ESRC Festival of Social Science

UEL Research, Innovation and Enterprise

The Festival of Social Science offers an opportunity for researchers to hold events aimed at non-academic audiences. Events which are aimed primarily at academic audiences are not eligible to be part of the Festival or to receive sponsorship.

The Festival of Social Science 2016 will take place from 5-12 November, and applications for sponsorship of up to £1,000 can be made to assist with events.

The Festival of Social Science is designed to promote and increase awareness of social sciences and ESRC’s research, enable social scientists to engage with non-academics and increase awareness of the contributions the social sciences make to the wellbeing and the economy of the UK society.

Each year the Festival:

  • offers a week of activities celebrating the diversity of ESRC funded and social science research
  • has an even geographical spread of activities across the UK
  • continues to increase the number events focused on engaging the public…

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Psychology Seminar Series: 11th May 2016, Professor Catherine Campbell

UEL Research, Innovation and Enterprise

UEL Psychology Seminar Series

Date: 11th May 2016

Time: 17:00 – 18:00

Venue: Arthur Edwards Building, Room 1.01

Understanding women’s agency in highly coercive settings: gender, power and social change.

This paper explores the complexities of talking about women’s agency in extremely oppressive situations – and how confused and limited understandings of women’s agency undermine the effectiveness of policies and interventions supposedly designed to support them. Drawing on international research into interventions to support women survivors of domestic violence it focuses on three key themes: (i) the problematic male-female and victim-agency binaries that obscure the complexity of agency-violence intersections, (ii) the poor fit between policy and interventions to support women in coercive settings and (iii) the neglect of the multiplicities of women’s agency, including the competing challenges they juggle alongside IPV, the often hidden strategies they use to manage violent relationships, and the temporality of agency. It concludes by…

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Now published: Syrian Researchers in Exile

ESPMI Network

cropped-capture-2

To download the full volume, click here.

Part I
Interview with James King – Assistant Director IIE-SRF

Syrian Academics between Reality and Ambition: The Perspective of a Syrian Academic in Exile

Returning Before the Crisis and then Leaving Again

PART II.
Articles and interviews with Syrian Researchers in Exile

The Role of Risk and Resilience in Access to Education: A Case Study of a Syrian Community School in Beirut Lebanon

Data Analytics in Citizen Cyberscience: Evaluating Participant Learning and Engagement with Analytics

Interview with Dr. Oula Abu-Amsha – The Role of Risk and Resilience in Access to Education: A Case Study of a Syrian Community School in Beirut Lebanon

Governance of Agriculture in Syria between Economics and Politics: Analysis of the Pre-Revolution Period

Interview with Dr. Ahmad Sadiddin – Governance of Agriculture in Syria between Economics and Politics: Analysis of the Pre-Revolution Period

Algorithm and Techniques of Prediction, Data Mining, and Big…

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The UK to take 3000 extra refugee children by 2020: generous, isn’t it?

#ArchivesRock on International Archives Day 2016

Ask Archivists

Zeeuws Archief_nl-mdbza_296-988_kzwg-zi-iii_rederijkers_middelburg_1785 Parade of ‘Rederijkers’ making music in Middelburg (province Zeeland, The Netherlands). Engraving by Daniël Veelwaard and Jan Arends, ca 1784/1785. Zeeuws Archief/Zeeland Archives, Zeeuws Genootschap, Zelandia Illustrata, dl III, nr 988.

Let’s celebrate June 9

International Archives Day 2016 #IAD16 is coming up! Like every year Follow An Archive and Ask Archivists organize a celebration event on Twitter.
With the celebration event we join the June 9 theme ‘Archives, Harmony and Friendship‘ of the International Council on Archives (ICA).
The theme of the annual Twitter event will be #archivesrock. It’s about music in archives.

Archives rock

Music makes a perfect match with the ICA theme ‘Archives, Harmony and Friendship’!
Remember the song ‘Ebony and Ivory’, a 1982 number-one single by Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder?
“Ebony and ivory live together in perfect harmony | Side by side on my piano…”.
It contains music and lyrics worth to…

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Call for Applications – (Forced) Migration and Media Workshop – 13th of June, University of Leicester

Call for Applications – (Forced) Migration and Media Workshop – 13th of June, University of Leicester

Call for Applications – Workshop (Forced) Migration and Media at the University of Leicester

13th and 14th of June, 2016

This workshop consists of two days: the first day is targeted on academic knowledge sharing whereas the second day is aimed at dialogue with community organisations in and around Leicester. 

For the first day of this workshop – Monday, the 13th of June – we are looking for applicants who conduct research on how media and forced migration intersect. The deadline to submit your abstract is on the Sunday, the 15th of May, 23.59 GMT.

Delegates are more than welcome to also attend the workshop of the 14th of June.  

Outline Day 1 – Interdisciplinary Workshop aimed at academic knowledge exchange

Digital technologies have “woven themselves into the everyday lives of refugees” (Wilding and Gifford , 2013), opening up new spaces for agency and creativity. For example, 96% of the refugees in Uganda use mobile phones, which is a much higher percentage than the general population (Betts, 2014). We aim to bring together established and upcoming scholars from different areas together in order to further understand and increase our knowledge on the mediation of (forced) migration.

The academic interest for (forced) migrants and media is very topical given the influence of the ‘refugee crisis in Europe’- for instance in dehumanizing language regarding refugees and other migrants in the British media or the confusion about the realization that refugees own smartphones.

But while ethnographic research has indeed shown that diasporic communities are often vanguards of digital technologies and it is clear that forced migration and mediated connectivity are increasingly intertwined, critical research in this area is still lacking. The few notable exceptions show that media (mass media and social media) can influence one’s feelings of security, but can also provide opportunities to strategise and negotiate one’s position of insecurity (Aouragh, 2011; Collyer, 2007; Dekker and Engersen, 2012; Horst, 2006; Moore and Clifford, 2007; Wilding and Gifford, 2013).

We are looking for applicants who conduct research to further the understanding on how media and forced migration intersect. New and old media play a crucial role in the lives of (forced) migrants. Within this workshop we aim to explore how we can understand the intersections between different media forms, including people’s own media use, and (forced) migration. We bracket the forced, as we recognise that the label ‘refugee’ can have its own difficulties, and could even be considered as a governing tool appropriated by nation-states. This workshop could therefore also be opened up to people who consider mixed migration or challenge the distinction between economic and forced migrations in regard to media.

The workshop (see a detailed program in the attachment) includes interactive activities in which established scholars, new career researchers and post-graduate students from a wide variety of fields are able to learn from each other and write together. 

After a general opening and key note speeches, the keynote speaker will be working within a small group of early career researchers (max. 5/6 people) on a specific subject which is related to the one of the 4 streams.
The 4 streams are:
1. Media representations of (forced) migration.
2. Methodology, media and migration.
3. Trajectories of (forced) migrants.
4. Media power in the politics of (forced) migration.
For a more detailed description of these streams, please have a look at the attachment or on our Facebook event-page: Workshop (Forced) Migration and Media.

The objective of the afternoon session is creating a more informal space where researchers working on similar subjects can present their work with people working on similar issues and to someone who has a tracked record in the field.

In the closing plenary session we will look for bridges, and consider how we as academics can best engage to policies and practices.

We ask you to submit the title of your work, an abstract of maximum 300 words and a short motivation of maximum 200 words why your works fits best in what particular stream by Sunday, the 15th of May, 23.59 GMT to mediamigrationworkshop@gmail.com.

Accepted participants will be notified by the 20th of May.

Costs: Attendees are asked to contribute £10 each, in order to contribute to the travel costs of attendees without funding. Those attendees who have to travel far within the UK and do not have funding to cover travel costs can contact us for additional funding.

Full details on the streams and program can be downloaded as follows: Streams and Program – Workshop Forced Migration and Media.

For more information or any questions, please contact mediamigrationworkshop@gmail.com, Mirjam Twigt, mat35@le.ac.uk or Zakaria Sajir: zs70@le.ac.uk or contact us through the Facebook event-page: Workshop (Forced) Migration and Media.

For more information on the Community Impact Event on the 14th of June, please contact Idil Osman io40@le.ac.uk or Mirjam Twigt: mat35@le.ac.uk.

What it’s like to live on a Syrian refugee’s stipend

ESPMI Network

syrian-refugees-1-2000x1333 (Image: Kayla Rocca)

Once the tearful photo-ops are over, newly arrived Syrian refugees face the task of making a life in Canada. It’s not a leisurely process: the vast majority need to learn English, integrate into a new culture and acquire the skills necessary to support themselves before their financial aid runs out. Complicating matters further is the fact that Canada’s refugee support system is two-tiered: some arrivals are sponsored by private groups with enthusiastic volunteers and ample funds, while others are sponsored by a resource-strapped federal bureaucracy. Here, a close-up look at the financial realities faced by three groups of recent arrivals who, despite having fled from the same country at roughly the same time, now face very different circumstances in Toronto.

The Al Rassoul family

Who: Mahmoud, 40; Isaaf, 38 (Mahmoud’s wife); Reyak, 39 and Saadah, 30 (Mahmoud’s sisters); Malek, Mohammad, Maher, Mohannad…

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Asotthalom, Hungary: Hungary’s Border War on Refugees

ESPMI Network

86659561fe874904af3cbc64fafabe8a_18 A village patrol officer driving along the border fence [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera] Asotthalom, Hungary –   A group of five police officers chopped wood and tossed it in a small fire pit as the brisk wind rattled their makeshift tent, hastily constructed with plastic tarps and tree branches to shield them from the cold on a morning in early March near the Hungarian border village of Asotthalom.

On the Serbian side of the Hungarian border fence that lines the 175-kilometre border between the two countries, abandoned Yugoslav army barracks and watchtowers testified to wars that had concluded 15 years earlier.

Today, however, the Hungarian army has launched a war of its own – one to stem the flow of refugees and migrants into Central Europe.

An army jeep bounced along the dirt road that hugs the barbed wire-crowned fence. A unit of officers from the village patrol sauntered along the…

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News: Border force warns terrorists could enter EU by abusing asylum checks

News:

Border force warns terrorists could enter EU by abusing asylum checks
By Migration correspondent at The Guardian

Frontex police escort migrants, who are being deported from Lesbos, on to a ferry before it returns to Turkey. Photograph: Milos Bicanski/Getty Images

Frontex border agency’s annual risk analysis echoes previous warnings that irregular migratory flows could be used by terrorists to enter the EU.

The EU’s border force has warned that terrorists may have infiltrated Europe by hiding among asylum seekers, noting that two of the bombers in last November’s Paris attacks arrived on the continent in a smuggling boat from Turkey.

Frontex’s annual risk analysis, released on Tuesday, said: “The Paris attacks in November 2015 clearly demonstrated that irregular migratory flows could be used by terrorists to enter the EU.”

Echoing observations made five months ago, the report added: “Two of the terrorists involved in the attacks had previously irregularly entered through Leros and had been registered by the Greek authorities. They presented fraudulent Syrian documents to speed up their registration process.

“As the vast majority of migrants arrive undocumented, screening activities are essential to properly verify their declaration of nationality.”

Frontex’s suggestions come weeks after European politicians introduced a stringent new border policy that will see almost all asylum seekers landing on islands such as Leros returned to Turkey.

Read Full Article – Border force warns terrorists could enter EU by abusing asylum checks.

 

New Journal Research Articles for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (weekly) (weekly)

  • “Online research methodologies may serve as an important mechanism for population-focused data collection in social work research. Online surveys have become increasingly prevalent in research inquiries with young people and have been acknowledged for their potential in investigating understudied and marginalized populations and subpopulations, permitting increased access to communities that tend to be less visible—and thus often less studied—in offline contexts. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) young people are a socially stigmatized, yet digitally active, youth population whose participation in online surveys has been previously addressed in the literature. Many of the opportunities and challenges of online survey research identified with LGBTQ youths may be highly relevant to other populations of marginalized and hard-to-access young people, who are likely present in significant numbers in the online environment (for example, ethnoracialized youths and low-income youths). In this article, the utility of online survey methods with marginalized young people is discussed, and recommendations for social work research are provided. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Call for Papers: Signs Journal invites submissions for special issue on ‘Displacement’

ESPMI Network

Signs-try-e1349357333542

Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society invites submissions for a special issue titled “Displacement,” slated for publication in spring 2018.

The current refugee crisis gives new urgency to questions of gendered displacement. The United Nations’ most recent statistics place the number of registered Syrian refugees at 4.7 million, 50.7 percent of whom are women and over half of whom are children under eighteen. During the same period, tens of thousands of Central American women and children have crossed the Rio Grande into the United States. Feminists have already responded to concerns about sexual violence in refugee camps and during refugees’ journeys and to the gendered response to the crisis on the part of receiving states (i.e., demographic concerns surrounding gender ratios of migrants admitted). What are the larger questions of “displacement” that require an interdisciplinary and transnational feminist lens?

This special issue of Signs seeks submissions reflecting multifaceted…

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Rewiring the Trojan Horse scandal

Postcards from ...

I’ve found my highlight for this year’s British Sociological Association conference held at the University of Aston – a small fringe event in the lunch break organised by the webzine Discover Society entitled ‘Questioning British values?’

It rarely happens (mostly because of my laziness perhaps) to come out from a conference session with a new way of seeing the world. The panel did it for me in relation to the Trojan Horse scandal, unpicking its significance on multiple levels and raising questions whose implication are far reaching.  Is it not unusual that to address fundamentalism we recur to a vocabulary of fundamental values? Was the academisation of school not all about raising education standard and involvement of local communities? How come that the same initiatives that OFSTED had raised as evidence of success for one school, became evidence against the same school a few months later? How vulnerable to political…

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New “How I Got Here” Series: #1 Being a Jew in Baghdad wasn’t safe anymore

ESPMI Network

346 Zigi Ben-Haim in the Bay Area, 1973

I was born in Baghdad, Iraq, in 1945. When I was four, it started to get dangerous for my parents to continue to live there. The authorities were after my father. This forced us to leave the country in a hurry. To make sure our house help wouldn’t suspect our plans, we made the breakfast table look as if we were ready to eat in the morning. But by time the sun rose, we were gone.

We escaped our house through a hole we dug under the exterior walls the night before. Leaving through the main door would have aroused too much suspicion. A car was waiting to take us away when we crawled out. We left behind our property, all our possessions and wealth. The smuggler was well-paid. He added us to a group of Shia pilgrims who were on their way…

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News: Greece on brink of chaos as refugees riot over forced return to Turkey

News from The Guardian (UK):

Greece on brink of chaos as refugees riot over forced return to Turkey

A woman feeds pigeons at the port of Piraeus near Athens where migrants are camped out. Photograph: Yorgos Karahalis/AP Image Copyright: Guardian and Associated Press.

The Greek government is bracing itself for violence ahead of the European Union implementing a landmark deal that, from Monday, will see Syrian refugees and migrants being deported back to Turkey en masse.

Rioting and rebellion by thousands of entrapped refugees across Greece has triggered mounting fears in Athens over the practicality of enforcing an agreement already marred by growing concerns over its legality. Islands have become flashpoints, with as many as 800 people breaking out of a detention centre on Chios on Friday.

Some 750 migrants are set to be sent back between Monday and Wednesday from the island of Lesbos to the Turkish port of Dikili.

“We are expecting violence. People in despair tend to be violent,” the leftist-led government’s migration spokesman, Giorgos Kyritsis, told the Observer. “The whole philosophy of the deal is to deter human trafficking [into Europe] from the Turkish coast, but it is going to be difficult and we are trying to use a soft approach. These are people have fled war. They are not criminals.”

Barely 24 hours ahead of the pact coming into force, it emerged that Frontex, the EU border agency, had not dispatched the appropriate personnel to oversee the operation. Eight Frontex boats will transport men, women and children, who are detained on Greek islands and have been selected for deportation, back across the Aegean following fast-track asylum hearings. But of the 2,300 officials the EU has promised to send Greece only 200 have so far arrived, Kyritsis admitted.

Read Full Article: Greece on brink of chaos as refugees riot over forced return to Turkey.

News: Conditions Rapidly Deteriorating for Children Detained in Moria Camp on Lesvos

News from ReliefWeb:

Conditions Rapidly Deteriorating for Children Detained in Moria Camp on Lesvos

Media Contact: Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, CT (April 3, 2016) — Save the Children expressed deep concern today over the deplorable conditions in Moria detention center on the Greek island of Lesvos, where more than 1,000 children, many traveling alone, are detained as part of the EU-Turkey deal.

In addition to concerns around the detention of asylum seekers, the agency is also shocked by the lack of safeguards in place for those likely to be returned to Turkey in less than 24 hours. It calls on European leaders to urgently rethink their proposal and suspend all transfers to Turkey until there is a guarantee that those in need of international protection will receive it.

“The situation inside Moria detention center is deteriorating rapidly,” said Simona Mortolini, Save the Children Team Leader in Greece. “We have spoken to families and children who are sleeping outside on the cold ground on thin blankets because there is nowhere else for them to sleep in the overcrowded accommodation facilities. The camp was initially designed to host a few hundred people transiting through within a day. It now hosts 3,300 people, many have been trapped there for more than a week.”

“People continue to arrive to the island and the number of families detained in the center continues to increase by the day. It is extremely dangerous for children and we are worried about their physical and mental well-being, especially those children travelling alone.”

“There are reports of protests and people have told us they will commit suicide if they are sent back to Turkey. Some said they will jump off the boats. People are absolutely desperate. They have sold all their worldly possessions to pay for the journey from Turkey to Greece, they already risked their lives at sea to make the crossing. There is nothing left for them to return to – in Turkey or in their countries of origin that are marred by wars and widespread violence and insecurity.”

As part of the new EU-Turkey deal, which came into effect on 20 March, newly-arrived vulnerable children and their families, regardless of their status, have been detained in closed facilities on the Greek islands until their individual interview and assessment take place – which could take weeks or months.

Read Full Article – Conditions Rapidly Deteriorating for Children Detained in Moria Camp on Lesvos

 

News – Migrant crisis: Greece starts deportations to Turkey

From the BBC News Service:

Migrant crisis: Greece starts deportations to Turkey

First group of returned migrants were welcomed by Turkish officials in Diki. Image Copyright: BBC.

The first boat carrying migrants being deported from Greece has arrived in Turkey as part of an EU plan aimed at easing mass migration to Europe.

Scores of migrants boarded ferries on the Greek island of Lesbos and arrived in Dikili, western Turkey.

Frontex, the EU’s border agency, told the BBC that most of the 136 people who left Lesbos on Monday were Pakistanis.

Meanwhile, the first group of 16 Syrian migrants has arrived in Germany from Turkey, officials say.

Under the deal, for each Syrian migrant returned to Turkey, the EU is due to take in another Syrian who has made a legitimate request.

However, Greek authorities said the first deportees were those who had not applied for asylum, and included citizens from Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Morocco.

And Turkey’s EU Affairs Minister Volkan Bozkir said there were no Syrians among the first group of migrants sent from Greece.

Another ferry carrying migrants to Turkey is also due to leave the Greek island of Chios on Monday.

The returns were carried out calmly, despite a small protest at the gate of Lesbos port, where activists shouted ‘No to deportations’ and ‘EU shame on you’, the BBC’s Sarah Rainsford at the scene said.

Read Full Article – Migrant crisis: Greece starts deportations to Turkey.

See Also – ReliefWeb: Turkey prepares for up to 500 migrants from Greece on Monday

New Journal Research Articles for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 04/03/2016

  • “Why did the United Nations General Assembly confer upon the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) a broad global mandate to address statelessness only in 1995 (four decades after the Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons was adopted) and not before? To address this question, this article examines the evolving relationship between UNHCR and the international community in regard to statelessness before 1995, drawing upon UNHCR archival records and official documents, Executive Committee conclusions, and General Assembly resolutions. Contrary to popular perception, UNHCR attempted to engage states on statelessness during the Cold War, exceeding its formal powers in doing so. However, states remained indifferent to UNHCR’s efforts. After the Cold War, the international community grew increasingly concerned with mass influxes of refugees possibly resulting from large-scale situations of statelessness in Eastern Europe, and pressured UNHCR to assume greater responsibility for averting such crises – and UNHCR was willing to do so. By 1995, the timing was opportune for the international community to empower UNHCR to lead the global effort against statelessness. As this article demonstrates, the refugee problem remained central to actions involving – and attitudes towards – statelessness by UNHCR and the international community, both during and after the Cold War. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Central America’s ‘Northern Triangle’ (El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras) is now among the most violent areas in the world due to the confluence of drug trafficking, gang culture, and lack of state control in some areas. As a result, thousands have fled to seek protection abroad. Nevertheless, asylum rates do not seem properly to acknowledge that a large proportion of these individuals may be entitled to refugee status or other forms of international protection. The purpose of this paper is to study how the particular characteristics of these forms of violence create international protection needs and how law and practice have responded to them. This issue is further explored through an analysis of eleven protection profiles from the region and their particular challenges in obtaining international protection. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The Almaty Process, a regional consultative process on migration, brings together international organizations, four Central Asian states and several neighbouring states, and civil society organizations to find solutions to regional migration challenges through intergovernmental dialogue, cooperation, and capacity building. The Almaty Process began in 2011 with the Regional Conference on Refugee Protection and International Migration in Central Asia. It is the fifth in a series of regional consultative processes organized by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the International Organization for Migration in regions where refugee protection is in jeopardy. It offers participating states an opportunity to discuss and resolve important migration issues in an environment that respects state sovereignty and security as well as human rights. International organizations play an essential role in the Almaty Process in terms of funding, organizational and technical support, and educating and socializing participating state actors. Among other objectives, through the Almaty Process, UNHCR seeks to assist participating states in improving compliance with international refugee law, while also ensuring the protection of national security. Although the participating Central Asian countries are ‘awkward states’, and the Almaty Process faces various challenges, it has the potential to facilitate increased compliance with international refugee law in Central Asia. Ultimately, the Almaty Process could also contribute to addressing some of the root causes of migration in the region, particularly the underlying lack of respect for human rights. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Recently, in Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom, tribunals determining refugee status appear to have adopted the position that North Korean refugee claimants are indeed South Korean nationals (and thus dual nationals). Accordingly, unless North Korean claimants can demonstrate a well-founded fear of persecution in the Republic of Korea (South Korea), they should be denied international protection under the Refugee Convention. A well-founded fear of persecution has long been recognized as the core element of refugee status in international refugee law. However, a growing number of scholars have begun to challenge the dominance of this view of refugee status. The emerging perspective points to lack of state protection as the essential aspect of refugee status. According to this ‘protection perspective’, refugee status is premised on the assumption that there should be a meaningful protection relationship between a state and its citizens that reflects the normative values formalized in the legal concept of ‘nationality’ or ‘citizenship’. According to this emerging view, one should look beyond merely theoretical nationality and determine whether each nationality of a refugee is effective. This understanding of nationality in the context of the refugee determination process gives rise to a new juridical approach in which the claims of North Korean refugees should be assessed according to different criteria. This article argues that, at least in cases of dual nationality, the protection perspective should be adopted. Where the facts permit, international protection should be provided to North Korean refugees, even outside South Korea. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Land dispossession and conflicts over land compound resettlement efforts in post-conflict contexts. This is particularly true in rural sub-Saharan African countries, where the vast majority of livelihoods depend on maintaining access and rights to cultivable land. This article engages in the active debate on this topic using ethnographic research conducted in the Teso region in eastern Uganda during 2012 and 2013. The Teso region experienced three violent conflicts from the late 1960s to the mid-2000s, which at times were overlapping: large-scale cattle rustling, a civil war, and an insurgency. The research focuses on Amuria District, Katakwi District, and Tisai Island in Kumi District in order to consider three interrelated phenomena: the cyclical nature of the displacement-resettlement process, the intra-regional differences in how this process has unfolded, and the particular ways in which struggles over land are deeply embedded within the post-conflict context. The article argues that post-conflict rearrangements in property relations create complex challenges for resettling populations, and if left unaddressed will merely result in increasingly unstable land tenure regimes. It also argues that struggles over land in Teso should not be understood solely through a post-conflict lens, as there are a variety of drivers – some not tied directly to the violent conflicts – that interact with post-conflict dynamics to create a perfect storm for land tenure instability. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Several initiatives to create a national Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) for Bosnia and Herzegovina were launched between 1997 and 2006, but none came to fruition. This article explains the rationale behind the pursuit of a truth-telling mechanism alongside the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), as well as the resistance to such initiatives both internationally and domestically. It argues that, despite the considerable efforts of external actors to create a TRC for Bosnia, the project foundered for three principal reasons: political resistance, institutional rivalry between the ICTY and the TRC project, and the TRC project’s lack of legitimacy, notably among Bosnia’s victim associations. The history of the failed TRC project in Bosnia holds important lessons for ongoing truth-seeking attempts in the region and beyond, and highlights problems that arise in postconflict societies with a high level of international involvement. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In 1967, philosopher Bertrand Russell set up an unofficial war crimes tribunal to investigate the actions of the US in Vietnam. This article explores the link between the Russell Tribunal and transitional justice. In recent years, critical voices have called for a transitional justice that is less legalistic and state-centric and more concerned with socioeconomic issues. The Russell Tribunal was an early instance of a transitional justice practice whose traits resonated with these critiques. It challenged legalism, breached the judicial monopoly of the state and criticized the economic global order. Given this affinity, the Russell Tribunal can provide critical approaches to transitional justice with a historic antecedent and a mechanism to push their agenda forward. Unofficial tribunals, inspired by the Russell initiative, can be useful tools for a transitional justice that is broader and more amenable to alternative perspectives. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Table of Contents Alert: International Journal of Refugee Law

Oxford Journals have just published their latest Table of Contents journal alert for the International Journal of Refugee Law.  Further details on the articles included in  Vol. 28, No. 1 (March 2016) are detailed below:

Editorial

Editorial
Jane McAdam
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 1-6
[Extract]

Articles

The Origins of UNHCR’s Global Mandate on Statelessness
Matthew Seet
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 7-24
[Abstract]

Fleeing Cartels and Maras: International Protection Considerations and Profiles from the Northern Triangle
Nicolás Rodríguez Serna
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 25-54
[Abstract]

The Almaty Process: Improving Compliance with International Refugee Law in Central Asia
Cynthia Orchard
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 55-84
[Abstract]

Lack of State Protection or Fear of Persecution? Determining the Refugee Status of North Koreans in Canada
Seunghwan Kim
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 85-108
[Abstract]

Case Law Summaries

Case Law Summaries
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 109-115
[Extract]

Documents

Note on International Protection: Executive Committee of the High Commissioner’s Programme
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 116-134
[Abstract]

Statement by Volker Türk: Assistant High Commissioner for Protection, UNHCR
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 135-147
[Extract]

Alternatives to Detention: Executive Committee of the High Commissioner’s Programme
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 148-155
[Abstract]

Agenda for the Protection of Cross-Border Displaced Persons in the Context of Disasters and Climate Change: October 2015
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 156-162
[Extract]

Book Reviews

Adjudicating Refugee and Asylum Status: The Role of Witness, Expertise, and Testimony
Julia Muraszkiewicz
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 163-166
[Extract]

EU Security and Justice Law: After Lisbon and Stockholm (Modern Studies in European Law)
Christopher Harding
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 166-168
[Extract]

 

Deportations to Jamaica, Honduras could hurt Canada

ESPMI Network

handcuffs+and+orange+jumpsuit+-+iStock1500x844

Deporting convicts to Jamaica and Honduras poses a boomerang-style threat because returnees may become involved in international crime that hurts Canada, federally commissioned research says.

While removing people who have committed serious crimes may be an important element of Canadian public security strategy, it places strains on law-enforcement and social services in the two destination countries and could have “unintended consequences” for Canada, say a pair of studies released under the Access to Information Act.

The Security Governance Group of Kitchener, Ont., delivered the findings to Public Safety Canada in January.

The studies suggest the Canadian government could do more to support programs in Jamaica and Honduras to prevent such deportees from returning to crime.

Scott Bardsley, a spokesman for Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale, did not commit to more assistance but said the Liberal government believes in evidence-based policy. “We continually monitor global events, ongoing issues and research related…

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The Good Chance Theatre: Calais refugee camp theatre stages a double encore

ESPMI Network

4287 Joe Robertson and Joe Murphy, founders of the Good Chance Theatre company in Calais. Photograph: Sarah Lee for the Guardia

The refugee theatre in Calais that starred the likes of Jude Law and Benedict Cumberbatch and withstood the worst of the winter in northern France is to rise again, say its two founders.

Due to the unflagging “Dunkirk spirit” of playwrights Joe Murphy and Joe Robertson, there are soon to be two Good Chance theatre tents, one planned down the coast in Dunkirk and another back in Calais, nearer to the shipping containers that now house 2,000 migrants.

Over six months the tent became famous as it welcomed visiting stars, including Law and Cumberbatch, and a succession of British theatre companies. But for most of that time it was a venue for those living in the Calais camp, known as the Jungle, watching each other sing, dance and tell stories…

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European policy is driving refugees to more dangerous routes across the Med

Postcards from ...

Heaven Crawley, Coventry University and Nando Sigona, University of Birmingham

It is estimated that in 2015, more than a million people crossed the
Mediterranean to Europe in search of safety and a better life. 3,770 are known to have died trying to make this journey during the same period. This so-called “migration crisis” is the largest humanitarian disaster to face Europe since the end of World War II.

That’s why we’ve been working to examine the conditions underpinning this recent migration across, and loss of life in, the Mediterranean.

Our first research brief , based on interviews with 600 people, including 500 refugees, shines a light on the reasons why so many risk everything on the dangerous sea crossing. It also offers an insight into why the EU response has been so ineffective.

One of the main problems with the current approach to this crisis is the…

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News: UN rights chief concerned over ‘collective expulsion’ of migrants after EU-Turkey deal

22 March 2016 – The United Nations refugee agency has announced that it is “not a party” to the new provisions agreed between the European Union (EU) and Turkey to stem the large-scale flow of refugees and migrants into Greece and Europe, and that it will align its work to cope with the deal.

Till now, the Office of UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has been supporting the authorities in the so-called “hotspots” on the Greek islands, where refugees and migrants were received, assisted, and registered. Under the EU-Turkey deal, which came into effect this past Sunday, these sites have now become detention facilities, and all new “irregular” migrants crossing from Turkey into Greek islands will be returned to Turkey.

UNHCR has a policy on opposing mandatory detention. Accordingly, it has suspended some of activities at all closed centres on the islands, including provision of transport to and from these sites.

“UNHCR is not a party to the EU-Turkey deal, nor will we be involved in returns or detention,” the agency said in a press release. “We will continue to assist the Greek authorities to develop an adequate reception capacity.”

Read Full Article: UN News Centre – UN rights chief concerned over ‘collective expulsion’ of migrants after EU-Turkey deal.

 

News: UN refugee agency redefines role in Greece as EU-Turkey deal comes into effect

22 March 2016 – The United Nations refugee agency has announced that it is “not a party” to the new provisions agreed between the European Union (EU) and Turkey to stem the large-scale flow of refugees and migrants into Greece and Europe, and that it will align its work to cope with the deal.

Till now, the Office of UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has been supporting the authorities in the so-called “hotspots” on the Greek islands, where refugees and migrants were received, assisted, and registered. Under the EU-Turkey deal, which came into effect this past Sunday, these sites have now become detention facilities, and all new “irregular” migrants crossing from Turkey into Greek islands will be returned to Turkey.

UNHCR has a policy on opposing mandatory detention. Accordingly, it has suspended some of activities at all closed centres on the islands, including provision of transport to and from these sites.

“UNHCR is not a party to the EU-Turkey deal, nor will we be involved in returns or detention,” the agency said in a press release. “We will continue to assist the Greek authorities to develop an adequate reception capacity.”

Read Full Article: UN News Centre – UN refugee agency redefines role in Greece as EU-Turkey deal comes into effect.

 

News: House of Lords votes to let lone child refugees come to Britain

The government has been defeated in the Lords as peers voted to allow 3,000 unaccompanied child refugees into the country.

Peers voted by 306 votes to 204, a majority of 102, to amend the immigration bill in order to require the government to let the children, currently in Europe, come to Britain.

They warned the government it must act fast to take in unaccompanied child refugees amid complaints from cross-party MPs that child migrants in Calais were enduring terrible conditions.

The vote came as three unaccompanied Syrian children, including one orphaned by war, arrived in the UK from the Calais refugee camp to be reunited with relatives.

Labour peer Lord Dubs, who proposed the amendment to the bill, said the step would protect children from exploitation, people trafficking and abuse. Dubs, who was rescued as a child as he fled the Nazis, called on the government to remember the spirit of the Kindertransport and take the lead in Europe in giving homes to child refugees traveling alone.

Read Full Article: The Guardian – House of Lords votes to let lone child refugees come to Britain.

 

News: Don’t call them ‘illegal immigrants’, says Europe human rights commissioner

A European human rights commissioner has told British ministers to stop referring to “illegal immigrants”, claiming they should use the term “irregular migrants” for foreigners who enter this country without permission.

Nils Muižnieks, the Council of Europe’s human rights commissioner, described Britain’s immigration laws as “draconian” and insisted key policies introduced by the Government should be scrapped.

Mr Muižnieks singled out David Cameron, the Prime Minister, for criticism, suggesting he had “scaled up the alarmist rhetoric targeting migrants” in official speeches.

In an official memorandum to James Brokenshire, the immigration minister, Mr Muižnieks said: “The commissioner is worried by the dominant political discourse in the UK which is tainted by alarmism.

Read Full Article: The Telegraph – Don’t call them ‘illegal immigrants’, says Europe human rights commissioner.

 

News: Home Office ‘to review’ policy on returning Afghan military interpreters

The Home Office is reviewing its controversial policy of returning Afghan military interpreters to their home country after granting asylum to a former interpreter it initially tried to remove from the UK, according to lawyers involved in the case.

The 31-year-old interpreter, who had worked with UK and other coalition forces for seven years on the frontline in the battle against the Taliban, is celebrating after being told by the Home Office on Thursday that he has been granted leave to remain in the UK, despite government officials trying to force him onto a plane back to Afghanistan last April.

Lewis Kett, the interpreter’s representative at Duncan Lewis solicitors, welcomed the news and said Home Office officials informed him at an earlier court hearing that a review of the policy of returning interpreters to Afghanistan is underway.

Read Full Article: The Guardian – Home Office ‘to review’ policy on returning Afghan military interpreters.

 

News: Theresa May faces parliamentary investigation over flimsy basis for student deportations

Theresa May is to face a parliamentary investigation after an immigration tribunal ruled that the Home Office used unscientific “hearsay” to deport thousands of students from Britain.

In a damning verdict that could open the doors to thousands of deported students returning to the UK and claiming compensation, the tribunal found that the Home Office had failed to prove students had cheated in English exams before detaining them and removing them from the country. The ruling centred on a test case of two students who had taken an English language test set by ETS, a US firm contracted by the Home Office.

The American firm was appointed by the Home Office after ETS claimed its voice recognition software had already detected thousands of fraudulent language tests, a source close to the deal told The Independent. This week’s ruling comes after the BBC’s Panorama programme exposed fraud by students taking language tests set by ETS at one site in east London in 2014. The language tests are part of a system designed to require immigrants to prove their English is up to the required standard.

Read full article:  The Independent – Theresa May faces parliamentary investigation over flimsy basis for student deportations

Hunger strike finished – struggle continues

calaishungerstrike2016

Statement from the hunger strikers in ‘The Jungle’ in Calais [25 March 2016]

We would like to extend our deep condolences to the people of Brussels and all the victims of Tuesday’s attacks.

It is from this same violence and terror that so many of the people of The Jungle are running. We must stand together, united as humanity, against violence in all its forms.

In the many months that we have been in The Jungle we have endured living in squalid and filthy conditions. We have all been subject to routine and systematic racist violence at the hands of nationalists, fascists and the French police. This experience of violence is common to all in The Jungle and has occurred on an almost daily basis. For many, including very young and unaccompanied refugees, this violence simply became the norm.

Despite the terrible conditions which we found ourselves living in, no…

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What makes a route more or less deadly for sea migrants?

Postcards from ...

In 2015 15 per cent of sea arrivals and 78 per cent of deaths occurred across the Central Mediterranean route. What makes a route more or less deadly?

We have just released some initial findings from the ESRC/DFID-funded MEDMIG project – which is run by Coventry University in collaboration with the Universities of Birmingham and Oxford and partners in Greece, Italy, Turkey and Malta. The researchers interviewed 500 refugees and migrants who had used, or were planning to use, the central and eastern Mediterranean routes to enter the EU and more than 100 stakeholders.

deathsarrivals2015

The research brief argues that current policy responses to the crisis are likely to fail because they do not take adequate account of the critical differences in the experiences, journeys and aspirations of those crossing the Mediterranean. There is a need for nuanced, tailored and targeted policy responses which reflect these diverse, stratified and increasingly complex flows.

To…

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Occupy Stockholm: one of the occupiers tells her story

IDP Laws and Policies: A Mapping Tool

ESPMI Network

screencapture-www-internal-displacement-org-law-and-policy-1458429701030

The database is divided into five sections:

  • Laws : laws on internal displacement
  • Policies: policies and other non-legally binding instruments on internal displacement
  • Processes: Laws, policies and other instruments under development or not yet adopted
  • Other normative instruments: laws and policies relevant but not specific to IDPs’ protection
  • The Kampala Convention and the Pact on Security, Stability and Development in the Great Lakes Region (Great Lakes Pact)

    Mapping national laws and policies on internal displacement
    The development of laws and policies that address the plight of internally displaced people (IDPs) is becoming a global trend. National authorities are increasingly expressing their commitment to implementing the standards set out in the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement and other supranational instruments through the adoption of national laws, policies, decrees, protocols, strategies and action plans.

    In mid-2015, the global protection cluster (GPC) task team on law and policy, co-chaired…

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‘I never heard from them again’: an Afghan family’s doomed journey

ESPMI Network

1120 Firooz Mozafari’s five-year-old son Akbar days before he drowned with the rest of his family in the Aegean.

In the early morning on 8 February, before setting off from the Turkish coast with his family, Firooz Mozafari was on the phone to his brother Farid in Kabul. They had spoken every day since Firooz left Afghanistan 48 days earlier, and Farid asked him to keep his phone on during this last stretch of the journey to Europe.

“I can’t, I’m running out of battery,” Firooz said, hung up, and climbed aboard a small speedboat with 11 relatives, including his wife and two children.

After two hours without word from his brother, Farid began to worry. The trip across the Aegean should take 40 minutes. A friend reassured him nothing was wrong. “It takes a couple of hours to get through immigration,” Farid remembered him saying. So he waited.

But…

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New Publication: Entitlement and belonging: social restructuring and multicultural Britain

New Publication:

Entitlement and belonging: social restructuring and multicultural Britain

An IRR discussion paper on the Housing and Planning and Immigration Bills 2015-16.

Entitlement_and_Belonging_coverThe Housing and Planning and Immigration Bills, currently going through parliament, contain measures which are central to the Conservatives’ stated belief in cohesive ‘One Nation’ government. In a discussion paper published by the IRR today, criminologist Dr Jon Burnett argues that the rapid social transformation that will inevitably take place through these mutually-reinforcing housing and immigration measures will be destructive for social cohesion. In fact, the break-up and displacement of multicultural neighbourhoods, coupled with the extended reach of immigration policing, will accentuate extremes of inequality in the inner city and lead to a marked deterioration in the quality of life for BAME communities.

Focusing largely on London, Entitlement and belonging suggests that a ‘SUS culture’ is developing in the UK as the ‘hostile environment principle’, long- established in immigration policy, is extended into housing. The government argues that nationally-implemented ‘right to rent’ checks, imposing a duty on landlords to carry out immigration profiling and allowing summary eviction of  tenants, are ‘justifiable’ measures aimed at forcing out those who have no legal right to stay in the country. Yet even its own evaluation provided compelling evidence of discrimination against BAME citizens.

According to Dr Burnett, author of the research: ‘In rolling out the measures, the government risks rolling out discrimination. Equally concerning though is the ideological assumptions underpinning the legislation about “who” belongs in particular localities. The poor in multicultural neighbourhoods are being dispossessed of their rights and uprooted from where they live. They have been deemed eminently disposable.’

The IRR hopes that this publication can encourage as wide a discussion as possible about the legislation as well as the wider goals of ‘One Nation’ government. IRR Director, Liz Fekete, asks: ‘Given that the cosmopolitan and multicultural nature of London was our brand in the  Olympic bid,  shouldn’t we be concerned when multicultural London is abandoned in favour of  a more elitist and monocultural urban future?’

Entitlement and belonging: social restructuring and multicultural Britain can be downloaded here (pdf file, 401kb)

Article reblogged from the Institute of Race Relations – www.irr.org.uk/news/entitlement-and-belonging-social-restructuring-and-multicultural-britain/

 

Event: Sites of Confinement: Confines, Control and Resistance at the Border

Event: Sites of Confinement: Confines, Control and Resistance at the Border
Thursday, 17 March 2016 09:0018:00

Campus Luigi Einaudi, University of Turin, Lungo Dora Siena 100/A – 10154, Turin, Italy
Room: E5

The aim of this day conference is to stimulate discussion around the ambiguity of sites of confinement with specific focuses on migration; race and racism; and physical, social and spatial bordering as control. Drawing together academics and activists working and campaigning across Europe, we aim to analyse the inconsistencies and contestations within pre-trial detention, administrative detention and the different forms of reception/confinement of asylum seekers, refugees and illegalised migrants. Alongside issues in control and punishment, the conference will emphasise forms of everyday resistance by those living in sites of confinement, as well as those campaigning for freedom.

Confirmed speakers include: Antigone Association, Monish Bhatia, Victoria Canning, Valeria Ferraris, Evgenia Iliadou, Simone Santorso, Alvise Sbraccia, No Borders, and Frances Webber

Conveners: Dr Victoria Canning, The Open University, victoria.canning@open.ac.uk and Dr Valeria Ferraris, University of Turin, valeria.ferraris@unito.it 
Conference Schedule

9.30 Welcome and Introduction:

Laura Scomparin, Head of Department of Law, University of Turin

Victoria Canning (Open University), Co-ordinator of the Prisons, Punishment and Detention Working Group

10:30-11:30  Panel 1: Perspectives on detention

Fernández-Bessa (University of Barcelona)
Simone Santorso (University of Padua)
Association Antigone

11.30 – 12.00 Coffee Break

12.00 – 13.30 Panel 2: Criminalisation of migrants

Alvise Sbraccia (University of Bologna)
Monish Bhatia (Abertay University)
Associazione Studi Giuridici Immigrazione (ASGI)

13.30-14.30 Lunch

14.30-16.30 Panel 3: Refugee crisis, border control and reception

Frances Webber (Institute of Race relations)
Evgenia Iliadou (The Open University)
Valeria Ferraris (University of Turin)
NO Borders Ventimiglia

17.00-18.00 Working Group Meeting and Resolution

Victoria Canning (Open University)

20.00 Social Dinner

Lost in the world: former unaccompanied minors in orbit

Postcards from ...

Young people seeking safety and security are subjected to the vagaries of all kinds of ‘solutions at various national borders’. Sometimes they are taken in and sometimes they are turned away. Sometimes, as Elaine Chase (UCL) and I write in The Conversation, they are offered help but then deported as soon as they become legal adults.

Read The Conversation: https://theconversation.com/lost-in-the-world-the-young-people-shunted-around-a-global-asylum-system-55991

For info about ESRC-funded project Becoming Adult: www.becomingadult.net

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The dangerous spread of crimes of solidarity

Postcards from ...

The Guardian reports on the  trial of high-profile Danish campaigner Lisbeth Zornig, who gave a lift to family of Syrians. She was fined DKr22,500 (£2,328).  According to the article, she is one of 279 people who have been charged under people trafficking laws  in the period from September 2015 to February 2016 in Denmark alone. In January, while Greek police pressed charges carrying prison sentences of up to 10 years in jail against a group of Spanish lifeguards who rescue refugees in Lesvos, in France a retired British soldier stood trial for attempting to bring a four-year-old Afghan girl from the Calais refugee camp to reunite with family the UK (see also a similar case in Norway).

Is this the next ‘solution’ to the refugee crisis coming from EU politicians? Intimidating volunteers to undermine the support for more a humane solution to the crisis? It may not end up in a mass round…

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Refugee Council: Let them fly: ask the Government to offer safe passage to Syrians

Refugees should be allowed to reach safety legally and by plane, the Refugee Council has said today.

Ahead of a special UN conference on Syrian refugees on 30 March, the charity is calling for Britain to offer more refugees safe passage.

At the conference in Geneva, the UN’s Refugee Agency (UNHCR) is calling for countries to offer safe pathways to refugees fleeing Syria’s brutal war, which is heading into its sixth year.

Britain’s Minister for Syrian Refugees Richard Harrington is attending the conference and will have the chance to offer refugees fleeing Syria’s brutal conflict more safe and legal options for international travel.

Ask your MP to call on Richard Harrington to #LetThemFly – email them now

At the moment, refugees fleeing war and persecution have little option for safe, legal international travel.

When war breaks out, countries like Britain often close down refugees’ legal options by refusing to issue them travel visas. This means they can’t get on planes.

Other harsh rules stop refugees joining their loved ones who have already made it to safety in other countries and there simply aren’t enough resettlement places to go around.

This is how refugees can end up in smugglers’ hands.

But there is a way out.

Read the full article on the Refugee Council website at:  www.refugeecouncil.org.uk/latest/news/4560_let_them_fly_ask_the_government_to_offer_safe_passage_to_syrians

 

Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 03/08/2016

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

A Matter of Justice, Not Immigration: What to do with War Criminals posing as Refugees

Justice in Conflict

Life jackets from refugees escaping violence in Syria and elsewhere lay strewn on the shores of Lesbos, Greece. (Photo: EPA) Life jackets from refugees escaping violence in Syria and elsewhere lay strewn on the shores of Lesbos, Greece. (Photo: EPA)

Rumours that terrorists have been hiding themselves among Syrian refugees and asylum seekers embarking for the shores and capitals Europe are nothing new. Especially in the wake of the Paris attacks last year, it was widely reported that groups like ISIS, or Daesh, as it’s increasingly called, were infiltrating European communities to perpetrate acts of terror. Now too, there is evidence that war criminals have followed suit.

According a report from the Guardian, Dutch authorities have identified thirty war criminals among last year’s influx of refugees into The Netherlands:

Dutch officials have identified 30 war crimes suspects, including 10 Syrians, among tens of thousands of asylum seekers who arrived in the country last year, the justice ministry said Monday.

Immigration authorities found them after investigating 170 people, Deputy Justice Minister…

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Abuse in Calais

Feminist Philosophers

Those with even half an eye on the news can’t have failed to notice the disastrous humanitarian situation on the UK border that is the build up of refugees in Calais, and other places along the French coast, notably Dunkirk. Amongst the many, many horrific things going on there (lack of basic necessities, such as food, shelter, water, sanitation; lack of healthcare; police violence; violence from far right groups), there have been various disturbing reports of sexual violence. People in desperate conditions do desperate things. (Sometimes, people are just generally horrible.) People – including children in the main camp – are being raped, and coerced into prostitution (i.e., raped for money). Moreover, the French authorities brutal and inhumane method of dismantling the camp, with no proper plan for where its residents will go and how they will be supported, just adds to the problem. They have built an official camp…

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Gender and Migration conference: Gediz University, Turkey

ESPMI Network

bgg3

International Conference on Gender and Migration in Turkey

This interdisciplinary conference is open for paper proposals across disciplines on themes such as mass migration of Syrians, gendered causes and implications of migration, refugees and gender, human trafficking, domestic workers, migration policies, home and host country implications of migration, among others. Panels will be both in English and Turkish.

You can submit your abstract by 1 April 2016 via EasyChair at:
https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=icgam2016

Each paper will be blind reviewed by two peers. Papers that are selected at the end of the conference will be published in an edited book by Cambridge Scholars in UK.

http://gamconference.gediz.edu.tr/

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Daily News and Updates from ReliefWeb 03/07/2016

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Call for Papers: Forced migration and digital connectivity (in)to Europe (April 15th deadline)

ESPMI Network

Call for papers: Forced migration and digital connectivity in(to) Europe

Please contact the guest editors if you have any questions about this call for papers. Informal inquiries about possible topics, themes and proposals are also welcomed. The guest editors welcome contributions by established scholars as well as early career researchers.

Special collection of Social Media + Society, edited by Koen Leurs and Kevin Smets

While it is increasingly observable that forced migration and digital connectivity are intertwined, there is a need for more in-depth, critical research into this topic, especially in the context of Europe. With this special collection of Social Media + Society, a high standing, peer reviewed, open-access journal published by Sage, we seek to bring together cutting-edge research on forced migration in(to) Europe and the way in which digital technologies and digital connectivity and in particular social media play a role in the lives of forced migrants…

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#RefugeeEconomics: Investigating the Economic Impact of Forced Displacement

ESPMI Network

Publication1

From March 1 #RefugeeEconomics  will be posting questions about refugees’ economic activities, self-reliance strategies and challenges faced.

#RefugeeEconomics ( www.refugee-economics.com ) is a reporting project headed by Flavie Halais that investigates the economic impact of refugee crises on host communities. When displaced populations settle in host countries, jobs, consumer prices and public resources are invariably affected. However the right policies can help refugees thrive and contribute to the local economy through entrepreneurship, increased consumption and taxes.

With the bulk of refugee crises taking place in the developing world, this project looks at how weaker governments and fragile cities can deal with mass displacement by enabling the economic integration of refugees. On March 7th we leave for fieldwork in Uganda and Kenya, where displaced populations are partaking in local and international trade in spite of the restrictions and stigmatisation they face as refugees. We’ll pay special attention to Uganda’s permissive policies in regards…

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Article 8 and MIR: Appendix FM in Supreme Court

United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog

steve2Despite stiff competition from other cases, these appeals have got to be the showdown of the year. Tearing through the UK’s social fabric the country’s immigration rules are a minefield and have been producing more than their fair share of contentious and protracted litigation copious amounts of which keeps piling up on the Supreme Court’s doorstep. Legal limbo is a frequent visitor for the court’s justices and the well-known appeals of MM (Lebanon), AM (Pakistan), Master AF, SJ (Pakistan)and SS (Congo) were finally heard for three days (22-24 Feb 2016) by Lady Hale (Deputy President), Lord Kerr, Lord Wilson, Lord Reed, Lord Carnwath, Lord Hughes, Lord Hodge. The infamous question for the Supreme Court is whether the Minimum Income Requirement (MIR) for a UK citizen or resident wishing to bring a non-EEA spouse or partner into the UK is in breach of article 8 ECHR

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UNHCR stresses right to asylum of Mozambicans crossing into Malawi

ESPMI Network

mozambican-refugees Image from The Marabi Post

As the number of Mozambicans fleeing to Malawi continues to grow, UNHCR is calling on all parties to respect their right to seek asylum amid signs of pressure to return. More than 6,000 have arrived in Malawi since mid-December, citing clashes between armed elements of the opposition RENAMO and government forces.

Nearly all of the new arrivals are staying in a settlement in Kapise village, Mwanza district, some 100 kilometres south of Malawi’s capital, Lilongwe, with others scattered throughout the neighbouring district of Chikwawa.

Mozambican government officials have visited Kapise at least three times since mid-January to ask people why they fled, discuss the possibility of returning to their places of origin and monitor the humanitarian situation of their fellow citizens. The Mozambican government has offered to provide socio-economic assistance should they return.

UNHCR has expressed concern to both governments that the right to seek…

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New Journal Research Articles for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (weekly)

  • This article examines the documentation of war crimes and human losses in Kosovo under the conditions of contested transitional justice and ethno-nationalist politics of remembrance. The article argues that the documentation of war crimes in Kosovo was utilized for retributive justice by the international community, for political revenge by former foes, and for power/identity consolidation by local protagonists. Attempting to overcome this suffocation of the past, the new politics of remembrance in Kosovo propagated by civil society groups aspires to liberate the past from ethno-nationalist tendencies by constructing a bottom-up and virtual memorialization. This is deemed to be inclusive for all sides in conflict; indestructible in its virtual and post-material constellation; and distinct with regard to volume and reliability. While civil society-based documentation has the potential to overcome the ethno-nationalist entanglements in Kosovo and to compensate for the inability of international transitional justice mechanisms to deliver justice and truth to victims, its impact on overcoming the past and improving ethnic relations in Kosovo remains questionable. Accordingly, the article illustrates the contextual interplay between material, relational, and virtual forms of remembrance in Kosovo.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • International law has become the reference frame that establishes legitimacy for international encounters, but paradoxically and at the same time international law itself has become increasingly contested. This article analyses the relationship between norm acceptance and norm implementation and examines an instance of norm contestation in the context of the US ‘War on Terror’. The focus is on the use of torture or ‘enhanced interrogation methods’ during the Bush Presidency. The so-called ‘torture memos’ that were made public in recent years shed light on different arguments that were used by the government at the time to justify their actions and to show that they were in line with existing international legal obligations. The article seeks to assess the validity of international agreements by analysing compliance and actual meaning (meaning-in-use) of fundamental international human rights norms that are being contested through different interpretations and usages on the domestic level.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • The revelations the Bush administration employed torture in ‘black sites’ and outsourced torture through the ‘extraordinary rendition’ programme demonstrated how the torture prohibition, or torture taboo, failed to constrain the United States (US) and other complicit states from engaging in torture in the fight against terrorism. Yet despite this violation of the taboo, this article makes the paradoxical argument that studying the taboo’s violation shows the strength of the norm’s legitimacy, not its weakness. The humanitarian pressures from the torture taboo continued to operate on the US even while the norm was being violated, shaping US identity, interests and actions during the ‘war on terror’.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Civil society movements can play an important political role in advocating for human rights, including the rights of migrants and migrant children. But successfully asserting their rights is difficult in the domain of migration, even in democracies, and any victories that are achieved can be short-lived. This article examines an initially successful episode of civil society advocacy on behalf of unaccompanied child migrants, drawing on evidence from Spain. We argue that pro-rights civil society organizations were initially able to force the Spanish state to act in accordance with its international human rights obligations in relation to repatriation. But states can learn and adapt. States might seek new venues for migration control and enlist new allies, thereby multiplying the numbers of gate-keepers, for example. In this case, the Spanish state reacted energetically to regain control by working closely with countries of origin, regional governments within Spain, private actors and service delivery NGOs to reassert its authority with regard to repatriation. We use the case to reflect on the difficulties of civil society activism in this issue-area and the obstacles to claiming the legal rights of this community of highly vulnerable children, even in advanced democracies.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This article shows that the effect of remittances on economic growth involves a U-shaped pattern, which is negative initially but later becomes positive. The analysis differs significantly from earlier studies in that it examines important methodological issues on the specification and estimation of the long-run growth effects of remittances by estimating their impact on total factor productivity (TFP) rather than on the growth rate of GDP, using time series data from Bangladesh. The use of single-equation cointegration methods shows that remittances’ effect on long-run growth in Bangladesh is negative and falling until the remittances-to-GDP ratio is roughly eight per cent. The benefits of remittances receipts outweigh their costs and their net effects start to become positive when the ratio exceeds 14 per cent.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Abstract

    Some literature depicts refugees as more passive than active when selecting a destination country. We draw on surveys of over 35,000 people in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Australia, to show that most potential asylum seekers and refugees of Hazara, Rohingya, Muslim and Tamil backgrounds prefer some destination countries over others and that many refugees from these groups surveyed in Australia specifically had Australia in mind as a destination country. We show how Australia’s asylum seeker policy was a key reason why many refugees chose Australia in 2011 and 2012 and that subsequent restrictive asylum seeker policy changes appear to be reflected in potential asylum seeker considerations in 2014. We find that despite the restrictive asylum seeker policy changes, perceptions of Australia as a highly functioning civil society, relative to other potential destination countries, may explain why Australia remains a country of choice for asylum seekers from west and south Asia.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This paper addresses several less-explored dimensions of current scholarship on globalisation, migration and transnationalism: north–south migration streams, the role of second-generation ‘heritage migrants’ and the importance of social capital within unequal transnational social fields. We compare two circuits of second-generation migrants, Turk-Germans and Turk-Americans, engaged in ‘intensive transnationalism’ having independently moved to reside in their parents’ homeland. Istanbul becomes the site of homeland return for these distinct streams of educated heritage migrants. Cross-national comparison of the children of the more stigmatised Turk-German ‘guest workers’ with the socially less salient Turk-Americans of middle-class backgrounds offers insight into the way class networks and national capital are distinctly leveraged by adult children with immigrant parents of distinct contexts of homeland exit.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Abstract

    This paper examines evidence on the role of assimilation versus source country culture in influencing immigrant women’s behavior in the United States—looking both over time with immigrants’ residence in the United States and across immigrant generations. It focuses particularly on labor supply but, for the second generation, also examines fertility and education. We find considerable evidence that immigrant source country gender roles influence immigrant and second generation women’s behavior in the United States. This conclusion is robust to various efforts to rule out the effect of other unobservables and to distinguish the effect of culture from that of social capital. These results support a growing literature that suggests that culture matters for economic behavior. At the same time, the results suggest considerable evidence of assimilation of immigrants. Immigrant women narrow the labor supply gap with native-born women with time in the United States, and, while our results suggest an important role for intergenerational transmission, they also indicate considerable convergence of immigrants to native levels of schooling, fertility, and labor supply across generations.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Abstract

    We propose a theory of free movement of goods and labor between two economies in the presence of moral hazard. Each country produces two final goods where the productive efforts of workers cannot be perfectly observed, or verified only in the complex industry. We show that national institutional quality and the system of the early childhood care and education determine the pattern of international trade. However, individuals’ decisions to emigrate depend only on the national institutional quality, where the country with more developed institutions serves as the host country of immigrants. We conclude that international labor movement promotes international trade.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Abstract

    Recent studies suggest that migrants may be less satisfied with their ‘new’ lives than members of the host population and worry that this may be driven by cultural factors, such as feelings of not belonging. Motivated by this concern, this paper analyses the life satisfaction of immigrants once settled in the host country. We rely on the German Socio-Economic Panel’s immigrant sample for the years 1984–2010 and find that while immigrants are less satisfied than natives, this difference can be explained by factors related to economic integration, such as the details of their employment conditions, rather than cultural factors such as feelings of not belonging, which often loom large in the public mind.

    JEL codes: J15, K37, O15
    Keywords
    Integration Subjective well-being Segregation Citizenship law

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Reviewer(s):

    Sara Bojarczuk (Sara Bojarczuk is PhD Candidate at the Department of Sociology, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.)
    Citation:
    Sara Bojarczuk, (2015) “Kids in the Middle. How Children of Immigrants Negotiate Community Interactions for Their Families”, International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, Vol. 11 Iss: 4, pp.299 – 300
    DOI
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJMHSC-11-2014-0045
    Downloads:
    The fulltext of this document has been downloaded 7 times since 2015

    Review Number:
    2015/1
    Review Subject:
    Kids in the Middle. How Children of Immigrants Negotiate Community Interactions for Their Families Rolando Tomasini and Luk van Wassenhove
    Publisher Name:
    Rutgers University Press
    Place of Publication:
    NJ
    Publication Year:
    2014
    Publisher:
    Emerald Group Publishing Limited

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This article deals with this ongoing spatial and political recrafting of the Mediterranean sea as a space of migration governmentality. It retraces the recent political and spatial transformations occurred with the starting of the military-humanitarian operation Mare Nostrum in the channel of Sicily and then the handover to the Triton operation coordinated by Frontex. The two specific angles from which it tackles this issue are the politics of and over life that is at stake in the government of migration at sea and the politics of visibility that underpins it. In the first section it analyses the politics and the scene of rescue that has been put into place with the start of Mare Nostrum, tacking stock of the re-articulation of military and humanitarian technologies for governing and containing migrant movements. Then, it discusses the recent transformations occurred with Triton operation and the effects on the level of political actions undertaken by activist migrant groups. The article moves on by taking into account the peculiar politics of visibility that is at stake in the government of migration in the Mediterranean.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • In recent years, studies of migration have given greater attention to spatiality, yet its influence on migrants’ identities and forms of attachment remain underexplored. Drawing on research conducted with migrants in Chinese cities, this paper proposes a new methodological strategy to explore migrants’ everyday spatial experiences. The strategy combines cognitive mapping, walking interviews, and self-photography, bringing together three interrelated fields of qualitative inquiry—the visual, the verbal, and the representative. The multi-method approach seeks to capture the growing complexity of migration-related spatial references, and the growing heterogeneity of the migrant population and the environments they encounter. This combination also provides access to elements of spatial experience previously missing, subdued, or socially internalized within traditional narratives; while the inherent mobility of the methods highlight meanings, representations, and identities that are themselves mobile and dynamic. The understandings of migration that result better incorporate migrants’ spatial practices and challenge the omnipresent categorization of migrants and the places associated with migration in dominant development discourse and policies.

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Journal Research Articles for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 02/28/2016

  • This article examines the documentation of war crimes and human losses in Kosovo under the conditions of contested transitional justice and ethno-nationalist politics of remembrance. The article argues that the documentation of war crimes in Kosovo was utilized for retributive justice by the international community, for political revenge by former foes, and for power/identity consolidation by local protagonists. Attempting to overcome this suffocation of the past, the new politics of remembrance in Kosovo propagated by civil society groups aspires to liberate the past from ethno-nationalist tendencies by constructing a bottom-up and virtual memorialization. This is deemed to be inclusive for all sides in conflict; indestructible in its virtual and post-material constellation; and distinct with regard to volume and reliability. While civil society-based documentation has the potential to overcome the ethno-nationalist entanglements in Kosovo and to compensate for the inability of international transitional justice mechanisms to deliver justice and truth to victims, its impact on overcoming the past and improving ethnic relations in Kosovo remains questionable. Accordingly, the article illustrates the contextual interplay between material, relational, and virtual forms of remembrance in Kosovo.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • International law has become the reference frame that establishes legitimacy for international encounters, but paradoxically and at the same time international law itself has become increasingly contested. This article analyses the relationship between norm acceptance and norm implementation and examines an instance of norm contestation in the context of the US ‘War on Terror’. The focus is on the use of torture or ‘enhanced interrogation methods’ during the Bush Presidency. The so-called ‘torture memos’ that were made public in recent years shed light on different arguments that were used by the government at the time to justify their actions and to show that they were in line with existing international legal obligations. The article seeks to assess the validity of international agreements by analysing compliance and actual meaning (meaning-in-use) of fundamental international human rights norms that are being contested through different interpretations and usages on the domestic level.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • The revelations the Bush administration employed torture in ‘black sites’ and outsourced torture through the ‘extraordinary rendition’ programme demonstrated how the torture prohibition, or torture taboo, failed to constrain the United States (US) and other complicit states from engaging in torture in the fight against terrorism. Yet despite this violation of the taboo, this article makes the paradoxical argument that studying the taboo’s violation shows the strength of the norm’s legitimacy, not its weakness. The humanitarian pressures from the torture taboo continued to operate on the US even while the norm was being violated, shaping US identity, interests and actions during the ‘war on terror’.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Civil society movements can play an important political role in advocating for human rights, including the rights of migrants and migrant children. But successfully asserting their rights is difficult in the domain of migration, even in democracies, and any victories that are achieved can be short-lived. This article examines an initially successful episode of civil society advocacy on behalf of unaccompanied child migrants, drawing on evidence from Spain. We argue that pro-rights civil society organizations were initially able to force the Spanish state to act in accordance with its international human rights obligations in relation to repatriation. But states can learn and adapt. States might seek new venues for migration control and enlist new allies, thereby multiplying the numbers of gate-keepers, for example. In this case, the Spanish state reacted energetically to regain control by working closely with countries of origin, regional governments within Spain, private actors and service delivery NGOs to reassert its authority with regard to repatriation. We use the case to reflect on the difficulties of civil society activism in this issue-area and the obstacles to claiming the legal rights of this community of highly vulnerable children, even in advanced democracies.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This article shows that the effect of remittances on economic growth involves a U-shaped pattern, which is negative initially but later becomes positive. The analysis differs significantly from earlier studies in that it examines important methodological issues on the specification and estimation of the long-run growth effects of remittances by estimating their impact on total factor productivity (TFP) rather than on the growth rate of GDP, using time series data from Bangladesh. The use of single-equation cointegration methods shows that remittances’ effect on long-run growth in Bangladesh is negative and falling until the remittances-to-GDP ratio is roughly eight per cent. The benefits of remittances receipts outweigh their costs and their net effects start to become positive when the ratio exceeds 14 per cent.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Abstract

    Some literature depicts refugees as more passive than active when selecting a destination country. We draw on surveys of over 35,000 people in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Australia, to show that most potential asylum seekers and refugees of Hazara, Rohingya, Muslim and Tamil backgrounds prefer some destination countries over others and that many refugees from these groups surveyed in Australia specifically had Australia in mind as a destination country. We show how Australia’s asylum seeker policy was a key reason why many refugees chose Australia in 2011 and 2012 and that subsequent restrictive asylum seeker policy changes appear to be reflected in potential asylum seeker considerations in 2014. We find that despite the restrictive asylum seeker policy changes, perceptions of Australia as a highly functioning civil society, relative to other potential destination countries, may explain why Australia remains a country of choice for asylum seekers from west and south Asia.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This paper addresses several less-explored dimensions of current scholarship on globalisation, migration and transnationalism: north–south migration streams, the role of second-generation ‘heritage migrants’ and the importance of social capital within unequal transnational social fields. We compare two circuits of second-generation migrants, Turk-Germans and Turk-Americans, engaged in ‘intensive transnationalism’ having independently moved to reside in their parents’ homeland. Istanbul becomes the site of homeland return for these distinct streams of educated heritage migrants. Cross-national comparison of the children of the more stigmatised Turk-German ‘guest workers’ with the socially less salient Turk-Americans of middle-class backgrounds offers insight into the way class networks and national capital are distinctly leveraged by adult children with immigrant parents of distinct contexts of homeland exit.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Abstract

    This paper examines evidence on the role of assimilation versus source country culture in influencing immigrant women’s behavior in the United States—looking both over time with immigrants’ residence in the United States and across immigrant generations. It focuses particularly on labor supply but, for the second generation, also examines fertility and education. We find considerable evidence that immigrant source country gender roles influence immigrant and second generation women’s behavior in the United States. This conclusion is robust to various efforts to rule out the effect of other unobservables and to distinguish the effect of culture from that of social capital. These results support a growing literature that suggests that culture matters for economic behavior. At the same time, the results suggest considerable evidence of assimilation of immigrants. Immigrant women narrow the labor supply gap with native-born women with time in the United States, and, while our results suggest an important role for intergenerational transmission, they also indicate considerable convergence of immigrants to native levels of schooling, fertility, and labor supply across generations.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Abstract

    We propose a theory of free movement of goods and labor between two economies in the presence of moral hazard. Each country produces two final goods where the productive efforts of workers cannot be perfectly observed, or verified only in the complex industry. We show that national institutional quality and the system of the early childhood care and education determine the pattern of international trade. However, individuals’ decisions to emigrate depend only on the national institutional quality, where the country with more developed institutions serves as the host country of immigrants. We conclude that international labor movement promotes international trade.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Abstract

    Recent studies suggest that migrants may be less satisfied with their ‘new’ lives than members of the host population and worry that this may be driven by cultural factors, such as feelings of not belonging. Motivated by this concern, this paper analyses the life satisfaction of immigrants once settled in the host country. We rely on the German Socio-Economic Panel’s immigrant sample for the years 1984–2010 and find that while immigrants are less satisfied than natives, this difference can be explained by factors related to economic integration, such as the details of their employment conditions, rather than cultural factors such as feelings of not belonging, which often loom large in the public mind.

    JEL codes: J15, K37, O15
    Keywords
    Integration Subjective well-being Segregation Citizenship law

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Reviewer(s):

    Sara Bojarczuk (Sara Bojarczuk is PhD Candidate at the Department of Sociology, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.)
    Citation:
    Sara Bojarczuk, (2015) “Kids in the Middle. How Children of Immigrants Negotiate Community Interactions for Their Families”, International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, Vol. 11 Iss: 4, pp.299 – 300
    DOI
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJMHSC-11-2014-0045
    Downloads:
    The fulltext of this document has been downloaded 7 times since 2015

    Review Number:
    2015/1
    Review Subject:
    Kids in the Middle. How Children of Immigrants Negotiate Community Interactions for Their Families Rolando Tomasini and Luk van Wassenhove
    Publisher Name:
    Rutgers University Press
    Place of Publication:
    NJ
    Publication Year:
    2014
    Publisher:
    Emerald Group Publishing Limited

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This article deals with this ongoing spatial and political recrafting of the Mediterranean sea as a space of migration governmentality. It retraces the recent political and spatial transformations occurred with the starting of the military-humanitarian operation Mare Nostrum in the channel of Sicily and then the handover to the Triton operation coordinated by Frontex. The two specific angles from which it tackles this issue are the politics of and over life that is at stake in the government of migration at sea and the politics of visibility that underpins it. In the first section it analyses the politics and the scene of rescue that has been put into place with the start of Mare Nostrum, tacking stock of the re-articulation of military and humanitarian technologies for governing and containing migrant movements. Then, it discusses the recent transformations occurred with Triton operation and the effects on the level of political actions undertaken by activist migrant groups. The article moves on by taking into account the peculiar politics of visibility that is at stake in the government of migration in the Mediterranean.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • In recent years, studies of migration have given greater attention to spatiality, yet its influence on migrants’ identities and forms of attachment remain underexplored. Drawing on research conducted with migrants in Chinese cities, this paper proposes a new methodological strategy to explore migrants’ everyday spatial experiences. The strategy combines cognitive mapping, walking interviews, and self-photography, bringing together three interrelated fields of qualitative inquiry—the visual, the verbal, and the representative. The multi-method approach seeks to capture the growing complexity of migration-related spatial references, and the growing heterogeneity of the migrant population and the environments they encounter. This combination also provides access to elements of spatial experience previously missing, subdued, or socially internalized within traditional narratives; while the inherent mobility of the methods highlight meanings, representations, and identities that are themselves mobile and dynamic. The understandings of migration that result better incorporate migrants’ spatial practices and challenge the omnipresent categorization of migrants and the places associated with migration in dominant development discourse and policies.

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

A Cartoon Guide to Immigration (National Institute of Economic and Social Research)

ESPMI Network

Opinion polls have shown for some time that the public sees immigration as one of the most important issues facing Britain (Ipsos Mori, 2015). At the same time, public understanding of evidence on the economic impacts of immigration is poor and strongly influenced by the media. This in turn affects the quality and content of public debate and the policy formulation process. This video presents evidence of the economic benefits of immigration to the UK and to London, but acknowledges that there has been some impact on pay, and that there are ‘winners and losers’. It is targeted at a wide audience who lack accurate information about migration impacts from which to form their opinions. It is intended to stimulate thinking and debate.

Publication1

For details of the sources used in this video, please visit the NIESR website here: http://tinyurl.com/j5e47nd

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Why are unaccompanied migrant children disappearing in the thousands?

Postcards from ...

Until the EU recognises the specific needs of child migrants and makes it a priority to swiftly reunite them with family members, Jenny Allsopp and I argue in an op-ed published in OpenDemocracy, many will likely continue to abscond from the reception system.

The ‘disappearance’ of 10,000 migrant children after arriving in the EU made recently headlines in British newspapers and across the world. The Observer reported data from Europol, the EU’s criminal intelligence agency, drawing an explicit link between the fact that thousands of young migrants had vanished after registering with EU state authorities and the alleged intervention of a ‘sophisticated pan-European criminal infrastructure’ that is ‘targeting minors for sex abuse and slavery’. But does this speak to the reality? In the OpenDemocracy piece we explain why the answer may not be so straightforward.

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Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 05/03/2016

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily News and Updates from ReliefWeb 05/03/2016

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Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 05/02/2016

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Daily News and Updates from ReliefWeb 05/02/2016

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Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 05/01/2016

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Daily News and Updates from ReliefWeb 05/01/2016

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Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 04/30/2016

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