CFP – Oxford Monitor of Forced Migration, Vol 5 No 1

Originally posted on ESPMI Network:

CALL FOR PAPERS:
Oxford Monitor of Forced Migration, Vol. 5, No. 1
Deadline: 1st May 2015 (Friday)

OxMo, the student journal dedicated to protecting and advancing the human rights of refugees and forced migrants, is accepting submissions for our eighth issue. We welcome articles fitting within the following sections.

For further information about the different sections and to review our style guidelines, please visit http://oxmofm.com/submissions/ To receive email alerts when OxMo publishes a new issue, please complete the following form: http://oxmofm.com/subscribe-to-oxmo/

OxMo Monitors:
Policy Monitor: critically examines policies and practices implemented by governments, (I)NGOs and UN agencies in all phases of forced migration. Please submit topolicyeditor.oxmofm@googlemail.com.

Law Monitor: critically analyses national and international laws, rulings and governmental policies as well as legal developments taking shape and their possible implications for the rights of forced migrants. Please submit to laweditor.oxmofm@googlemail.com

Field Monitor: critically explores direct experiences of…

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Publication: Migrant Voice Newspaper

Further details on the latest issue of the Migrant Voice Newspaper.  The following text is taken from the Migrant Voice website:

The Migrant Voice newspaper will be distributed on Monday April 20th in Birmingham from 3-6pm at Moor Street station; in London on Tuesday the 21st from 4-7pm at Waterloo, Victoria and London Bridge stations and on April 28th from 4-7pm at Kings Cross, Euston, Oxford Circus and Paddington stations.

_____

Immigration is high on the news agenda and is being presented by some politicians as a burden on the country, feeding fears and fuelling prejudice. There are 7.8 million foreignborn nationals in the UK but they are largely underrepresented in mainstream British media.

Our research reveals that migrants’ voices are heard in only one in eight media stories on migration. Many of these articles reflect critical, sometimes explicitly negative, attitudes – not only towards migration policies but also migrants themselves.

Far from the idea that debating migration is off-limits, it turns out that the only people ‘banned’ from discussing it are migrants themselves.

Here, we place migrants at the centre of the debate and let them tell their stories.

We found that over 90 per cent of migrants feel at least partially integrated into British society yet feel totally excluded from the political conversation about migration. When politicians make ill-informed comments it creates distrust on both sides. Yet – thankfully – the vast majority of Britons feel positive about the migrants they encounter in their daily lives, and the feeling is mutual.

Migrant Voice aims to address the lack of balanced and accurate representation in the media and celebrate the contribution migrants make to the UK. Our paper includes vibrant, engaging and moving stories, created and distributed by migrants.

This year’s issue is particularly important as it coincides with Migrant Voice celebrating five years of movement building, mobilisation and engagement with the public debate.

In this issue we unveil a new ‘I am an Immigrant’ poster campaign which celebrates the immense contribution that immigrants make.

The posters, which go on display at hundreds of London tube stations and national railway stations this month, show immigrants are part of the fabric of British society.

We are also the first to report on the launch of the ‘Bloody Foreigners’ campaign mobilising migrant communities to give more blood, turning an old phrase on its head. It’s just one of the many ways today’s migrants are contributing to the health and wealth of our nation.

We give you a glimpse into the strong North Korean community in the UK, the largest defector community from that country in Europe.

We also take you on two long, horrifying journeys from Syria and Eritrea in search of safety in the UK.

And we share the inspirational story of Agnes, an orphan of the Rwandan genocide and a former child soldier, who is now settled in the UK and is campaigning to improve the lives of other children orphaned by war.

There are also stories about the everyday lives of migrants in Britain – in restaurants, on the sports field, in the arts, in business.

Many more stories are featured on our website www.migrantvoice.org.

We also want to hear your thoughts – write to us at [email protected]

We hope you enjoy reading our paper.

Nazek Ramadan Founder, Migrant Voice

To read the full paper: http://bit.ly/1GYTI9M

To request printed copies of the paper, please email [email protected]

News: Daily Telegraph (UK) – Mapped: The World’s Immigration Landscape

News:

Daily Telegraph (UK) – Mapped: The World’s Immigration Landscape

As part of the media frenzy associated with the build up to the UK General Election on the 7 May, the Daily Telegraph has posted the following article entitled, “Mapped: the world’s immigration landscape.”

Using statistical data from the United Nations, an interactive map of world migration has been produced and is available via the afull article link at the end of this post.

The article highlights some very interesting statistics in relation to the current immigration landscape with the UK, especially in light of some of the anti-immigration rhetoric to be heard sections of the party election rhetoric so far. Just by way of example, the article highlights that “In 2013, Germany and Russia had more international migrants that the UK.” In its reporting of the UN figures, the article also indicates that between 2010 and 2013, the numbers of refugee “stock” within the UK had fallen from 238,150 to 193,510 refugees.

Full details on this story can be found as follows:

The Daily Telegraph: `Mapped: the world’s immigration landscape.’ By Raziye Akkoc, 14 April 2015.

Palestine’s Accession to the ICC May Strengthen Peace-first not Rights-based Approach

Originally posted on Justice in Conflict:

With the fourth contribution to JiC’s ongoing symposium on Palestine and the International Criminal Court (ICC), we are thrilled to welcome Leslie Vinjamuri. Leslie is a Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in International Relations and the Co-Director of the Centre for the International Politics of Conflict, Rights and Justice at SOAS, University of London.

(Photo: Mohammed Salem / Reuters) (Photo: Mohammed Salem / Reuters)

The prospect of the International Criminal Court (ICC) becoming mired in politics has been an ongoing concern for its supporters – and one that is not without just cause. Politics have shaped states’ trysts with international justice since long before negotiations in Rome. Palestine’s recent decision to join the ICC has reignited the passions and interests that infuse debates among civil society, international human rights advocates, and governments about the role of the ICC in ongoing conflicts. References to accountability and justice have figured surprisingly little in the official responses by…

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Nari Diganta denounces the heinous act of sexual harassment of girls and young women in Dhaka

Originally posted on Nari Diganta:

Bangladesh Government Must Take the Responsibility to Apprehend the Perpetrators

Rumana Hashem

In the evening of 14 April, during the celebration of Bangla New Year 1422, called Pohel Boishak, several young girls and women were attacked by a group of rapists who took possessions of women’s bodies by forcing them to be naked at the Dhaka University premise in the capital city of Dhaka. While the act of violence against these women was just less what we call rape in the West, the ferocity of the sexual assault was beyond account. The outrageous act of sexual harassment of young women in public went on for about two hours, near the gate of Teachers and Students’ Centre (TSC) and the Suhrawardy Udyan (the historical Suhrawardy Garden in Dhaka), known as a premise of the country’s progressive people. During the vicious incidence, a group of progressive students belonging to a left…

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Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 04/17/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 04/17/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

ToC Alert: Latest issue of Torture Journal is out (Vol. 25, Nr 1, 2015)

The latest issue is now available online. Access all articles free-of-charge at www.irct.org/torture-journal.

Journal on Rehabilitation of Torture Victims and Prevention of Torture

Volume 25, Nr. 1, 2015

Contents:

Follow-up study of the treatment outcomes at a psychiatric trauma clinic for refugees
Cæcilie Buhmann, Erik Lykke Mortensen, Merete Nordentoft, Jasmina Ryberg, Morten Ekstrøm

Cognitive behavioral psychotherapeutic treatment at a psychiatric trauma clinic for Refugees: description and evaluation
Cæcilie Buhmann, Ida Andersen, Erik Lykke Mortensen, Jasmina Ryberg, Merete Nordentoft, Morten Ekstrøm

“After all the traumas my body has been through, I feel good that it is still working.” – Basic Body Awareness Therapy for traumatised refugees
Kajsa Stade, Signe Skammeritz, Charlotte Hjortkjær, Jessica Carlsson

The DSM 5 and the Istanbul Protocol: Diagnosis of psychological sequels of torture
Thomas Wenzel, Andreas Frewer, Siroos Mirzaei

Statement on Virginity Testing
Independent Forensic Expert Group

Migration Studies journal Table of Contents for March 1, 2015; Vol. 3, No. 1

Oxford Journals have published the latest table of contents alert for the Migration Studies journal.  Further details of the articles included in Vol. 3, No. 1
March 2015 are available as follows:

Articles

Expatriate voting and migrants’ place of residence: Explaining transnational participation in Colombian elections
Cristina Escobar, Renelinda Arana, and James A. McCann
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 1-31
[Abstract]

Migrants’ acquisition of cultural skills and selective immigration policies
Moritz Bonn
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 32-48
[Abstract]

Travellers and their journeys: A dynamic conceptualization of transient migrants’ and backpackers’ behaviour and experiences on the road
Joris Schapendonk, Ilse van Liempt, and Bas Spierings
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 49-67
[Abstract]

Legal consciousness as a form of social remittance? Studying return migrants’ everyday practices of legality in Ukraine
Agnieszka Kubal
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 68-88
[Abstract]

Modeling internal migration flows in sub-Saharan Africa using census microdata
Andres J. Garcia, Deepa K. Pindolia, Kenneth K. Lopiano, and Andrew J. Tatem
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 89-110
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Supplementary Data] OPEN ACCESS

Across a divide: Cosmopolitanism, genre, and crossover among immigrant Moroccan musicians in contemporary Andalusia
Brian Karl
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 111-130
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Research Note

The emerging New Zealand jurisprudence on climate change, disasters and displacement
Jane McAdam
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 131-142
[Abstract]

Review Essay

Visualising migration: Online tools for taking us beyond the static map
Adam Dennett
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 143-152
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

 

Table of Contents Alert Special Issue: The Role of International Organizations and Human Rights Monitoring Bodies in Refugee Protection Vol. 34, No. 1 March 2015

Oxford Journals has published a Table of Contents alert for a special edition of the Refugee Survey Quarterly journal.  This special issue is entitled, “The Role of International Organizations and Human Rights Monitoring Bodies in Refugee Protection” and further details can be found as follows:

Table of Contents Alert
Special Issue: The Role of International Organizations and Human Rights Monitoring Bodies in Refugee Protection
Vol. 34, No. 1
March 2015

Introduction

Introduction: The Role of International Organizations and Human Rights Monitoring Bodies in Refugee Protection
María-Teresa Gil-Bazo
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 1-10
[Abstract]

Articles

Refugee Protection under International Human Rights Law: From Non-Refoulement to Residence and Citizenship
María-Teresa Gil-Bazo
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 11-42
[Abstract]

Time for Reform? Refugees, Asylum-seekers, and Protection Under International Human Rights Law
Colin Harvey
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 43-60
[Abstract]

Recent Jurisprudence of the United Nations Committee against Torture and the International Protection of Refugees
Fernando M. Mariño Menéndez
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 61-78
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] OPEN ACCESS

Reframing Relationships: Revisiting the Procedural Standards for Refugee Status Determination in Light of Recent Human Rights Treaty Body Jurisprudence
David James Cantor
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 79-106
[Abstract]

International Protection in Court: The Asylum Jurisprudence of the Court of Justice of the EU and UNHCR
Madeline Garlick
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 107-130
[Abstract]

Daily International News Stories Round-up 04/16/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 04/16/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

News: The Guardian – World’s largest refugee camp scapegoated in wake of Garissa attack

The Kenyan government has called Dadaab ‘a nursery for al-Shabaab’ and is demanding its closure. But dismantling the home of 350,000 people will not happen quickly or make the country safer, says Simon Allison

After the terrorist attack on Garissa University in which 147 students were killed Kenya’s government has found a scapegoat. Three hundred and fifty thousand scapegoats, in fact.

On Saturday, the country’s deputy president William Ruto issued an ultimatum to the UN. He told the High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to shut down Dadaab refugee camp near the border with Somalia within three months, or else Kenya would shut it down itself.

Officials have claimed that Dadaab is where al-Shabaab plans its acts of terror, such as Garissa and the 2013 Westgate Mall attack, and must be shut down.

For full details, please visit: www.theguardian.com/world/2015/apr/14/kenya-garissa-dadaab-scapegoat-al-shabaab

 

News: UNHCR statement on the future of Kenya’s Dadaab Refugee Camps

This is a summary of what was said by UNHCR spokesperson Karin de Gruijl to whom quoted text may be attributed at the press briefing, on 14 April 2015, at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.

The Government of Kenya has announced that the Dadaab refugee camps should be closed within three months and the 350,000 Somali refugees living there returned to their country. The Government’s decision was announced this past weekend following the horrific attack at Garissa University earlier this month.

UNHCR too has been shocked and appalled by the Garissa attack. High Commissioner António Guterres and his staff stand in solidarity with the people of Kenya. We reiterate our condolences to the families of all the victims.

Kenya has been generously hosting and protecting refugees from violence and persecution in neighbouring Somalia for more than two decades. UNHCR works closely with the Government of Kenya and we understand well the current regional security situation and the seriousness of the threats Kenya is facing. We also recognize the obligation of the Government to ensure the security of its citizens and other people living in Kenya, including refugees.

For full article, please visit:  www.unhcr.org/552d0a8a9.html

 

Course: Applied Research Methods with Hidden, Marginal and Excluded Populations

Source: Forced Migration List – List Archives: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/forced-migration.html

Applied Research Methods with Hidden, Marginal and Excluded Populations (2Q)
School in Social Science Data Analysis, University of Essex (UK)
27-31 July 2015 (full time)

Detailed program: HERE
http://www.essex.ac.uk/summerschool/media/pdf/Outlines/2Q.pdf

The course (11th Edition) provides an introduction to research methods in conducting research, both qualitative and quantitative, with marginal, hidden and excluded populations, with a specific focus on equity related research. The course introduces the main theories and research approaches on hard-to-reach populations (such as migrants, displaced population, victims of human rights violations, LGBT, drug addicted, child soldiers, victims of violence) , using different frameworks and techniques.

This intensive course will provide tools to address key quantitative and qualitative issues such as the lack of known sampling frame; the difficulties in reaching the target group; the concepts of impact, attribution and contribution; and the political dimension of research findings. The course explores topics such as: estimation and sampling techniques; participatory research; evidence-based policy versus policy-based evidence; innovation, crowdsourcing , innovation and the use of technology; the art of combining qualitative and quantitative methods; and ethical considerations arising when conducting research with hidden and marginalized populations.

Topics :

1) Quantitative methods:
– Cluster sampling
– Adaptive cluster sampling
– Time location sampling
– Small area estimation
– Capture and Recapture
– Respondent Driven Sampling RDS (intro)
– Social network analysis applied to hard-to-reach populations (introduction)

2) Qualitative methods
– Participatory research methods
– Rapid assessment
– Positive deviance

3) Ethics and Research

4) Innovation and the use of technology: SMS, crowd sourcing and mapping
– Using SMS and mobile phones for research and data collection, online survey,
– Crowdsourcing and mapping: Ushahidi (introduction)

Course description, contact and registration  HERE
https://www.essex.ac.uk/summerschool/pages/courses/session2/2q.html

Contacts :
www.essex.ac.uk/summerschool
Select Course 2Q

CMRB Film Screenings of `Everyday Borders’

University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging, Southall Black Sisters, Migrant Rights Network and the Refugee and Migrant Forum of Essex and London present the following film screening hosted by Northumbria University’s Migration and Diaspora Network and Department of Geography:

Everyday Borders

(dir. Orson Nava)

This event will take place in room 0.8, Broadacre House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE43 7PZ

Location details are here

Thursday 30th April 2015, 18.45–20.30

Please reserve a space at:

https://everydaybordersncl.eventbrite.co.uk

Increasing numbers of people are becoming border-guards as employers, landlords, health workers and educators are legally required to administer the UK border as part of their everyday lives. As the 2014 Immigration Act pulls more people into border-guard roles, those who are their subjects experience being denied jobs, accommodation, healthcare and education because these border administrators may not be able or willing to understand the complexities of immigration law, may act on racist stereotypes or, threatened by fines and raids, exclude racialised minorities in order to minimize risk to themselves.

What are the implications of these developments to all of us in our daily lives?

The film screening will be followed by a panel discussion including:

Kathryn Cassidy (Northumbria University/UEL), Tom Vickers (Northumbria University) & community partners

*Apologies for cross-posting*

The University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB), Southall Black Sisters (SBS), Migrant Rights Network (MRN) and the Refugee and Migrant Forum of Essex and London (RAMFEL) present the following film screening hosted by the SOAS Student Union:

‘Everyday Borders’ (dir. Orson Nava)

The film screening will be followed by a panel discussion with: Meena Patel (SBS), Rita Chadha (Ramfel), Don Flynn (MRN), Georgie Wemyss (CMRB) and Orson Nava. Chair: Nira Yuval-Davis (CMRB)

This event will take place on Thursday 30th April 2015, 19.00–21.00 in G3, SOAS, London, WC1H 0XG

Please reserve a space at: everydayborders.eventbrite.co.uk

Full details can be found on the attached flyer. Please circulate widely.

 

Event: “Go Home”: Mapping Immigration Controversy – End of Project Conference 10 June 2015

“Go Home”: Mapping Immigration Controversy
End of Project Conference

June 10th, 9.30am – 6.30pm, University of Warwick, Social Sciences Building

Register here: http://mic-conference.eventbrite.com

This one day conference is aimed at academics and activists interested in discussing the findings of the Mapping Immigration Controversy project. We want to bring together learning and research within and outside universities, to discuss how government rhetoric and practice on immigration is affecting our everyday lives, and the new forms of resistance that are emerging.

Keynote speakers:
Bridget Anderson, University of Oxford
Rita Chadha, Refugee and Migrant Forum of Essex and London
Suresh Grover,  The Monitoring Group
Georgie Wemyss, University of East London

Panel discussions on:
Activist Research Methodology
State Communications on Immigration
Resistance

The conference will also include performance and interactive sessions

Free attendance, including lunch, but you need to register at http://mic-conference.eventbrite.com

The Mapping Immigration Controversy project is an 18 month research project that has been exploring the impacts on local communities and national debate of current publicity campaigns about migration by the UK Home Office. Discussions at the conference will build on our interim findings and will include other researchers and activists.

GETTING TO THE EVENT
The nearest mainline station to the University of Warwick is Coventry station. Buses and taxis to campus are available at the station. There is pay and display car parking on campus but spaces are often very limited. You can find out more about transport options here: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/directions/

TRAVEL BURSARIES
We have travel bursaries for travel within the UK, to enable participation from people who would not otherwise be able to come, and to encourage attendance from community organisations, activists, migrants, people directly affected by Home Office immigration campaigns, young people, students and early career researchers.

If you are applying for a travel bursary, please be prepared to write a sentence about why, and give an estimate of how much your transport costs are likely to be on the registration page. Please note that we will ordinarily expect you to pay for your travel in advance, and will reimburse you by BACS transfer to your bank account after the conference (you will need to complete a form and provide receipts). If you foresee a problem with this – for example if you are not able to pay the cost of your travel up-front, or if you do not have a UK bank account which can receive BACS transfers – please get in touch and we will try to make arrangements to book your travel for you.

Wreck of Migrant Vessel Headed to Italy Leaves Up to 400 Dead

Originally posted on clandestina:

Source: http://www.wsj.com

ROME—Survivors of the wreck of a migrant boat headed to Italy from Libya said that as many as 400 people had died in the wreck, according to Save the Children and the International Organization for Migration.

According to some among the 150 survivors from that boat, who were interviewed by migrant assistance groups including the IOM and Save the Children, the wreck happened in the past few days, 24 hours after the boat left the Libyan coast, and involved migrants coming from sub-Saharan Africa. “Many young men, probably minor,” were among the victims, Save the Children said, citing the refugees.

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Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistanc

Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance: Local and Global Conceptions and Struggles Conference

Friday 1 May 2015, University of East London (Docklands).

This conference launches the ESRC-Funded seminar series ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: Learning from History and Thinking Internationally’ organised by Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL). We are grateful to the ESRC, UEL and the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, the University of Glasgow and the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group for their support.

Full programme attached and registration and further details can be found at:
http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/evolving-understandings-of-racism-and-resistance-tickets-16258660090

Evolving understandings of racism and resistance – local and global conceptions and struggles

Friday 1st May 2015

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: JOHN SOLOMOS, STEPHEN SMALL

One-day conference at the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, University of East London in conjunction with the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group.

Launching the ESRC-funded seminar series, ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: learning from history and thinking internationally’, organised by Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL).

This conference responds to the urgent need to understand how and why people have mobilised around ethnicity – to challenge racism or to fight for social justice – despite other exclusionary forms of ethnic politics, including campaigns of racism. Whereas we have learned to argue against social policy that divides the population by ethnicity (Commission for Integration and Cohesion, 2007), there is little contemporary debate about the socially beneficial potential of calls to ethnic identity in enabling political mobilisation. At

a time when there is widespread disillusionment with mainstream politics and unexpected and relatively unknown political groupings can emerge to prominence with little warning, it is essential that we understand the range of forms of ethnic mobilisation and the implications of these diverse forms of political engagement.

These questions become urgent in a context of the resurgence of racist movements across Europe and the continuation and intensification of communal divisions in many regions. In many urban spaces, the impacts of economic crises and war have remade the terrain of racism and inequality, hardening some divisions and giving rise to new kinds of ethnic mobilisation that reference religious, national, regional and ethnic identity in ways that reflect the transnational connectedness of these mobile populations.

Papers and discussions will address the following questions and debates, and more:

Contemporary and historical examples of movements against racism and the role of ethnic mobilisation within such movements; the role played by ethnic mobilisations in wider movements for social justice;         changing terrains of racism and new articulations of anti-racist resistance.

Programme:

Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance: Local and Global Conceptions and Struggles

Conference

Friday 1 May 2015

University of East London, East Building, Docklands Campus, E16 2RD

9.30am: Registration, tea and coffee

10am: Welcome and introduction to the ESRC seminar series ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: Learning from History and Thinking Internationally’: Gargi Bhattacharrya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL)

10.15am: Plenary 1: Professor Stephen Small (University of California, Berkeley), Decolonizing the mind for knowledge production and dissemination

11.15am: Tea and coffee break

11.30am: Parallel sessions

Anti-racism in historical perspective

Doron Avraham (Bar Ilan), Contested Concepts of Race and Ethnicity: A Response of German Jews to Nazi Racial Policy

Brendan McGeever (Birkbeck), Racism and Resistance in the Russian Revolution: the political mobilisation of ethnicity in socialist campaigns against antisemitism in revolutionary Russia, 1917-1922.

Lindy Moore (Independent), Networks of anti-racism 1890-1914: the mobilisation of evangelical Christian Socialists

Stephen Ashe (CoDE, Manchester) and Laurence Brown (CoDE, Manchester), Evolving understandings of racism and resistance – local and global conceptions and struggles

Racism and anti-racism in France

Joseph Downing (LSE), Ethnic Mobilisation in the Republic: The Quest to Challenge Exclusionary Narratives of Migration in France

Selim Nadi (Lyon), Organizing anti-racism in France: from the Arab Workers Movement to the Party of the Indigenous of the Republic (1972 – 2010

Pauline Picot (Université Paris), Ethnic categories and ethnic segmentation within the antiracist activist field in contemporary France

1pm: Lunch break

2pm: Parallel sessions

Migrants and anti-racist organising

Federico Olivieri (Pisa), Migrant struggles as acts against racism Italian contemporary cases in comparative perspective

Alice Mukaka (UEL), Resistance and mobilization around migrant women’s rights: a feminist issue

Sukhwant Dhaliwal, (Bedfordshire) and Kirsten Forkert (BCU), Resisting the Go Home van and other Home Office immigration campaigns

Marella Hoffman, (Cambridge), Belonging and resistance in ethnic communities in Cambridge

Black Politics: then and now

Kehinde Andrews (BCU), Back to Black: Black radical activism in twenty first century Britain

John Narayan (Warwick), The Coloured Cosmopolitanism of Black Power: From The Black Panther Party to #Blacklivesmatter

Fatima Rajina (SOAS), Racism and Resistance: the story of British Bangladeshis

3.30pm: Plenary 2: Professor John Solomos (University of Warwick), Race, Racism and Social Research: between social science and policy

4.30pm: Tea and coffee break

4.45pm: Parallel sessions

Anti-racist practice in institutional settings

Alessio D’Angelo (Middlesex), BME organisations in the UK: communities of resistance or sub-contractors?

Bethan Harries (CoDE, Manchester), “Divide and conquer?” The effects of public sector retrenchment on anti-racist and marginalised community organising

Omar Khan (Runnymede), ‘Ending Racism this Generation': learning from a UK campaign

Islamophobia

Hilary Aked (Bath), The gender segregation on campus furore as a racialised moral panic

Shamira Megnani (Leeds), Alliances across Historical Exclusions: Evoking ‘Guilt by Association’ in the anti-Islamophobia Novel

Aurelien Mondon (Bath), The mainstreaming of racism in France: the resurgence of reactionary propagandists

6.15pm: Closing remarks and Conference closes

This conference launches the ESRC-Funded seminar series ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: Learning from History and Thinking Internationally’ organised by Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL).  We are grateful to the ESRC, UEL and the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, the University of Glasgow and the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group for their support.

Please note that lunch will not be provided at this free event, but facilities to purchase meals, snacks, coffee and tea are available throughout the Docklands site (Menus and information: http://www.dineoncampus.co.uk/uel/places-to-eat.aspx – Map: http://www.dineoncampus.co.uk/doc-assets/docs/UEL_Docklands_Campus_Map.pdf.

Travel and Accommodation:

Directions to Conference Site at UEL, Docklands Campus – which is located at Cyprus Station on the DLR (easily accessible fromn Stratford Station, but please remember to purchase tickets in advance and/or tap your card before entering and after exiting the train): http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

The closest airport is City: http://www.londoncityairport.com/

Accommodation is available in Stratford near and around Westfield Mall, the Olympic Stadium and UEL’s Stratford Campuses (but please note that the conference is not located at the UEL Stratford sites): http://www.visitlondon.com/discover-london/london-areas/east/stratford

Accommodation is also available closer near the Excel Centre:  http://www.excel-london.co.uk/visiting-excel/visitors-guide/hotels/

Do you have questions about Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance? Contact CMRB. UEL

New Articles on Refugee and Migration History 04/15/2015

  • “Transitional justice discursively occupies a two-dimensional space mapped by understandings of ‘transition’ and ‘justice.’ Transition is defined very broadly, understood as any regime change, however achieved, because transition is defined contingently, as something that is normatively presumed to have the goal of liberal democracy. The edited volumes under review, particularly that discussing the Arab Spring, thus include in their remit states where a regime has fallen but liberal democracy is far from being consolidated, where vicious civil wars are underway (as in Syria or Libya) or authoritarianism has been reasserted (as in Egypt). Justice, in contrast, is defined narrowly. While the idea of justice is presumed to be represented by a situation where the entirety of human rights law is respected, in both theory and practice transitional justice focuses largely on truth and accountability for past violations, prioritizing civil and political rights over other rights, rather than explicitly building justice for the future. The books reviewed here represent an extensive survey of the practice of transitional justice in recent decades and an articulation of global discourses of transition and justice. This review seeks to use the three volumes and the dozens of contexts they address to investigate this discursive space, to interrogate how in practice transitional justice is understood and articulated, and to suggest what a future practice could look like. “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

  • “This article examines the underlying intentions that guided the authors of Article 33, better known as the non-refoulement principle, of the 1951 Refugee Convention, from February 1950 until the signing of the Final Act in July 1951. I begin by explaining the diplomatic context within which the non-refoulement principle was inscribed into the text of the Convention, following the schism between the two opposing groups of member states present at the drafting table. Based on unpublished material from Israeli and UK archives, I then study four specific aspects of the drafting of the non-refoulement article. The first issue concerns the geographical scope of non-refoulement regarding refugees on the high seas. The second concerns the addition to non-refoulement in the first paragraph of Article 33 of the category of ‘a particular social group or political opinion’, in direct contemporary reference to political refugees from the Soviet bloc. The third issue studied here is the development of the text of paragraph 2 of Article 33, one of the major conditions restricting protective measures for refugees. This study uncovers how this paragraph was drafted, where it was initially intended to fit within the Convention text, and how it eventually became a qualifying condition for Article 33. Fourthly, this article considers the embedded meaning of the term ‘national security’ as it was inserted into Article 33 by the UK representatives who drafted it. “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

  • “The Making of the Modern Refugee is an important history of forced displacement in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. This study by Peter Gatrell makes several new contributions to the literature on refugee policy. Many previous contemporary histories of refugee movements mainly cover events and policies in Europe or the global North and largely exclude consideration of refugee movements in the global South. In contrast, this study encompasses a wide spectrum of forced displacements across the globe including in the Middle East and North Africa, Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. Nonetheless, the scope of this book could have been even broader had refugee movements in the Western hemisphere been covered and other significant … “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

  • “This work aims to reframe a discussion of refugees and migration in the late-Ottoman and interwar periods. To understand the emergence of an ‘Ottoman refugee’, Isa Blumi explores the destructive power of global capitalism, a theme often downplayed in historical analyses of violence and displacement in the Middle East.

    By the mid-nineteenth century, external players—foreign states and trans-Atlantic bankers whom Blumi collectively calls the ‘Euro-American Empire’—competed in the Ottoman markets, often through local agents (p. 16). They encouraged the commercialization of agriculture, the reduction of trade tariffs, and a transition towards private property, and also provided the Ottoman government with significant loans to finance its internal reforms; repaying the debt further subjected the Ottoman economy to external demands. These processes coincided with the arrival of millions of refugees from the Caucasus and the Balkans in the Ottoman domains. A source of cheap labour, they were put to work in the production of cash crops and the … ”

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 04/15/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 04/15/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Articles on Refugee and Forced Migration Issues 04/15/2015

  • “Transitional justice discursively occupies a two-dimensional space mapped by understandings of ‘transition’ and ‘justice.’ Transition is defined very broadly, understood as any regime change, however achieved, because transition is defined contingently, as something that is normatively presumed to have the goal of liberal democracy. The edited volumes under review, particularly that discussing the Arab Spring, thus include in their remit states where a regime has fallen but liberal democracy is far from being consolidated, where vicious civil wars are underway (as in Syria or Libya) or authoritarianism has been reasserted (as in Egypt). Justice, in contrast, is defined narrowly. While the idea of justice is presumed to be represented by a situation where the entirety of human rights law is respected, in both theory and practice transitional justice focuses largely on truth and accountability for past violations, prioritizing civil and political rights over other rights, rather than explicitly building justice for the future. The books reviewed here represent an extensive survey of the practice of transitional justice in recent decades and an articulation of global discourses of transition and justice. This review seeks to use the three volumes and the dozens of contexts they address to investigate this discursive space, to interrogate how in practice transitional justice is understood and articulated, and to suggest what a future practice could look like. “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

  • “This article examines the underlying intentions that guided the authors of Article 33, better known as the non-refoulement principle, of the 1951 Refugee Convention, from February 1950 until the signing of the Final Act in July 1951. I begin by explaining the diplomatic context within which the non-refoulement principle was inscribed into the text of the Convention, following the schism between the two opposing groups of member states present at the drafting table. Based on unpublished material from Israeli and UK archives, I then study four specific aspects of the drafting of the non-refoulement article. The first issue concerns the geographical scope of non-refoulement regarding refugees on the high seas. The second concerns the addition to non-refoulement in the first paragraph of Article 33 of the category of ‘a particular social group or political opinion’, in direct contemporary reference to political refugees from the Soviet bloc. The third issue studied here is the development of the text of paragraph 2 of Article 33, one of the major conditions restricting protective measures for refugees. This study uncovers how this paragraph was drafted, where it was initially intended to fit within the Convention text, and how it eventually became a qualifying condition for Article 33. Fourthly, this article considers the embedded meaning of the term ‘national security’ as it was inserted into Article 33 by the UK representatives who drafted it. “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

  • “The Making of the Modern Refugee is an important history of forced displacement in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. This study by Peter Gatrell makes several new contributions to the literature on refugee policy. Many previous contemporary histories of refugee movements mainly cover events and policies in Europe or the global North and largely exclude consideration of refugee movements in the global South. In contrast, this study encompasses a wide spectrum of forced displacements across the globe including in the Middle East and North Africa, Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. Nonetheless, the scope of this book could have been even broader had refugee movements in the Western hemisphere been covered and other significant … “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

  • “This work aims to reframe a discussion of refugees and migration in the late-Ottoman and interwar periods. To understand the emergence of an ‘Ottoman refugee’, Isa Blumi explores the destructive power of global capitalism, a theme often downplayed in historical analyses of violence and displacement in the Middle East.

    By the mid-nineteenth century, external players—foreign states and trans-Atlantic bankers whom Blumi collectively calls the ‘Euro-American Empire’—competed in the Ottoman markets, often through local agents (p. 16). They encouraged the commercialization of agriculture, the reduction of trade tariffs, and a transition towards private property, and also provided the Ottoman government with significant loans to finance its internal reforms; repaying the debt further subjected the Ottoman economy to external demands. These processes coincided with the arrival of millions of refugees from the Caucasus and the Balkans in the Ottoman domains. A source of cheap labour, they were put to work in the production of cash crops and the … ”

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Journal of Refugee Studies Table of Contents for March 1, 2015; Vol. 28, No. 1

Oxford Journals have published the latest table of contents alert for the Journal of Refugee Studies.  Further details on the articles available in
Vol. 28, No. 1, March 2015, are detailed as follows:

Articles

‘He’s a Cracking Wee Geezer from Pakistan’: Lay Accounts of Refugee Integration Failure and Success in Scotland
Steve Kirkwood, Andy McKinlay, and Chris McVittie
Journal of Refugee Studies 2015 28: 1-20
[Abstract]

Control and Biopower in Contemporary Humanitarian Aid: The Case of Supplementary Feeding
Tom Scott-Smith
Journal of Refugee Studies 2015 28: 21-37
[Abstract]

To ‘Promote, Protect and Ensure’: Overcoming Obstacles to Identifying Disability in Forced Migration
Laura Smith-Khan, Mary Crock, Ben Saul, and Ron McCallum
Journal of Refugee Studies 2015 28: 38-68
[Abstract]

Narrative and Silence: How Former Refugees Talk about Loss and Past Trauma
Teresa Puvimanasinghe, Linley A. Denson, Martha Augoustinos, and Daya Somasundaram
Journal of Refugee Studies 2015 28: 69-92
[Abstract]

The British–Jewish Roots of Non-Refoulement and its True Meaning for the Drafters of the 1951 Refugee Convention
Gilad Ben-Nun
Journal of Refugee Studies 2015 28: 93-117
[Abstract]

Review Article

Closing Legal Black Holes: The Role of Extraterritorial Jurisdiction in Refugee Rights Protection
Tom De Boer
Journal of Refugee Studies 2015 28: 118-134
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Book Reviews

The Rise and Decline of a Global Security Actor: UNHCR, Refugee Protection and Security. By Anne Hammerstad
Frederick Laker
Journal of Refugee Studies 2015 28: 135-136
[Extract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Migration, Security and Citizenship in the Middle East. Edited by Peter Seeberg and Zaid Eyadat
Emanuela Paoletti
Journal of Refugee Studies 2015 28: 137-138
[Extract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Humanitarian Crises and Migration: Causes, Consequences and Responses. Edited by Susan F. Martin, Sanjula Weerasinghe and Abbie Taylor
Jørgen Carling
Journal of Refugee Studies 2015 28: 138-140
[Extract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

The Making of the Modern Refugee. By Peter Gatrell
Gil Loescher
Journal of Refugee Studies 2015 28: 140-141
[Extract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Ottoman Refugees, 1878–1939: Migration in a Post-Imperial World. By Isa Blumi
Vladimir Troyansky
Journal of Refugee Studies 2015 28: 141-142
[Extract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Rescripting Religion in the City: Migration and Religious Identity in the Modern Metropolis. Edited by Jane Garnett and Alana Harris
Jennifer B. Saunders
Journal of Refugee Studies 2015 28: 142-144

 

CMRB Event: Sovereignty and Agency in the Post-Ottoman Middle East, Dr. James Renton, Edge Hill University

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) is pleased to announce the following seminar:

Sovereignty and Agency in the Post-Ottoman Middle East

Dr. James Renton, Edge Hill University

This seminar will take place in EB G.06, Docklands Campus,

UEL, E16 2RD

http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

Monday 27th April 2015, 4–6pm

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at

                                  jamesrenton.eventbrite.co.uk                      

Dr James Renton is a Reader in History at Edge Hill University, and Senior Honorary Research Associate in the Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies at University College London. He is the author of The Zionist Masquerade: The Birth of the Anglo-Zionist Alliance, 1914-1918 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), and is currently writing a history of the idea of the Middle East.

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb

 

Read On! National Case Law as a Generator of International Refugee Law: Rectifying an Imbalance within UNHCR Guidelines on International Protection

Originally posted on IntLawGrrls:

Emory International Law Review recently published my article which seeks  to evaluate UNHCR Guidelines on International Protection in order to examine whether there are discrepancies in the citation of national case law. Part I pursues quantitative analysis of UNHCR’s references to national case law in its guidelines. It is suggested that there are two main problems: first, the absence of reference to national case law in some guidelines and second, the dominance of common law/English-language national decisions in other guidelines which renders UNHCR output subject to legitimacy challenges as it seeks to provide objective guidance on interpretation of the 1951 Convention on the Status of Refugees. It also quantifies and discusses the nature of reference to case law from international human rights and criminal tribunals within UNHCR guidelines. Part II presents an alternative view on the importance of transnational judicial dialogues within Refugee Law, using as a case example the treatment…

View original 97 more words

Courses: CMRS Summer Short Courses, American University in Cairo

Center for Migration and Refugee Studies
Summer Short Courses May 24th  – June 11th, 2015

The Center for Migration and Refugee Studies (CMRS) at The American University in Cairo (AUC) is offering the following three short courses during the month of May and June 2015:

1.       Displaced by Armed Conflict: Protection under International Law (May 24  – 28, 2015)
2.       International Refugee Law (May 31 – June 4, 2015)
3.       Diaspora and transnationalism  (June 7 – 11, 2015)

1. Eligibility for all courses:

Requirements: These courses are offered for undergraduate and postgraduate students, and researchers as well as practitioners working with migrants and refugees. A minimum knowledge of displacement and migration terminologies and context is a requirement for participation in any of the three courses.

All courses are conducted in English and no translation facilities are provided.  Participants should have a sufficient command of the English language. Each course will run from 9 am till 5pm for five days.

Interested applicants can apply for one course or for all the three courses.

Number of Participants: minimum of 12 in each course

NB: Non- Egyptian applicants are strongly encouraged to apply early in order to have enough time to obtain their visa.

2. Dates and Location

CMRS courses will take place between Sunday 24th of May and 11th of June at the AUC Tahrir Campus in Downtown Cairo. The exact location and room numbers will be forwarded to accepted participants before the start of the courses.

3. Courses’ Descriptions

3.1 Displaced by Armed Conflict: Protection under International Law (May 24 – 28, 2015)

This course provides an introduction to the international legal framework protecting those displaced by armed conflict. It is useful to post-graduate students and those working in international, national and non-governmental organizations that engage with internationally displaced persons, particularly those working with situations of mass displacement. Through lectures, case studies, and discussions, this one-week intensive course introduces the different areas of international law that govern conflict-induced displacement. Questions explored include: How does international humanitarian law, especially the four Geneva Conventions and their Protocols, protect displaced peoples? How does international humanitarian law intersect with international refugee law and international human rights law? What are temporary or complementary protection regimes? What are the protection gaps faced by those displaced by armed conflict? How have states and international organizations such as UNHCR and ICRC adapted to manage these gaps? These questions are explored through case studies from the Arab region, including displacement from Palestine, Iraq and Syria. A background in law is useful but not required for participation.

About the Instructors: Jasmine Moussa (PhD, LLM, MA, BA, LLB) is assistant professor of law at the American University in Cairo (AUC), where she teaches public international law and the law of armed conflict and the use of force. Before joining AUC, Dr. Moussa completed her PhD in Law at the University of Cambridge (2014). Her recent research projects focused on the relationship between international humanitarian law and the law on the use of force, as well as the development of the theory and practice of humanitarianism in the Arab region. She has also worked on legal affairs and human rights affairs at the Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Other engagements include providing legal advise to several international non-governmental organizations and think tanks.

Usha Natarajan (PhD, MA, LLB, BA) is assistant professor of international law at the Department of Law and the Center for Migration and Refugee Studies in the American University in Cairo. Her research is multidisciplinary, utilizing third world and postcolonial approaches to international law to provide an interrelated understanding of the relationship between international law and issues of development, migration, environment and conflict. Dr Natarajan explores the interplay of these issues globally and in the Arab region, with a particular focus on Iraq as well as the ongoing Arab uprisings. Prior to joining AUC in 2010, she served as Legal Research Fellow for Human Rights and Poverty Eradication at the Center for International Sustainable Development Law at McGill University, and taught international law at the Australian National University. She has worked with various international organizations including UNDP, UNESCO and the World Bank on law reform initiatives in Asia, including Indonesia during its democratic transition, and in post-independence Timor-Leste.

3.2 International Refugee Law (May 31 – June 4, 2015)

The course will provide post-graduate students, international agency staff, NGO workers, lawyers and others working with refugees or interested in refugee issues with an introduction to the international legal framework which governs the protection of refugees.  Through lectures, case studies and  small group discussions, course participants will learn about the basic features of international refugee law through the lens of the 1951 Refugee Convention, looking at the elements of the definition(s) of “refugee,” who is excluded from the definition, the role of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the process by which refugee status is determined, the rights of refugees under international law, the ethical and professional obligations of those representing refugees, and other issues of refugee policy.  A background in law is useful but not required.

About the Instructor: Parastou Hassouri has previously taught international refugee law at the American University of Cairo and has extensive experience in the field of international refugee law and refugee and immigrant rights and migration policy. Most recently, as a consultant with the Global Detention Project, she researches the issue of migration-related detention in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries.  Her previous experience also includes serving as a consultant with the UNHCR in the Zaaatari Refugee Camp in Jordan, and with the UNHCR office in Moscow.  Prior to that, as a consultant for Human Rights First, she conducted extensive research on the resettlement of Iraqi refugees out of the Middle East to third countries.  She has worked as a Legal Advisor and Sexual and Gender-Based Violence Focal Point at Africa and Middle East Refugee Assistance (AMERA) in Cairo.  Her experience in the United States includes serving as an Attorney Advisor at the Immigration Courts of New York City and Los Angeles and working as an immigration attorney in private practice in New York City.  In addition, she designed and directed the Immigrant Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey, where she focused on responding to ethnic profiling and other forms of anti-immigrant backlash in the United States in the aftermath of the attacks of September 11.

3.3 Diaspora and transnationalism (June 7 – 11, 2015)

The concepts of Diaspora and transnationalism both refer to cross-border processes and are becoming increasingly prominent to understand patterns in international migrations, the meaning of State borders, identities constructions and socio-economic relationships. The aim of the course is to define those processes, looking at Diasporic groups and their relationship to both host countries and (real or perceived) homeland, as well as analyzing the social formations and transformations induced by transnationalism. Following the review of theoretical literature, we will focus on the methods used to study Diasporic communities and transnationalism and engage in a series of case studies.

About the instructor: Alexandra Parrs is a sociologist and she teaches at the Center for Migration and Refugee Studies. She has taught graduates courses on integration, citizenship transnationalism, migration and international relations. She received her doctorate in sociology in 2009. She has taught in the US, Oman, Burma and Egypt. Her areas of research are migrations, ethnic minorities, integration, transnationalism, and gender. She is currently working on a book on Egyptian Gypsies.

Deadlines for submitting application for all courses are:

·         24th of April, 2015
·         Deadline for paying course deposit (30% of the course’s fee- 150$) is 3rd of May, 2015

Application Information:

To apply for the courses:

1. Fill out the application form. The form is available on CMRS website:
http://www.aucegypt.edu/GAPP/cmrs/outreach/Pages/ShortCourses.aspx

2. Send the application form to cmrscourses@aucegypt.edu with your most recent CV; Att. Ms. Naseem Hashim

Applicants may apply to and be accepted in more than one course. Please do not hesitate to contact cmrscourses@aucegypt.edu if you have any difficulty with the application process.
Applicants accepted for the course will be notified by email within a week after the deadline for submitting the application.

Fees and Scholarship:

The fee for each course is $ 500. Participants are expected to pay a 30% of the total fees ($150) as a deposit. Please pay attention to the deposit deadline and kindly note that the deposit is non-refundable.  More information on payment method will be provided to accepted participants.

Tuition fees will cover course material and two coffee breaks per course day. All participants are kindly requested to secure their visa and organise and cover expenses for their travel to and from Egypt, as well as their accommodation and local transportation in Egypt.

Independent researchers and students can apply for the limited number of scholarships. Scholarships are not intended for participants who can be funded by their own institutions.

New Articles on Refugee and Migration History 04/14/2015

  • “Bruno Cabanes’s The Great War and the Origins of Humanitarianism, 1918-1924 complicates current scholarship of the 1920s as he traces the emergence of a discourse of rights following the First World War. The shift from war to peace radically changed traditional identity categories, and this evolving process of redefinition from 1918 through to 1924 is the crux of Cabanes’s study. Instead of confining himself to a more conventional legal and political framework, Cabanes adopts the perspective of the social historian, in order to illuminate how the traumatic experience of the Great War informed the rise of transnational humanitarianism. The five figures under study here—René Cassin, Albert Thomas, Fridtjof Nansen, Herbert Hoover, and Eglantyne Jebb—all found themselves in precarious positions while negotiating competing interests in their attempts to relieve international crises. These diverse responses to the aftermath of the First World War position the 1920s ‘not as a step in the history of rights but a key moment in shaping attitudes and values’ (p. 10; author’s emphasis). “

    tags:newjournalarticles newjournalarticleshistory

  • “From 1963 to 1981, the London borough of Ealing bussed South Asian students away from neighborhood schools, citing a need to assimilate migrant students into British culture. The increasing number of migrants in the area and their supposed detrimental effect on education frightened local parents, who pressured Ealing Council to implement bussing to maintain a majority of white, “native” children in each school in the borough. The bussing system and its advocates, initially supported by the Department of Education and Science, relied on ill-defined ideas of assimilation and integration that privileged British cultural authority. The practice also lent itself to American comparisons: the idea of bussing as a progressive civil rights practice across the Atlantic provided a liberal gloss that obscured how bussing worked in different political contexts. This article examines the parties involved in bussing— including educational reformers, South Asian students and parents, and race relations authorities—who invested it with their own meanings and values, making competing arguments for the merit of the practice in England. It argues that despite its liberal transatlantic veneer, bussing made South Asian children vulnerable to racism and ostracization, a position which many parents and local organizations made abundantly clear. The borough terminated the practice only after the Race Relations Board found Ealing guilty of educational discrimination. The long debate over bussing’s legitimacy in London came to represent both national and international discourses of integration and segregation, even as Ealing officials pursued drastically different goals than their counterparts in the United States. “

    tags:newjournalarticles newjournalarticleshistory

  • “The search for the origins of the process of denization in England has traditionally focused on the needs of merchants and the context of international trade, and no credible explanation has been given for why denization emerged as a recognisable Chancery form in the 1380s and 1390s. A new consideration of wartime treatment of aliens demonstrates the slow emergence, between c.1250 and c.1400, of an official policy towards lay foreigners that sought to minimise the disruptions arising in moments of national emergency and to accord rights of denizen equivalence to foreigners whose presence was profitable to the realm. In certain exceptional conditions during the 1270s and 1340s, alien residents with good connections at court could secure more developed statements of their rights as denizens. However, it was a series of events set off by the announcement of an intention to expel all French residents in 1377–78 that generated letters of protection containing specific reference to a change of allegiance, and thus established the principle that the recipient should renounce his former commitment and became a subject of the English Crown. Applied to other nationalities and outside the immediate context of war, these developments would give rise to the form known as letters of denization during the decades that followed. “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

  • “This article looks at Britain’s response to the World Refugee Year (1959–60), and in particular the government’s decision to allow entry to refugees with tuberculosis and other chronic illnesses. In doing so, it broke the practice established by the 1920 Aliens’ Order which had barred entry to immigrants with a range of medical conditions. This article uses the entry of these sick refugees as an opportunity to explore whether government policy represented as much of a shift in attitude and practice as contemporary accounts suggested. It argues for the importance of setting the reception of tubercular and other ‘disabled’ refugees in 1959–61 in its very particular historical context, showing it was a case less of the government thinking differently about refugees, and more of how, in a post-Suez context, the government felt obliged to take into account international and public opinion. The work builds on and adds to the growing literature surrounding refugees and disease. It also places the episode within the specificity of the post-war changing epidemiological climate; the creation of the National Health Service; and the welfare state more broadly. In looking at the role of refugee organizations in the Year, the article also contributes to debates over the place of voluntary agencies within British society. “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory newjournalarticles

  • “Planned relocation has gained recent prominence as a tool for reducing vulnerable communities’ exposure to the impacts of climate change and disasters. This article situates the phenomenon of cross-border relocation within a history spanning the 18th century to the present, connecting resettlement programmes with legally-sanctioned population transfers and exchanges. “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory newjournalarticles

  • “We have needed a textbook synthesis of the flood of work on early modern London for a long while now. So, Bucholz and Ward’s London is timely, but unlike the city it describes this book lacks shine and is rather flat and lackluster. This is partly down to a lack of interpretative threads that would give London more substance and coherence along the lines of how what were in effect late-medieval structures and concepts—guilds, government, policing, jurisdictions, citizenship, and the like—responded to and were shaped by London’s scary speedy growth, for instance, or how a more commercial-market ethos—seen in banking, shopping, advertising, water supply, and street-cleaning and lighting and so on—reconfigured what it meant to live in London, or how people from all walks of life understood growth through new strategies and reimagining their home city. Any one of these threads would have given London a stronger spine and unifying lucidity.

    London is aimed at student pockets but it is too dense at times and riddled with basic errors: Bridewell did not “house orphans,” that was in the hands of the governors of Christ’s Hospital (52), there were more than four Inns of Court (54), Southwark Cathedral did not ”

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily News and Updates from Reliefweb 04/14/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 04/14/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Articles on Refugee and Forced Migration Issues 04/14/2015

  • “Bruno Cabanes’s The Great War and the Origins of Humanitarianism, 1918-1924 complicates current scholarship of the 1920s as he traces the emergence of a discourse of rights following the First World War. The shift from war to peace radically changed traditional identity categories, and this evolving process of redefinition from 1918 through to 1924 is the crux of Cabanes’s study. Instead of confining himself to a more conventional legal and political framework, Cabanes adopts the perspective of the social historian, in order to illuminate how the traumatic experience of the Great War informed the rise of transnational humanitarianism. The five figures under study here—René Cassin, Albert Thomas, Fridtjof Nansen, Herbert Hoover, and Eglantyne Jebb—all found themselves in precarious positions while negotiating competing interests in their attempts to relieve international crises. These diverse responses to the aftermath of the First World War position the 1920s ‘not as a step in the history of rights but a key moment in shaping attitudes and values’ (p. 10; author’s emphasis). “

    tags:newjournalarticles newjournalarticleshistory

  • “From 1963 to 1981, the London borough of Ealing bussed South Asian students away from neighborhood schools, citing a need to assimilate migrant students into British culture. The increasing number of migrants in the area and their supposed detrimental effect on education frightened local parents, who pressured Ealing Council to implement bussing to maintain a majority of white, “native” children in each school in the borough. The bussing system and its advocates, initially supported by the Department of Education and Science, relied on ill-defined ideas of assimilation and integration that privileged British cultural authority. The practice also lent itself to American comparisons: the idea of bussing as a progressive civil rights practice across the Atlantic provided a liberal gloss that obscured how bussing worked in different political contexts. This article examines the parties involved in bussing— including educational reformers, South Asian students and parents, and race relations authorities—who invested it with their own meanings and values, making competing arguments for the merit of the practice in England. It argues that despite its liberal transatlantic veneer, bussing made South Asian children vulnerable to racism and ostracization, a position which many parents and local organizations made abundantly clear. The borough terminated the practice only after the Race Relations Board found Ealing guilty of educational discrimination. The long debate over bussing’s legitimacy in London came to represent both national and international discourses of integration and segregation, even as Ealing officials pursued drastically different goals than their counterparts in the United States. “

    tags:newjournalarticles newjournalarticleshistory

  • “The search for the origins of the process of denization in England has traditionally focused on the needs of merchants and the context of international trade, and no credible explanation has been given for why denization emerged as a recognisable Chancery form in the 1380s and 1390s. A new consideration of wartime treatment of aliens demonstrates the slow emergence, between c.1250 and c.1400, of an official policy towards lay foreigners that sought to minimise the disruptions arising in moments of national emergency and to accord rights of denizen equivalence to foreigners whose presence was profitable to the realm. In certain exceptional conditions during the 1270s and 1340s, alien residents with good connections at court could secure more developed statements of their rights as denizens. However, it was a series of events set off by the announcement of an intention to expel all French residents in 1377–78 that generated letters of protection containing specific reference to a change of allegiance, and thus established the principle that the recipient should renounce his former commitment and became a subject of the English Crown. Applied to other nationalities and outside the immediate context of war, these developments would give rise to the form known as letters of denization during the decades that followed. “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

  • “This article looks at Britain’s response to the World Refugee Year (1959–60), and in particular the government’s decision to allow entry to refugees with tuberculosis and other chronic illnesses. In doing so, it broke the practice established by the 1920 Aliens’ Order which had barred entry to immigrants with a range of medical conditions. This article uses the entry of these sick refugees as an opportunity to explore whether government policy represented as much of a shift in attitude and practice as contemporary accounts suggested. It argues for the importance of setting the reception of tubercular and other ‘disabled’ refugees in 1959–61 in its very particular historical context, showing it was a case less of the government thinking differently about refugees, and more of how, in a post-Suez context, the government felt obliged to take into account international and public opinion. The work builds on and adds to the growing literature surrounding refugees and disease. It also places the episode within the specificity of the post-war changing epidemiological climate; the creation of the National Health Service; and the welfare state more broadly. In looking at the role of refugee organizations in the Year, the article also contributes to debates over the place of voluntary agencies within British society. “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory newjournalarticles

  • “Planned relocation has gained recent prominence as a tool for reducing vulnerable communities’ exposure to the impacts of climate change and disasters. This article situates the phenomenon of cross-border relocation within a history spanning the 18th century to the present, connecting resettlement programmes with legally-sanctioned population transfers and exchanges. “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory newjournalarticles

  • “We have needed a textbook synthesis of the flood of work on early modern London for a long while now. So, Bucholz and Ward’s London is timely, but unlike the city it describes this book lacks shine and is rather flat and lackluster. This is partly down to a lack of interpretative threads that would give London more substance and coherence along the lines of how what were in effect late-medieval structures and concepts—guilds, government, policing, jurisdictions, citizenship, and the like—responded to and were shaped by London’s scary speedy growth, for instance, or how a more commercial-market ethos—seen in banking, shopping, advertising, water supply, and street-cleaning and lighting and so on—reconfigured what it meant to live in London, or how people from all walks of life understood growth through new strategies and reimagining their home city. Any one of these threads would have given London a stronger spine and unifying lucidity.

    London is aimed at student pockets but it is too dense at times and riddled with basic errors: Bridewell did not “house orphans,” that was in the hands of the governors of Christ’s Hospital (52), there were more than four Inns of Court (54), Southwark Cathedral did not ”

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

RSC Events: Global refugee policy | Refugee Studies Centre Public Seminar Series

Source: Forced Migration List – List Archives: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/forced-migration.html

Global refugee policy | Refugee Studies Centre Public Seminar Series, Trinity term 2015
www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/trinity-2015
Beginning Wednesday, 29 April

All seminars take place at 5pm in Seminar Room 1, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford Department of International Development. No registration is required* and all are welcome to attend.

Global refugee policy is a formal statement of, and proposed course of action in response to, a ‘problem’ relating to protection, solutions or assistance for refugees or other persons of concern to the global refugee regime. It is discussed and approved within UNHCR’s governing structures, and is intended to either limit the behaviour of governments or guide UNHCR’s activities. Despite the time and resources invested in the making, implementation and evaluation of global refugee policy, and concerns about the elements and implications of particular policies, our understanding of the process that leads to these policies at the global level, and factors affecting their implementation at the local level, is surprisingly limited.

Building on discussions at the RSC’s 30th Anniversary Conference and the December 2014 Special Issue of Journal of Refugee Studies on the topic, this seminar series will examine particular aspects of the global refugee policy process to further our understanding of how global refugee policy is made, implemented and evaluated, and the extent to which a more critical understanding of this process contributes to our ability to influence outcomes.

We also have the Annual Elizabeth Colson Lecture this term, further details on which will be announced shortly.

If you’d like to receive updates about our public seminars and lectures, please visit our Connect With Us page and subscribe to our email alerts: www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/RSC-Connect

29 April 2015
Understanding global refugee policy: the case of naturalisation in Tanzania
www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/understanding-global-refugee-policy-the-case-of-naturalization-in-tanzania
Dr James Milner (Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Carleton University)

6 May 2015
Better late than never? The evolution and implementation of UNHCR’s urban refugee policy
www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/the-evolution-and-implementation-of-unhcrs-urban-refugee-policy
Dr Jeff Crisp (independent consultant) and MaryBeth Morand (Senior Policy and Evaluation Officer, UNHCR)

13 May 2015
Ethnographic understandings of global refugee policy: Looking at policy in practice
www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/ethnographic-understandings-of-global-refugee-policy-looking-at-policy-in-practice
Dr Marion Fresia (Professeure assistante, Institut d’ethnologie, Université de Neuchâtel)

20 May 2015
UNHCR’s protection guidelines: What role for external voices?
www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/unhcrs-protection-guidelines-what-role-for-external-voices
Professor Guy Goodwin-Gill (Emeritus Fellow, All Souls College)

27 May 2015
Global policy for IDPs: A parallel process?
www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/global-policy-for-idps-a-parallel-process
Dr Phil Orchard (Senior Lecturer, Peace and Conflict Studies and International Relations, University of Queensland)

10 June 2015
Annual Elizabeth Colson Lecture
www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/Colson2015
Professor Miriam Ticktin (The New School for Social Research)

Please note: There is no seminar on 3 June.

*The 2015 Annual Elizabeth Colson Lecture will take place in Seminar Room 3 and is free to attend and open to all, but registration will be required. Information on how to register will be circulated soon.

Courses: CESI International Summer School on Refugee Law – Western Balkans in focus, Sarajevo, July 2015

Source: Forced Migration List – List Archives: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/forced-migration.html

The Centre for Refugee and IDP Studies (CESI) of the Faculty of Political Sciences in Sarajevo

Invites you to register for the International Summer School on Refugee Law – Western Balkans in focus, with Professor Emerita Barbara Harrell-Bond

Date: 6-16th of July, 2015

University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

In the last decade countries of Western Balkans, including Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) and Serbia have been transformed from refugee producing countries to host countries for asylum-seekers and refugees. Moreover, due to ongoing wars and prolonged hostilities in Syria and other parts of the world, it is expected that the number of persons seeking an international protection in the region will grow, thus making further development of the three countries asylum systems an important task.

This year’s International Summer School on refugee law and refugee rights will offer a specific focus on the refugee law and asylum rights in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia. We aim to gather students from different countries with social sciences background, NGO workers and activists to discuss the current challenges of access to international refugee protection in the countries of the Western Balkans, and the responsibilities of both citizens and the state towards them.

The Summer School will employ an interactive learning environment using documentary films and open discussions enabling participants to both contribute to and gain an in-depth knowledge of asylum adjudication procedures, reception and integration policies.

Our training program will cover the following modules:
•       Assessment of 1951 Refugee Convention and 1967 Protocol
•       The Relevance of International Human Rights Law to Flight from Persecution
•       UNHCR Guidelines on International Protection: “Membership of a particular social group” within the context of Article 1A(2).
•       Assessment of the Female Genital Cutting debate in Africa
•       Convention on the Rights of the Child: Unaccompanied Minor/Separated Children
•       UNHCR Guidance Note on Refugee Claims Relating to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity
•       Statelessness
•       The ethics of Refugee Law
•       Psycho-Social Issues: Medical Evidence in Asylum and Human Rights Appeals
•       Use of Country of origin Information assessment
•       Credibility Assessment in Asylum Procedures
•       Establishment and development of Asylum systems in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia
•       Refugee Status Determination (RSD) Procedures in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia
•       Reception and integration of Refugees in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia
•       Detention in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia
•       Transit migration, readmission and irregular migration in the Western Balkans
•       UNHCR Guidelines on the Application in Mass Influx Situations of the Exclusion Clauses
•       Internal Protection/Relocation/Flight Alternatives
•       Providing Legal Aid to Refugees: Starting a Refugee Legal Aid Clinic?

Instructors at the course are experienced and committed lawyers, scholars, practitioners and activists in the field that will bring a comparative and locally focused perspective to the international protection debate. They are led by Professor Emerita Barbara Harrell-Bond, being with us for the third time, supporting CESI work and helping the development of the refugee studies in Bosnia and Herzegovina/ WB region, Nedim Kulenović, doctoral candidate and a lawyer at the Association “Vaša prava Bosnia and Herzegovina”, providing free legal aid in the sector for international protection, Radoš Đurović, LL.M International Law, Belgrade University, Asylum Protection Center-APC, Belgrade, Serbia, Drago Župarić-Iljić, Junior Research Assistant at the institute for Migration and Ethnic Studies, Zagreb, Croatia, Victoria Smythies, Juris Doctorate, LL.M. International Law, University of Vienna, Grants writer, British Red Cross , Gabriel Bonis, MA, International Relations from Queen Mary, University of London, Refugee Caseworker, British Red Cross and Dr. Selma Porobić , CESI director and forced migration scholar.

The school is open to students from all social sciences backgrounds with admission fee of 500Euros/with considerable discount offered to the participants from the WB region, covering school programme with materials, supervision, tutoring, certificate of participation, food and beverage during the 10-days long training and activities.

CESI invites you to conduct the registration for the ISS 2015 by sending your letter of interest and CV by 1st of June, 2015 by email to cesi@fpn.unsa.ba

ToC Alert: International Journal of Refugee Law for March 1, 2015; Vol. 27, No. 1

Oxford Journal have published the latest Table of Contents alert for the International Journal of Refugee Law, Vol. 27, No. 1 (March 2015).  Further details of the articles included in this volume are highlighted as follows:

Articles

Asylum as a General Principle of International Law
María-Teresa Gil-Bazo
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 3-28
[Abstract]

The Internal Protection Alternative Inquiry and Human Rights Considerations – Irrelevant or Indispensable?
Bríd Ní Ghráinne
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 29-51
[Abstract]

An Ongoing Anomaly: Pre- and Post-Second World War Palestinian Refugees

Mutaz M Qafisheh

Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 52-74

[Abstract]

The Application and Interpretation of International Humanitarian Law and International Criminal Law in the Exclusion of those Refugee Claimants who have Committed War Crimes and/or Crimes Against Humanity in Canada
James C Simeon
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 75-106
[Abstract]

‘Climate Change Migrants’: Impediments to a Protection Framework and the Need to Incorporate Migration into Climate Change Adaptation Strategies
Lauren Nishimura
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 107-134
[Abstract]

Opinion

‘Systemic Flaws’ and Dublin Transfers: Incompatible Tests before the CJEU and the ECtHR?
Anna Lübbe
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 135-140
[Abstract]

Case Law Summaries

Case Law Summaries
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 141-153
[Extract]

Documents

Introductory Note to UNHCR’s Guidelines on Temporary Protection or Stay Arrangements
Volker Türk, Alice Edwards, and Matthias Braeunlich
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 154-156
[Extract]

Guidelines on Temporary Protection or Stay Arrangements
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 157-165
[Extract]

Introductory Note to the Guidelines on International Protection No. 10 on Claims to Refugee Status related to Military Service
Volker Türk and Alice Edwards
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 166-171
[Extract]

Guidelines on International Protection No. 10: Claims to Refugee Status related to Military Service within the context of Article 1A(2) of the 1951 Convention and/or the 1967 Protocol relating to the Status of Refugees
UNHCR
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 172-197
[Extract]

Book Reviews

Life Interrupted: Trafficking into Forced Labor in the United States
Thomas Harré
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 198-200
[Extract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

On the Doorstep of Europe: Asylum and Citizenship in Greece
Rita Theodorou Superman
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 201-204
[Extract]

The UNHCR and the Supervision of International Refugee Law
Ulrike Brandl
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 204-206
[Extract]

Trafficking in Human Beings and Human Rights: The Role of the Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings
Petya Nestorova
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 207-209
[Extract]

Ethnicity and Collective Targeting in Civil Wars

Originally posted on Political Violence @ a Glance:

Guest post by Lisa Hultman and Hanne Fjelde

Gabriel, a South Sudanese man, in a refugee camp in Uganda. By European Commissions DG ECHO. Gabriel, a South Sudanese man, in a refugee camp in Uganda. By European Commissions DG ECHO.

A few days ago UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon called on the Security Council to take action to end the systematic killings of ethnic and religious minorities in the Middle East. It is not rare that policy makers and journalists highlight ethnic dimensions of violence against civilians. In many conflicts, we see widespread collective targeting of civilians based on their ethnic identity. Bosnia and Southern Sudan are but a few examples.

Yet, whereas numerous news reports and case studies from contemporary conflicts testify to the importance of ethnicity in accounting for civilian targeting, there has so far been very little evidence from quantitative studies to corroborate such notions. One study finds no evidence for the hypothesis that ethnic/identity conflicts are more likely to see…

View original 582 more words

Seeking home: The lives of gay and transgender asylum seekers of the Middle East – The Washington Post

Originally posted on ESPMI Network:

image

Beginning in Damascus, Syria, in 2010, photojournalist Bradley Secker began to document the lives of gay Iraqi refugees that had fled Iraq to escape homophobic violence. Shortly after chronicling their stories, Secker crossed borders and traveled to Turkey, following Iranians, Turkish Kurds, Syrians and more Iraqis who were claiming asylum abroad or fighting for their rights in their home country.

Hundreds of individuals from the Middle Eastapply for resettlement overseas every yearbecause of increased discrimination against their sexuality or gender identity. They wait for their cases to be processed by the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) so they can move to a third country. Iranian LGBT refugees in central Anatolia in Turkey wait an average of two years for their cases to be processed before being resettled in Europe or North America. Over time, Secker’s intimate portraits of the lives of 11 gay Iraqi men in Syria…

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Daily News and Updates from Reliefweb 04/13/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

What an Honest UN Security Council Referral of ISIS to the ICC Would Look Like

Originally posted on Justice in Conflict:

An Islamic State militant (Photo: Reuters) An Islamic State militant (Photo: Reuters)

There has been a lot of chatter on the internet about the need to refer the Islamic State or ISIS / IS / ISIL to the International Criminal Court (ICC). In fact, the subject has received so much attention that ICC Chief Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda felt compelled to issue a statement declaring that her office was unlikely to bring forward any prosecutions against ISIS militants unless Syria or Iraq were referred to the Court.

There is no doubt that accountability for atrocities committed by groups in Iraq and Syria would be a welcome development. The real question is how best to do so and, more specifically, whether referring a particular actor – rather than a state or a territorial situation – would help or hinder the pursuit of justice. In this context, even if there is a growing consensus that, one, ISIS atrocities should…

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Conference: Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance: Local and Global Conceptions and Struggles

Conference:

Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance: Local and Global Conceptions and Struggles Conference

Friday 1 May 2015, University of East London (Docklands).

This conference launches the ESRC-Funded seminar series ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: Learning from History and Thinking Internationally’ organised by Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL). We are grateful to the ESRC, UEL and the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, the University of Glasgow and the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group for their support.

Full programme attached and registration and further details can be found at:
http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/evolving-understandings-of-racism-and-resistance-tickets-16258660090

Evolving understandings of racism and resistance – local and global conceptions and struggles

Friday 1st May 2015

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: JOHN SOLOMOS, STEPHEN SMALL

One-day conference at the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, University of East London in conjunction with the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group

Launching the ESRC-funded seminar series, ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: learning from history and thinking internationally’, organised by Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL).

This conference responds to the urgent need to understand how and why people have mobilised around ethnicity – to challenge racism or to fight for social justice – despite other exclusionary forms of ethnic politics, including campaigns of racism. Whereas we have learned to argue against social policy that divides the population by ethnicity (Commission for Integration and Cohesion, 2007), there is little contemporary debate about the socially beneficial potential of calls to ethnic identity in enabling political mobilisation. At

a time when there is widespread disillusionment with mainstream politics and unexpected and relatively unknown political groupings can emerge to prominence with little warning, it is essential that we understand the range of forms of ethnic mobilisation and the implications of these diverse forms of political engagement.

These questions become urgent in a context of the resurgence of racist movements across Europe and the continuation and intensification of communal divisions in many regions. In many urban spaces, the impacts of economic crises and war have remade the terrain of racism and inequality, hardening some divisions and giving rise to new kinds of ethnic mobilisation that reference religious, national, regional and ethnic identity in ways that reflect the transnational connectedness of these mobile populations.

Papers and discussions will address the following questions and debates, and more:

Contemporary and historical examples of movements against racism and the role of ethnic mobilisation within such movements; the role played by ethnic mobilisations in wider movements for social justice;         changing terrains of racism and new articulations of anti-racist resistance.

Programme:

Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance: Local and Global Conceptions and Struggles

Conference

Friday 1 May 2015

University of East London, East Building, Docklands Campus, E16 2RD

9.30am: Registration, tea and coffee

10am: Welcome and introduction to the ESRC seminar series ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: Learning from History and Thinking Internationally’: Gargi Bhattacharrya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL)

10.15am: Plenary 1: Professor Stephen Small (University of California, Berkeley), Decolonizing the mind for knowledge production and dissemination

11.15am: Tea and coffee break

11.30am: Parallel sessions

Anti-racism in historical perspective

Doron Avraham (Bar Ilan), Contested Concepts of Race and Ethnicity: A Response of German Jews to Nazi Racial Policy

Brendan McGeever (Birkbeck), Racism and Resistance in the Russian Revolution: the political mobilisation of ethnicity in socialist campaigns against antisemitism in revolutionary Russia, 1917-1922.

Lindy Moore (Independent), Networks of anti-racism 1890-1914: the mobilisation of evangelical Christian Socialists

Stephen Ashe (CoDE, Manchester) and Laurence Brown (CoDE, Manchester), Evolving understandings of racism and resistance – local and global conceptions and struggles

Racism and anti-racism in France

Joseph Downing (LSE), Ethnic Mobilisation in the Republic: The Quest to Challenge Exclusionary Narratives of Migration in France

Selim Nadi (Lyon), Organizing anti-racism in France: from the Arab Workers Movement to the Party of the Indigenous of the Republic (1972 – 2010)

Pauline Picot (Université Paris), Ethnic categories and ethnic segmentation within the antiracist activist field in contemporary France

1pm: Lunch break

2pm: Parallel sessions

Migrants and anti-racist organising

Federico Olivieri (Pisa), Migrant struggles as acts against racism Italian contemporary cases in comparative perspective

Alice Mukaka (UEL), Resistance and mobilization around migrant women’s rights: a feminist issue

Sukhwant Dhaliwal, (Bedfordshire) and Kirsten Forkert (BCU), Resisting the Go Home van and other Home Office immigration campaigns

Marella Hoffman, (Cambridge), Belonging and resistance in ethnic communities in Cambridge

Black Politics: then and now

Kehinde Andrews (BCU), Back to Black: Black radical activism in twenty first century Britain

John Narayan (Warwick), The Coloured Cosmopolitanism of Black Power: From The Black Panther Party to #Blacklivesmatter

Fatima Rajina (SOAS), Racism and Resistance: the story of British Bangladeshis

3.30pm: Plenary 2: Professor John Solomos (University of Warwick), Race, Racism and Social Research: between social science and policy

4.30pm: Tea and coffee break

4.45pm: Parallel sessions

Anti-racist practice in institutional settings

Alessio D’Angelo (Middlesex), BME organisations in the UK: communities of resistance or sub-contractors?

Bethan Harries (CoDE, Manchester), “Divide and conquer?” The effects of public sector retrenchment on anti-racist and marginalised community organising

Omar Khan (Runnymede), ‘Ending Racism this Generation': learning from a UK campaign

Islamophobia

Hilary Aked (Bath), The gender segregation on campus furore as a racialised moral panic

Shamira Megnani (Leeds), Alliances across Historical Exclusions: Evoking ‘Guilt by Association’ in the anti-Islamophobia Novel

Aurelien Mondon (Bath), The mainstreaming of racism in France: the resurgence of reactionary propagandists

6.15pm: Closing remarks and Conference closes

This conference launches the ESRC-Funded seminar series ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: Learning from History and Thinking Internationally’ organised by Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL).  We are grateful to the ESRC, UEL and the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, the University of Glasgow and the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group for their support.

Please note that lunch will not be provided at this free event, but facilities to purchase meals, snacks, coffee and tea are available throughout the Docklands site (Menus and information: http://www.dineoncampus.co.uk/uel/places-to-eat.aspx – Map: http://www.dineoncampus.co.uk/doc-assets/docs/UEL_Docklands_Campus_Map.pdf.

Travel and Accommodation:

Directions to Conference Site at UEL, Docklands Campus – which is located at Cyprus Station on the DLR (easily accessible fromn Stratford Station, but please remember to purchase tickets in advance and/or tap your card before entering and after exiting the train): http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

The closest airport is City: http://www.londoncityairport.com/

Accommodation is available in Stratford near and around Westfield Mall, the Olympic Stadium and UEL’s Stratford Campuses (but please note that the conference is not located at the UEL Stratford sites): http://www.visitlondon.com/discover-london/london-areas/east/stratford

Accommodation is also available closer near the Excel Centre:  http://www.excel-london.co.uk/visiting-excel/visitors-guide/hotels/

Do you have questions about Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance? Contact CMRB. UEL

Film Screening: Everyday Borders

The University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB), Southall Black Sisters (SBS), Migrant Rights Network (MRN) and the Refugee and Migrant Forum of Essex and London (RAMFEL) present the following film screening hosted by the SOAS Student Union:

‘Everyday Borders’ (dir. Orson Nava)

The film screening will be followed by a panel discussion with: Meena Patel (SBS), Rita Chadha (Ramfel), Don Flynn (MRN), Georgie Wemyss (CMRB) and Orson Nava. Chair: Nira Yuval-Davis (CMRB)

This event will take place on Thursday 30th April 2015, 19.00–21.00 in G3, SOAS, London, WC1H 0XG

Please reserve a space at: everydayborders.eventbrite.co.uk

Full details can be found below. Please circulate widely.
University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging, Southall Black Sisters, Migrant Rights Network and the Refugee and Migrant Forum of Essex and London present the following film screening hosted by the SOAS Student Union:

Everyday Borders
(dir. Orson Nava)

Film screening followed by a panel discussion with:
Meena Patel (SBS), Rita Chadha (Ramfel), Don Flynn (MRN), Georgie Wemyss (CMRB) and Orson Nava. Chair: Nira Yuval-Davis (CMRB)

This event will take place in G3, SOAS, London, WC1H 0XG
Campus details are here

Thursday 30th April 2015, 19.00–21.00

Please reserve a space at:
everydayborders.eventbrite.co.uk

Increasing numbers of people are becoming border-guards as employers, landlords, health workers and educators are legally required to administer the UK border as part of their everyday lives. As the 2014 Immigration Act pulls more people into border-guard roles, those who are their subjects experience being denied jobs, accommodation, healthcare and education because these border administrators may not be able or willing to understand the complexities of immigration law, may act on racist stereotypes or, threatened by fines and raids, exclude racialised minorities in order to minimize risk to themselves.
What are the implications of these developments to all of us in our daily lives?

AP PHOTOS: Pregnant Syrian refugees fearful of future

Originally posted on ESPMI Network:

622x350
Photo By Muhammed Muheisen/AP
In this Tuesday, March 17, 2015 photo, Syrian refugee Mahdiya Alkhalid, 36, poses for a portrait at nine months pregnant inside her tent at an informal settlement near the Syrian border, on the outskirts of Mafraq, Jordan. Unlike expectant mothers in informal tented settlements, pregnant women in Jordan’s three recognized refugee camps have access to free services, including pre-natal care and delivery, according to the U.N. refugee agency. Zaatari, the largest camp, saw more than 3,500 births last year, out of a total more than 18,000 babies born to refugee mothers in 2014, the agency says.

MAFRAQ, Jordan (AP) — Pregnant refugee women living in informal tent settlements are among the most vulnerable of the hundreds of thousands of Syrians who have found shelter in Jordan. They often can’t afford doctor visits and face potential health hazards because of lack of running water and other challenges.

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Belgian Refugees in Glamorgan

Originally posted on Glamorgan Archives:

When the First World War began in August 1914, one of the first groups of people to be affected were the citizens of Belgium. Fearing persecution by the invading German army, some 250,000 decided to leave the country and relocated to the United Kingdom, the largest influx of refugees in British history. Some of those found new homes in the South Wales valleys.

The local parishes and chapels had a part to play with regards to helping the refugees:

Proposed by Councillor D. Bayliss that the council should recommend to the Public Meeting that as many persons as possible in the Parish should subscribe a certain sum weekly, to maintain a family of Refugees during the period of War. Carried. St Brides Minor Parish Council (P78)

It was proposed by Councillor D Lewis that they allow rates to be free on the Belgian Refugee House. Carried. St Brides Minor Parish…

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e-Borders Arbitration Set Aside for ‘Serious Irregularity’

Originally posted on United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog:

These judgments given by Akenhead J relate to the e-Borders controversy. The e-Borders passenger information system was marketed as a one-stop solution to the UK’s immigration and security problems. Under e-Borders the Home Office sought to create an electronic system to examine everyone entering and exiting the UK by verifying their details against immigration, police and security related watch lists. In Raytheon Systems Ltd[2014] EWHC 4375 (TCC), Akenhead J set aside an arbitral award (in e-Borders contractor Raytheon’s favour) because of “serious irregularity” within the meaning of section 68(2)(d) of the Arbitration Act 1996 (“the 1996 Act”). In December 2014, the court held that the arbitration tribunal failed to deal with all the issues (of fault and responsibility attributable to Raytheon which were highly relevant to quantum) put to it. Subsequently, in Raytheon Systems Ltd[2015] EWHC 311 (TCC), in February 2015, Akenhead J set the arbitration award (£200+…

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The Guardian: Clashes in Damascus refugee camp after reported arrival of Isis

Originally posted on ESPMI Network:

Palestinian officials says Islamic State fighters have entered Yarmouk refugee camp in Syrian capital and are under attack from anti-government rebels.

Residents of the besieged Palestinian camp of Yarmouk queue to receive food supplies in Damascus. Photograph: UNRWA/AP

Fighting has erupted throughout Yarmouk refugee camp in Damascus, with observers claiming Islamic State has entered the area, less than 10 miles from the Syrian capital’s most secure hub.

Yarmouk, the largest Palestinian camp in Syria, has been a frequent battle zone pitting regime forces against mainstream and Islamist rebels during more than three years of fighting, which along with a brutal siege has emptied it of all but around 15,000 of its pre-war population of close to 200,000 residents.

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Notes on the Conflict in Yemen: Local vs. Transnational Roots of Violence

Originally posted on Political Violence @ a Glance:

Guest post by Thomas Eilers

Street art in Yemen. Photo by Thomas Eilers. Street art in Yemen. Photo by Thomas Eilers.

Shots crackled sporadically throughout the day as dark plumes of smoke rose from different areas of the city. Protesters took to the streets of Sana’a in early June 2014, angered by fuel shortages and high gas prices. The young men demonstrating on the street that I lived on carried a sign reading, “need water.” Most were angry with President Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi and the transitional government for failing to provide basic goods and services. At the end of the day, President Hadi dismissed five ministers. Two months later the Houthis, also known as Ansar Allah, took advantage of the widespread frustration and led major protests calling for the government to step down. One month later in September, the Houthis took control of Sana’a.

Yemen is mired in a civil war overshadowed by regional rivalries. On…

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Refugee Counci Archive at UEL: Recently Received Books

On behalf of the Refugee Council Archive here at the University of East London, we have recently received the following reference books to add to the collection:

The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies. Edited by Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyehm Gil Loescher, Katy Long, and Nando Sigona.  Archive Reference: QU5 OXF.

Further details taken from the abstract available on the Oxford University Press website:

This authoritative Handbook critically evaluates the birth and development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, and analyses the key contemporary and future challenges faced by academics and practitioners working with and for forcibly displaced populations around the world. The 52 state-of-the-art chapters, written by leading academics, practitioners, and policymakers working in universities, research centres, think tanks, NGOs and international organizations, provide a comprehensive and cutting-edge overview of the key intellectual, political, social and institutional challenges arising from mass displacement in the world today. The chapters vividly illustrate the vibrant and engaging debates that characterize this rapidly expanding field of research and practice.

Further details on the Handbook can also be found on the pages of the Refugee Studies Centre.

Child and Youth Migration : mobility-in-migration in an era of globalization. Edited by Angela Veale, University College Cork, Ireland and Giorgia Dona, University of East London, UK. Archive Reference: QU86.22 VEA.

Further details taken from the abstract available on the Palgrave website:

Migration across multiple borders is a defining feature of the time in which we live, and children are central to this contemporary migration phenomenon. A core aim of this volume is to contribute at an empirical level to knowledge about the intersection between children, migration, and mobilities by highlighting underresearched child and youth short-term and micro movements within major migration fluxes that occur in response to migration and global change. This collection positions this complex mobility-in-migration within individual, intergenerational, and collective migratory lifespan trajectories. Drawing together empirical research from around the globe, we see how in the lives of children and young people, migration and mobility intersect so that migration is not an end state but rather is one form of movement in lives characterized by multiple journeys, short, circular or seasonal migrations, and holiday and pleasure mobilities that are dynamic and often ongoing into the future.

The Battle of Britishness : migrant journeys, 1685 to the present by Tony Kushner. Archive Reference: QU60.574 KUS.

Further details taken from the abstract available on the Manchester University Press website:

This pioneering study of migrant journeys to Britain begins with Huguenot refugees in the 1680s and continues to asylum seekers and east European workers today. Analyzing the history and memory of migrant journeys, covering not only the response of politicians and the public but also literary and artistic representations, then and now, Kushner’s volume sheds new light on the nature and construction of Britishness from the early modern era onwards. It is an essential tool for those wanting to understand why people come to Britain (or are denied entry) and how migrants have been viewed by state and society alike.

The (Conditional) Effectiveness of International Human Rights Courts

Originally posted on Political Violence @ a Glance:

Guest post by Jillienne Haglund

A sign at the entrance to the International Criminal Court. By Alkan Boudewijn de Beaumont Chaglar. A sign at the entrance to the International Criminal Court. By Alkan Boudewijn de Beaumont Chaglar.

On March 10th, the International Peace Institute (IPI), along with the Permanent Mission of Liechtenstein to the United Nations, cohosted a panel bringing together scholars, legal practitioners, diplomats and representatives from human rights organizations to discuss whether the International Criminal Court (ICC) deters atrocities, or more generally, whether the ICC is an effective institution. As the only global forum for individual criminal prosecution, the ICC represents an institution of critical importance in international relations. To date, 122 states have ratified the Rome Statute and accepted the jurisdiction of the ICC. The ICC aims to end impunity for the perpetrators of large-scale human rights abuses by prosecuting individuals responsible for atrocities. Twenty-two cases in 9 situations have been brought before the ICC and in 2012, the ICC issued its…

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Union Law and Kafka under the EEA Regulations

Originally posted on United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog:

The Immigration (European Economic Area) (Amendment) Regulations 2015 (“the 2015 Regulations”), which enter into force on 6 April 2015, further amend the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2006 (“the 2006 Regulations”). Among other things, the 2015 Regulations aim to amend the transposition of Directive 2004/38/EC (“the Citizens’ Directive”) and implement the decision in Case C-202/13 McCarthy and OthersECLI:EU:C:2014:2450; they also aim to synchronise the 2006 Regulations with the new system of appeals produced by the Immigration Act 2014 (“the 2014 Act”) that will apply to all appeals from next month. Part 5 of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 (“the 2002 Act”), which contains the appeals’ infrastructure in relation to immigration decisions, intersects with the appeals system established by the 2006 Regulations. With the arrival of the 2014 Act, and the reformulation of appeals’ framework, several provisions of the 2002 Act have been recast in a different…

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HC 1116 and ‘Abuse’ of Asylum by Syrians

Originally posted on United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog:

s01_10031615Statement of Changes in Immigration Rules HC 1116 was immediately condemned as “sickening”. Undoubtedly, the formula of a well-founded fear of persecution is wide open to abuse. However, in light of all the carnage that we have witnessed over the last few years, nothing could be further from the truth in the case of Syria. Designed to be a preemptive instrument, HC 1116 removes the transit without visa exemption in respect of Syrians possessing a B1 (temporary visitor for business) or B2 (temporary visitor for pleasure) category visa for entry to the United States of America. Not so long ago, the mosques of Damascus and Aleppo attracted tourists from every corner of the world who wanted to see the relics of the “Golden Age of Islam”. In addition to being a centre of culture and spiritualism, Syria was also the birthplace of Arab nationalism. Because of the Tigris and

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ToC Alert: Int J Refugee Law Table of Contents for December 1, 2014; Vol. 26, No. 4

Articles

The Contemporary International Law Status of the Right to Receive Asylum
William Thomas Worster
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 477-499
[Abstract]

The Safe Country of Origin Concept in European Asylum Law: Past, Present and Future
Matthew Hunt
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 500-535
[Abstract]

UNHCR’s Involvement with IDPs – ‘Protection of that Country’ for the Purposes of Precluding Refugee Status?
Bríd Ní Ghráinne
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 536-554
[Abstract]

Expanding Protection in Africa? Case Studies of the Implementation of the 1969 African Refugee Convention’s Expanded Refugee Definition
Tamara Wood
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 555-580
[Abstract]

Palestinian Refugees and the Syrian Uprising: Filling the Protection Gap during Secondary Forced Displacement
Noura Erakat
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 581-621
[Abstract]

Case Law

Febles v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration) Supreme Court of Canada
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 622-654
[Extract]

Case BVerwG 10 C 7.13: German Federal Administrative Court
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 655-669
[Extract]

Matter of A-R-C-G- et al., Respondents
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 670-676
[Extract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

FTZK v Minister for Immigration and Border Protection
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 677
[Extract]

Documents

Guidelines on Temporary Protection or Stay Arrangements
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 678-686
[Extract]

Statement by Volker Türk: Director of International Protection
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 687-699
[Extract]

Submissions of the Intervener: The Queen (on the Application of B) v The Director of the Legal Aid Casework
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 700-715
[Extract]

 

Book Reviews

Gender in Refugee Law. From the Margins to the Centre
Hannah Baumeister
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 716-718
[Extract]

Humanitarian Law in Action in Africa
Hannah Baumeister
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 719-720
[Extract]

European Asylum Law and the Rights of the Child
Helmut Sax
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 721-724
[Extract]

Protection of Refugees and Displaced Persons in the Asia Pacific Region
Ivan Shearer
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 724-727
[Extract]

The Ethics of Immigration
Dr Baerbel Heide Uhl
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 727-729
[Extract]

Daily International News Stories Round-up 04/18/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 04/18/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Human Rights Tools for a Changing World

Originally posted on The Advocates Post:

Change the World front coverThe Advocates for Human Rights’ Executive Director Robin Phillips is in London today speaking about The Advocates’ human rights monitoring work at the International Bar Association’s colloquium on “Rule of Law Fact-Finding by NGOs: Monitoring Standards and Maximising Impact”.

This international convening to explore the standards and impact of non-governmental organization (NGO) fact-finding on human rights violations is also an appropriate setting to introduce The Advocates’ latest publication:

        Human Rights Tools for a Changing World:  A Step-by-Step Guide to Human Rights Fact-finding, Documentation and Advocacy 

Human rights advocacy takes many forms, and human rights activists can be found in every corner of the world.  Human Rights Tools for a Changing World was created with the express purpose of providing advocates of all backgrounds and experiences a full range of tools and resources to promote human rights in a changing world.

This manual provides practical, step-by-step…

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