations with applied concerns. Along with papers we encourage creative engagement using other formats with a capacity to capture our subject matter, such as artwork, poetry or performance.

Submissions for papers or posters should be sent with a brief resume (biographical notice and main publications or achievements) of no more than 300 words and an abstract of no more than 600words presenting the topic or main argument, its relation to the specific session and its interest in the field of critical heritage studies. Paper abstracts should also demonstrate scientific quality through references to a theoretical framework, a methodology or by outlining the contribution to knowledge. It is expected that poster submissions also outline their contribution and state how the poster format will allow a better understanding of the subject treated.

Enquiries to: Susannah Eckersley (susannah.eckersley@ncl.ac.uk) and Ullrich Kockel (u.kockel@hw.ac.uk)

Submission through the open call via https://achs2016.uqam.ca/secure/submitAbstract.php by 1st November 2015, with the session code: OS067 Changing places, changing people? Critical heritage(s) of diaspora, migration and belonging

More information is available on the conference website at: http://achs2016.uqam.ca

Call for Papers: Migration and Diversity Section at the European Union in International Affairs Conference (EUIA), Brussels, 11-13 May 2016

Call for papers and panels on Migration and Diversity at the European Union in International Affairs Conference (EUIA), Brussels, 11-13 May 2016

Deadline for submitting paper and panel proposals: 19 October 2015

The Institute for European Studies at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (IES-VUB), the Institut d’Études Européennes at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (IEE-ULB), the United Nations University Institute on Comparative Regional Integration Studies (UNU-CRIS), and Egmont – the Royal Institute for International Relations invite paper abstracts and panel proposals for the fifth European Union in International Affairs (#EUIA16) conference.

For the first time we are organizing a section on Immigration and Diversity at the conference and we would like to encourage you to submit abstracts or panel proposals on topics related to the following call:

International migration has profoundly changed European nation-states which today are more culturally and religiously diverse than ever. These diversities interact with the traditional European cleavages of class, gender and ethnicity, making governance increasingly challenging. The governance of immigration, as well as the resulting cultural and religious diversity surpass national boundaries and present complicated puzzles for European and global governance levels. This section of the EUIA Conference wants to address these imperative challenges for EU and global policy-makers, as well for national policy makers forced to cede policy power. Panels will address the EU and international organisations’ roles in the global governance of immigration and diversities, as well as the interaction between governance levels, from local to global. Paper and panel submissions on the following themes are particularly welcome:

  • The politics of equality indicators (gender, LGBT, immigrants, ethnic minorities, Roma);
  • International Organisations and equality policies (gender, LGBT, immigrants, ethnic minorities, Roma);
  • The multi-level governance of immigration and diversity (with a special focus on the interaction between governance levels);
  • The role of EU institutions in border, mobility and diversity policies;
  • The implementation of immigration, immigrant integration and diversity policies (immigrant integration and citizenship courses, border control, …).

You can read more about the conference on our website: www.euia.be

You can submit your paper or panel proposal online here: http://www.euia.be/cfpp/

Important dates:

19 October 2015: Deadline for submitting paper or panel proposals

13 January 2016: Notification of acceptance

11-13 May 2016: Conference

Looking forward to receiving your submissions!

Call for papers: Critical Approaches to Irregular Migration Facilitation

Call for Papers: Critical Approaches to Irregular Migration Facilitation:
Dismantling the Human Smuggler Narrative
European University Institute
Florence, Italy
April 7-8, 2016

In contemporary mainstream narratives of migration, the human smuggler has earned a privileged if infamous spot as one of the most widely recognized and despised global predators. Smugglers are often referred to as orchestrators of senseless human tragedies along migration corridors, masterminds behind sexual exploitation rings, or amassers of untold riches made at the expense of asylum seekers, migrants and their families –in turn often narrowly portrayed as infantile and ignorant. Constructed as racialized, hypersexual and greedy males from the global South, facilitators of irregular migration have earned widespread notoriety in narratives of human and national security, particularly in the context of migration control efforts.   Scholarship on the facilitation of irregular migration often draws from the experiences of law enforcement or of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers, especially those who have been the target of threats, scams or violence, further obscuring the perspectives of those playing a role in their transits (often migrants and asylum seekers themselves). As a result, our knowledge of irregular migration facilitation is often plagued with fragmented perspectives on the socio-cultural dynamics of the migratory journey, the facilitator-traveler relationship and their community dimensions.

Simultaneously, there is a growing corpus of empirical and critical work on the facilitation or brokerage of irregular migration within migration regimes that deserves to be fostered and strengthened. With that goal in mindwe invite abstracts on the theme of irregular migration/ human mobility facilitation for an international workshop to be held on April 7-8, 2016 at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy.  We seek critical and empirical engagements on the topic of the facilitation and brokerage of irregular migration as witnessed regionally and comparatively. Aware of the multiple processes involved in the facilitation of irregular migration efforts, facilitation is broadly conceived to include those who may not be explicitly recognized as facilitators/smugglers, but who also develop paths conducive to human mobility that takes place outside of legal/ized and/or state sponsored mechanisms.

Some themes to consider include:
1. Representations of human smuggling
2. The social organization of human smuggling/facilitation of irregular migration
3. Gender/ed dimensions within the facilitation of irregular migration
4. Human smuggling and its encounters with other extra-legal, criminalized, illicit markets or
activities
5. Ethics of irregular/clandestine migration research
6. Criminalization of irregular migration facilitation and its implications
7. New theoretical approaches to irregular migration/human mobility
8. Historical and community dimensions of human smuggling facilitation
9. Irregular migration economies

OUTCOMES
Selected contributions will be part of a proposal for the publication of a special issue and/or edited collection on the facilitation of irregular migration/human mobility with an international journal or publishing house. Every effort will be made to select works that allow for breadth across and within regions. We will further aim for collaborative opportunities among participants. Preference will be given to work that draws on ethnographic research.

SUBMISSIONS
Please submit a 200-300 word abstract to smugglingworkshop@gmail.com by November 15th, 2015. Participants will be notified of their acceptance by December 31, 2015. Final papers are due on March 21st, 2016. In the meanwhile, questions can be addressed to the organizers, Dr Luigi Achilli, research associate at the European University Institute (Luigi.Achilli@eui.edu) and Gabriella Sanchez, assistant professor at the University of Texas at El Paso (gesanchez4@utep.edu).