Funding opportunities: Announcing IASFM Call for Seed Funding Proposals

Originally posted on ESPMI Network:

International Association for the Study of Forced Migration

Working Group Seed Funding Opportunity

Formally established in 1994, the International Association for the Study of Forced Migration (IASFM) has become the most significant forum for academics, activists, and policymakers from around the world to present research and discuss issues related to forced migration. At our 15h Annual Meeting in Bogota, Colombia, July 2014, we formed a common vision statement (link) with the Refugee Research Network (RRN) in order to strengthen the field of forced migration studies by: 1) expanding our awareness of the global knowledge regime concerning refugee and forced migration issues, 2) improving communication of this knowledge within and between academic, policymaking, and practice sectors within and between the Global South and North, and 3) building alliances and support for the development of regional and global policy frameworks and humanitarian practices affecting refugees and forced migrants. With these goals in…

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Cracking down on illegal migration doesn’t change net migration

Originally posted on Postcards from ...:

Photo opportunism for Theresa May and David Cameron who joined enforcement officers on an immigration raid on the day ONS data are released. Photo opportunism for Theresa May and David Cameron who joined enforcement officers on an immigration raid on the day ONS data are released.

Today’s announcement of a crackdown on illegal migration to coincide with ONS latest figure on net migration is misleading. Clearly, undocumented migration has nothing, or only marginally, to do with net migration as the latter are a measure of legal migration only.

So the announced measures were just an attempt (mostly successful only with Tory media) to divert attention away from what is a remarkable failure of Cameron’s previous government to deliver on its own immigration pledge (for a critique of the immigration pledge see here).

We have also witnessed a poor attempt by Cameron to shift the blame for the failure on Lib Dem. This is totally misleading as the Home Office, and the Immigration portfolio in particular, have been firmly in Tory’s hands throughout the previous…

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Burundi and the Challenges of Evaluating Peace-building Success

Originally posted on Political Violence @ a Glance:

Guest post by David E. Cunningham

Munitions surrendered by CNDD-FDD forces in 2005. By the United Nations. Munitions surrendered by CNDD-FDD forces in 2005. By the United Nations.

Recent events in Burundi, where President Pierre Nkurunziza’s decision to seek a third term led to large protests and an unsuccessful coup attempt, bring up important questions about peace-building in post-conflict settings. Burundi is an interesting case because the international community devoted significant effort to resolving the 1991-2008 civil war there and to peace-building in its aftermath. International recognition of the costs of failure to respond to the 1994 Rwandan genocide and the continued growth of a large conflict resolution industry meant that for the last several years Burundi has received an impressive amount of attention from international organizations, prominent national leaders, non-governmental organizations, and academics.

Taking into account the recent turmoil, is Burundi a success story? This is a complicated question. A large body of academic literature has demonstrated that international…

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ToC: Refugee Survey Quarterly Table of Contents for June 1, 2015; Vol. 34, No. 2

Oxford Journals have published their latest Table of Contents alert for the latest issue of the Refugee Survey Quarterly journal.  Further details of the articles included in Volume 34 Number 2 (1 June 2015) are available as follows:

Articles

“Rather Than Talking in Tamil, They Should Be Talking to Tamils”: Sri Lankan Tamil Refugee Readiness for Repatriation
Miriam George, Wendy Kliewer, and Sebastan Irudaya Rajan
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 1-22
[Abstract]

From Ad Hoc to Universal: The International Refugee Regime from Fragmentation to Unity 1922–1954
Gilad Ben-Nun
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 23-44
[Abstract]

Refugees’ Conceptualizations of “Protection Space”: Geographical Scales of Urban Protection and Host–Refugee Relations
Eveliina Lyytinen
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 45-77
[Abstract]

Getting Refugees to Work: A Street-level Perspective of Refugee Resettlement Policy
Jessica H. Darrow
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 78-106
[Abstract]

Notes and Comments

Recognizing Refugee Status for Victims of Trafficking and the Myth of Progress
Satvinder S. Juss
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 107-123
[Abstract]

 

Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 05/21/2015 (a.m.)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/21/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/21/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/20/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/20/2015

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Oxford Rights Workshops registration deadline reminder: The Fear of Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting (FGM/C) as grounds for seeking asylum

PLEASE NOTE THE REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS: 1 JUNE 2015

The Fear of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) as grounds for seeking asylum

Female Genital Mutilation is child abuse and torture. It is illegal in the UK, but the Home Office is consistently rejecting claims to refugee status made by women and girls who seek asylum because they fear they will be subjected to FGM if forced to return to their home countries.

This workshop will introduce participants to the types of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM); the laws against FGM in the UK and international law; the countries from where you may expect to receive asylum seekers; the potential health risk that result from FGM; how the fear of FGM is grounds for claiming asylum, constitutes child abuse, and where the claimant is an adult, FGM amounts to torture, inhumane and degrading treatment.

Topics reviewed will teach participants about the practice of FGM and its potential physical and psychological consequences.  Participants will engage with UK case law on FGM; learn to improve interviewing techniques; to provide imp representation to clients by engaging specialized County of Origin Information (COI) expert statements; and to anticipate and counter arguments for rejecting asylum claims based on FGM/C that may be mounted by Home Office Presenting Officers (HOPO).

DATE: Wednesday 22 July 2015, 8.45 a.m – 5.30 p.m

VENUE: St Aldates Room,  Oxford Town Hall, St Aldates, Oxford, OX1 1BX

REGISTER:  www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk/product/fgmc-workshop/

Registration deadline: 1 June, 2015

Fee: £200. The fee includes tuition, workshop materials, lunch and refreshments.

This workshop is suitable for: legal professionals, researchers, staff of NGOs, Government personnel and practitioners

Oxford Rights Workshops offers unaccredited CPD points for eligible solicitors under the new continuing competency approach.  This FGM Workshop offers 6 hours at intermediate level.  (Knowledge of immigration law and/or FGM is assumed).

CONVENOR: Oxford Rights Workshops – Dr Barbara Harrell-Bond, Advisor.  Founder and former Director of the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford.

TUTORS:

KATY BARROW-GRINT: Katy Barrow-Grint, Detective Chief Inspector, Protecting Vulnerable People Department, Thames Valley Police works closely with the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner to promote awareness of FGM in the Thames Value region and it the Thames Valley Police force FGM lead.

LAUREN BUTLER: For the past eighteen years Lauren Butler has worked in refugee organisations including the Amnesty International Refugee Office in San Francisco and the Centre for Women War Victims in Zagreb, Croatia. Having relocated permanently to the UK she is now a senior immigration caseworker at Rochdale Law Centre, having conduct of asylum applications and appeals and coordinating a programme providing specialised legal services to women and girls seeking protection in the UK. She has acted on behalf of women with FGM/C-related claims from the Gambia, Nigeria, and Senegal.

 BARBARA HARRELL-BOND: Dr Barbara Harrell-Bond, Emerata Professor, OBE, is a legal anthropologist who conducted research in West Africa from 1967-1982 while employed by the Departments of Anthropology, University of Edinburgh & University of Illinois-Urbana,USA, Afrika Studiecentrum, Leiden, Holland, & the Faculty of Law, University of Warwick. She founded/directed the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford (1982-96); conducted research in Kenya and Uganda (1997-2000), and was Adjunct Professor, American University in Cairo (2000-2008). She is now responsible for the information portal, www.refugeelegalaidinformation.org that promotes legal assistance for refugees around the world.

SAJIDA ISMAIL: Sajida Ismail is currently an Associate Lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) where she teaches Law & Society, Public Law and the Law of the European Union, each subject encompassing aspects of Human Rights law. Sajida is also a solicitor (non-practicing). Prior to teaching at MMU she worked at South Manchester Law Centre as an immigration lawyer from June 2001 until September 2014 when the Centre closed down due to legal aid cuts. Whilst at the Law Centre she was seconded to a trans-national action research project (the WASP Project) in partnership with MMU on domestic violence and refugee law and co-authored the project report. She has also contributed to a Gender and Forced Migration working group at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg as well as contributing the collection, Gender and Migration: Feminists Interventions , Palmary, I. et al. (eds), 2010, Zed Books. Ms Ismail has also undertaken voluntary work with the Medico-Legal Report Service (MLRS) at Freedom from Torture.

BRENDA KELLY: Dr Brenda Kelly is a consultant in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, sub-specialising in maternal-foetal medicine. She is also the clinical lead for FGM in Oxford, and has research interests in Pre-eclampsia and its link to CV health. She is part of the FGM National Clinical Group, a charity committed to improving services for women with FGM through education and training of health care professionals

For any queries please contact:  Heidi El-Megrisi
admin@oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk
www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk
tel: + 44 (0) 7720601053

 

Oxford Rights Workshop registration deadline reminder: Palestine refugees and the interpretation of Article 1D

Please note the deadline for registration is 5 June 2015.

Palestine refugees and the interpretation of article 1D of the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees

This workshop will focus on legal issues relating to Palestinians who seek asylum in the UK.  This workshop will examine:

1)  The historical situation of Palestine refugees

2)  International law of Palestine refugees and Article 1D’s interpretations

3) Litigating asylum claims in the UK and interpreting the ECJs El Kott decision and UNHCR interpretive notes under UK asylum law and practice.

Date:  Monday 27 July 2015, 8.45 a.m. – 5.30 p.m.

VENUE : Oxford Quaker Meeting room, 43 St Giles, Oxford, OX1 3LD

REGISTER:  http;//www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk/product/Palestine-refugees/  

FEE: £350. The fee includes tuition, workshop materials, lunch and refreshments.

This course is suitable for: legal professionals, researchers, post-graduate students and those with an interest in immigration law.

This refugee law workshop offers 6 hours CPD

Level: UPDATE

Oxford Rights Workshops offers unaccredited CPD points for solicitors who chose to follow the new continuing competency approach

GUEST SPEAKERS AND TUTORS:

SUSAN M AKRAM, CLINICAL PROFESSOR, BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW

Professor Susan M. Akram teaches immigration law, comparative refugee law, and international human rights law at Boston University. She is a graduate of Georgetown University Law Center, Washington DC (JD), and the Institut International des Droits de l‘Homme, Strasbourg (Diploma in international human rights). She is a past Fulbright Senior Scholar in Palestine, teaching at Al-Quds University/ Palestine School of Law in East Jerusalem

DAWN CHATTY, PROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY AND FORCED MIGRATION; FORMER DIRECTOR, RSC

Professor Dawn Chatty is a social anthropologist and has conducted extensive research among Palestinian and other forced migrants in the Middle East. Some of her recent works include Children of Palestine: Experiencing Forced Migration in the Middle East (ed. with Gillian Lewando-Hundt), Berghahn Press, 2005, and Dispossession and Displacement in the Modern Middle East, Cambridge University Press, 2010.

Elizabeth Ruddick, Solicitor at wesley gryk solicitors llp

Elizabeth is a solicitor at Wesley Gryk Solicitors LLP, a firm with a leading role in personal immigration law in the UK.  Her current practice covers a broad range of cases, but focuses on asylum and applications based on human rights and family relationships.  She is qualified as a solicitor as well as an Attorney-at-Law in the State of New York.

Elizabeth first practiced immigration law in the US in 1996, and in the UK in 2007. Elizabeth is a native of New York City, and has lived in Germany and Italy as well as the UK. She was educated at Harvard University, Boston University, and the London School of Economics. After graduating from law school, she clerked for Hon. Nancy Gertner at the Federal District Court for the District of Massachusetts, before joining the Immigration Group at Dechert Price and Rhoads in Philadelphia. After moving to the UK, she practiced law at Elder Rahimi Solicitors and Refugee and Migrant Justice, specialising in asylum and refugee law. In addition to preparing asylum and immigration applications, she has represented her clients as an advocate before both the First Tier and Upper Tribunal, Immigration and Asylum Chamber.

CONTACT: Heidi El-Megrisi
admin@oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk
www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk
tel: +44 (0) 7720601053

 

Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 05/19/2015 (a.m.)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/19/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/19/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/18/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/18/2015

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Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/17/2015

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Archives in the News: Updates from the UEL Archives (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Articles on Refugee and Forced Migration Issues (weekly)

  • “For two decades now, the countries of Central and Eastern Europe, as well as Russia, have been transitioning from authoritarian pasts to somewhat more liberal forms of social and political organization. The development of human rights consciousness confronts three core challenges posed by the legacy of twentieth century communism: associational life reduced to niche or clique; lack of trust; and discouragement of individual personhood. Practitioners can meet these challenges through a new approach to civic education. I show how, in four steps: (1) I propose human rights advocacy by means of a ‘cognitive style’, (2) deployed within civic education, (3) in ways that encourage civic participation. (4) I conclude by sketching three forms of a human rights cognitive style to spur civic education and participation: for professional activists; for non-professional community activists; and for educational deployment. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Stigma and discrimination against men who have sex with men (MSM) and transsexual-transgender-transvestite (trans) people in Latin America increase their vulnerability to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Discrimination in hospitals, schools and workplaces drives them away from HIV information, prevention and treatment services that can save their lives. This increased vulnerability is reflected in pockets of HIV prevalence within these populations, higher than the national averages for the general population. This article postulates that prejudice against MSM and trans persons is not only life-threatening for them, but can also increase the HIV vulnerability of heterosexual males. This study explores how negative attitudes towards lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) persons among a population of male heterosexual long-distance truck drivers in South America may affect their knowledge about HIV and AIDS; this, consequently, may affect their HIV vulnerability. Employing an independent analysis of an International Labour Organization (ILO) survey of 353 long-distance truck drivers from Bolivia and Chile, we develop measures of vulnerability to HIV transmission and prejudice against LGBT persons. We find that vulnerability is strongly associated with prejudice. We conclude that a culture of prejudice against LGBT persons in the workplace has a detrimental impact on heterosexual men’s knowledge and attitudes, increasing their HIV vulnerability. One implication is that promoting the human rights of the LGBT community must be mainstreamed into HIV prevention efforts. Another is that work should be done on emphasizing the interconnectedness of human rights. This could make an impact in halting the AIDS epidemic across the board. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is the site of one of the most egregious conflicts in modern times. Fuelled by a violent political economy of mineral and natural resource extraction, the lengthy cycle of violence and intimidation has resulted in the highest death toll in any war since World War II. The shortcomings of internationally sponsored peacebuilding efforts in the region have led to a local turn in the peacebuilding literature where a key role for community groups in local conflict resolution and development is being promoted. Drawing on fieldwork conducted by the author with community groups in Ituri District in north-eastern DRC, this article highlights the failure of international and national initiatives to address the underlying causes of the Iturian conflict and goes on to argue that there are limits to what local communities can achieve in this context. The findings demonstrate that the greatest impact of community groups’ activities is at individual rather than structural levels and three inter-related reasons are given for this. The article concludes by highlighting four issues for community groups interested in challenging the status quo and effecting long-lasting transformative change, moving from conflict containment to conflict transformation. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “International refugee law, in particular the 1951 Convention on the Status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol, has been accorded an exceptionally strong role in the framework for EU asylum policies. By virtue of EU primary law, it was established as a yardstick for secondary EU refugee law and its application by EU member states. As a consequence of this, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) has the power to interpret provisions of international refugee law. In fact, it has become the first international court actually interpreting the 1951 Convention and the 1967 Protocol. Expectations that this institutional setting would boost international refugee law through the strong framework of the EU were rising high after the establishment of the legal framework for EU refugee policies. More than twelve years after the adoption of the first asylum law instruments under EU law, and more than seven years after the first judgments were handed down, it is time for an assessment of how the Court has been dealing with the potential of applying and possibly shaping international refugee law. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Environmental migration is often presented as one of the gravest consequences of environmental disruptions – climate change in particular, and is already a reality in many parts of the world. Yet the protection of these migrants is not adequately addressed in the international normative frameworks on migration. As a result, a growing number of scholars and advocacy groups have sought to create a special convention and/or an ad hoc status for these migrants, while others have contended that such a legal status is not the answer. As a result, the protection of environmental migrants is currently the subject of vigorous debates amongst scholars and policy-makers, and no clear solution is yet in sight.

    Research however has little considered the debates that surrounded the protection of those displaced within their countries (IDPs) in the 1990s. Both phenomena have sometimes overlapped, especially as environmental displacement is often internal. Yet, the debate on IDPs has had some significant success, in particular, the adoption of the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement in 1998, and the signature of the Organization for African Unity’s Kampala Convention in 2009.

    This article argues that important lessons can be drawn from the protection of IDPs in order to inform the current debates on the protection of environmental migrants, as the political contexts and policy challenges associated with both crises of the migration regime are often similar. The article identifies such lessons and assesses the opportunities and caveats of applying a similar approach of soft law to environmental migration – and what would be needed to achieve it. ”

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/17/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

The Atlantic- “From Smiles to Terror: A Moment in Syria”

Originally posted on ESPMI Network:

On May 6, Reuters photographer Bassam Khabieh was in the Douma neighborhood of Damascus, Syria, covering the arrival of a Red Crescent convoy carrying medical aid and supplies used for activities to give psychological support to children affected by the war. Khabieh: “Whenever the aid convoy entered the Eastern Ghouta, children would gather around it, happy that they were going to be supplied with food and medicine. While I was there, the children asked me to take their pictures so they could see them on the camera’s screen. The children gathered around me so I could photograph them. First I took a photo of Ghazal, then her sister Judy who was carrying a baby called Suhair asked me to take a picture of her kissing the baby. While I was taking these photos, a shell landed on the area. The children started to scream and cry amid the…

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Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 05/16/2015 (a.m.)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/16/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/16/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/15/2015

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UN support needed for accountability in Libya

Originally posted on :

LIBYA DESERVES JUSTICEWith violence in Libya escalating, civil society is calling for new ICC investigations into potential war crimes and crimes against humanity. But in a report to the UN Security Council this week, the ICC prosecutor said the international community must do much more to support accountability in the divided country.

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News from EUObserver: Military action underpins EU migration plan

The European Commission on Wednesday (13 May) unveiled its long-awaited five-year plan on migration.

The proposal aims to tackle urgent issues and looks to the “root causes” of why people risk their lives to enter Europe.

With some 1,800 known to have died in their attempt to cross the Mediterranean Sea since the start of the year, the EU has come under pressure to act.

EU migration commissioner Dimitris Avramopoulos told reporters in Brussels that “this is not about opening or closing borders because both are unrealistic.”

Full article: https://euobserver.com/justice/128708

 

Guardian: “EU plan to strike Libya networks could include ground forces”

Originally posted on MIGRANTS AT SEA:

From today’s Guardian: “European plans for a military campaign to smash the migrant smuggling networks operating out of Libya include options for ground forces on Libyan territory. The 19-page strategy paper for the mission, obtained by the Guardian, focuses on an air and naval campaign in the Mediterranean and in Libyan territorial waters, subject to United Nations blessing. But it adds that ground operations in Libya may also be needed to destroy the smugglers’ vessels and assets, such as fuel dumps. … [The strategy paper] which is expected to be endorsed by European Union foreign ministers on Monday [states that] ‘[t]he operation would require a broad range of air, maritime and land capabilities. These could include: intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; boarding teams; patrol units (air and maritime); amphibious assets; destruction air, land and sea, including special forces units.’ … [The strategy paper states that operations] could include ‘action along…

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Russia May Agree to Security Council Resolution Authorising “Seizing and Arresting” Smuggler Boats and Assets – Security Council Vote Could Happen at Any Time

Originally posted on MIGRANTS AT SEA:

Politico EU reports that “Russia’s Ambassador to the EU, Vladimir Chizhov, told POLITICO the ‘EU’s proposals of destroying vessels would definitely go too far for Russia,’ but did not oppose the other key element of [HRVP Federica] Mogherini’s proposal. ‘In our opinion, seizing and arresting vessels and assets of smugglers would be an adequate measure to undermine their illegal “business model” in Libya,’ he said. Chizhov confirmed that ‘Russia is ready to work with the EU and its member states with the aim of solving the migration crisis in the Mediterranean, including on a possible UNSC resolution.’”

Politico EU suggests that “Mogherini or other EU officials may carefully shift emphasis from the boat destruction plan to the interruption of the trafficker networks” and reports that “[a] vote on a UN resolution could happen anytime in coming weeks — even before next Monday would be possible…”

See full article here.

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HR/VP Federica Mogherini’s remarks at the UN Security Council, 11 May 2015

Originally posted on MIGRANTS AT SEA:

HR/VP Mogherini’s remarks earlier today to the Security Council contained very few details on the EU proposal to engage in “systematic efforts to identify, capture and destroy vessels before they are used by traffickers in accordance with international law.” Here is one excerpt from her remarks: Mogherini at UNSC

“[M]y presence here at the Security Council today is so important for us. We have in these weeks prepared for a possible naval operation in the framework of the European Union Common Security and Defence Policy. The mandate of this operation is currently being elaborated with the EU Member States in Brussels, and will be discussed by the meeting of the EU Foreign Affairs Council, in a week from now, in exactly a week from now on 18 May, with a possibility of taking decisions, the first decisions already. We want to work with the United Nations, in particular with the UNSC. …”

Full…

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Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/14/2015

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Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/14/2015

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Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/13/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/12/2015

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Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/12/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

CMRB Event Today: Challenges in conducting research with Roma women offenders in prison Can Yildiz

No need to reserve a plce – just turn up at 4 pm today. Best, Nira Y-D

CMRB (The Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging)

at the University of East London is pleased to announce as part of its

Borders and Bordering Seminar Series:

Challenges in conducting research with Roma women offenders in prison
Can Yildiz
(King’s College London)

This seminar will take place in

EB.G.06, Docklands Campus, University of East London, E16 2RD,

nearest tube: Cyprus DLR

(http://www.uel.ac.uk/campuses/docklands/)

4-6pm, Monday 11th May 2015

The event is free but spaces are limited so please reserve a place by following the below link

canyildiz.eventbrite.co.uk

Abstract: Can Yildiz’s doctoral study focuses on the experiences of Romanian and Bulgarian Roma women offenders as it aims to investigate the crucial social processes which produce extremely disproportionately high numbers of them in a London prison. She is about to start doing with her fieldwork in May 2015.  Drawing on her experiences obtaining ethical approval and to formulate her research framework, this paper will discuss some of the bureaucratic, theoretical and practical challenges in conducting research in this field.

Can Yildiz is a PhD student in Urban Geography at King’s College London. Her doctoral research is based on the experiences of Eastern European Roma women offenders in London. She holds MA on migration, mental health and social care. She is a qualified social worker.

See www.euborderscapes.eu for more information on the EU Borderscapes project, www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/borderscapes for details of the UEL Borderscapes team and www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb for information on CMRB

VIDEO of police violence in Calais just after Interior Minister Cazeneuve visit (4th May 2015)

Originally posted on Calais Migrant Solidarity:

These images were captured on the 5th of May 2015, beginning at 8 am and continuing throughout the day on the motorway branch leading to the ferry port of Calais (A216). These are just some examples of the everyday police brutality against people who attempt to cross the channel from Calais to the UK by hiding inside trucks. Calais Migrant Solidarity also intends to recall the difficult conditions faced when documenting police violence.

1 – at 0’12, Three members of the French riot police (CRS) force a person who was hidden in a truck to the other side of the motorway guardrail. At the end of the sequence (0’22) a second police officer discharges a burst of tear gas while the two persons were fleeing.

2 – at 0’28 “,A CRS officer removes a person from a truck and pushes him violently over the guardrail.

3 – at 0’42 “On…

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Workshop Flyer

New Article on Litigating Human Rights: Fair Trial and International Criminal Justice

Originally posted on IntLawGrrls:

My article, “Litigating Human Rights:  Fair Trial and International Criminal Justice, the Appellate Acquittals of Major F.X. Nzuwonemeye in the Ndindiliyimana (“Military II”) Case at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda  (‘ICTR’)” was just published in the Spring 2015 Edition of Africa Law Today, the ABA-SIL’s Africa Committee Newsletter.   The article can be accessed at https://gallery.mailchimp.com/90e6f5277dc1d1c2723bb6cee/files/Litigating_Human_Rights_Fair_Trial_and_International_Criminal_Justice_Beth_Lyons_FINAL_.pdf

Chief Charles A. Taku and I represented Major Nzuwonemeye at trial, and on appeal.

In February 2014, the ICTR Appeals Chamber acquitted Major Nzuwonemeye.

The article discusses the reversals by the ICTR Appeals Chamber of Major Nzuwonemeye’s convictions for modes of liability, based on fair trial (right to notice) grounds and failure to provide a reasoned opinion.   The Appeal Judgment, where it holds that there were fair trial violations, is a significant contribution toward strengthening the jurisprudence in support, and defense, of fair trial as an international human right.

CORRECTIONS:  The title should read “. …

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German Shipowners’ Association (VDR) Criticises Growing Reliance on Merchant Vessels to Conduct Mediterranean Sea Rescue – Calls for Expansion of SAR Boundaries

Originally posted on MIGRANTS AT SEA:

Ralf Nagel, the Chief Executive Officer of the German Shipowners’ Association (VDR), last week called on Germany to deploy Navy vessels outside of the Frontex Triton operation zone and closer to the coast of Libya where private merchant ships are often the first to encounter migrant boats in distress. At least two German Navy ships were in Crete last week waiting for deployment instructions. “Deploying the [German] Navy in that part of the Mediterranean would not only send a strong political signal to Brussels, it would also be an important message for the shipping industry, which is doing all it can. And above all else: it would save the lives of innumerable refugees. Rescuing people at sea ought to be the responsibility of navy and coast guard vessels as a rule. … [W]e therefore demand that the boundaries within which maritime rescues are conducted by government forces be expanded beyond…

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(Ab)normality of international migration law: normative and structural asymmetries and contradictions

Originally posted on Interest Group on Migration and Refugee Law:

Blogpost by a member of our Interest Group
by Tamás Molnár

International migration law (hereinafter: IML) is a multi-layered body of law. It is composed of an ever-growing number of norms relating to various branches of international law such as human rights law, international refugee law, international labour law, international trade law, law of the sea, nationality law, diplomatic and consular protection, and international humanitarian law. Despite this rich normative content, these norms and principles do not constitute a logically structured, coherent and integrated system. That is why some refer to IML as “substance without architecture” (A.T. Aleinkoff, ‘International Legal Norms on Migration: Substance without Architecture’ in R. Cholewinski – R. Perruchoud – E. MacDonald (eds.), International Migration Law. Developing paradigms and Key Challenges, The Hague, T.M.C. Asser Press, 2007, 467-480) or describe it as a “giant unassembled juridical jigsaw puzzle, [in which] the number of pieces is still…

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German Shipowners’ Association (VDR) Criticises Growing Reliance on Merchant Vessels to Conduct Mediterranean Sea Rescue – Calls for Expansion of SAR Boundaries

Originally posted on MIGRANTS AT SEA:

Ralf Nagel, the Chief Executive Officer of the German Shipowners’ Association (VDR), last week called on Germany to deploy Navy vessels outside of the Frontex Triton operation zone and closer to the coast of Libya where private merchant ships are often the first to encounter migrant boats in distress. At least two German Navy ships were in Crete last week waiting for deployment instructions. “Deploying the [German] Navy in that part of the Mediterranean would not only send a strong political signal to Brussels, it would also be an important message for the shipping industry, which is doing all it can. And above all else: it would save the lives of innumerable refugees. Rescuing people at sea ought to be the responsibility of navy and coast guard vessels as a rule. … [W]e therefore demand that the boundaries within which maritime rescues are conducted by government forces be expanded beyond…

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Amnesty International Report: ‘Libya is Full of Cruelty’ – Stories of Abduction, Sexual Violence and Abuse from Migrants and Refugees

Originally posted on MIGRANTS AT SEA:

Amnesty International has released a new report entitled: “’Libya is Full of Cruelty’ – Stories of Abduction, Sexual Violence and Abuse from Migrants and Refugees.” (also available here.)  2015-05-11_Amnesty Intl_Report_Libya_Libya_is_full_of_cruelty COVER

Key points include (see formal AI recommendations below):

  • “Widespread abuses by armed groups, smugglers, traffickers and organized criminal groups in Libya as well as systematic exploitation, lawlessness and armed conflicts are pushing hundreds of thousands of migrants, asylum-seekers and refugees to risk their lives by attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea”;
  • “In many cases, migrants and refugees attempting to cross the Mediterranean Sea have been subjected to prolonged beatings in [detention] facilities following their interception and arrest by the Libyan coastguard or militias acting on their own initiative in the absence of strong state institutions”;
  • “While Amnesty International welcomes the EU’s commitment to increase resources for search and rescue operations, it is also concerned that some of the proposed…

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UN Security Council, 11 May, Briefing and Informal Interactive Dialogue on the Smuggling of Migrants in the Mediterranean

Originally posted on MIGRANTS AT SEA:

Full text from “What’s in Blue” (published by Security Council Report):

“On Monday (11 May) the [Security] Council will receive a briefing by Federica Mogherini, the EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, on the EU response to the smuggling of migrants in the Mediterranean Sea. After the briefing, Council members are expected to hold an informal interactive dialogue with her. At the request of Chad, the permanent observer of the AU to the UN, Ambassador Tete António, will also participate in these meetings.

This briefing comes after the 19 April incident in which more than 700 migrants drowned when the overcrowded boat on which they were traveling sank near Libya. According to the [International] Organization for Migration, more than 1,700 migrants have drowned since the beginning of January in the Mediterranean Sea. In a 21 April press statement, Council members expressed grave concern at the…

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Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/10/2015

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Archives in the News: Updates from the UEL Archives (weekly)

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Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/10/2015

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New Articles on Refugee and Forced Migration Issues (weekly)

  • “Motivations for migrants to return clearly change with integration, but the time-changing aspect of return migration has received little attention in the literature. This paper studies how migrants’ preferences for the home country change with intermarriage, i.e., marriage to a spouse from the host country. Specifically, I analyse the association between intermarriage and three outcomes related to migrants’ home country preference – intentions to return, remittances sent and actual return – using German panel data (SOEP) for the period 1984–2012. The results reveal a negative association between intermarriage and home country preference that is moreover stronger for female than for male migrants. However, some of the effect seems driven by selection since the relationship gets weaker once I control for person fixed effects. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Citizenship scholars in Europe often focus on the institutional factors that influence naturalisation, but a less explored topic in the literature is the role of politics and group belonging in naturalisation behaviour—factors that have been proven to influence immigrants’ behaviour in the North American context. Through analysis of the extensive Trajectories and Origins (2008) data-set, I find that interest in politics shapes naturalisation behaviour and outcomes, and living in an anti-immigrant climate, identifying as Muslim and feeling otherised is negatively correlated with naturalisation behaviour. Lastly, Arab immigrants are more likely to seek French naturalisation and have this status than White, non-EU immigrants. This paper sets a quantitative foundation for the role of political orientation and context, and ethnic group belonging in shaping immigrants’ naturalisation behaviour in France. It ends with proposals for a future research agenda on studying the political integration of different ethnic groups in France, and Europe generally.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “We examine differences in the intensity of employer stereotypes of men and women with Arabic names in Sweden by testing how much work experience is needed to eliminate the disadvantage of having an Arabic name on job applications. Employers are first sent curriculum vitaes (CVs) of equal merit in a field experiment setup. Arabic-named CVs are thereafter enhanced with more relevant work experience than Swedish-named CVs. The results indicate a reverse gender gap in employer stereotypes because initial differences in the number of callbacks disappear for female applicants when Arabic-named CVs are enhanced but remain strong and significant for male applicants. Thus, contrary to what is often assumed about the interaction of gender and ethnicity, we find that Arabic men face stronger discrimination in the labor-market than Arabic women.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article aims to advance the discussion on the relationship between people and places in the context of protracted exile. It analyses narratives of home and belonging of protracted Congolese refugees in Kampala and argues for a dynamic and changing notion of home that takes place in protracted exile. Conditions in exile lead to a profound feeling of being out of place and fuel an antagonistic sense of home. This does not mean, however, that all refugees share a strong attachment to their homeland, or that their desire to return is a natural given. Indeed, this article argues that the home of Congolese refugees is not only left behind in another place, it has also been left behind in another time and is therefore experienced as a previous and irretrievable home. Triggered by remittances and information, refugees’ search for home is translated into a desire to be resettled, and thus the idea of home becomes stronger. This is also reflected in refugees’ notion of home as a spiritual place, transcending both time and space. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “For several months in 2013 and 2014, a group of failed Afghan asylum seekers in Brussels became a constant focus of Belgian media and public attention. Through a combination of factors, they succeeded in highlighting the precarious situation of their group in a manner that garnered unprecedented levels of public support, although they ultimately failed to deliver their primary political goal—a moratorium on deportations to Afghanistan. This article analyses the specific combination of factors underlying the short-lived success of this social protest movement and the group dynamics that propelled it to national prominence. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Election-related violence, because it is meant to coerce voters, may have an adverse effect on individual attitudes towards elections—and towards democracy in general. Victims of election violence may come to associate voting with conflict, which may in turn translate into lower levels of support for democratic processes and an unwillingness to participate in future elections. This may be especially true when repeated instances of electoral violence take place, as has been the case in Kenya. To explore the possible relationship between electoral violence and democratic alienation, interviews were conducted in two internally displaced person (IDP) camps in Kenya: one which housed primarily government supporters and one which housed primarily opposition supporters. Among interviewees—all of whom were victims of past electoral violence—there were pronounced differences in stated willingness to vote in future elections. These differences depended on the individual’s perception of freeness and fairness of elections and whether the individual’s candidate or party of choice won or lost. Additionally, as ethnicity is an important factor in vote choice and partisan support, this translates into stark differences between ethnic groups. These findings suggest that electoral violence may have an uneven effect on democratic attitudes and participation. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article investigates the ways in which a shift from post-colonial nation building to neoliberal state restructuring has shaped church and Irish state relations regarding migrant welfare. It develops the extensive work of Bäckström and Davie (Welfare and Religion in 21st Century Europe: Configuring the Connections, Vol. 1. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate 2010) and Bäckström et al. (Welfare and Religion in 21st Century Europe: Gendered, Religious and Social Change, Vol. 2. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate 2011) on how majority churches in European countries are reclaiming a social welfare role as the state relinquishes this responsibility: first, by examining the domain of migrant welfare which is not developed in their work; and second, by arguing that majority church pro-migrant service provision, as it has evolved in recent decades, can be understood in relation to an emergent neoliberal mode of collective responsibility for migrant welfare. It suggests that in spite of other factors and forces that undermine Irish Catholic church authority, the marketization of more domains of life in the first decades of the 21st century has given new significance to Catholic Social Teaching and pro-migrant church initiatives.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Immigration has become systematically politicized and opposed by many individuals. We examine individual attitudes toward equal opportunities for foreigners and Swiss citizens, using cross-sectional data from the Swiss Household Panel. Individuals with low levels of education tend to oppose foreigners, while the opposition by individuals with high levels of education increases with the risk of unemployment. Values and beliefs explain the negative attitudes of individuals with low levels of education, but not the association with the risk of unemployment for individuals with high levels of education. Clearly, both values and economic factors are important for explaining attitudes toward foreigners.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

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Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 05/28/2015 (a.m.)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/28/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/28/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 05/27/2015 (p.m.)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 05/27/2015 (a.m.)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/27/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/27/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.