University scholarships for refugees

ESPMI Network

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS FOR REFUGEES

*   University of Warwick
https://www2.warwick.ac.uk/insite/news/intnews2/refugee_scholarships/
*   University of York
https://www.york.ac.uk/study/international/fees-funding/scholarships/refugee-scholarships/
*   SOAS University of London
https://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/soas-refugee-scholarships—201617.html
*   UEL University of East London, scholarships for Syrian refugees https://www.uel.ac.uk/International/Scholarships-for-Syrian-students-2016
*   University of Sussex, scholarships for Syrian refugees
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/broadcast/read/32160
*   University of Edinburgh, postgraduate scholarships for Syrian refugees http://www.ed.ac.uk/student-funding/postgraduate/international/region/syria

*If you are aware of other scholarships and would like ECRE to publicise them, please send an email toecre@ecre.org<mailto:ecre@ecre.org> with the Subject ‘Scholarships for refugees’*

Website: www.refugeelegalaidinformation.org<http://www.refugeelegalaidinformation.org>
Rights in Exile Legal Aid Newsletter<http://www.refugeelegalaidinformation.org/fahamu-refugee-legal-aid-newsletter>

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Event: BSA Citizenship Study Group and the European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR) Standing Group on Citizenship: Political Citizenship and Social Movements

BSA Citizenship Study Group and the European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR) Standing Group on Citizenship:

Political Citizenship and Social Movements

University of Portsmouth,
27-28 June 2016

Sponsored by University of Portsmouth’s Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Citizenship, ‘Race’ and Belonging Research Group and the Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence

Keynote Speakers:

Prof Engin Isin (The Open University)
Dr Therese O’Toole (University of Bristol)

Recent cultural, social and political events reveal how citizenship and social movements collide and interact in increasingly nuanced and complex ways. Occupy, the revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt, Gezi Park, Sans Papiers, No Borders demand that we re-assess this relationship and think beyond the classification of citizenship and formal political membership. Aided by technological transformations, social movements emerge as both local/global in orientation – from environmental rights, animal rights, gender and sexual rights, migrant and refugee movements to demands for colonial reparations and indigenous land claims. Whilst traditionally understood as the enactment of civil or political ‘citizenship’, scholars have begun to explore how social movements themselves provide alternative spaces for the play, disruption and even (re)theorisation of citizenship. Importantly for Citizenship Studies, the participation of those without formal rights in social movements complicates our sovereign understanding of the citizen. Equally, whilst civil and political citizenship has usually been studied and understood as a product of European history, exploring social movements helps us recognise the global dimensions of being political as well as its radical contingency. This two day interdisciplinary conference addresses these issues by exploring how citizenship and social movements continue to reshape each other.

In exploring the interrelationship between citizenship and current social movements we call for papers across several fields of study, including political philosophy, political geography, sociology, legal studies, education and political studies. In order to understand how citizenship studies can help us understand social movements and how social movements reconfigure citizenship we are interested in research on:

• Participation; social movements as resistance; protest and contemporary rights claims.
• The development of social/political trust, social movements and political subjectivity.
• The role of identities in citizenship and social movements.
• Mobilisation, new information and communication technologies (ICTs) and social and political movements.
• New trans-nationalisation of citizenship and social movements.
• Social movements as sites for education, practice and learning.

This will be a two-day event organised around a series of keynote talks and paper presentations that will allow for the exchange of ideas and experiences.

We especially welcome abstract submissions from postgraduate and early career researchers as well as established researchers. Each speaker will be given 15 minutes to present their paper and 10 minutes each for questions.
Abstracts should be no more than 250 words and include title, author, affiliation, current position and contact email. To submit an abstract, please go to (http://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/abstract/Abstracts.aspx) no later than Tuesday 1st March 2016.

Registration is free, but delegates must register. Lunch and refreshments will be provided.
Registration will be open after the decision on abstracts is released.

For inquiries, please contact:

Dr Nora Siklodi (University of Portsmouth, UK) nora.siklodi@port.ac.uk (Conference chair; Contact for academic and University of Portsmouth inquires related to this event)

Dr Kristoffer Halvorsrud (University of Newcastle, UK) k_halvorsrud@hotmail.com (Contact for abstract and booking related inquires, as well as BSA Citizenship study group inquires)

Prof. Trond Solhaug (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway) trond.solhaug@plu.ntnu.no (Contact for ECPR Standing Group on Citizenship inquires)

Event Invitation: Official release of ‘Look How Far We’ve Come: Commentaries On British Society And Racism?’ DVD @ Houses Of Parliament Feb. 24, 6-8.30pm

Invitation: Official release of ‘Look How Far We’ve Come: Commentaries On
British Society And Racism?’ DVD @ Houses Of Parliament Feb. 24, 6-8.30pm

I wish to invite you to the official release of the ‘Look How Far We’ve Come: Commentaries On British Society And Racism?’ DVD. This will be the first public screening of the full documentary, which was filmed over a three year period during which over five dozen contributors* contributed.

The event, which marks the 50th anniversary of the 1965 Race Relations Act, will end with a Q&A which looks back in order to move forward in highlighting racism, race equality legislation and practice, and identity. Contributors and VIPs will be welcome to comment or respond to questions.

Hosted by John McDonnell MP, Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer, it takes place on Wednesday February 24 2016,  6.00-8.30pm at the Wilson Room,  Portcullis House,  SW1A 0AA
(visitors need to allow 10-15 minutes for security checks).

If you can attend, kindly RSVP: Awula Serwah via  btwsc@hotmail.com by Feb. 12 2016. The Look… DVD and Look Race/Racism Primer are also available  via  btwsc@hotmail.com.

Also, I’d like to bring to your attention one of our upcoming event that may be of interest: 

Culture, Appropriation, Authorship And Copyright – The Story Of ‘The Lion Sleeps Tonight’ Mar 7, 5.30-8.30pm @ University Of Westminster http://bit.ly/1SglSCM

 

SLS Migration and Asylum Law Section: Call for Papers/Posters

SLS Migration and Asylum Law Section: Call for Papers/Posters

2016 SLS Annual Conference at University of Oxford

 

This is the call for papers and posters for the Migration and Asylum Law Section of the 2016 SLS Annual Conference to be held at the University of Oxford from Tuesday 6th September to Friday 9th September.  This year’s theme is ‘Legislation and the Role of the Judiciary’.

The Migration and Asylum Section will meet in the second half of the conference on Thursday 8th and Friday 9th September and we are very pleased to announce that Professor Dora Kostakopoulou and Dr Cathryn Costello have already agreed to give a presentation.

If you are also interested in delivering a paper, please, submit an abstract of 250 words max. by midnight on Friday 18th March.  All abstracts must be submitted through the EasyChair conference system which can be accessed using the following link: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=sls2016. Full instructions on how to use the EasyChair system can be found here:  https://gallery.mailchimp.com/47624183ad52dd8428c97d3f6/files/Using_EasyChair_to_Submit_a_Paper_to_SLS_2016_02.pdf Please, contact Jed Meers at jed.meers@york.ac.uk if you experience any problems using EasyChair.

We would welcome proposals for papers on any issue relating to migration and asylum, including those addressing this year’s conference theme, whether from a doctrinal, critical, socio-legal or empirical perspective.  Alternatively, if you would like to propose a panel or roundtable discussion on a topic of current interest, please, do get in touch by e-mail to see if this can be arranged.

As the SLS is keen to ensure that as many members with good quality papers as possible are able to present, we discourage speakers from presenting more than one paper at the conference.  With this in mind, when you submit an abstract via EasyChair you will be asked to notify whether you are also responding to calls for papers from other sections.

Please, note that whilst you need only submit a proposed title and abstract at this stage, speakers will be asked to submit a copy of their draft paper no later than a week before the conference or, if that is not possible, their PowerPoint slides / handout or an extended abstract (two sides of A4).  This is to enable those who wish to read the papers in advance to do so, thereby enhancing the quality of feedback and discussion within the sessions.

We should also note that the SLS offers a Best Paper Prize which can be awarded to academics at any stage of their career.  The Prize carries a £250 monetary award and winning papers are published in Legal Studies.  To be eligible:

  • speakers must be fully paid-up members of the SLS;
  • papers must not exceed 11,000 words including footnotes (as counted in Word);
  • papers must be uploaded to EasyChair by midnight on Monday 29th August; and
  • papers must not have been published previously or have been accepted or be under consideration for publication.

Those wishing to present a poster should select ‘Submit a Poster’ within EasyChair. The SLS offers a Best Poster Prize, which carries a £250 monetary award and the winning poster will be displayed at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies in London.

We have also been asked to remind you that all speakers and poster presenters will need to register and pay to attend the conference.  As part of a new initiative this year, to reduce the number of late cancellations, speakers and poster presenters will be asked to register for the conference by the end of June in order to secure their place within the programme, though, please, do let us know if this is likely to pose any problems. Booking information will be circulated in due course.

We look forward to your submissions,

With best wishes,

Dr Diego Acosta Arcarazo   and Dr Violeta Moreno-Lax

d.acosta@bristol.ac.uk    and    v.moreno-lax@qmul.ac.uk

Co-convenors of SLS Migration and Asylum Law Section

Call for Papers Europe’s crisis: What future for immigration and asylum law and policy?

Call for Papers

Europe’s crisis: What future for immigration and asylum law and policy?

Migration and Law Network 2016 Conference: 27-28 June, in association with Queen Mary University of London

The European Union is today faced by significant movements of refugees and migrants from places which have experienced war or economic or environmental pressure. Combined with recent terrorist attacks, these developments have led some to doubt the viability of the EU migration framework. At the same time, they have led to arguments for new action by EU institutions and agencies, and by neighbouring countries. New forms of solidarity have been sought by some states and sections of public opinion, but rejected by others. Given the current sense of crisis, there are great uncertainties as to the future direction of the EU migration framework, as well as its content.

Against this background, we invite papers from any discipline which address legal and policy aspects of the ongoing EU migration crisis. Among the questions that papers may wish to address are the following:

·      What is the nature, and what are the sources, of the EU crisis concerning migration?

·      What should be the legal, policy and operational responses to the European migration crisis?

·      Is solidarity among states and peoples possible inside the EU? Does solidarity apply also externally, towards non-EU countries?

·      What is, and what should be, the role of neighbouring and transit states in controlling migration towards the EU?

·      Are there lessons from elsewhere – including the Americas, South East Asia and Australia – for the experience in the EU and its surrounding region?

·      Are new international norms and approaches needed to accommodate contemporary migration flows?

We welcome papers from academics, researchers with other organisations, and from advanced PhD students.

Abstracts of no more than 200 words alongside the author’s affiliation and contact details should be sent to MLNconference2016@qmul.ac.uk no later than 15 February 2016.

The 2016 conference is being organised by

Prof. Valsamis Mitsilegas, Head of Law Department, Queen Mary

Prof. Elspeth Guild, Jean Monnet Professor, Queen Mary & Radboud University, Nijmegen

Prof. Bernard Ryan, University of Leicester

Dr. Prakash Shah, School of Law, Queen Mary

Dr. Violeta Moreno-Lax, School of Law, Queen Mary

Niovi Vavoula, School of Law, Queen Mary

The Migration and Law Network

The Migration and Law Network was set up in 2007 to promote migration law as a subject within United Kingdom universities. It is overseen by a steering committee of academics and other professionals in the immigration law field. It runs the Migration and Law mailing list for those who work in the field, for which subscription requests may be made at http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/migrationlaw. Further information about the network or mailing list may be obtained from the network’s co-chairs, Bernard Ryan (bernard.ryan@le.ac.uk) and Prakash Shah (prakash.shah@qmul.ac.uk).

Call for Papers: Precarious citizenship: Young people who are undocumented, separated and settled in the UK

Birkbeck University of London & Migrant and Refugee Children’s Legal Unit. 

Call for Papers Precarious citizenship: Young people who are undocumented, separated and settled in the UK

 A one-day conference at Birkbeck, University of London to be held on June 1st 2015 for academics, practitioners and activists interested in how precarious citizenship impacts on separated youth as they live and transition to adulthood in the UK. Organised by the Department of Geography, Environment and Development Studies and Pears Institute for the Study of Anti-Semitism at Birkbeck, and Migrant and Refugee Children’s Legal Unit.

Please submit a title and abstract (150 words) and a brief bio (150 words) to k.wells@bbk.ac.uk by 5 pm on March 15th 2016.

We welcome papers that: 

  • Focus on young people who were not aware of their precarious citizenship until State intervention in their lives (going into LA Care; family proceedings; removal/detention of family; police involvement/checks) or when they attempt to access post-school opportunities and services (housing, employment, benefits, higher education etc.) and who were/are Looked After Children by the Local Authority or whose families do not have high levels of economic and/or social capital with which to secure their immigration status and/or who are estranged from their family
  • Focus on the political mobilisation of young people around citizenship and immigration rights (we are particularly interested in papers from activists and/or those young people)
  • We welcome papers from academics, campaigners, activists and practitioners.

Background 

Significant numbers of young people who are settled in the UK (some 120,000) do not have British citizenship. Many have no ‘lawful’ status to remain in the UK whilst cuts to legal aid and fast-paced changes to immigration laws fuelled by a hostile anti-immigrant climate mean that this trend may indeed get worse with numbers rising. Many of these young people may have lived in the UK for many years and consider themselves to be British. Indeed, they may not be aware of their precarious citizenship until they leave school and try to apply for bank accounts, jobs, benefits or university or when they are leaving care or following a family breakdown. Their precarious status arises from the combination of their transition out of childhood, which gave them a degree of protection or insulation from immigration laws, and the discriminatory character of immigration law that means for many of these young people, despite being settled in the UK for many years, once they reach adulthood they cannot secure their British citizenship.

The purpose of this conference is to increase awareness of the precarious citizenship of this group of young people in the UK; to share empirical and theoretical knowledge about contemporary and historical forms of precarious citizenship at the intersection of youth and immigration; to develop a network of academics and practitioners who can take forward the study of precarious citizenship in young people’s lives, and to contribute to theoretical and policy development focused on this group; to engage with activists on effective political mobilisation of youth.

The conference is financially supported by Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, and Migrant and Refugee Children’s Legal Unit.

Nato launches naval patrols to return migrants to Turkey

clandestina

http://www.theguardian.com

Military alliance sends three warships, backed by planes, to intercept migrants and refugees in admission from EU that it is failing to cope with flow of people.

Nato has sent a patrol of three warships to intercept migrants trying to reach Greece by sea and send them back to Turkey, as Europe steps up efforts to contain the refugee crisis.

The mission has been agreed and ordered to the Aegean sea in less than 24 hours, an extremely rapid move for the alliance. Nato normally spends months deliberating over decisions and agreeing details.

The German-led patrol will be backed by planes that can monitor the flow of people attempting illegal crossings. Greece and Turkey have agreed that any migrants they intercept will be sent back.

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New Journal Research Articles for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 02/12/2016

  • “As United Nations (UN) peacekeeping evolved from interposition forces to multidimensional missions, the UN adjusted its peacekeeping principles and allowed a wider use of force. As the latest adjustment, the Security Council adopted a new mandate for UN Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo creating the ‘Force Intervention Brigade’, described as the first contingent of troops to conduct targeted offensive operations against armed groups. However, this role of the UN as an enforcement actor within a non-international armed conflict was not prepared by an assessment of the rules applicable to UN missions. These rules provide the Force Intervention Brigade with an ambiguous double status being at the same time a specially protected peacekeeping force and a party directly engaged in hostilities. As a consequence, peacekeeping missions as a whole are put at a higher risk of failing to perform their assigned mediation between the conflict parties and of themselves becoming the target of attacks. As a preliminary policy advice, I propose a clear distinction between peacekeeping and peace enforcement troops with a view to protect the peacekeeper’s perceived legitimacy and to reconcile the status of peace enforcement troops with the law applicable to the conflicts they, in fact, became a party to. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The majority of Palestinians in Denmark have followed a route from villages in Palestine via camps in Lebanon to housing projects in Denmark. Whereas it is well known that the camps were modelled after the villages, it is less well known that the housing projects are referred to and enacted as camps. Based on fieldwork among Palestinians in the Danish camps, this article explores why my interlocutors describe their current lives as a catastrophe. Al-Nakba literally means the catastrophe and, in Palestinian national discourse, it is used to designate the event of 1948, when the Palestinians were expelled from their homeland. However, according to my interlocutors, al-Nakba never stopped, but continues in the present. To understand this phenomenon, I suggest that it is conducive to think of al-Nakba as a reverse national myth, a figure of un-becoming, which is replicated in the present. I argue that, unlike the spectacular catastrophes in Palestine and later in Lebanon, life in the Danish camps is characterized by minor mundane catastrophes that are each so small that they barely register or elicit a moral response, but nevertheless erode the lives of my interlocutors. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This paper analyzes the determinants of migration duration focusing on family composition and human capital. A utility maximization model is built to show that migrants face a trade-off between avoiding psychic costs from leaving family members and accumulating wealth to support their consumption. The empirical analysis on Mexican men’s US experience carried out using the hazard model shows that marriage and children, which imply a heavier financial burden, are negatively associated with migrants’ duration in the USA. Fathers with more young children under age 12 stay even shorter, because taking care of them is time intensive.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Inspired by the idea of safe citizenship this article queries the possibilities of safety in an age of securitization. It challenges the cosmopolitan worldview and its iteration of a global cosmopolitan citizen. It champions an account of affective citizenship, narration and attends to the trauma of exile. It offers an account of exile before suggesting an institutional design premised on politicization. This design, it is argued, facilitates moments of storytelling fostering individual empowerment. This unorthodox rendering of agency allows the traumatized exile to negotiate the world as it is, not as it could be, as a potential ‘safe’ citizen.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article discusses asylum seekers and the right to work in the UK. Differential access to the labour market is one of the ways in which the state maintains a distinction between British citizens, who ‘belong’, and non-citizens who do not. While such a policy approach garners widespread support amongst the general public of citizens, it does not go uncontested. This article discusses a UK-based campaign, ‘Let Them Work’, which has sought to influence the government in extending the right to work to asylum seekers. In doing so, it demonstrates the ways in which the stratified regime of citizenship rights is contested politically, and explores how such contestation troubles the exclusive privileges of citizenship by enacting mobile solidarities from marginalised spaces.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article aims to critically examine the development of alternatives to immigration detention policies. In the European Union, the emergence of alternatives to detention in the immigration framework is a relatively new phenomenon, strongly inspired by the criminal framework and enshrined in a movement of increased regulation of the immigration detention regime. Through promoting this notion, civil society has sought to engage in a constructive dialogue with States on the use of detention and the possibility to use less coercive and more human rights compliant approaches when dealing with migrants. In Europe, while these campaigns have yielded some positive results, one can question whether, when implemented, they have led to a humanisation of migration policies or, on the contrary, to an increase in the criminalisation of migrants. In view of the above, this article introduces briefly the different understandings of what are alternatives in the framework of immigration detention. Secondly, it analyses their current state of implementation in the EU European Union, both from the legal and political perspective. From this analysis, some opportunities and risks associated with such developments are presented. Finally, possible ways forward are proposed to support civil society’s positioning on this issue. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Border procedures have so far received little attention in the legal literature dealing with European asylum law. Literature on immigration detention in Europe has also neglected the use of detention in border procedures. This is remarkable because one of the reasons that Member States resort to border procedures can be traced back to the centrality of territorial presence within the modern State for the enjoyment of rights. The triangular relationship between an application for international protection, refusal of entry, and a deprivation of liberty has remained imprecise. This indeterminacy has had important repercussions for the way in which the right to liberty has been protected at the borders of Europe. However, the way in which the Recast Asylum Procedures Directive circumscribes Member States’ use of this procedure is unprecedented. This article uses the Dutch implementation of the Asylum Procedures Directive in order to unpack the above-mentioned triangular relationship between an application for international protection, refusal of entry, and a deprivation of liberty. It will show that European Union regulation in this area is distinctive because it entails recognition of the fact that, when it comes to the enforcement of migration control, individual rights are at stake. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article critically assesses the amended European Union asylum detention framework. It traces the tension reflected in the regime between protection provision and administrative imperatives, such as migration management. The research argues that the amended legislation closely frames asylum detention. A coherent regional understanding of “alternatives to asylum detention” also emerges from the legal framework. These elements have the potential to advance protection of forced migrants at global and regional levels. However, European Union asylum law also carries within it the risk of undermining protection. The research explores in this respect the broadly phrased detention grounds and advances an interpretation on the basis of Member States’ international and regional (Council of Europe) legal obligations. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article analyses the interaction between immigration detention and the notion of vulnerability. Vulnerability dominates the contemporary legal discourse and is particularly relevant in the context of deprivation of liberty. Despite its frequent use in international, European, and European Union (EU) legislation and jurisprudence, a clear definition is lacking. However, the EU asylum directives, and mainly the Recast Reception Conditions Directive, initiate an EU approach to vulnerability. Bearing in mind this context, the present article, first, critically analyses how the EU conceptualizes the notion of vulnerability and its relationship with the notion of special needs. It then assesses how vulnerability impacts immigration and asylum detention taking into account jurisprudence from the Human Rights Committee and the European Court of Human Rights, the recast EU asylum directives themselves as well as the EU Return Directive, as it applies in this context. More specifically, the article examines the influence of vulnerability on: detention decision-making, the method of imposition of an alternative to detention, detention conditions, and the implementation in practice of alternative measures. The analysis is enriched with empirical legal findings. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Detention poses a specific challenge to refugee protection; detained asylum-seekers risk not being able to file and meaningfully pursue their claim and benefit only from restrained social and economic rights. They pay a steep human cost. Courts, the legislature, and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees have made efforts to rationalise its use, with the aim to render it a truly exceptional measure of last resort. However, challenges remain and there are pitfalls in asylum detention regulation. One major challenge is non-implementation of legal guarantees in practice and insufficient control by the judge. This can nullify legal guarantees, especially in a highly sophisticated framework like European Union law, where individualisation and the necessity and proportionality requirements, are the elements that rationalise otherwise broadly phrased detention grounds. The misuse of alternatives to detention that have been established to rationalise the use of asylum detention is another, as they may paradoxically be used to enhance control over asylum-seekers instead. Finally, migration management imperatives pose distinct challenges to refugee protection, where asylum detention is used arbitrarily as a means to their end. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Consider the following example: A dark-skinned, female hospital technician was called to take a blood sample from a newborn. When she entered the room, the infant’s mother visibly recoiled, clutching her baby more tightly, and exclaimed, “I don’t want you touching my baby!” Witnessing the situation were a white social worker and a white nurse. The nurse quickly responded, “That’s OK, I’ll hold the baby while you draw the blood.” In anger, the technician turned and walked out of the patient’s room, without the blood sample. The social worker remained a silent bystander.

    In this commentary, we bring attention to the problem of racism in health care, and more specifically, racist acts toward health care workers. We want to highlight the relative paucity of literature in this area and to also call to action social work’s role in addressing this problem.

    Our example of a racist incident, one we suspect is quite common in health care, is reflective of a problem for all health care workers. A New York Times article by Dr. Pauline Chen (2013), titled “When the Patient Is Racist,” explores this very problem. Chen asked, “What does a doctor do if the patient discriminates?,” when, for example, a patient refuses medical treatment based on a physician’s racial identity. The question raises challenging ethical, legal, and professional dilemmas and also concerns about repeated psychic injuries for the physician. Kimani Paul-Emile (2012) argued that patients regularly refuse medical treatment based on the physician’s racial identity and that this is an “open secret” in the medical profession. How are they and other health care providers expected to respond in the face of a racial insult? But more to our point, what is social work’s role in these scenarios? Are we silent bystanders, contributing to the problem in the field … ”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Illegal immigration is a contentious issue on the American policy agenda. To understand the sources of public attitudes toward immigration, social scientists have focused attention on political factors such as party identification; they have also drawn on theories of intergroup contact to argue that contact with immigrants shapes immigration attitudes. Absent direct measures, contextual measures such as respondents’ ethnic milieu or proximity to salient geographic features (such as borders) have been used as proxies of contact. Such a research strategy still leaves the question unanswered – is it contact or context that really matters? Further, which context, and for whom? This article evaluates the effects of party identification, personal contact with undocumented immigrants, and contextual measures (county Hispanic population and proximity to the US–Mexico border) on American attitudes toward illegal immigration. It finds that contextual factors moderate the effects of political party identification on attitudes toward illegal immigration; personal contact has no effect. These findings challenge the assumption t”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Studies demonstrate a negative association between community ethnic diversity and indicators of social cohesion (especially attitudes towards neighbours and the community), suggesting diversity causes a decline in social cohesion. However, to date, the evidence for this claim is based solely on cross-sectional research. This article performs the first longitudinal test of the impact of diversity, applying fixed-effects modelling methods to three waves of panel data from the British Household Panel Survey, spanning a period of 18 years. Using an indicator of affective attachment, the findings suggest that changes in community diversity do lead to changes in attitudes towards the community. However, this effect differs by whether the change in diversity stems from a community increasing in diversity around individuals who do not move (stayers) or individuals moving into more or less diverse communities (movers). Increasing diversity undermines attitudes among stayers. Individuals who move from a diverse to a homogeneous community report improved attitudes. However, there is no effect among individuals who move from a homogeneous to a diverse community. This article provides strong evidence that the effect of community diversity is likely causal, but that prior preferences for/against out-group neighbours may condition diversity’s impact. It also demonstrates that multiple causal processes are in operation at the individual-level, occurring among both stayers and movers, which collectively contribute to the emergence of average cross-sectional differences in attitudes between communities. Unique insights into the causal impact of community disadvantage also emerge. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This essay examines a longstanding normative assumption in the historiography of slavery in the Atlantic world: that enslaved Africans and their American-born descendants were bought and sold as “commodities,” thereby “dehumanizing” them and treating them as things rather than as persons. Such claims have, indeed, helped historians conceptualize how New World slavery contributed to the ongoing development of global finance capitalism—namely, that slaves represented capital as well as labor. But the recurring paradigm of the “dehumanized” or “commodified” slave, I argue, obscures more than it reveals.

    This article suggests that historians of slavery must reconsider the “commodification” of enslaved humanity. In so doing, it offers three interrelated arguments: first, that scholarship on slavery has not adequately or coherently defined the precise mechanisms by which enslaved people were supposedly “commodified”; second, that the normative position implied by the insistence that persons were treated as things further mystifies or clouds our collective historical vision of enslavement; and third, that we should abandon a strictly Marxian conception of the commodity—and its close relation to notions of “social death”—in favor of Igor Kopytoff’s theory of the commodity-as-process. It puts forth in closing a reconstituted conceptualization of the slave relation wherein enslaved people are understood as thoroughly human. ”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article provides new evidence on the economic assimilation of immigrants from the British Isles in Canada during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Using data from the 1901 and 1911 censuses and a pseudo-cohort methodology, we estimate both entry and assimilation effects. We find a non-negligible decline in entry earnings among successive cohorts of British and Irish immigrants, previously overlooked in the literature. Our estimates also reveal that the economic performance for Irish and older British arrival cohorts was better than previously reported. Overall, slow economic assimilation and sparse occupational mobility of immigrants have been a long-standing issue in the Canadian labour market.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Since the development of the immigrant enclave thesis, there has been a disagreement regarding whether the immigrant enclave hurts or benefits individual immigrants’ earnings. The controversy mainly arises from the imprecise way by which enclave participation is measured and from the difference in performance between entrepreneurs and workers. This study uses data from the 2006 Census of Canada to examine how Chinese immigrants who participate in the mainstream economy and enclave economy differ in earnings. Using “the language used most often at work” to determine enclave participation, the study finds that actual and net earnings of Chinese immigrants in the enclave are lower than those of their counterparts in the mainstream economy. However, when the interaction between human capital and enclave participation is considered, human capital brings a net negative return to enclave participants, but at the same time, a positive effect associated with enclave participation. The positive effect may be understood as coming from unmeasured ethnic and cultural features of the enclave that provide a cushion to lessen the magnitude of income disadvantages in the enclave. The study suggests that there is evidence to support both sides of the debate: enclave participants have lower net returns, but the enclave provides a cushioning effect in reducing earnings disparities. The study suggests that integration policy towards immigrants may consider immigrant enclaves as providing some support to immigrants to soften some disadvantages, but enclaves do not offer the same opportunities as the mainstream economy.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Skilled migration is an increasingly important topic for both policy and research internationally. OECD governments in particular are wrestling with tensions between their desire to use skilled migration to be on the winning side in the ‘global war for talent’ and their pandering to and/or attempts to outflank rising xenophobia. One aspect that has received relatively little attention is skilled migration from the African Commonwealth to the UK, a situation in which skilled migrants have relatively high levels of linguistic capital in the language of the host country. We focus here on the case of Zimbabwe. In spite of its popular image as a failed state, Zimbabwe has an exceptionally strong educational tradition and high levels of literacy and fluency in English. Drawing on 20 in-depth interviews of Zimbabwean highly skilled migrants, we explore the specific ways in which the communicative competences of these migrants with high formal levels of English operate in complex ways to shape their employability strategies and outcomes. We offer two main findings: first, that a dichotomy exists between their high level formal linguistic competence and their ability to communicate in less formal interactions, which challenges their employability, at least when they first move to the UK; and second, that they also lack, at least initially, the competence to narrativise their employability in ways that are culturally appropriate in England. Thus, to realise the full potential of their high levels of human capital, they need to learn how to communicate competently in a very different social and occupational milieu. Some have achieved this, but others continue to struggle.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “A major question in labour market research is the extent to which discrimination in employments causes the disadvantages experienced by children of immigrants. This article contributes to the debate by utilising a correspondence test study in which pairs of equivalent résumés and cover letters—one with a Pakistani name and one with a Norwegian name—were sent in response to 900 job openings in the greater Oslo area. The results show that applicants with Norwegian names on average are 25 % more likely to receive a call back for a job interview than equally qualified applicants with Pakistani names. More refined analyses demonstrate that the effect of ethnic background on employment probabilities is larger among men than women and larger in the private sector than in the public sector, and important variations among the occupations included in the study are revealed. In an effort to separate the potentially conflating effects of gender and sector, all applications to gender-segregated occupations were removed from the analyses. Interestingly, the gender differences disappear when exclusively analysing discrimination in gender-integrated occupations by sector. In gender-integrated occupations in the private sector, the gender difference in fact is reversed, indicating that women with minority background are treated less favourably than are minority men in the private sector. These results suggest that the intersection of gender, ethnicity, and sector should be scrutinised more carefully in future field experiments.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This paper presents findings from a study that investigated the experiences of the returning Ghanaian migrants from Libya during the Arab Spring of 2011. The study used qualitative methods to explore involuntary return and reintegration of migrants in a south–south migration framework. Information from semi-structured interviews of migrants from selected communities in Ghana in addition to data from the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the National Disaster Management Organisation (NADMO) were used. The objective of the study was to find out the major difficulties returnees faced in reintegrating into their societies of origin as a result of their hasty departure and to assert the factors that may influence reintegration. The study finds that the combination factors including of high levels of family dependence on returnees, weak governance and the absence of reintegration policies may foster re-emigration.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Based on in-depth interviews with highly skilled and business Turkish nationals (HSBTN) in Canada and Germany, this study aims to explore why HSBTN decide to move and whether migration policy differences among the countries of destination affect recent migration motivations of HSBTN. It mainly focuses on the reasons and rationale of HSBTN and their explanations. This study argues that the high skilled and business migrants in general and HSBTN in particular move internationally as a consequence of individual-level gain beyond economic prospects.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

The economic data that tells us there is no reason to worry about refugees

ESPMI Network

There has been some disgraceful treatment of refugees across Europe in recent days. The Danish parliament has passed a law forcing refugees to surrender their valuables on arrival. Asylum-seekers in Cardiff have been required to wear coloured wristbands to receive food. Our own Government is still “considering” whether to take in 3,000 unaccompanied children who have fled the Middle East’s war zones. Quite a way to mark Holocaust Memorial Day.

Great currents of fear about refugees are swirling around the Continent. Some of this anxiety relates to culture, some to crime, some to terrorism, but much is economic in nature. And there are many economic myths around asylum-seekers.

First, the numbers. One prevalent idea is that Europe is bearing the brunt of the human fallout from the conflicts of the Middle East. There has certainly been a pronounced pick-up in asylum applications in the European Union: 995,000 in 2015 alone…

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Seminar with Tamara Last on migrant deaths at EU borders, 1-2pm, 22 February 2016

Seminar with Tamara Last on migrant deaths at EU borders, 1-2pm, 22 February 2016

Please join Border Criminologies for a seminar with Tamara Last (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) entitled ‘Counting and Accounting for Migrant Deaths along the Southern External Borders of the EU.’

When: Monday, 22 February 2016, 1-2pm

Where: Seminar Room A, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, University of Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Abstract: The Deaths at the Borders Database is the first compilation of official, state-produced data about people who have died attempting to cross the Southern external borders of the EU and whose bodies were recovered in, or brought to, European soil. The information has been gathered primarily from death certificates registered in the civil registries of municipalities in Spain, Gibraltar, Italy, Malta, and Greece, that border non-EU countries. Previously, the only data available on ‘border deaths’ was sourced from news media. The Database has revealed two significant findings: Firstly, that the majority of migrants whose bodies are found remain unidentified by the local authorities responsible for their bodies. Secondly, that, with further analysis, the data could reveal trends in migrant mortality that may be used to evaluate the effect of different trends in migration and border policy. In addition to outlining these two preliminary findings, this presentation will discuss the research and methodology behind the Database, and the challenges faced in using the Database to investigate the relationship between migrant mortality and European migration and border policies.

About the speaker: Tamara Last is currently researching a PhD on the relationship between migrant mortality and European migration and border policies as part of the Human Costs of Border Control project at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. She has compiled a database of persons whose bodies were found in Spain, Gibraltar, Italy, Malta, or Greece, having died crossing the southern external borders of the EU. Prior to starting her PhD research, Tamara completed an MSc in Migration Studies from the University of Oxford, and specialized in migration, human rights, and international law during her Bachelors in Law at the University of Warwick. Tamara has previously worked with the Centre for Migration Studies at the University of Ghana (on the Migrating Out of Poverty project), the UN Research Institute for Social Development (on regional governance of migrants’ rights), and IOM-Nederland (on the development activities of Ethiopian and Ghanaian diaspora communities in the Netherlands).

All are welcome to attend. Sandwiches and refreshments will be provided.

Refugee Law Initiative Book Launch: Seeking Asylum in the European Union

You are warmly invited to a panel discussion and a wine reception to launch a new volume, Seeking Asylum in the European Union: Selected Protection Issues Raised by the Second Phase of the Common European Asylum System (Brill 2015), published in the RLI International Refugee Law book series.

Against the backdrop of the ‘refugee crisis’ and amid questions surrounding the suitability – and indeed future – of the Common European Asylum System, this panel event provides an opportunity to assess the ‘second phase’ of the Common European Asylum System and look to the future of European cooperation on asylum.

– Keynote: Professor Hélène Lambert

– Chair: Professor Vincent Chetail 

– Discussants: Dr Céline Bauloz, Meltem Ineli-Ciger, Dr Sarah Singer and Dr Vladislava Stoyanova

– Friday 19 February 2016, 1800-2000

– Senate Room, Senate House, London, WC1E 7HU

The event is free. To guarantee your place please register at http://bit.ly/1EGRX2I.

Event: SCMR-JEMS 3rd ANNUAL CONFERENCE March 16th, 2016 migration and diversity: a dialogue across disciplines

SCMR-JEMS 3rd ANNUAL CONFERENCE March 16th, 2016
migration and diversity: a dialogue across disciplines
host: Sussex Centre for Migration Research
@ Chichester 1 lecture theatre,
University of Sussex, Brighton, UK

Programme:

Welcome lunch 11.50-12.50

Paul Statham, director SCMR & Editor JEMS, Introduction 1–1.10

Roger Waldinger, UCLA, California. A cross border perspective on migration. Beyond the transnationalism / assimilation debate. 1.10-1.55

Jørgen Carling, PRIO, Oslo. Comment on Roger Waldinger. 1.55-2.05

Public Q&A 2.05-2.45

 Coffee Break 2.45-3

Brenda Yeoh, National University of Singapore. Reflections on Diversity in SE Asia. 3-3.40

Magdalena Nowicka, Humboldt University, Berlin. Migrant spaces, shared values and negotiated meanings. 3.40-4.20

Alexander Betts, University of Oxford, Refugees Studies Centre. Reflections on the refugee ‘crisis’. 4.20-5.00

Elaine Chase, UCL, London. The shifting contours of ‘precarity’. The wellbeing of former unaccompanied migrant children in UK   5-5.40

Drinks Reception to close and celebrate Sussex Mahidol Migration Partnership between SCMR and Institute of Population and Social Research, Mahidol University, Thailand 5.40-6.30

All Welcome, Attendance free, but for catering purposes please register at http://scmrjems2016.eventbrite.co.uk

Call for Papers: Syrian Academics in Exile

ESPMI Network

Publication1 (2)

Flyer is replicated here.

Read more about Researchers in Exile and New Research Voices here.

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Our Refugee Camps are Not Tourist Attractions

ESPMI Network

It’s true. There are tourist trips to the refugee camps, where privileged foreigners encroach on the grounds to obtain their official right to brag.

“Oh, yes we went to Zaatari camp and saw the refugees,” says the privileged foreign audience, to uplift their own credibility. They snap a picture with the “pretty-blue-eyed” child to showcase to those around them their understanding of the pain and struggle of those forced out of their homes.

Every time the tourists in the refugee camp are confronted, they claim, “we are here to understand the situation.” As if a few hours touring the camp, taking pictures with a few of the children, and leaving is how one will come to understand the situation.

When tourists snap pictures, photography turns into a tool that dehumanizes people into products. Cameras fill the Syrian refugee camps at the borders, as people enter and exit, taking with them…

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Refugees in Denmark to Show their Most Valuable Possessions

ESPMI Network

billeder-af-flygtninges-vaerdigenstande-body-image-1453822437-size_1000On Tuesday, a majority vote in Denmark’s Parliament ratified an extensive tightening of Danish asylum laws in an attempt to make the country a less attractive destination for refugees and immigrants. Among other things, bill L87 extends the mandatory waiting period for the right to family reunification from one to three years, cuts asylum seekers’ financial support by 10 percent, and shortens residency permits for future seekers of asylum in Denmark. Importantly, the bill will also allow police officers to confiscate refugees’ valuables. This is in order to finance their stay in the country while they seek asylum.

That’s the part of the new law Danes have dubbed “The Jewellery Act”; it’s caused most of the international outrage surrounding the controversial new law. Denmark has not received this kind of attention since the newspaper Jyllands-Posten decided to publish cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad ten years ago. Just like back…

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The Challenges of Visible Migrant Settlement in Regional Australia

Glasgow Refugee Asylum and Migration Network (GRAMNet)

by David Radford

In November last year, David Radford and Louis Everuss from the Hawke-EU Centre for Mobilities, Migrations, and Cultural Transformations, Hawke Research Institute, University of South Australia visited GRAMNet. In this post, David, a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre, contributes a write up of a seminar paper he delivered, as well as some reflections on his time with GRAMNet.

The nature of Australia’s growing multicultural society requires individuals and communities to meaningful engage and negotiate with one another’s ‘differences and sameness”. Pardy and Lee have argued that increasing diverse communities living in the same physical location ‘is not something to be accepted, rejected or debated’, rather, ‘…it is a fact of life’ (Pardy and Lee, 2011 p. 300), influenced in no small part by globalisation and increased mobilities. Recent work into the nature of Australia’s multicultural society has investigated how diverse local and immigrant communities negotiate their…

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Female Genital Mutilation

Wellcome Trust Blog

Today is International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation. To mark the day watch our new audio slideshow which explores the stories behind some of the girls and women who have undergone this procedure or who themselves perform it on others. Find out why one woman voluntarily chose to have this done and what motivates some of the women who continue to perform this on others.

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is the intentional alteration or injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. It offers no medical benefit and yet in spite of being illegal in many countries is still widely practiced today. It is often performed on young girls and children for a variety of social, cultural and religious reasons and is internationally recognised as a violation of the human rights of girls and women.

Our audio slideshow is narrated by and features the work…

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Greek Soccer Players Stage Sit-In Protest To Honor Migrants And Refugees (Video)

ESPMI Network

At a soccer match in Larissa, Greece, on Friday, players on opposing teams showed true sportsmanship to stage a protest in solidarity with the migrants and refugees who died trying to reach their country.

After the referee blew the opening whistle, instead of starting the game, all 22 players on the pitch — as well as substitute players and coaches on the sidelines — from Greece’s second-division football clubs AEL Larissa and Acharnaikos, sat down in silence. Footage of the moment can be seen in the video above from Greece’s OTE Sports channel, which was distributed by the Guardian.

The crowds erupted into applause, and an announcer said the players would stage a two-minute sit-in protest “in an effort to drive the authorities to mobilize all those who seem to have been desensitized to the heinous crimes that are being perpetrated in the Aegean,” according to Reuters. (After the brief…

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The people of Lesbos, Kos, Chíos, Samos, Rhodes and Leros to be nominated for Nobel Peace Prize

ESPMI Network

12466228_1072471572784636_5217496923983594136_o The island of Lesbos makes a peace sign from life jackets. Image taken from Daily Read List (see credit at end of article)

Greek islanders who have been on the frontline of the refugee crisis are to be nominated for the Nobel peace prize with the support of their national government.

Of the 900,000 refugees who entered Europe last year most were received –scared, soaked and travelling in rickety boats – by those who live on the Greek islands in the Aegean Sea.

The islanders, including fishermen who gave up their work to rescue people from the sea, are in line to be honoured with one of the world’s most esteemed awards. Eminent academics from the universities of Oxford, Princeton, Harvard, Cornell and Copenhagen are drafting a submission in favour of awarding the prize to the people of Lesbos, Kos, Chíos, Samos, Rhodes and Leros.

The nomination deadline is…

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Foreign Policy – Refugees Don’t Need Your Pity

ESPMI Network

refugees

“Pity is condescension; it reeks of neocolonial paternalism. It denigrates, leaves no room for sympathy. It does not allow you to see that Ibrahima from Gambia has an endearing stutter. That Fili from Dakar is 19 years old, that he is training to be Senegal’s next wrestling champion, that his favorite breakfast is a po’boy with spaghetti, beans, murex, onions, and french fries. That Issa the Fulani misses his wife who is pregnant with their first child, or that he misses his cows.”

To read more: http://foreignpolicy.com/2016/01/26/refugees-dont-need-your-pity-migrants-dispossesed-senegal/

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A nation without a state? A brief history of Roma political movements

Postcards from ...

While doing some readings for a comparative article on statelessness among Roma, Palestinians and Kurds I found a fascinating paper that traces a concise history of how and where Roma organisations emerged and what goals they pursued. The article is by Elena Marushiakova and Vesselin Popov: http://mail.geobiz.net/sr-www/files/Virtual%20library/Nation.pdf

DiasporasReI have recently written on a small fragment of this history in Diasporas Reimagined where I discuss the Yugo-nostalgia of some of my Roma informants in Italy and Kosovo. The chapter is available here.

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Integration in turbulent contexts – CfP for IMISCOE Annual Conference

Postcards from ...

CALL FOR PAPERS: The Effects of External Shocks on Integration

IMISCOE Annual Conference, Prague 30 June – 2 July 2016

Workshop convened by the IMISCOE Research Initiative

“INTEGRATION IN TURBULENT CONTEXTS – Analysing the impact of exogenous factors on integration dynamics and intergroup relations”

The diffusion of the concept of integration in the field of migration studies was embedded in a specific historical contingency, marked by relatively continuous and sustained economic growth, and by relative geopolitical stability. Such key contextual aspects indirectly shaped theoretical approaches and research agenda-setting. In fact, in spite of a wide scholarly consensus on the reversible nature of integration, this fundamental assumption has seldom been developed into clear hypotheses and research paths.

Over the last decade, wider international dynamics have strongly impacted on migrants’ integration in European societies in various and unforeseen ways. Specifically, the global economic crisis and the highly mediatised and politicised ‘mixed’…

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Northwestern University Summer Institute: Refugee Protection and the Rights and Process of (Re)Settlement

ESPMI Network

CFMS

Northwestern University Center for Forced Migration Studies Summer Institute: Refugee Protection and the Rights and Process of (Re)Settlement, August 713, 2016

Apply Online: http://bit.ly/Si2016registration

The Northwestern Center for Forced Migration Studies at the Buffett Institute for Global Studies (CFMS) is pleased to announce that registration is now open for our 2016 Summer Institute: Refugee Protection and the Rights and Process of (Re)Settlement, August 713, 2016. The 2016 Summer Institute introduces participants to the resettlement process from identification and classification of refugee status to resettlement in a secondary country, with a particular focus on the United States. The week-long course begins by putting the U.S. Resettlement program in the broader framework of refugee protection and introduces students to local contexts of refugee settlement in the Global South. Through lectures, workshops and experiential learning, students will learn about transitions from host to (re)settlement country and then focus…

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2,647 of 4.5 million: Why is it so difficult for Syrian refugees to get into the U.S.?

ESPMI Network

24mag-24index-t_CA0-articleLarge

‘We aren’t the kind of family that sends our daughters to work,’’ Mahmoud al-Haj Ali told me one evening this fall. He’d just returned to the family’s dingy second-floor apartment in Aurora, Ill., from the warehouse where he and his 19-year-old daughter, Sham, sorted boxes. At work, Mahmoud tried to keep her in sight. ‘‘I saw how tired she was,’’ he continued. ‘‘It’s more than she can take.’’ Sham’s English classes provided only a shaky foundation in the language, and she struggled to negotiate basic conversations. Mahmoud also spoke little English — we were sitting with an interpreter — but he could manage the essential.Mahmoud work tomorrow, Mahmoud no work tomorrow, he said in self-parody. But he, too, was tired. He rolled up his sweatpants to reveal a swollen leg. In Syria, Mahmoud, 57, who once owned a flourishing locksmith business in the Emirates, would have…

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Steve Peers: The Draft Renegotiation Deal: EU Immigration Issues

UK Constitutional Law Association

Cross-posted from EU Law Analysis.

Steve PeersThis is the first in a series of blog posts about the draft deal on the renegotiation of the UK’s EU membership, tabled earlier today. I am starting with the critical issue of free movement of EU citizens (often referred to as ‘EU immigration’). Subsequent posts will be on the other substantive issues (competitiveness, Eurozone relations, sovereignty) and on the legal form of the deal.

The draft deal takes the form of six draft legal texts: a Decision of the EU Member States’ Heads of State and Government (the ‘draft Decision’); a Statement of the Heads of State and Government (which consists of a draft Council Decision); a Declaration by the European Council (which consists of the EU Member States’ Heads of State and Government, although when acting collectively they are legally distinct from the European Council): and three declarations by the Commission…

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A 2-Tier system in Canada: Syrian refugees arriving before and after Nov. 4th

ESPMI Network

refugee-loan-program If Boziaklian, seen above with his daughter Aline, and his family had arrived just a few months later, their costs would be covered by the federal government. (Marie Morrissey/CBC)

Syrians who arrived prior to Nov. 4 and refugees from other countries must cover flights, medical checks

By Laura Lynch, CBC NewsPosted: Jan 19, 2016 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Jan 19, 2016 1:50 PM ET

The first letter, dated Dec. 1, arrived before Christmas, while the second came just after the holiday. Both were from the government. Zouvik Baghjajian had been living in Canada for nearly five months by then, adjusting to her new life away from Syria.

She still could not get over how quiet it was near her new home, a tidy two-bedroom apartment in a suburban Toronto neighbourhood she shares with her husband and three children.

“Very peaceful. No bombs,” Baghjajian said.

The letters, though, had their own impact. They were notices from…

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4 migration-focused summer classes @ SOAS (scholarship opportunities)

ESPMI Network

SOAS-mastheadThis summer 2016, SOAS will be offering four, migration-focused summer courses, co-convened by leading academics in the field. Through a mixture of lectures, readings, discussions and activities, the courses will explore contemporary issues of

There are scholarship opportunities students may be able to take advantage of too. 

Please don’t hesitate to contact Sophie Dilley (sd31@soas.ac.uk ) if you have any questions, or get in touch directly with the Summer School Team (summerschool@soas.ac.uk)

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“I Came By Boat”: former refugee launches campaign to highlight migrant contribution

ESPMI Network

unnamed

By SBS Staff
9 DEC 2015 – 5:10 PM  UPDATED 11 DEC 2015 – 8:05 AM

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Remember, we defend refugees not because they are saints, but because they are human

Development and Human Rights

Take a random sample of a million British people, and you’re sure to come across some bad ones. Some rapists? Probably. Some sexists? Certainly. Among these million people are going to be fat people and thin people, tall people and short people, Left-wingers and right-wingers, Muslims, Christians, atheists, mothers, fathers, grandparents and everything in between. So it should come as little surprise to us that when Germany, at a time when everyone else was slamming doors and putting up fences, generously opened its borders to a million refugees, some of them turned out to be not very nice people. But according to right-wingers, this was a reality the Left had been willfully ignoring, an inconvenient truth disregarded because it didn’t suit our agenda. And they’d be right.

Take a look at any right-wing newspaper and you’re sure to find screaming headlines about foreigners who came to our land, stole our…

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New UK Immigration Rules: Will You be Affected?

ESPMI Network

d9609954-0c88-4b80-947c-7fa44a87186f-2060x1236

Non-EU migrants who have spent more than five years working in the country will be required to earn £35,000 per year or else face deportation, according to a policy that comes into effect in April next year. The policy, announced in 2012 by the home secretary Theresa May, has been criticised this week by the Royal College of Nursing. It predicted chaos in the health service, and urged the Home Office to add nursing to the list of occupations exempt from the rules and reconsider the salary threshold.

But nurses won’t be the only people affected by the changes. Migration figures published in May reveal migration for work from outside Europe rose by 24,000 to 68,000 in 2014, with nearly all coming on SKILLED WORK VISAS. £35,000 is a salary that won’t affect those working in finance or, for the most part, IT, but there are many other sectors with…

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The Kindertransport in Gloucester

Gloucestershire Archives

Kindertransport posterIn the nine months before the outbreak of the Second World War in September 1939, thousands of Jewish children were brough to Britain from Germany under the Kindertransport (children’s transport) programme.

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On migration, it’s “Free market? What free market?”

Development and Human Rights

In the modern world, political leaders queue up to wax lyrical about the wonders of the free market. Free markets, David Cameron tells us, improve “human wealth and happiness”, “lift people out of poverty” and even “promote morality”. Well isn’t that fantastic! The neoliberal ideology espoused by Cameron promotes the free market as the path to human salvation, where human wellbeing rests on the simple, unadulterated function of movement, trade and capital. Just try telling that to the “bunch of migrants” trapped in a living hell in the refugee camps at Calais or Dunkirk. Because within the bizarre neoliberal ideology stands an increasingly tense and untenable contradiction; if free markets are the magic bullet for human success and prosperity, why are we increasingly cracking down on the free movement of people?

Reports from the likes of the European Union have noted the many benefits migration can bring to developing…

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Case Preview: Rahmatullah v MoD and FCO

United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog

Nabbed by British forces in Iraq – where he was seeking work – in 2004 only to be handed over to the Americans and rendered to Bagram Airbase, Yunus Rahmatullah, a Pakistani national who grew up in the Gulf, was detained for a decade without charge until his release on 17 June 2014. He now lives in Quetta, once an idyllic colonial town that gained strategic importance during the Afghan war and thereafter quickly morphed into a hotbed of Islamic extremism. He is claiming damages in tort and under the Human Rights Act 1998 from the Ministry of Defence (MoD) and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO). In Rahmatullah (Respondent) v Ministry of Defence and another (Appellants) UKSC 2015/0002, the issue for Lord Neuberger, Lady Hale, Lord Mance, Lord Kerr, Lord Clarke, Lord Wilson, Lord Sumption is whether Rahmatullah’s claims in tort against the appellants in respect…

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Case Preview: Belhaj v Straw

United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog

Belhaj and another (Respondents) v Straw and others (Appellants) UKSC 2014/0264 concerns allegations by a former opponent of Colonel Gaddafi and his wife that they were abducted and unlawfully taken to Libya in February 2004 and were both allegedly detained and tortured in that country. Abdul-Hakim Belhaj, the first respondent, was detained until 23 March 2010 and alleges he was tortured and was sentenced to death following a flagrantly unfair trial. Fatima Boudchar, the second respondent, was released on 21 June 2004. The appellants – namely Jack Straw (ex-foreign secretary), Sir Mark Allen CMG (ex-director of Counter-Terrorism of the Secret Intelligence Service), the Secret Intelligence Service, the Security Service, the Attorney General, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Home Office – have denied liability in their defences and the issues in this appeal have arisen by way of preliminary issues of law. There is an…

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Greece faces being sealed off from Europe to stop migrant flow

Follow The Money

greece_3558215b

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/eu/12119799/Greece-threatened-with-expulsion-from-Schengen-free-movement-zone.html

Greece will have its borders effectively sealed off from the rest of the continent under plans to tackle the migrant crisis, European leaders proposed on Monday night.

The European Commission will consider plans that would see the frontier of the Schengen zone – the area which allows passport-free travel within Europe – moved north to exclude Greece.

The proposal came at a meeting of European leaders on Monday which also agreed to draw up plans to allow internal border checks in Europe for up to two years, effectively suspending the Schengen zone.

There were calls for Greece to set up vast holding camps for 300,000 refugees in an attempt to stem the flow of unchecked migrants from Syria and other nations outside Europe entering the continent.

At the summit in Amsterdam, Theresa May, the Home Secretary, accused her counterparts of doing nothing to stem the crisis that now threatens…

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Denmark migration law: a sign of things to come?

Postcards from ...

Al Jazeera’s Inside Story (27 Jan) on Denmark adopting law on seizure of asylum seeker assets. Guests: Ramazan Salman – Director of the support group ‘Migrants for Migrants’, Irene Zugasti – Co-author of the report ‘Civil Society Responses to the Refugee Crisis’, and me.

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Dutch anti-refugee racists on trial

Dear Kitty. Some blog

This 10 October 2015 Dutch TV video is about the anti-refugee violence in Woerden on 9 October 2015.

Dutch NOS TV reports today about the trial of the refugee-hating men who on 9 October 2015 violently attacked the refugee center in Woerden.

In the hall were 148 refugees, including 51 children; mainly from war zones in Syria. The refugee families were extremely shocked, as the firebomb and other incendiary device explosions of the attack brought back traumatic memories from these war zones.

The perpetrators, about 25 masked men, were not from Woerden. Many of them were from Montfoort, members of the group ‘Our Montfoort free from refugees’. Some of them had been convicted for violent crimes before. The Internet messages of that group included stuff like: ‘Kill the Muslims. Dirty unclean whore-like people.’ On the day of the attack on the refugee…

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Speculation, misinformation and lies, they said. ‘Speak to Legenda and Pomost for facts’, they said.

conflict antiquities

In the discussion about the Nazi War Diggers’ Battlefield Recovery, one of the under-currents – or counter-currents – was a defence of the programme. Any search of #NaziWarDiggers or #BattlefieldRecovery will show that those defences were few and far between. And the knowledge and motives of even those few defenders were sometimes questionable.

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For Exiles In Turkey, Syrian Eateries Offer Taste Of Better Times

ESPMI Network

Abu Mohammed, the owner of Sultan Kesap restaurant in the Southern Turkish city of Reyhanli, debones a lamb for meat. His butcher shop/eatery provides his displaced countrymen with culinary reminders of home during better days. Nish Nalbandian Abu Mohammed, the owner of Sultan Kesap restaurant in the Southern Turkish city of Reyhanli, debones a lamb for meat. His butcher shop/eatery provides his displaced countrymen with culinary reminders of home during better days.
Nish Nalbandian

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Refugee contractor (IRC) criticized in Huffington Post story as Syrian refugee pleads for more $$$

Refugee Resettlement Watch

This lengthy story in the Huffington Post is a must-read for everyone seriously looking into how the UN/US State Department Refugee Admissions Program works in your community.  But, just please ignore the fact that it is a blatant pitch for refugees to receive MORE OF YOUR TAX DOLLARS!

The article begins (Ho hum! according to Journalism 101) with a sob story about a recently arrived Syrian refugee family resettled in California.  The star-of-the-story’s time in jail in Syria sounds improbable to me, but only he will ever know if it’s a truthful account.

Miliband and Hillary eating David Miliband, bff Hillary, is the CEO of the IRC which takes in approximately $350 million in government grants and contracts annually. Surely they don’t need to take $875 from every man, woman and child they resettle. Doesn’t sound charitable to me! But, gotta keep the bigwigs in 6-digit salaries!

However, this is the part of the…

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How host countries can improve their resilience to refugee flows?

ForumAsile

Large scale involuntary migration is, according to the Global Risks Report 2016 of the World Economic Forum, the most important concern of developping countries for the next 18 months.

As Sara Pantuliano stresses States should not only look at the risks refugees might pose for the economies and societies of host countries, but also at the potential benefits they can bring.

Evidence shows that, if refugees are given sufficient support and investment, they can make significant social and economic contributions to their host countries. Countries can become better able to cope with mass refugee flows by nurturing refugees’ economic contribution and supporting their integration into host societies.

How is it possible for host countries to improve their resilience to mass refugee flows? First, by recognizing the substantial social and economic contribution refugees can make to their host societies, “support for refugees, particularly support for integration, should be seen as an investment for…

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Beyhayai On Wheels

Hafsa Khawaja's Blog

*Originally posted on the Dawn Blogs:

The Punjab government’s Women on Wheels programme was initiated this 10th by a rally of 150 women trained by the Special Monitoring Unit on Law & Order and City Traffic Police.

According to a report in the Daily Times:

“The campaign is aimed at increasing women mobility and presence in public spaces by providing them free lessons in motorbike driving,” said PML-N MNA Maiza Hameed. “The Chief Minister’s Special Monitoring Unit (SMU) had launched this campaign for educating the women of Punjab against harassment and violence,” she said, adding that the campaign involved workshops to provide women with free motorcycle lessons and also to educate them on their role in society. “Women from all walks of life are invited to ride motorcycles on a pre-specified road,” Hameed said.

The WoW programme took off but not without condemnations on social media littered mainly with…

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Banksy uses new artwork to criticise use of teargas in Calais refugee camp

Feminist Philosophers

The artwork is here. I watched the video below until it was clear there was tear gas (or some sort of gas). I don’t especially recommend watching it all the way through, though I don’t know how bad it got.

Did anyone know that tear gas was being used? A police spokesperson says it wasn’t. One wishes such spokespeople were kept more in the picture. From the Guardian:

The work is the latest in a series of pieces by the graffiti artist criticising Europe’s handling of the ongoing refugee crisis. It is a direct comment on the recent attempts by French authorities to bulldoze part of the camp in Calais – which has now been deemed unsafe – and evict about 1,500 refugees.

Speaking to the Guardian last week, a police spokesperson, Steve Barbet, denied that teargas was being used to clear the camps. “It’s not in our interest to…

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‘No more Jungle, no more borders’ – a report from Calais refugee protest

rs21

On Saturday 23 January, residents of the Calais refugee camp protested the destruction of the their shelters and the French government’s attempts to forcibly move them into new accommodation, described by many as a ‘prison’ or ‘concentration camp’. Duncan Thomas reports.

DSCN3373

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Record numbers of migrants apply for asylum in Japan – but they accept just 27 PEOPLE

~~Defender of Faith~Guardian of Truth~~

A RECORD number of migrants applied for asylum in Japan last year – but the country accepted just 27 people.

Japan-refugee-crisis-asylum-seekers-637465Japan accepted just 11 refugees out of 5,000 applicants in 2014

Fewer than one per cent of the 7,586 would-be refugees were allowed entry – and many of them could have been waiting for years.

Most of them came from Nepal, followed by Indonesia and Turkey, according to official data.

Authorities approved six Afghans, three Syrians, three Ethiopians and three Sri Lankans last year.

Japan, which has a population of 127 million, has one of the world’s strictest refugee systems and accepted just 11 people out of 5,000 applicants in 2014.

Japan refugee protestsJapan has faced protests over its policy on refugees

Meanwhile EU countries let in about 185,000 asylum seekers in the same period.

The Japan Association for Refugees said: “We hope that (Japan) will hold discussions with UNHCR and NGOs…

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New Journal Research Articles for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (weekly) (weekly)

  • “Human rights have become ubiquitous; it is feared that consequently they have become meaningless – claimed by any and every political actor seeking the moral high ground. The authors in these volumes, in their varied ways, show that the radical and critical potential of human rights is not exhausted by their contemporary institutionalization, or their instrumentalized appropriation.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In this article we describe and analyse the Swedish reception of unaccompanied refugee children and efforts to promote their integration into Swedish society. We identify the actors involved in the reception and promotion of the children’s integration and investigate their efforts through the lens of social ecological systems theory. We show that reception is fraught with challenges that concern lack of interconnections between actors, lack of an articulated political vision of integration and absence of systematic evaluations and long-term follow-ups of how the reception affects integration.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “There is a dearth of information pertaining to experiences that refugee children encounter on a journey to the host country (transmigration). This study is a presentation of transmigration experiences of Zimbabwean refugee children from their home country to South Africa. The study was guided by the following critical questions: What were refugee children’s transmigration experiences from Zimbabwe to South Africa, and why did they have those experiences? Kunz’s kinetic model of refugee flight and settlement was used as a theoretical framework. Informed by the paradigmatic position of interpretivism, the study was done using a qualitative case study of a school of refugees in South Africa. Twelve refugee children and four parents/guardians were purposively selected to participate in semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions. Data was analysed using content analysis. The study found that transmigration is a relatively major life event that is characterised by perilous and harrowing experiences to children. It is concluded that due to traumatising transmigration experiences that refugee children encounter, pseudo and fluid identities develop.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The assimilation of immigrant workers to the Spanish labour market is a topic widely addressed by the economic literature. However, a little explored issue is the time allocation of immigrants and its effects on their integration and convergence to Spanish workers. This paper aims to study the time use of immigrants among different activities and the influence of personal and family characteristics on the participation and the amount of time spent in each activity. The results will be compared to those obtained for the native workers, in order to detect possible similarities and differences between both groups (immigrants versus natives). The data used come from the Time Use Survey for the periods 2002–2003 and 2009–2010 (INE, 2004, 2011), which allows analysing the evolution of the time use’s patterns of the immigrant and native workers at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Censored regression models are applied because the time spent in different activities is a left-truncated variable. The traditional approximation to the left-truncation is a Tobit model, but it assumes that the underlying process determining the participation and the time spent in each activity are similar, which is quite restrictive. To solve this restriction, a double hurdle model is applied.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In the aftermath of the Sierra Leone civil war, demobilized militia soldiers have become an attractive resource to private security companies. Based on extensive ethnographic fieldwork, this article traces the outsourcing of security at American military bases in Iraq to Sierra Leonean ex-militias, facilitated by a British security company and the Sierra Leone government. In doing so, the article contributes to the ongoing scholarly debate on the privatization of security by offering a “local” ethnographically informed perspective on the micro-dynamics of “global” security. It is argued that the supply of global security depends on a form of local immobility: on a population that is “stuck”, yet constantly on the move to seize opportunities for survival and recognition. Structured by a chronological account of the recruitment, deployment, and deportation of Sierra Leonean ex-militias, the article discusses how these former militia soldiers experience being reduced to mere bodies rather than recognized labourers. It concludes that notions of race and slavery are employed by the ex-militias to make sense of their predicaments, but most notably as a moral response to the unequal relationships in which they find themselves embedded, in the context of security outsourcing in a global economy. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Abstract: Immigration continues to be on the forefront of the policy debate on both sides of the Atlantic. A number of reforms of permanent and guest-worker (GW) immigration programs are being considered, and the temporary movement of service providers under Mode IV (GATS) is being negotiated at the Doha Round of the WTO. This paper contributes to the debate by examining these programs in a model where the host country government maximises its objective function with respect to three policy instruments: the share of migrants’ deferred income payment, the value of the bond employers must post and forfeit if GWs overstay, and the size of the program. Circular migration and illegal GWs’ status regularisation are considered. The paper shows that: 1) the optimal value of the bond is zero; 2) Mode IV is preferable to GW migration; 3) the optimal policy package consists of Mode IV and permanent migration; 4) incorporating circular migration improves the policy package. Additional policy implications are also provided.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The impact of migration on population growth has become a ubiquitous argument in UK immigration debates, leading to the introduction of immigration restrictions to reduce net migration and prevent the UK population from reaching 70 million. Taking the UK as a case study, this article assesses the rationale for setting a national net migration target as a pivotal point for migration policies and the feasibility of limiting net migration using immigration controls. A framework for analysing the effects of migration policies on net migration is proposed and applied to UK official migration data. The results show that, due to various policy constraints, competing objectives and unintended feedbacks, it is neither optimal nor entirely feasible to prioritize a reduction of net migration as a target for migration policies. Nevertheless, factoring net migration into the migration policy debate provides useful insights on the long-term implications of migration policies in the context of broader demographic changes.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Based on empirical research conducted in Albania, this article reports that educational experience and performance, and hence, integration of the children of (returned) migrants in their parents’ homeland is obstructed by structural factors linked to the educational system. A finding such as this challenges the centrality of an essentialized notion of ethnicity in models of “second generation” integration and evidences the centrality of the nation-state, and the education system as one of its pillars, in the integration of migrants and their children. Comparative integration context theory appears to apply to the integration of children of returned migrants; yet it needs to take into account the mobile lives of migrants and their children, the transnational disjuncture between different educational systems, and the role of locality within the nation-state. Moreover, including children in analyses of integration, in the context of education, calls for the inclusion of life-course and scale in integration theories.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Founded in 1974, the Carolina Gay Association (CGA) was the first gay rights group at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and one of the first in the American South. This article traces the history of the CGA during the 1970s and early 1980s as a predominantly white organization that advocated for gay rights on campus and across the region. It also demonstrates how oral history exposes the many ways people remember their sexuality during their formative years at college. People were not simply out or not—there was a wide spectrum of outness. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Research on internal migration within and between countries has been dominated by the search for patterns and causes, and while more attention is being paid to the consequences of such movement, only recently has attention shifted to the migrants’ own appraisal of their move. Most models of migration are predicated on the reasonable assumption that migrants will not move voluntarily unless they believe they are going to be better off. It is a big step, however, to then assume that all or even most migrants end up better off. Outcome measures such as wages and income typically show substantial variation around a positive average improvement and a minority typically result in losses. The relatively new body of literature on post-move satisfaction draws attention to the fact that returns to moving can be measured in subjective as well as objective terms and these two reveal considerable variation as to the success of changing where one lives. In this paper we use a unique survey of individuals moving within New Zealand to model the variation in subjective returns to moves both within and between local labour markets (using the attributes of movers and the moves themselves as arguments). “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Motivated by recent debates in the media on multiculturalism and national identities, this paper examines the question of whether identity is just a ‘label’ or whether it matters in affecting outcomes, such as education, employment or political orientation. We begin with an empirical investigation of identity formation, with a focus on parental investment in their child’s identity, and use this to understand the impact of the child’s own identity on own outcomes, a generation later. Our results suggest that identity does not have a significant effect on education, employment and political orientation, thus suggesting that a strong ethnic/ religious minority identity does not constrain the second generation or hamper socio-economic integration. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) herald a new phase for international development. This article presents the results of a consultative exercise to collaboratively identify 100 research questions of critical importance for the post-2015 international development agenda. The final shortlist is grouped into nine thematic areas and was selected by 21 representatives of international and non-governmental organisations and consultancies, and 14 academics with diverse disciplinary expertise from an initial pool of 704 questions submitted by 110 organisations based in 34 countries. The shortlist includes questions addressing long-standing problems, new challenges and broader issues related to development policies, practices and institutions. Collectively, these questions are relevant for future development-related research priorities of governmental and non-governmental organisations worldwide and could act as focal points for transdisciplinary research collaborations.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The deaths and destruction stemming from a disaster are traumatic enough to implicate victims’ beliefs not only about disasters themselves but also about other social and political concerns. In particular, disasters are associated with the scapegoating of out-groups, suggesting that even deep-rooted moral concerns may shift, at least temporarily, after disasters. This study uses exposure to local natural disaster fatalities to examine moral judgements regarding gays1 in United States surveys from 1984–98. Survey respondents whose county has suffered a disaster feel appreciably more negatively towards gays, even though most of the disasters in this data set are relatively small and local. The increased antipathy towards gays dissipates within months, and is most marked among those who had, before the disaster, considered themselves more religious. These results raise the possibility that some groups, especially those already marginalised by society, may suffer in a backlash in the wake of a natural disaster.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Using unique data from Hungary, the gap in reading and mathematics test scores between Roma and non-Roma 8th grade students is assessed and a substantial gap between them revealed. Standardized test scores as well as the fraction of students with competences considered inadequate are examined. Regardless of measurement and subject area, the bulk of the gap is explained by social differences in income, wealth and parental education. Using reduced-form regressions, two major mediating mechanisms are identified: first, on average the home environment of Roma children is less favourable for cognitive development; second, the educational environment of the average Roma student is different from the average non-Roma student. Comparing students with similar home environments from the same school and class, the ethnic gap in test scores is found to be insignificant. Ethnic differences in the home environment are explained by social disparity, and ethnicity seems to play no additional role in that regard. The unequal distribution of Roma students in schools and classes is found to be explained predominantly by social difference, too, with a significant residual portion, indicating the effect of ethnic segregation.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In this article, we develop conceptual tools for analysing the practices of children’s rights organizations and professionals as transnational citizenship. To this end, we set out to trace a continuum of citizenship practices in which global and local influences and forces enmesh in ways that are difficult to grasp when treated as two separate realms. To theorize the social dynamism and spatial constitution of transnational citizenship as a local–global continuum, we turn to Bourdieu’s field theory. By analysing the Committee on the Rights of the Child’s handling of the Finnish Periodic Report on children’s rights, and how Finnish children’s rights advocates mobilize its recommendations, we show that transnational citizenship in the field of children’s rights is practised not merely ‘out there’ but also ‘right here’. We conclude by discussing what novel insights field theory has to offer to the study of advocacy practices as transnational citizenship.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

‘Would he disapprove of my single heathen lifestyle?’: me and my Syrian refugee lodger

ESPMI Network

Helen and Yasser eat their separate breakfasts. Photograph: Christopher Thomond for the Guardian Helen and Yasser eat their separate breakfasts. Photograph: Christopher Thomond for the Guardian

“You are not going to like me saying this,” my dad said, “but you need to get a lock on your bedroom door and a lock on your bathroom door. Men can get very frisky when they are away from their wives.”

I rolled my eyes, hung up and panicked. I’d rung my parents to tell them that Yasser, a Syrian refugee, was coming to live with me while he arranged for his wife and baby to join him in Britain. I was a little nervous about the arrangement, but of all the many things worrying me – would he disapprove of my single heathen lifestyle? Could I carry on having bacon butties at the weekend? Should I edit my drinks cupboard? – the possibility of getting molested by my lodger had yet to occur to me.

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On the Rebirth of Hybrid Tribunals

Justice in Conflict

Judges at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon look over a model of the area of Beirut where former Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri was assassinated (Photo: STL) Judges at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon look over a model of the area of Beirut where former Prime Minister Rafic Hariri was assassinated (Photo: STL)

International criminal justice is an emerging marketplace. It has a diversity of stakeholders, different ‘business’ models, and is based, like all markets, on supply and demand — although demand clearly and vastly outstrips supply. Something of a political economy of international criminal justice is developing and a growing number of observers and scholars are concluding that no tribunal type can or should have a monopoly over the provision of international accountability.

In this context, I have recently written about renewed interest of hybrid international criminal tribunals. In broad terms, such tribunals (as well as ad hoc courts more generally) have been justified on the basis that they can act as stop-gaps for the short-comings of the International Criminal Court (ICC). Because the ICC can’t…

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New Journal Research Articles for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 01/22/2016

  • “In the aftermath of the Sierra Leone civil war, demobilized militia soldiers have become an attractive resource to private security companies. Based on extensive ethnographic fieldwork, this article traces the outsourcing of security at American military bases in Iraq to Sierra Leonean ex-militias, facilitated by a British security company and the Sierra Leone government. In doing so, the article contributes to the ongoing scholarly debate on the privatization of security by offering a “local” ethnographically informed perspective on the micro-dynamics of “global” security. It is argued that the supply of global security depends on a form of local immobility: on a population that is “stuck”, yet constantly on the move to seize opportunities for survival and recognition. Structured by a chronological account of the recruitment, deployment, and deportation of Sierra Leonean ex-militias, the article discusses how these former militia soldiers experience being reduced to mere bodies rather than recognized labourers. It concludes that notions of race and slavery are employed by the ex-militias to make sense of their predicaments, but most notably as a moral response to the unequal relationships in which they find themselves embedded, in the context of security outsourcing in a global economy. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Abstract: Immigration continues to be on the forefront of the policy debate on both sides of the Atlantic. A number of reforms of permanent and guest-worker (GW) immigration programs are being considered, and the temporary movement of service providers under Mode IV (GATS) is being negotiated at the Doha Round of the WTO. This paper contributes to the debate by examining these programs in a model where the host country government maximises its objective function with respect to three policy instruments: the share of migrants’ deferred income payment, the value of the bond employers must post and forfeit if GWs overstay, and the size of the program. Circular migration and illegal GWs’ status regularisation are considered. The paper shows that: 1) the optimal value of the bond is zero; 2) Mode IV is preferable to GW migration; 3) the optimal policy package consists of Mode IV and permanent migration; 4) incorporating circular migration improves the policy package. Additional policy implications are also provided.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The impact of migration on population growth has become a ubiquitous argument in UK immigration debates, leading to the introduction of immigration restrictions to reduce net migration and prevent the UK population from reaching 70 million. Taking the UK as a case study, this article assesses the rationale for setting a national net migration target as a pivotal point for migration policies and the feasibility of limiting net migration using immigration controls. A framework for analysing the effects of migration policies on net migration is proposed and applied to UK official migration data. The results show that, due to various policy constraints, competing objectives and unintended feedbacks, it is neither optimal nor entirely feasible to prioritize a reduction of net migration as a target for migration policies. Nevertheless, factoring net migration into the migration policy debate provides useful insights on the long-term implications of migration policies in the context of broader demographic changes.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Based on empirical research conducted in Albania, this article reports that educational experience and performance, and hence, integration of the children of (returned) migrants in their parents’ homeland is obstructed by structural factors linked to the educational system. A finding such as this challenges the centrality of an essentialized notion of ethnicity in models of “second generation” integration and evidences the centrality of the nation-state, and the education system as one of its pillars, in the integration of migrants and their children. Comparative integration context theory appears to apply to the integration of children of returned migrants; yet it needs to take into account the mobile lives of migrants and their children, the transnational disjuncture between different educational systems, and the role of locality within the nation-state. Moreover, including children in analyses of integration, in the context of education, calls for the inclusion of life-course and scale in integration theories.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Founded in 1974, the Carolina Gay Association (CGA) was the first gay rights group at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and one of the first in the American South. This article traces the history of the CGA during the 1970s and early 1980s as a predominantly white organization that advocated for gay rights on campus and across the region. It also demonstrates how oral history exposes the many ways people remember their sexuality during their formative years at college. People were not simply out or not—there was a wide spectrum of outness. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Research on internal migration within and between countries has been dominated by the search for patterns and causes, and while more attention is being paid to the consequences of such movement, only recently has attention shifted to the migrants’ own appraisal of their move. Most models of migration are predicated on the reasonable assumption that migrants will not move voluntarily unless they believe they are going to be better off. It is a big step, however, to then assume that all or even most migrants end up better off. Outcome measures such as wages and income typically show substantial variation around a positive average improvement and a minority typically result in losses. The relatively new body of literature on post-move satisfaction draws attention to the fact that returns to moving can be measured in subjective as well as objective terms and these two reveal considerable variation as to the success of changing where one lives. In this paper we use a unique survey of individuals moving within New Zealand to model the variation in subjective returns to moves both within and between local labour markets (using the attributes of movers and the moves themselves as arguments). “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Motivated by recent debates in the media on multiculturalism and national identities, this paper examines the question of whether identity is just a ‘label’ or whether it matters in affecting outcomes, such as education, employment or political orientation. We begin with an empirical investigation of identity formation, with a focus on parental investment in their child’s identity, and use this to understand the impact of the child’s own identity on own outcomes, a generation later. Our results suggest that identity does not have a significant effect on education, employment and political orientation, thus suggesting that a strong ethnic/ religious minority identity does not constrain the second generation or hamper socio-economic integration. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) herald a new phase for international development. This article presents the results of a consultative exercise to collaboratively identify 100 research questions of critical importance for the post-2015 international development agenda. The final shortlist is grouped into nine thematic areas and was selected by 21 representatives of international and non-governmental organisations and consultancies, and 14 academics with diverse disciplinary expertise from an initial pool of 704 questions submitted by 110 organisations based in 34 countries. The shortlist includes questions addressing long-standing problems, new challenges and broader issues related to development policies, practices and institutions. Collectively, these questions are relevant for future development-related research priorities of governmental and non-governmental organisations worldwide and could act as focal points for transdisciplinary research collaborations.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The deaths and destruction stemming from a disaster are traumatic enough to implicate victims’ beliefs not only about disasters themselves but also about other social and political concerns. In particular, disasters are associated with the scapegoating of out-groups, suggesting that even deep-rooted moral concerns may shift, at least temporarily, after disasters. This study uses exposure to local natural disaster fatalities to examine moral judgements regarding gays1 in United States surveys from 1984–98. Survey respondents whose county has suffered a disaster feel appreciably more negatively towards gays, even though most of the disasters in this data set are relatively small and local. The increased antipathy towards gays dissipates within months, and is most marked among those who had, before the disaster, considered themselves more religious. These results raise the possibility that some groups, especially those already marginalised by society, may suffer in a backlash in the wake of a natural disaster.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Using unique data from Hungary, the gap in reading and mathematics test scores between Roma and non-Roma 8th grade students is assessed and a substantial gap between them revealed. Standardized test scores as well as the fraction of students with competences considered inadequate are examined. Regardless of measurement and subject area, the bulk of the gap is explained by social differences in income, wealth and parental education. Using reduced-form regressions, two major mediating mechanisms are identified: first, on average the home environment of Roma children is less favourable for cognitive development; second, the educational environment of the average Roma student is different from the average non-Roma student. Comparing students with similar home environments from the same school and class, the ethnic gap in test scores is found to be insignificant. Ethnic differences in the home environment are explained by social disparity, and ethnicity seems to play no additional role in that regard. The unequal distribution of Roma students in schools and classes is found to be explained predominantly by social difference, too, with a significant residual portion, indicating the effect of ethnic segregation.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In this article, we develop conceptual tools for analysing the practices of children’s rights organizations and professionals as transnational citizenship. To this end, we set out to trace a continuum of citizenship practices in which global and local influences and forces enmesh in ways that are difficult to grasp when treated as two separate realms. To theorize the social dynamism and spatial constitution of transnational citizenship as a local–global continuum, we turn to Bourdieu’s field theory. By analysing the Committee on the Rights of the Child’s handling of the Finnish Periodic Report on children’s rights, and how Finnish children’s rights advocates mobilize its recommendations, we show that transnational citizenship in the field of children’s rights is practised not merely ‘out there’ but also ‘right here’. We conclude by discussing what novel insights field theory has to offer to the study of advocacy practices as transnational citizenship.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.