Innovating Justice: The Mobile Apps Aiming to Transform How We Respond to Situations of Mass Atrocity

Originally posted on Justice in Conflict:

Christof Heyns, Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, recently released a report on the use of information and communication technologies to secure the right to life (photo: OHCHR) Christof Heyns, UN Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions (photo: OHCHR)

International criminal courts have often been a source of inspiration for technological innovation. At Nuremberg, the trial of the leading Nazis was facilitated by the creation of a pioneering interpretation machine by IBM, which enabled the simultaneous translation of the proceedings into English, Russian, French and German. In addition, the prosecution took the unprecedented step of relying on a documentary film, Nazi Concentration Camps, to provide a visual register of the unimaginable atrocities that had been perpetrated under Nazi rule.

Fast-forward seventy years, however, and the field of international criminal justice is struggling to keep apace with the lightning speed at which new information and communication technologies (ICTs) have been developing. In 2010, Philip Alston, then-UN Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial Executions, observed that the use of ICTs in human rights work was “only at a nascent…

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Making Human Rights Violations Visible: The UN Commission of Inquiry on Sri Lanka

Originally posted on Justice in Conflict:

Thamil Ananthavinayagan joins JiC for this guest post on the UN Commission of Inquiry of Sri Lanka’s soon-to-be released report and the challenges in achieving justice and accountability. Thamil is PhD researcher at the Irish Centre for Human Rights at NUi Galway and where his work focuses on the UN Human Rights Council.

A soldier carries a small child during the Sri Lankan civil war (Photo: Reuters) A soldier carries a small child during the Sri Lankan civil war (Photo: Reuters)

“Only the dead have seen the end of war.”
– George Santayana

In the concluding phases of their thirty-year civil war, Sri Lankan security forces and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) repeatedly committed mass atrocities. Although both sides had committed atrocities throughout the conflict, the scale and nature of violations radically worsened in the final five months that led up to the government’s declaration of victory in May 2009, resulting in the deaths of thousands of civilians and the displacement of…

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Recording the labours of the ingenious: 350 years of the scholarly journal

Originally posted on The Policy Press Blog:

In this blog post, Kim Eggleton, our Journals Executive, takes a look back at the 350 year history and exciting future possibilities for the humble Journal.

Kim Eggleton, Journals Executive Kim Eggleton, Journals Executive

2015 marks the 350th anniversary of the scholarly journal. Can you believe that, 350 years? Think where we’ve come from there. There are now arguably too many journals to choose from!

There are even tools and businesses dedicated to helping researchers find the “right” journal for them. While the exact number is up for debate, there were estimated to be more than 28,000 active scholarly peer-reviewed journals in existence in August 2012, collectively publishing about 1.7–1.8 million articles a year (Ware and Mabe, 2012).

There’s a journal of everything now. Want to know more about chips? Try the American Journal of Potato Research. Wondering what the music of Ancient Greece was inspired by? Try Greek and Roman Musical Studies

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EU Migration Agenda as a cloud

Originally posted on Postcards from ...:

EU migration agenda as a cloud, Nando Sigona, 2015 EU migration agenda as a cloud, Nando Sigona, 2015

Not sure what to make of this, interesting to see the prominence of ‘member states’, as they are certainly crucial in determining the success or failure of the strategy. Given the responses in the last few weeks (including France’s pushback at Ventimiglia), the latter seems a much more likely outcome. Assuming that the ‘kingdom’ in the cloud stands for the UK, it confirms that the UK is a major player on this agenda, despite having the right to opt-out from some components of it.

Interesting also to see the difference between ‘migration’ and ‘migrants’, a sign perhaps that EU legislators are much more comfortable with the process than with human beings. Not surprisingly, ‘smugglers’, ‘criminal network’and ‘smuggling’ also make the top 150 words, but not ‘traffickers’, term often used by the Italian PM to justify is interventionist agenda. Finally, the EU solutions…

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Freedom not borders! Unconditional European residence permit for all migrants!

Originally posted on clandestina:

Saturday, the 13th of June, will be a day of mobilization of migrants in Italy and in Germany, with demonstrations in Bologna, Bari, Brescia and Frankfurt.

Migrants, together with precarious and industry workers, will say laud and clear that they are not going to be the ones who pay the most violent backlashes of the crisis. While migration enters the public debate as a steady «emergency», only when the massacres in the Mediterranean keep happening, a true and daily war against migrants is fought on the internal and external borders of Europe. The division between economic migrants and refugees, as well as the new measures to face the arrivals from the Mediterranean, are just other tools to create hierarchies and to reinforce the widespread belief that migrants are something to be «managed» and «relocated», to be «used», while they become an unwelcome «burden» when they are not needed anymore. Migrants…

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Addressing the Economic Dimensions of Mass Atrocities: International Criminal Law’s Business or Blind Spot?

Originally posted on Justice in Conflict:

Carl von Clausewitz, a Prussian general and military theorist (Photo: Quotessays.com) Prussian general and military theorist, Carl von Clausewitz (Photo: Quotessays.com)

The past few decades have witnessed a burgeoning literature examining the economic dimensions of modern warfare. Indeed, if Prussian general and military theorist Carl von Clausewitz could argue in 1832 that war is merely a continuation of politics by other means, more recent studies seem to suggest that modern conflict is often as much, if not more, a continuation of economics by other means.

For international criminal lawyers, the question that naturally arises from such studies is the extent to which international criminal law can and should address the economic dimensions of mass atrocity situations. With this question in mind, this post summarises three perspectives from which scholars and practitioners have been examining the potential and limits of international criminal law as a response to the political economy of mass atrocity situations.

The Critical Perspective: Illuminating the Structural Economic Causes…

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Justice and Accountability in Syria: The Limited Options at Hand

Originally posted on Justice in Conflict:

Shikha Dilawri and Mark Lattimer join JiC for this guest-post on the options available for achieving justice and accountability in Syria. Mark is the Director of the Ceasefire Centre for Civilian Rights and co-editor of Justice for Crimes Against Humanity. Shikha works with the Ceasefire Centre for Civilian Rights and Minority Rights Group International.

(Photo: Freedom House, Creative Commons) (Photo: Freedom House, Creative Commons)

Atrocities continue to mount in Syria and the situation has become no less critical a year after the UN Security Council failed to pass a resolution to refer the situation to the ICC. Answers remain elusive, with different parties to the conflict continuing to perpetrate war crimes and crimes against humanity – including massacres of civilians, indiscriminate aerial bombardment, enforced disappearances, systematic torture, rape, and the use of children in hostilities. Meanwhile, the heavy focus on ISIS or Da’ash has detracted international attention from the broader humanitarian disaster, now turning the…

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A Greek Court Is Fining Migrants Who Were Shot at by Their Boss

Originally posted on clandestina:

Source: http://www.vice.com/read/exclusive-greek-tax-authority-demands-money-from-migrants-876

On April 17, 2013, nearly 200 Bangladeshi immigrants working in the strawberry production fields of the Peloponese town of Manolada, in Greece, demanded to be paid the six months outstanding wages that they were owed. In response, their supervisors opened fire on them, injuring 28 people.

The controversies surrounding the Manolada case and it’s judicial proceedings seem to keep unfolding. The Bangladeshi migrant workers have not only been denied any sort of witness protection or financial compensation, they are now expected to pay legal fees related to the case.

The court recently ruled their employer—strawberry trader Nikos Vaggelatos—as well as one of the accused gunmen, Kostas Chaloulos, not guilty. Two of the other supervisors were, however, charged. One for grievous bodily harm and the other for aiding by omission.

During the trial, the legal team defending the workers asked for the president of the Mixed Jury Court of…

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Security Council Negotiations Regarding EU Call for Use of Force Against Smugglers Ongoing; Russia Warns Against Repeating “Abuse” of 2011 UNSC Resolution

Originally posted on MIGRANTS AT SEA:

The Security Council Report reports that “[t]he negotiations on the EU draft aimed at tackling the smuggling of migrants on the Mediterranean were still ongoing at press time between some Council members and the Libyan authorities. (For at least one permanent member the consent of the Tobruk/al-Bayda-based government seems to be indispensable for the adoption of the resolution.) In the past, it has been difficult to get agreement on resolutions authorising the interception of vessels, whether in the context of the implementation of sanctions or counter-piracy measures. Some Council members feel strongly about not contravening the principle of freedom of navigation codified in the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea. As such, they have tended to focus their discussions in the past on such issues as the procedures to authorise interdiction, whether the consent of the flag state is required and the maritime zones where the interdiction is…

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European Migrant Death Database – Deaths at the Borders of Southern Europe

Originally posted on MIGRANTS AT SEA:

VU University Amsterdam has released a border death database documenting migrant deaths along the Southern European borders.

Here is a web post from DIIS (Danish Institute for International Studies) describing the project: “On 12 May 2015, researchers of VU University Amsterdam 2015-05-12_Border Deaths Org mapreleased a border death database, based on official death records of migrants who died at the Southern European borders in the years 1990-2013. They suggest that European states continue to collect such data supervised by a new European Migrant Death Observatory which is should be part of the Council of Europe.

The database contains individualized information on 3.188 people who died while attempting to reach southern EU countries from the Balkans, the Middle East, and North & West Africa, and whose bodies were found in or brought to Europe. It is unique because it includes – where known – date and place of death, cause of death, gender…

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WikiLeaks Releases Classified Documents Describing EU Plans For Military Strikes Against Libyan Migrant Smugglers

Originally posted on MIGRANTS AT SEA:

WikiLeaks has released two documents which describe the EU plans for possible military attacks on boats used by migrant smugglers in Libya:

Document 1: “Military Advice on the “Draft Crisis Management Concept for a possible CSDP operation to disrupt human smuggling networks in the Southern Central Mediterranean””(also here)

Document 2: “PMG Recommendations on the draft Crisis Management Concept for a possible CSDP operation to disrupt human smuggling networks in the Southern Central Mediterranean” (also here)

WikiLeaks Press Statement:

“EU plan for military intervention against ‘refugee boats’ in Libya and the Mediterranean

Today, WikiLeaks is releasing two classified EU documents, outlining the planned military intervention against boats travelling from Libya to Italy. The more significant of the two documents was written by the combined military defence chiefs of the EU member states. The plan was formally approved by representatives from all 28 countries on…

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HRA Watch: Reform, Repeal, Replace? Tobias Lock: Legal Implications of Human Rights Reform in the UK

Originally posted on UK Constitutional Law Association:

Editors’ note: The blog is inviting constitutional lawyers to comment on the UK Government’s proposal to repeal and replace the Human Rights Act. We begin with a post by Dr Tobias Lock, Lecturer in EU Law at Edinburgh Law School. You can read the other contributions in this series here. Posts on the topic are welcome.

Tobias LockThe return of a majority Conservative government in last week’s general election in the UK has made the Conservative Party’s plans for reforming human rights law in the United Kingdom a likely prospect. It is recalled that on 3 October 2014, the Conservative Party published its policy document ‘Protecting Human Rights in the UK’ which sets out its proposal to repeal the Human Rights Act 1998 (HRA) and replace it with a new British Bill of Rights. In addition, the policy document also raised the prospect that the UK might withdraw from the European Convention on…

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Statewatch Analysis: The EU’s Planned War on Smugglers

Originally posted on MIGRANTS AT SEA:

Statewatch has issued an Analysis, “The EU’s Planned War on Smugglers,” written by Steve Peers, Professor of EU Law, University of Essex:

“The EU’s Foreign Affairs Council is meeting today to discuss the possibility of a military operation in the Mediterranean to take actions against smuggling of migrants. Officially, at least, the purpose of the operation (as defined by EU leaders last month) is to destroy smugglers’ boats. The EU’s High Representative has stated that there will be ‘no boots on the ground’; and as she arrived at the Council meeting today, she referred to authorising an ‘EU operation at sea’. However, it is clear from the documents discussed in the EU’s Political and Security Committee last week that (unless plans have changed radically in the meantime) the High Representative is being “economical with the truth”. The EU action clearly contemplates action by ground forces. Moreover, it anticipates…

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Cambridge Migration Research Network Event: “Drowning Humanity?” High-level panel discussion on the Mediterranean migrant crisis

Cambridge1Thursday, 25th June, 5-7pm, Bateman Auditorium, Gonville and Caius College, followed by complimentary refreshments at Michaelhouse Café
High-level panel discussion on the Mediterranean migrant crisis
With high-profile panel of speakers:
  • Ms. Nuala Mole, Founder and Senior Lawyer at Advice on Individual Rights in Europe (AIRE)
  • Mr. Federico Soda, Chief of Mission in Italy, International Organization for Migration
  • Ms. Kalliopi Stefanaki, Protection Officer, Head of Protection Unit, UNHCR Greece
  • Mr. Wadid Benaabou, Desk Officer for Libya at the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • Ms. Carlotta Bellini, Head of Child Protection, Save the Children Italy
ALL WELCOME – please register your interest for this event with organisers Fabrice Langronet, Olimpia Squillaci and Andrea Binder by emailing: cammigsoc@gmail.com

Event: CAMMIGRES hosts Impact Lab Co-Founder, Andrew Means and Director of Field Data Collection, Jesse Berns

CAMMIGRES hosts Impact Lab Co-Founder, Andrew Means and Director of Field Data Collection, Jesse Berns

Mon, 22nd June, 2 – 3.30pm – Room S2, Alison Richards Building, 7 West Road, Sidgwick site, University of Cambridge,  CB3 9DT

ALL WELCOME

Bringing science to the business of doing good…

CambridgeThe divide between operational actors, academia, and information technologists is often immense. Research is commonly seen by operational entities as secondary to response, and technology as an afterthought. In the area of humanitarian aid, data-driven decision-making is imperative, as time and resource allocation are crucial to the lives of those affected by crisis. In order to provide rapid, simple information to field responders, operational managers, and policy makers, the integration of humanitarian response-specific technology is imperative.

The Impact Lab, a data science organisation for social good, works with a wide range of public- and private-sector partners to solve analytical and strategic problems, particularly in the areas of health, education, operations, and sustainability.  In the realm of humanitarian aid, the Impact Lab provides complete data solutions in low resource settings, including sound epidemiological methods, valid statistics, and rapid, intuitive analytics.

A recent programme administered by The Impact Lab, the Health Assessment Project, utilises mobile data collection tools and a standardised deployment ‘toolkit’ in order to provide real-time, pertinent, operationally relevant information to NGOs and UN actors in crisis-affected regions of the Middle East (Iraq, Lebanon, & Jordan). Roughly 30,000 displaced persons in the region were assessed for critical health and essential service needs during a two-month period.

The Health Assessment Project, as well as other programmes and technology innovations, will be discussed by the Impact Lab staff.

talks.cam listing here.

Event poster here.

Event: Migration and Justice Forum – Newcastle upon Tyne, 30 June 2015

Migration and Justice Forum

Tuesday 30 June, 6pm
Broadacre House
Market Street, Newcastle NE1 6HQ

An invitation from Northumbria University’s
Migration and Diaspora Network

The rise of UKIP and a turn towards considering migration as a threat goes against the principles of a multicultural Just society, which many people have been struggling for for a long time. We believe that there is now, more than ever, a need to provide a platform of support to obtain justice for those refugees, asylum seekers, migrants, and new, as well as older, ethnic minority communities who need it. We believe that often individuals and communities themselves can help each other if there is space to develop new initiatives and perhaps new ways of working.

To support this process we wish to welcome you to an event which will provide an opportunity to voice your opinions about what the main issues are with regard to injustice and migration, connect with others where we have shared goals, and discuss what action we might take.

All welcome. The venue is wheelchair accessible and children are welcome.

The event is free but please book your place at http://migrationandjusticeforum.eventbrite.co.uk so we can make sure we have a big enough room.

Tuesday 30 June, 6pm
Broadacre House
Market Street, Newcastle NE1 6HQ

 

Denied citizenship and forced to flee, Myanmar’s Rohingya deserve justice

Originally posted on :

Rohingya flee persecution in Myanmar. © Al Jazeera Rohingya flee persecution in Myanmar. © Al Jazeera

Migrant Rohingya are literally stuck at sea, but the persecuted ethnic group needs justice as well as humanitarian assistance.

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Refugee Week at UEL: Refugee Archives and Special Collections Open Day, Tuesday 16 July

As part of Refugee Week 2015, we are pleased to announce a:

UEL Archives and Special Collections Open Day

When: Tuesday, 16 June 2015
11am – 6pm.

Where: University of East London, Docklands Campus Library Archive: Room DL.G.02

FB-example-8Are you interested in archives, history or refugee and migration issues? Are you a student undertaking research for a dissertation, an NGO-worker focusing on policy; an archivist interested in learning about “refuge archives”; a historian of population movements; an activist or community-group member actively working in the field to support your local community group or organisation? If so, then you may be interested in attending our Archives Open Day?

We would very much like the opportunity to welcome you to a showcase of material from our unique and diverse archival collections and we are also very keen to use this day to discuss hoe are archival collections can be best utilised to encourage greater usage and accessibility beyond the confines of academia. We are very keen to make our Archives more interactive and engaging and we are hoping to take a step towards achieving this through a civic engagement and outreach project that we are currently running.

The aim of this day will be to:

  • Showcase materials for the Archive Collections at UEL, especially FB-We're-Partthe Refugee Council Archive and associated collections.
  • To encourage new groups and communities to attend this open day to discuss our latest civic engagement project which hopes to pilot a new Living Refugee Archive website developed through external engagement beyond the Archive and the collection of oral histories.
  • To promote the UEL Archives to a wider audience beyond academia and to try and encourage new outreach and partnership opportunities.
  • To consider the relevance of “Refugee Archives” in the 21st Century and to reflect on the collection development and management of such collections.

FB-ContributeThe Archivist, Paul Dudman, will be on hand all day to provide advice on how to care for your personal archive collection including photographs and documents. You can also discover how to access the Archives at UEL for your own research projects and further study. If you are interested in using the archives for your research; to Improve your research quality and potential; or if you would like to discuss ways we can utilise the archives for your teaching; or even if you would like to discuss the possibility of forming a new partnership or helping with outreach or civic engagement activities? Or maybe you are just curious about UEL’s fascinating collection of archives and special collections? Please do get in touch and try to come to our Open Day!

This is a free event and there are no charges associated with attending. If you require a car parking space, please do let us know and we can make the arrangements accordingly.

If you are interested in attending, please sign up for a free ticket via our Eventbrite page in order that we can get an idea of the number of people who are interested in attending. Please sign-up here: http://uelarchivesopnday.eventbrite.co.uk

Further details are also available on the Refugee Archives Facbook page at: https://www.facebook.com/RefugeeCouncilArchive

Details of how to find the UEL Docklands Campus can be found here: http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

Background Information on the UEL Archives

The University of East London is currently the home of several high profile archival collections including the British Olympic Association Archive and Library; the Hackney Empire Theatre Archive; the Eastside Community Heritage oral history collection and the Refugee Council Archive and associated collections.

Further details of these collections can be found on our website at: https://uelarchivesportal.wordpress.com/

Organised By

Paul Dudman, Archivist, in conjunction with the Library and Learning Services at the University of East London.

Contact Details:

Contact E-mail: p.v.dudman@uel.ac.uk
Contact Telephone: +44 (0) 20 8223 7676
Twitter: @refugeearchives
Refugee Archives Blog: https://refugeearchives.wordpress.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/679985885480139/

Rescheduled: The Fear of Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C) as grounds for seeking asylum

Please note this workshop has been rescheduled to take place on Wednesday 11 November 2015.

Register online: http://www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk/fgm/

The Fear of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) as grounds for seeking asylum

Female Genital Mutilation is child abuse and torture. It is illegal in the UK, but the Home Office is consistently rejecting claims to refugee status made by women and girls who seek asylum because they fear they will be subjected to FGM if forced to return to their home countries.

This workshop will introduce participants to the types of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM); the laws against FGM in the UK and international law; the countries from where you may expect to receive asylum seekers; the potential health risk that result from FGM; how the fear of FGM is grounds for claiming asylum, constitutes child abuse, and where the claimant is an adult, FGM amounts to torture, inhumane and degrading treatment.

Topics reviewed will teach participants about the practice of FGM and its potential physical and psychological consequences.  Participants will engage with UK case law on FGM; learn to improve interviewing techniques; to provide imp representation to clients by engaging specialized County of Origin Information (COI) expert statements; and to anticipate and counter arguments for rejecting asylum claims based on FGM/C that may be mounted by Home Office Presenting Officers (HOPO).

DATE: Wednesday 11 November 2015, 8.45 a.m – 5.30 p.m

VENUE: St Aldates Room,  Oxford Town Hall, St Aldates, Oxford, OX1 1BX

REGISTER:  www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk/product/fgmc-workshop/

Registration deadline: 30 September, 2015

Fee: £200. The fee includes tuition, workshop materials, lunch and refreshments.

This workshop is suitable for: legal professionals, researchers, staff of NGOs, Government personnel and practitioners. (Knowledge of immigration law and/or FGM is assumed).

CONVENOR: Oxford Rights Workshops – Dr Barbara Harrell-Bond, Advisor.  Founder and former Director of the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford.

TUTORS:

LIANNE POPE: Detective Sergeant, Protecting Vulnerable People Department, Thames Valley Police works closely with the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner to promote awareness of FGM in the Thames Value region.

LAUREN BUTLER: For the past eighteen years Lauren Butler has worked in refugee organisations including the Amnesty International Refugee Office in San Francisco and the Centre for Women War Victims in Zagreb, Croatia. Having relocated permanently to the UK she is now a senior immigration caseworker at Rochdale Law Centre, having conduct of asylum applications and appeals and coordinating a programme providing specialised legal services to women and girls seeking protection in the UK. She has acted on behalf of women with FGM/C-related claims from the Gambia, Nigeria, and Senegal.

BARBARA HARRELL-BOND: Dr Barbara Harrell-Bond, Emerata Professor, OBE, is a legal anthropologist who conducted research in West Africa from 1967-1982 while employed by the Departments of Anthropology, University of Edinburgh & University of Illinois-Urbana,USA, Afrika Studiecentrum, Leiden, Holland, & the Faculty of Law, University of Warwick. She founded/directed the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford (1982-96); conducted research in Kenya and Uganda (1997-2000), and was Adjunct Professor, American University in Cairo (2000-2008). She is now responsible for the information portal, www.refugeelegalaidinformation.org that promotes legal assistance for refugees around the world.

SAJIDA ISMAIL: Sajida Ismail is currently an Associate Lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) where she teaches Law & Society, Public Law and the Law of the European Union, each subject encompassing aspects of Human Rights law. Sajida is also a solicitor (non-practicing). Prior to teaching at MMU she worked at South Manchester Law Centre as an immigration lawyer from June 2001 until September 2014 when the Centre closed down due to legal aid cuts. Whilst at the Law Centre she was seconded to a trans-national action research project (the WASP Project) in partnership with MMU on domestic violence and refugee law and co-authored the project report. She has also contributed to a Gender and Forced Migration working group at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg as well as contributing the collection, Gender and Migration: Feminists Interventions , Palmary, I. et al. (eds), 2010, Zed Books. Ms Ismail has also undertaken voluntary work with the Medico-Legal Report Service (MLRS) at Freedom from Torture.

BRENDA KELLY: Dr Brenda Kelly is a consultant in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, sub-specialising in maternal-foetal medicine. She is also the clinical lead for FGM in Oxford, and has research interests in Pre-eclampsia and its link to CV health. She is part of the FGM National Clinical Group, a charity committed to improving services for women with FGM through education and training of health care professionals

For any queries please contact:  Heidi El-Megrisi
admin@oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk
www.oxfordrightsworkshops..co.uk
tel: + 44 (0) 7720601053

From Poland to Waltham Forest: New Exhibition Highlights 150 Years of Polish Migration to Waltham Forest

The Vestry House Museum is currently displaying an exhibition entitled, From Poland to Waltham Forest which runs at  as part of the E17 Art Trail.  The exhibition is on display between the 30th May and the 14th June 2015 and focuses upon 150 years of Polish migration to Waltham Forest in London.

This exhibition marks the conclusion of a Heritage Lottery Funded project to undertaken by Share UK, a non profit organisation based in Waltham Forest, with the aim of revealing how there has been a long history of Polish migration to Waltham Forest with evidence of Polish migration to the area from the mid 1800s through to the present day.

The history and heritage of “Characters from over 150 years of migration come to life through film, photography, audio and archive materials” can now be discovered both within the exhibition and also the project website which is now available online at:  http://frompoland.org.uk/

Reflecting upon the project, Share UK’s Esther Freeman said: “Since this area has existed in its current urban form there have been Polish people living here. They established businesses, raised their children and contributed to the community both economically and culturally, much like they do today.”

Further details are available from the website at http://frompoland.org.uk/ and the exhibition is currently running at the Vestry House Museum until the 24th June.

 

Event: Refugee Tales

Refugee Tales

Saturday 13th – Sunday 21st June 2015

Gatwick Detainee Welfare Group’s unique walk follows the North Downs Way from Dover to Crawley via Canterbury along some of the paths that were taken by the Canterbury pilgrims many centuries ago. We will be reflecting on the many long and dangerous journeys that refugees make fleeing war and persecution, seeking a safe place to live.

We welcome walkers to join us on the 80 mile walk – for the whole route, a day or a few days.

Following a colourful launch event at the beginning of the walk in Dover, arts events (drama, art, music, poetry and prose) inspired by The Canterbury Tales will be held at every evening stop on the walk.

All events, apart from the final event at the Hawth Theatre in Crawley on Sunday 21th June, are free of charge and entry will be on a first come, first served basis and sorry but latecomers will not be admitted.

Tickets for the final event on Sunday 21st June at The Hawth are on sale here.

Interested in being a more active participant? Check out The Walk as well.

Reminder: Event: Refugee Council Archive at UEL – Archives Open Day, Tuesday 16 June 2015

As part of Refugee Week 2015, we are pleased to announce a:

UEL Archives and Special Collections Open Day

When: Tuesday, 16 June 2015
11am – 6pm.

Where: University of East London, Docklands Campus Library Archive: Room DL.G.02

FB-JoinAre you interested in archives, history or refugee and migration issues? Are you a student undertaking research for a dissertation, an NGO-worker focusing on policy; an archivist interested in learning about “refuge archives”; a historian of population movements; an activist or community-group member actively working in the field to support your local community group or organisation? If so, then you may be interested in attending our Archives Open Day?

We would very much like the opportunity to welcome you to a showcase of material from our unique and diverse archival collections and we are also very keen to use this day to discuss hoe are archival collections can be best utilised to encourage greater usage and accessibility beyond the confines of academia. We are very keen to make our Archives more interactive and engaging and we are hoping to take a step towards achieving this through a civic engagement and outreach project that we are currently running.

The aim of this day will be to:

  • Showcase materials for the Archive Collections at UEL, especially FB-example-6the Refugee Council Archive and associated collections.
  • To encourage new groups and communities to attend this open day to discuss our latest civic engagement project which hopes to pilot a new Living Refugee Archive website developed through external engagement beyond the Archive and the collection of oral histories.
  • To promote the UEL Archives to a wider audience beyond academia and to try and encourage new outreach and partnership opportunities.
  • To consider the relevance of “Refugee Archives” in the 21st Century and to reflect on the collection development and management of such collections.

The Archivist, Paul Dudman, will be on hand all day to provide advice on how to care for your personal archive collection including photographs and documents. You can also discover how to access the Archives at UEL for your own research projects and further study. If you are interested in using the archives for your research; to Improve your research quality and potential; or if you would like to discuss ways we can utilise the archives for your teaching; or even if you would like to discuss the possibility of forming a new partnership or helping with outreach or civic engagement activities? Or maybe you are just curious about UEL’s fascinating collection of archives and special collections? Please do get in touch and try to come to our Open Day!

FB-example-4This is a free event and there are no charges associated with attending. If you require a car parking space, please do let us know and we can make the arrangements accordingly.

If you are interested in attending, please sign up for a free ticket via our Eventbrite page in order that we can get an idea of the number of people who are interested in attending. Please sign-up here: http://uelarchivesopnday.eventbrite.co.uk

Further details are also available on the Refugee Archives Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/RefugeeCouncilArchive

Details of how to find the UEL Docklands Campus can be found here: http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

Background Information on the UEL Archives

The University of East London is currently the home of several high profile archival collections including the British Olympic Association Archive and Library; the Hackney Empire Theatre Archive; the Eastside Community Heritage oral history collection and the Refugee Council Archive and associated collections.

Further details of these collections can be found on our website at: https://uelarchivesportal.wordpress.com/

Organised By

Paul Dudman, Archivist, in conjunction with the Library and Learning Services at the University of East London.

Contact Details:

Contact E-mail: p.v.dudman@uel.ac.uk
Contact Telephone: +44 (0) 20 8223 7676
Twitter: @refugeearchives
Refugee Archives Blog: https://refugeearchives.wordpress.com/
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Daily International News Stories Round-up 06/04/2015

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Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 06/04/2015

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Daily International News Stories Round-up 06/03/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 06/03/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 06/02/2015

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Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 06/02/2015

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A workshop: Aid in Time – Histories of Humanitarianism, June 3rd at the University of Bristol

Originally posted on Aid in Time:

The Humanitarian Histories Group at the University of Bristol are pleased to announce their first workshop, on Wednesday June 3rd 2015. To book a space, please email emily.baughan@bristol.ac.uk

Programme:

2:00-3:00 – Humanitarianism and the Humanities: framing the debate – Juliano Fiori, Save the Children UK

3:15-4:30- Where’s my House?: Histories of Shelter and Changing Channels of Information (Chair, Su Lin Lewis)

 Tom Scott-Smith (University of Bristol): From Aalto to IKEA: What is really new about innovation in the shelter sector?

Ben White (University of Glasgow): Care and Control: the refugee camp in history

Imogen Wall (Independent consultant/ former UN): – Where’s my house? Information and community empowerment in humanitarian emergencies

4:45 – 5:30 Looking Back, Facing Forward: Histories of humanitarianism (Chair: Rob Skinner)

Eleanor Davey (University of Manchester): Writing history for a humanitarian audience: HPG’s ‘modern’ and ‘global’ project

Andrew Jones (University of Birmingham): Band Aid in Time: from…

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Archives in the News: Updates from the UEL Archives (weekly)

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New Articles on Refugee and Forced Migration Issues (weekly)

  • “By conducting a textual analysis of the National Human Rights Action Plans of 39 countries, this study revealed that these plans are faced with at least 14 significant problems in the ‘pre-phase’ and the four phases of planning—these are preparatory phase; development phase; implementation phase; and assessment phase. The problems include: non-compliance; tardiness; lack of a baseline study; ideological orientation; non-correspondence; lack of comprehensiveness; lack of coordination; supporting the status quo; lack of time frame; lack of transparency; lack of accountability; lack of resources; lack of monitoring mechanism; and lack of evaluation mechanism. These problems are best addressed by attempting to remove or mitigate their root causes. In this regard, this study explored three important root causes of the problems: the lack of political will; the lack of stakeholder awareness; and the traditional concept of planning. This suggested building three response strategies including: a shift from unitary systems of government to more horizontally-organized system of networked governance; raising awareness of such plans; and a strategic move towards the modern concept of planning. By directing corrective measures at root causes, it is hoped that the likelihood of recurrence of problems will be minimized. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

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Reminder: Workshop registration deadline reminder: The Fear of Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C) as grounds for seeking asylum

A courteous reminder that the deadline to register for the FGM/C workshop is approaching. Please register by 1 June 2015  to secure your place:  www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk/product/fgmc-workshop/

CONVENOR: Oxford Rights Workshops – Dr Barbara Harrell-Bond, Advisor. Founder and former Director of the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford.

The Fear of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) as grounds for seeking asylum

Female Genital Mutilation is child abuse and torture. It is illegal in the UK, but the Home Office is consistently rejecting claims to refugee status made by women and girls who seek asylum because they fear they will be subjected to FGM if forced to return to their home countries.

This workshop will introduce participants to the types of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM); the laws against FGM in the UK and international law; the countries from where you may expect to receive asylum seekers; the potential health risk that result from FGM; how the fear of FGM is grounds for claiming asylum, constitutes child abuse, and where the claimant is an adult, FGM amounts to torture, inhumane and degrading treatment.

Topics reviewed will teach participants about the practice of FGM and its potential physical and psychological consequences. Participants will engage with UK case law on FGM; learn to improve interviewing techniques; to provide imp representation to clients by engaging specialized County of Origin Information (COI) expert statements; and to anticipate and counter arguments for rejecting asylum claims based on FGM/C that may be mounted by Home Office Presenting Officers (HOPO).

DATE: Wednesday 22 July 2015, 8.45 a.m – 5.30 p.m
VENUE: St Aldates Room, Oxford Town Hall, St Aldates, Oxford, OX1 1BX
REGISTER: www..oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk/product/fgmc-workshop

Registration deadline: 1 June, 2015

Fee: £200. The fee includes tuition, workshop materials, lunch and refreshments.

TUTORS:

KATY BARROW-GRINT: Katy Barrow-Grint, Detective Chief Inspector, Protecting Vulnerable People Department, Thames Valley Police works closely with the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner to promote awareness of FGM in the Thames Value region and it the Thames Valley Police force FGM lead.

LAUREN BUTLER: For the past eighteen years Lauren Butler has worked in refugee organisations including the Amnesty International Refugee Office in San Francisco and the Centre for Women War Victims in Zagreb, Croatia. Having relocated permanently to the UK she is now a senior immigration caseworker at Rochdale Law Centre, having conduct of asylum applications and appeals and coordinating a programme providing specialised legal services to women and girls seeking protection in the UK. She has acted on behalf of women with FGM/C-related claims from the Gambia, Nigeria, and Senegal.

BARBARA HARRELL-BOND: Dr Barbara Harrell-Bond, Emerata Professor, OBE, is a legal anthropologist who conducted research in West Africa from 1967-1982 while employed by the Departments of Anthropology, University of Edinburgh & University of Illinois-Urbana,USA, Afrika Studiecentrum, Leiden, Holland, & the Faculty of Law, University of Warwick. She founded/directed the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford (1982-96); conducted research in Kenya and Uganda (1997-2000), and was Adjunct Professor, American University in Cairo (2000-2008). She is now responsible for the information portal, www.refugeelegalaidinformation.org<http://www.refugeelegalaidinformation.org/> that promotes legal assistance for refugees around the world.

SAJIDA ISMAIL: Sajida Ismail is currently an Associate Lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) where she teaches Law & Society, Public Law and the Law of the European Union, each subject encompassing aspects of Human Rights law. Sajida is also a solicitor (non-practicing). Prior to teaching at MMU she worked at South Manchester Law Centre as an immigration lawyer from June 2001 until September 2014 when the Centre closed down due to legal aid cuts. Whilst at the Law Centre she was seconded to a trans-national action research project (the WASP Project) in partnership with MMU on domestic violence and refugee law and co-authored the project report. She has also contributed to a Gender and Forced Migration working group at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg as well as contributing the collection, Gender and Migration: Feminists Interventions , Palmary, I. et al. (eds), 2010, Zed Books. Ms Ismail has also undertaken voluntary work with the Medico-Legal Report Service (MLRS) at Freedom from Torture.

BRENDA KELLY: Dr Brenda Kelly is a consultant in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, sub-specialising in maternal-foetal medicine. She is also the clinical lead for FGM in Oxford, and has research interests in Pre-eclampsia and its link to CV health. She is part of the FGM National Clinical Group, a charity committed to improving services for women with FGM through education and training of health care professionals

For any queries please contact: Heidi El-Megrisi

admin@oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk<mailto:admin@oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk>

www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk<http://www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk>

Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/28/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/28/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Funding opportunities: Announcing IASFM Call for Seed Funding Proposals

Originally posted on ESPMI Network:

International Association for the Study of Forced Migration

Working Group Seed Funding Opportunity

Formally established in 1994, the International Association for the Study of Forced Migration (IASFM) has become the most significant forum for academics, activists, and policymakers from around the world to present research and discuss issues related to forced migration. At our 15h Annual Meeting in Bogota, Colombia, July 2014, we formed a common vision statement (link) with the Refugee Research Network (RRN) in order to strengthen the field of forced migration studies by: 1) expanding our awareness of the global knowledge regime concerning refugee and forced migration issues, 2) improving communication of this knowledge within and between academic, policymaking, and practice sectors within and between the Global South and North, and 3) building alliances and support for the development of regional and global policy frameworks and humanitarian practices affecting refugees and forced migrants. With these goals in…

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Cracking down on illegal migration doesn’t change net migration

Originally posted on Postcards from ...:

Photo opportunism for Theresa May and David Cameron who joined enforcement officers on an immigration raid on the day ONS data are released. Photo opportunism for Theresa May and David Cameron who joined enforcement officers on an immigration raid on the day ONS data are released.

Today’s announcement of a crackdown on illegal migration to coincide with ONS latest figure on net migration is misleading. Clearly, undocumented migration has nothing, or only marginally, to do with net migration as the latter are a measure of legal migration only.

So the announced measures were just an attempt (mostly successful only with Tory media) to divert attention away from what is a remarkable failure of Cameron’s previous government to deliver on its own immigration pledge (for a critique of the immigration pledge see here).

We have also witnessed a poor attempt by Cameron to shift the blame for the failure on Lib Dem. This is totally misleading as the Home Office, and the Immigration portfolio in particular, have been firmly in Tory’s hands throughout the previous…

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Burundi and the Challenges of Evaluating Peace-building Success

Originally posted on Political Violence @ a Glance:

Guest post by David E. Cunningham

Munitions surrendered by CNDD-FDD forces in 2005. By the United Nations. Munitions surrendered by CNDD-FDD forces in 2005. By the United Nations.

Recent events in Burundi, where President Pierre Nkurunziza’s decision to seek a third term led to large protests and an unsuccessful coup attempt, bring up important questions about peace-building in post-conflict settings. Burundi is an interesting case because the international community devoted significant effort to resolving the 1991-2008 civil war there and to peace-building in its aftermath. International recognition of the costs of failure to respond to the 1994 Rwandan genocide and the continued growth of a large conflict resolution industry meant that for the last several years Burundi has received an impressive amount of attention from international organizations, prominent national leaders, non-governmental organizations, and academics.

Taking into account the recent turmoil, is Burundi a success story? This is a complicated question. A large body of academic literature has demonstrated that international…

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ToC: Refugee Survey Quarterly Table of Contents for June 1, 2015; Vol. 34, No. 2

Oxford Journals have published their latest Table of Contents alert for the latest issue of the Refugee Survey Quarterly journal.  Further details of the articles included in Volume 34 Number 2 (1 June 2015) are available as follows:

Articles

“Rather Than Talking in Tamil, They Should Be Talking to Tamils”: Sri Lankan Tamil Refugee Readiness for Repatriation
Miriam George, Wendy Kliewer, and Sebastan Irudaya Rajan
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 1-22
[Abstract]

From Ad Hoc to Universal: The International Refugee Regime from Fragmentation to Unity 1922–1954
Gilad Ben-Nun
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 23-44
[Abstract]

Refugees’ Conceptualizations of “Protection Space”: Geographical Scales of Urban Protection and Host–Refugee Relations
Eveliina Lyytinen
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 45-77
[Abstract]

Getting Refugees to Work: A Street-level Perspective of Refugee Resettlement Policy
Jessica H. Darrow
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 78-106
[Abstract]

Notes and Comments

Recognizing Refugee Status for Victims of Trafficking and the Myth of Progress
Satvinder S. Juss
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 107-123
[Abstract]

 

Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 05/21/2015 (a.m.)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/21/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/21/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/20/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/20/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Oxford Rights Workshops registration deadline reminder: The Fear of Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C) as grounds for seeking asylum

PLEASE NOTE THE REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS: 1 JUNE 2015

The Fear of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) as grounds for seeking asylum

Female Genital Mutilation is child abuse and torture. It is illegal in the UK, but the Home Office is consistently rejecting claims to refugee status made by women and girls who seek asylum because they fear they will be subjected to FGM if forced to return to their home countries.

This workshop will introduce participants to the types of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM); the laws against FGM in the UK and international law; the countries from where you may expect to receive asylum seekers; the potential health risk that result from FGM; how the fear of FGM is grounds for claiming asylum, constitutes child abuse, and where the claimant is an adult, FGM amounts to torture, inhumane and degrading treatment.

Topics reviewed will teach participants about the practice of FGM and its potential physical and psychological consequences.  Participants will engage with UK case law on FGM; learn to improve interviewing techniques; to provide imp representation to clients by engaging specialized County of Origin Information (COI) expert statements; and to anticipate and counter arguments for rejecting asylum claims based on FGM/C that may be mounted by Home Office Presenting Officers (HOPO).

DATE: Wednesday 22 July 2015, 8.45 a.m – 5.30 p.m

VENUE: St Aldates Room,  Oxford Town Hall, St Aldates, Oxford, OX1 1BX

REGISTER:  www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk/product/fgmc-workshop/

Registration deadline: 1 June, 2015

Fee: £200. The fee includes tuition, workshop materials, lunch and refreshments.

This workshop is suitable for: legal professionals, researchers, staff of NGOs, Government personnel and practitioners

Oxford Rights Workshops offers unaccredited CPD points for eligible solicitors under the new continuing competency approach.  This FGM Workshop offers 6 hours at intermediate level.  (Knowledge of immigration law and/or FGM is assumed).

CONVENOR: Oxford Rights Workshops – Dr Barbara Harrell-Bond, Advisor.  Founder and former Director of the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford.

TUTORS:

KATY BARROW-GRINT: Katy Barrow-Grint, Detective Chief Inspector, Protecting Vulnerable People Department, Thames Valley Police works closely with the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner to promote awareness of FGM in the Thames Value region and it the Thames Valley Police force FGM lead.

LAUREN BUTLER: For the past eighteen years Lauren Butler has worked in refugee organisations including the Amnesty International Refugee Office in San Francisco and the Centre for Women War Victims in Zagreb, Croatia. Having relocated permanently to the UK she is now a senior immigration caseworker at Rochdale Law Centre, having conduct of asylum applications and appeals and coordinating a programme providing specialised legal services to women and girls seeking protection in the UK. She has acted on behalf of women with FGM/C-related claims from the Gambia, Nigeria, and Senegal.

 BARBARA HARRELL-BOND: Dr Barbara Harrell-Bond, Emerata Professor, OBE, is a legal anthropologist who conducted research in West Africa from 1967-1982 while employed by the Departments of Anthropology, University of Edinburgh & University of Illinois-Urbana,USA, Afrika Studiecentrum, Leiden, Holland, & the Faculty of Law, University of Warwick. She founded/directed the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford (1982-96); conducted research in Kenya and Uganda (1997-2000), and was Adjunct Professor, American University in Cairo (2000-2008). She is now responsible for the information portal, www.refugeelegalaidinformation.org that promotes legal assistance for refugees around the world.

SAJIDA ISMAIL: Sajida Ismail is currently an Associate Lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) where she teaches Law & Society, Public Law and the Law of the European Union, each subject encompassing aspects of Human Rights law. Sajida is also a solicitor (non-practicing). Prior to teaching at MMU she worked at South Manchester Law Centre as an immigration lawyer from June 2001 until September 2014 when the Centre closed down due to legal aid cuts. Whilst at the Law Centre she was seconded to a trans-national action research project (the WASP Project) in partnership with MMU on domestic violence and refugee law and co-authored the project report. She has also contributed to a Gender and Forced Migration working group at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg as well as contributing the collection, Gender and Migration: Feminists Interventions , Palmary, I. et al. (eds), 2010, Zed Books. Ms Ismail has also undertaken voluntary work with the Medico-Legal Report Service (MLRS) at Freedom from Torture.

BRENDA KELLY: Dr Brenda Kelly is a consultant in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, sub-specialising in maternal-foetal medicine. She is also the clinical lead for FGM in Oxford, and has research interests in Pre-eclampsia and its link to CV health. She is part of the FGM National Clinical Group, a charity committed to improving services for women with FGM through education and training of health care professionals

For any queries please contact:  Heidi El-Megrisi
admin@oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk
www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk
tel: + 44 (0) 7720601053

 

Oxford Rights Workshop registration deadline reminder: Palestine refugees and the interpretation of Article 1D

Please note the deadline for registration is 5 June 2015.

Palestine refugees and the interpretation of article 1D of the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees

This workshop will focus on legal issues relating to Palestinians who seek asylum in the UK.  This workshop will examine:

1)  The historical situation of Palestine refugees

2)  International law of Palestine refugees and Article 1D’s interpretations

3) Litigating asylum claims in the UK and interpreting the ECJs El Kott decision and UNHCR interpretive notes under UK asylum law and practice.

Date:  Monday 27 July 2015, 8.45 a.m. – 5.30 p.m.

VENUE : Oxford Quaker Meeting room, 43 St Giles, Oxford, OX1 3LD

REGISTER:  http;//www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk/product/Palestine-refugees/  

FEE: £350. The fee includes tuition, workshop materials, lunch and refreshments.

This course is suitable for: legal professionals, researchers, post-graduate students and those with an interest in immigration law.

This refugee law workshop offers 6 hours CPD

Level: UPDATE

Oxford Rights Workshops offers unaccredited CPD points for solicitors who chose to follow the new continuing competency approach

GUEST SPEAKERS AND TUTORS:

SUSAN M AKRAM, CLINICAL PROFESSOR, BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW

Professor Susan M. Akram teaches immigration law, comparative refugee law, and international human rights law at Boston University. She is a graduate of Georgetown University Law Center, Washington DC (JD), and the Institut International des Droits de l‘Homme, Strasbourg (Diploma in international human rights). She is a past Fulbright Senior Scholar in Palestine, teaching at Al-Quds University/ Palestine School of Law in East Jerusalem

DAWN CHATTY, PROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY AND FORCED MIGRATION; FORMER DIRECTOR, RSC

Professor Dawn Chatty is a social anthropologist and has conducted extensive research among Palestinian and other forced migrants in the Middle East. Some of her recent works include Children of Palestine: Experiencing Forced Migration in the Middle East (ed. with Gillian Lewando-Hundt), Berghahn Press, 2005, and Dispossession and Displacement in the Modern Middle East, Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Elizabeth Ruddick, Solicitor at wesley gryk solicitors llp

Elizabeth is a solicitor at Wesley Gryk Solicitors LLP, a firm with a leading role in personal immigration law in the UK.  Her current practice covers a broad range of cases, but focuses on asylum and applications based on human rights and family relationships.  She is qualified as a solicitor as well as an Attorney-at-Law in the State of New York.

Elizabeth first practiced immigration law in the US in 1996, and in the UK in 2007. Elizabeth is a native of New York City, and has lived in Germany and Italy as well as the UK. She was educated at Harvard University, Boston University, and the London School of Economics. After graduating from law school, she clerked for Hon. Nancy Gertner at the Federal District Court for the District of Massachusetts, before joining the Immigration Group at Dechert Price and Rhoads in Philadelphia. After moving to the UK, she practiced law at Elder Rahimi Solicitors and Refugee and Migrant Justice, specialising in asylum and refugee law. In addition to preparing asylum and immigration applications, she has represented her clients as an advocate before both the First Tier and Upper Tribunal, Immigration and Asylum Chamber.

CONTACT: Heidi El-Megrisi
admin@oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk
www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk
tel: +44 (0) 7720601053

 

Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 07/08/2015 (a.m.)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 07/08/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 07/08/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 07/07/2015 (p.m.)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 07/07/2015 (a.m.)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 07/07/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 07/07/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.