CMRB Event: Re-Living the Dream? Reinventing East London for the Post-Olympic Legacy Prof. Phil Cohen

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) is pleased to announce the following seminar:

Re-Living the Dream? Reinventing East London for the Post-Olympic Legacy

Prof. Phil Cohen

This seminar will take place in US 2.38, University Square Stratford, University of East London, 1 Salway Road, London E15 1NF

http://www.universitysquarestratford.ac.uk/find-us.htm

Monday 30th March 2015, 4–6pm

In order to access the room in University Square Stratford it is essential to register at:

                                         relivingthedream.eventbrite.co.uk                     

Abstract: 2012 was billed as the ‘legacy games’. It was supposed to ‘inspire a generation’ to greater things on and off the track. It was supposed to create a level playing field in which the life chances of young people growing up in the most deprived parts of East London were to converge with those born into more affluent circumstances in other parts of the city. How far are these material dreams realisable and to what extent do they connect with the actual aspirations of different communities in East London? How are the utopian and commercial dimensions of the Olympic project rhetorically reconciled and how do they come into conflict in the actual strategies of urban regeneration the mega event sets in motion? What kind of economies of worth should be applied to evaluating the success or failure of 2012? Finally, how is the Olympic Legacy narrative being enacted on the ground, in the development plans for the Olympic park and how are those living in this new piece of city actually making sense of the place? To examine these questions concretely I will drawn on my current ethno-cartographic research with residents groups in East Village.

Prof. Phil Cohen is the author of ‘On the Wrong Side of the Track: East London and the Post Olympics’ published by Lawrence and Wishart in 2013. He is currently co-editing a collection of 2012 legacy studies to be published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2016. He is the research director of Living Maps, a network of academics, artists and activists concerned to develop a creative and critical approach to the social mapping of the city and is currently carrying out a number of mapping projects with communities in and around the Olympic Park .

He is a visiting professor at the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Birkbeck College, a research fellow of the Young Foundation and an Emeritus at UEL where he is a research associate of the London East Research Institute.

 

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb

Refugee camp in Dresden attacked by Pegida! The Struggle continues!

Originally posted on clandestina:

On the 28th of February, right after a big antiracist protest march, refugee activists, helped by German supporters, occupied the central square in front of the Frauenkirche in Dresden and set up a protest camp.

During yesterday’s Pegida march around 150 militant neo-Nazis attacked the refugee protest camp.

View original 175 more words

Call for Papers: Global Symposium on Gender, Poverty & Violence, Sydney

Call for Papers:

Gender, Poverty and Violence: Implications for gender justice in post conflict settings
A Global Symposium
13 – 15 July 2015 (Sydney, Australia)

Conflict has many varied and lasting impacts – for individuals directly affected, for relationships between people, for communities and at a societal level. Many of these impacts are gendered; the ways in which women experience conflict and post conflict differs in significant ways to men’s experiences.  Of particular significance are the socio-economic dimensions of conflicts and post conflict rebuilding for women. The intersections of gender, poverty and violence are an emerging and important focus of work and analysis.

We invite you to join a small symposium of international scholars to collaboratively workshop this important nexus. Some possible questions for consideration include:

·      How does the socio-economic context of post conflict societies affect women’s and men’s access to justice?
·      How do pre conflict gender norms/roles shape both the conflict and post conflict rebuilding? Conversely, how do conflict and post conflict rebuilding change gender relations and roles in societies?
·      How do gender, poverty and violence affect interpersonal and community relationships?
·      What happens to social norms during conflict and post conflict rebuilding, and how does this affect gender relations, violence and poverty interventions?
·      How effective are post conflict interventions in improving justice for women, men, children, particularly individuals and communities living in poverty? How does widespread poverty affect post conflict rebuilding strategies?

Please do not feel constrained by these questions. We very much welcome other possible relevant questions for discussion.

Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words to lucy.fiske@uts.edu.au by Monday 16 March 2015.

Successful participants will be notified by Friday 3 April 2015.

Paper presentations should be 20 minutes in length and presenters will be invited to contribute their papers soon after the symposium for inclusion in an edited volume.

Note: There is no cost for participation, however we are unable to subsidise travel or other costs.

Hosted by University of Sydney Law School and UTS Cosmopolitan Civil Societies, in conjunction with Kings College London, University of Capetown and ActionAid.

Call for Presentations: 1st Annual Workshop – White Rose Migration Research Postgraduate Network

White Rose Migration Research Postgraduate Network
1st POSTGRADUATE WORKSHOP ON MIGRATION
“Reframing the Migration Debate”
CALL FOR PAPERS
ICoSS, University of Sheffield, 11th June 2015

Keynote Speaker:

Professor Andrew Geddes (Politics Department, University of Sheffield)

The White Rose Migration Research Postgraduate Network, in collaboration with The University of Sheffield Migration Research Group, invites submissions for the 1st Postgraduate Workshop on Migration. The aim of the workshop is to provide a space of discussion and dissemination for early career researchers (either doctoral or postdoctoral researchers) working on different topics and across different disciplines in relation to migration. This will be an opportunity to showcase your research, preliminary research findings and any other ‘work in progress’ with a critically engaged audience from across the White Rose Universities. This workshop will facilitate the development of networks and foster future research collaborations and is open to participants from all Universities.

 

This year the workshop is inviting postgraduate students and early career researchers from different disciplines to critically discuss and reflect about different aspects of migrants’ experiences. With an increase in restrictive policies, the perceived need to secure borders and anti-migrant sentiment, this workshop extends an invitation to researchers, who wish to challenge pejorative migrant discourses through engagement in a comprehensive discussion of migrants displacement and the integration process into a new ‘place’. We are interested in papers that contribute to “reframing the migration debate”, with innovative approaches that allow us to explore migrants citizenship, contribution and resistance in the context of the challenges they face. Suggested topics include, but are in no way limited to:

 

  • Migrants as active citizens exercising agency.
  • Challenges to migrants’ ability to contribute to society, such as the impact of migration on capital and subsequently integration.
  • Relationship between governance, the management of migration and integration.
  • New dynamics and patterns of migration.
  • Exploration of the role played by different institutions in civil society in relation to migration flows e.g. the media, NGO’s, etc.
  • Alternative theoretical/empirical perspectives on migration.

 

Abstracts in all areas of migration and from all disciplines will be considered. The workshop welcomes research and work in progress about broad heterogeneous groups including documented, undocumented and forced migrants.

 

Abstracts submission

Abstracts should be no longer than 300 words and should be submitted via the following link by 15th March 2015:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1Jktog5NPvrtOCcT4GCNx2tkUz2OO2klj0ybvVv0ywX0/viewform?usp=send_form

(If the link is broken please copy and paste in your browser)

 

Conference Registration Deadline: 30th April 2015

All students planning to attend the workshop to join the discussion should register via the link below
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1AOLLArJCMaOFdTBCG1EwX0XlNzkWf6a5N1oVA3YNI2M/viewform?usp=send_form
(If the link is broken please copy and paste in your browser)

*The event is FREE to all attendants, and lunch and refreshments will be provided. However, participants will be responsible for covering their own travel costs.

*There will be a limited number of travel grants (within the UK) available for accepted abstracts. 10 of these grants are available for researchers from the White Rose Universities.

 

If you have any questions please contact Michaela Bruckmayer (m.bruckmayer@sheffield.ac.uk) or Marcia Vera (marcia.vera@sheffield.ac.uk)

Call for Papers: New Modalities for Democratic Autonomy for Minorities that do not entail Dismembering States: 15th to 19th May 2015

Call for Papers:

New Modalities for Democratic Autonomy for Minorities that do not entail Dismembering States: 15th to 19th May 2015

The School of Politics International Relations and Philosophy, Queen’s University Belfast, and, the Faculty of Politics of the University of Ankara (Ankara Üniversitesi, Siyasal Bilgiler Fakültesi),  with the generous support of the British Council, calls for applications from early carrier researchers with a doctoral standing of less than ten years to participate in the British Council Researcher Links Workshop to be held at the Faculty of Political Science of the University of Ankara on the topic New Modalities for Democratic Autonomy for Minorities that do not entail Dismembering States: the Case of the Turkish Republic from 15th to 19th May 2015

The workshop is an intense research meeting for the evaluation and discussion of ideas and models for democratic autonomy for cultural and national minorities within the framework of a multination state. Fifteen early career researchers form UK and fifteen early career researchers from Universities in the Turkish Republic will be invited for four days to Ankara. Full expenses will be paid to those selected to participate in the workshop, courtesy of the generous support of the British Council. This is a call for early career researchers in the United Kingdom. A separate call will be made in the Turkish Language for early career researchers in Turkey.

All participants, from the UK and Turkey, are required to deliver a 20 minutes presentation IN ENGLISH on a topic closely related the theme of the workshop.

The workshop will include the following subsections:

Theories and concepts of Non Territorial Autonomy and Demoicracy as applied to Turkey, Led by Dr. Ephraim Nimni

Minority rights, representation of minorities and International law, led by Professor Bill Bowring, Law Department, Birkbeck College University of London.

National Cultural Autonomy in the Baltic States and the former Soviet Union. Development and Democratisation, what can the Turkish Republic learn from this experience? led by Professor David Smith, of the University of Glasgow, School of Social and Political Sciences.

Minority Representation in the Turkish Republic, led by Professor Baskin Oran from the University of Ankara.

Empowering women through minority representation, led by Dr. Rebecca Bryant from the European Institute, London School of Economics

The Antinomies of the Kurdish Question in The Turkish Republic, led by  Dr. Elçin Aktoprak, Faculty of Politics University of Ankara

The coordinators of the workshop are:

Dr. Ephraim Nimni, School of Politics International Relations and Philosophy Queen’s University Belfast. Email: e.nimni@qub.ac.uk

Dr. Elçin Aktoprak, Faculty of Politics University of Ankara, email: aktoprak@politics.ankara.edu.tr

Criteria for the selection of candidates from the UK and Ireland:

Fifteen applicants will be selected in accordance to the following criteria:

  1. a) A doctoral standing of ten years or less.
  2. b) A 250 word abstract of a paper proposal with a title, showing the ability to present a paper closely related to the topic of the workshop.
  3. c) An affiliation to a Higher Education Institution in the UK or the Irish Republic

The criteria for selection are:

1)      A demonstrable research interest on the topic of the workshop, ideally through a PhD thesis and publications

2)      A demonstrable ability to present a paper closely related to the topic of the workshop, and a demonstrable ability to convert this paper into a chapter for an edited collection that will result from the workshop.

There are no application forms.

An application must consist of:

A NOT MOREE than 250 word  abstract for a  20 minute presentation with a title, of on a theme closely related to the topic of the workshop.

All applicants must indicate in writing that if selected, they are able and willing to travel to Ankara all expenses paid, from 14 to 19 May 2015.

A SHORT CV (not more than half of an A4 page) indicating and email address and institutional affiliation date of completion of doctoral dissertation, and relevant recent publications.

Women and minorities are especially encouraged to apply. The selectors will try, as much as possible, to select a gendered balanced group of participants.

THE DEADLINE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF APPLICATIONS FROM THE UK AND IRELAND IS FRIDAY 20 MARCH midnight GMT. And if in Turkey, midnight Ankara time. Late applications will not be considered. Successful applicants will be notified on or before Monday 30 March. If you do not hear from us by that date, please assume that you have not been selected.

APPLICATIONS BY EMAIL ONLY TO:

UK and Irish applicants to: e.nimni@qub.ac.uk

Applicants from Turkey to: aktoprak@politics.ankara.edu.tr

RATIONALE OF THE WORKSHOP

Cultural diversity is the norm in a world of nation-states, particularly in developing societies. A recurrent problem is how to organise developing multi-ethnic and multi-nation states so that majorities and minorities are able to coexist and effectively participate in the life of the state, bolstering allegiance without suffering cultural alienation and without resorting to territorial secession.

The consolidation of modalities for the growth of democratic pluralism is a crucial strategic goal for developing democracies. Multicultural liberal democracies sincerely champion equality and individual human rights, but often have difficulties in accommodating the representation of culturally diverse minority communities. Territorial representation is only possible when minority communities inhabit a compact territorial space, yet in many cases, minority communities do not reside compactly, making any territorial representation impossible. These situations undermine the proper functioning of democracies, and require modalities of non-territorial autonomy (NTA) as a remedy for the representation of minority communities.

The aim of this workshop is to examine in theory, in relevant case studies and through the work of legal practitioners, the challenges, and possible solutions offered by different models of NTA for the effective participation of minorities in public life, in accordance with the Lund Recommendations of the OSCE.

With a specific reference to the Republic of Turkey, and, drawing on the experience of Northern Ireland, and, other recent attempts of minority accommodation in other parts of the world, and considering, the Turkish and Ottoman experience of minority autonomy (The Millet System), this workshop aims to bring together researchers from the Turkish Republic, with their counterparts in the UK, to develop an ongoing dialogue and examine critically various models of minority accommodation. The focus will be on the Kurdish minority and on the other minorities that constitute 30% of the population of the Republic of Turkey.

The aim is to organise a joint ongoing research group in the UK and Turkey interested in issues of minority recognition and representation.  The goal is to see how it is possible to cross-fertilise the experience of both countries into models of minority autonomy and representation that are a crucial ingredient for a stable democracy.

 

Call for Papers: Gendered Dimensions of Migration: Material and social outcomes of South-South migration

Call for Papers: Gendered Dimensions of Migration: Material and social outcomes of South-South migration

Papers, films and multi-media presentations are invited for the Migrating out of Poverty Research Programme Consortium conference ‘Gendered Dimensions of Migration: Material and social outcomes of South-South migration’ which will take place 30 June – 2 July 2015, Singapore.

Panels will explore links between gender and labour migration in the South via papers, films and multi-media presentations. The key themes are: Gender dynamics in labour markets; Labour and migration regimes; Expectations and moralities surrounding remittances.

Abstracts of 250 words or less should be submitted to D.Thorsen@sussex.ac.uk and rpctemp@sussex.ac.uk by 6 March 2015.

 

Waking up to the scourge of war-time sexual violence

Originally posted on :

Women and children displaced by violence in the Central African Republic sit at a Bangui mosque. © Evan Schneider/UN Photo Women and children displaced by violence in the Central African Republic sit at a Bangui mosque. © Evan Schneider/UN Photo

The international community is slowly starting wake up to importance of prosecuting perpetrators to bring about an end to the continuing global scourge of wartime sexual violence. Yet much work remains to be done.

View original 909 more words

A closer focus on Endorois women reveals strength and resilience in the face of hardship

Originally posted on minorities in focus:

RebeccaRebecca Marlin is currently the Legal Fellow at Minority Rights Group International (MRG) in London. She earned her B.A. from Wellesley College and her J.D. from Fordham University School of Law. During her time at MRG she will be working extensively with the Endorois to achieve implementation of the 2010 African Commission decision granting them rights to Lake Bogoria.

View original 2,380 more words

Athena SWAN – What is it all about? Come and celebrate International Women’s Day and find out more

Originally posted on UEL Research Blog:

Watch our short video from our event last week to find out:

To find out more and help us celebrate International Women’s Day come to one of our events on Thursday 5th March –  Event Information.

View original 135 more words

Migration, social networks and integration: new IRiS Working Papers out

Originally posted on Postcards from ...:

photo credit: Corscri Daje Tutti! [Cristiano Corsini] via photopin cc photo credit: Corscri Daje Tutti! [Cristiano Corsini] via photopincc Two new IRiS Working Papers (no. 6 and 7) exploring issues related migration, social networks and integration policy and practice are out today. Using a wide range of literature, Dr Marta Kindler and colleagues (IRiS WP no. 6) focus upon the ways in which social networks and social capital have been found to promote or hinder integration of third country nationals into their local neighbourhood and communities across the European Union. In IRiS WP no. 7, Professor Gary Craig  addresses the issue of whether integration works, summarising the factors most significant in promoting integration and argues that a narrow focus on the economic aspects of integration and the continuing racism experienced by migrants are key barriers to effective integration.

IRiS Working Paper Series is edited by Dr Nando Sigona and Dr Aleksandra Kazlowska. They are available on IRiS Website: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/superdiversity-institute/publications/working-paper-series.aspx

View original

Students: Appeal Rights Arise From Statute, Not By Fiat

Originally posted on United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog:

London Metropolitan UniversityR (Ahmed) v The Secretary of State for the Home Department [2015] EWHC 23 (Admin) (15 January 2015)

Subsequent to imposing an entry clearance ban on Mehmooda Begum for her brother’s “deception”, in this Tier 4 (General) case involving London Metropolitan University, sitting as a deputy judge, the vice president of the upper tribunal, Mr CMG Ockelton was unimpressed with everyone including Walker J who extended time and granted permission on the ground that it was arguable that the claimant, Khandaker Shaheen Ahmed, had been treated unfairly. The court was unhappy with the claimant because of his reluctance to provide a full account of the facts and also by an “arithmetical slip” at the hearing by his counsel. Ahmed entered the UK at the age of 23. He arrived as a student and renewed his leave from time to time and his last grant of leave, which expired on…

View original 1,089 more words

At least 300 migrants dead or missing in Lampedusa

Originally posted on clandestina:

Around 300 migrants are thought to have died while trying to cross the Mediterranean Sea, the United Nations refugee agency (UNHCR) said Wednesday.

The incident happened off the coast of the Italian island of Lampedusa.

Survivors coming ashore Wednesday reported that four rubber boats attempted to make the journey to Europe from Libya in frigid temperatures.

Carlotta Sami, the UNHCR’s spokeswoman in Italy, said at least 203 people had been “swallowed up by the waves,” the youngest aged 12. However, the agency said that if all four boats are confirmed missing the death toll may surpass 300.

At least 29 people died from hypothermia Monday off Lampedusa — which is about 70 miles from Tunisia — in what the UNHCR said was the first major maritime loss of life this year. They too were travelling from north Africa to Italy.

View original

Event: SOAS Symposium: Law, Politics and Constitution-Making in the Arab Spring

Originally posted on UK Constitutional Law Association:

SOAS logo20 March 2015, 15:25-19:00

Khalili Lecture Theatre, SOAS, University of London, Russell Square, London, UK

15:25

Welcome Notes:

Dr. Nimer Sultany, Law Department, SOAS

Professor Matthew Craven, Dean, Faculty of Law & Social Sciences, SOAS

15:30 – 17:00

Panel I: Whose Constitution?

Professor Mohamed Fadel, Toronto Law School, Constitutionalism, Democracy and Political Division: the Virtues of a Modus Vivendi

Dr. Nadia Marzouki, European University Institute, The Politics of Compromise from the Constitutional Debate to Elections

Hedayat Heikal, Harvard Law School, The Puzzle of the Persisting Faith in Constitutionalism

Discussant: Dr. Scott Newton, Law Department, SOAS

Moderator: Professor Mashood Baderin, UN Independent Expert on the situation of human rights in the Sudan; Law Department, SOAS

17:30 – 19:00

Panel II: The Politics of Rule of Law

Hossam Bahgat, Journalism School, Columbia University, The State of Human Rights in Post-Revolutionary Egypt

Dr…

View original 77 more words

Data Challenges in Conflict Research

Originally posted on Political Violence @ a Glance:

Guest post by Idean Salehyan and Henrik Urdal

A graph of the frequency and severity of violent incidents in Afghanistan. By Max Braun. A graph of the frequency and severity of violent incidents in Afghanistan. By Max Braun.

Quality data is at the heart of quality research. The scholarly community depends on valid, reliable, and easily accessible data in order to empirically test our theories of social and political processes. Yet quantitative data is not “truth” in an absolute sense, but rather, is a numeric representation of complex phenomena. For conflict researchers, the challenge of collecting quality data is particularly acute given the nature of our enterprise. Given the costs and risks involved, it is practically impossible to observe every battle, civilian massacre, human rights violation, or protest event. Therefore, we often rely upon other sources—journalists, non-governmental organizations, truth commissions, and so on—to report on key features of a conflict, then turn such information into numeric values. Turning such reports into data isn’t a…

View original 773 more words

Can Sri Lanka’s minorities dare to hope for change from the nation’s new President?

Originally posted on minorities in focus:

Farah MihlarFarah Mihlar is a Sri Lankan Muslim human rights activist and academic who works as a conflict prevention co-ordinator at Minority Rights Group International and is currently on maternity leave. She started her career as a journalist and has reported on the country’s ethnic conflict for over a decade. She is currently doing a PhD on Islamic extremism in Muslim minority contexts.

View original 1,156 more words

Listening to Voices of Creative Bengali Women in London

Originally posted on Nari Diganta:

An evening with Film, Dialogue, Music and Bangla-Feast with Creative Bengali Women speaking out against oppression and bigotry on International Women’s Day 2015

When?            8 March, Sunday, at 5pm – 9pm

Where?          Brady Arts & Community Centre, 192- 196 Hanbury Street, London, E1 5HU

Who?             Nari Diganta – the Women in Movement for Equality, Social Justice and Secularism

Nari Diganta recognises and celebrates Bengali women’s achievements and struggles in a particular field on every International Women’s Day since its foundation. In 2013 we have celebrated the success and struggles of our women in the field of education, and last year we have focused on Bangladeshi-British women’s struggle in public political sphere. This year Nari Diganta organises an evening to recognise the success and voices of creative Bengali women against bigotry and oppression. We will explore our women’s contribution in the creative field to celebrate International…

View original 603 more words

CMRB Event: Borders, Boundaries and Beyond: A Feminist Exploration of the Making of Borders, Boundaries and Identities in Post-colonial Bangladesh – Rumana Hashem and Zobaida Nasreen

 

CMRB (The Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging)

at the University of East London is pleased to announce as part of its

Borders and Bordering Seminar Series:

Borders, Boundaries and Beyond: A Feminist Exploration of the Making of Borders, Boundaries and Identities in Post-colonial Bangladesh

Rumana Hashem and Zobaida Nasreen

(University of East London and Durham University)

This seminar will take place in

EB.G.06, Docklands Campus, University of East London, E16 2RD, nearest tube: Cyprus DLR

(http://www.uel.ac.uk/campuses/docklands/)

4-6pm, Monday 9th March 2015

The event is free but spaces are limited so please reserve a place by following the below link

bordersboundariesandbeyond.eventbrite.co.uk

Abstract: This presentation draws on two PhD studies and seeks to critically discuss the making of borders, boundaries and identities, especially how borders and boundaries are drawn, contested and redrawn in particular historical and socio-political location, in this case South-east Bangladesh. With a reference to our empirical studies about the post-colonial Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT), we explore how the borders of Bangladesh and the redrawn boundaries of the CHT affect groups/collectivities with regard to gender, ethnicity, religion, and socio-economic status within the nation-state. The presentation relies on the concept of situated and contextual narratives to provide a multi-level, intersectional and discursive analysis of the creation of Bangladesh’s border. Accordingly, we adopt a translocational social-field framework for grasping the making of boundaries of different groups of women. We demonstrate, going beyond a structural assessment, that while the contested and redrawn borders of the nation-state of Bangladesh have enabled spheres for identity politics and hegemony of Bengali nation over ‘other nations/collectivities’, the redrawing of territorial borders has enabled the construction of identities of certain groups and individuals who form identities through cultural belonging, whose boundaries are regularly shifting and contested in relation to their gender, religion, culture, language and nationality. The discussion is interdisciplinary in nature and it draws on political-sociological and political-anthropological scholarship in particular.

Rumana Hashem is a Bangladeshi-born activist-sociologist and a post-doctoral associate affiliated with the CMRB. Originally a rights-activist and journalist, Rumana holds a PhD in gendered relations in the armed conflict in south-east Bangladesh, obtained from the University of East London. She completed a Bachelors and Masters from Dhaka University. Her MA dissertation explored state-violence against sex-workers in Bangladesh, and has led to the achievement of two awards, namely, a DAAD Fellowship (2000) at International Women’s University and a two-year DFG Post-colonial Studies Fellowship (2001-2003) at University of Munich. At UEL, she co-coordinates a research project ‘Democratic Access or Privileged Exclusion: Civic Engagement through the Preservation and Access to Refugee Archives’ that is aimed at developing an oral history of different refugee communities in London. She serves the Sociology journal as an associate reviewer combined with serving the London Roots Collective as a Trainer, the Phulbari Solidarity Group as the Co-ordinator, and Nari Diganta a secular Bengali women’s organisation in East London as an organising member. Rumana taught Sociological modules at the University of Leicester, University of East London and at BRAC University. She published in the Sage Research Cases Methodologies, Feminism & Psychology, DIEGESIS, The Journal of Social Science and other peer-reviewed journals. Contact on twitter @rumanahashem

Zobaida Nasreen is a Commonwealth Fellow and a PhD Candidate in Political Anthropology at Durham University. Her research title is, ‘State violence, Forced Displacement and the Indigenous Women’s Narratives in the Chittagong Hill Tracts in Bangladesh’. She is a faculty member (on Sabbatical) in the department of Anthropology at Dhaka University, and she taught on undergraduate courses at the Independence University in Bangladesh. Originally a left feminist- activist, Zobaida serves the East London’s Bengali women’s organisation Nari Diganta as a Movement and Advocacy Secretary.

www.euborderscapes.eu for more information on the EU Borderscapes project, www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/borderscapes for details of the UEL Borderscapes team and www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb for information on CMRB

 

CMRB Event Today: Secessionism, Separatism and Survivalism in America: Racism and White Supremacy in Times of Perceived Crisis

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) is pleased to announce the following seminar:

Secessionism, Separatism and Survivalism in America: Racism and White Supremacy in Times of Perceived Crisis

This seminar will take place in EB G.06, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD

http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

Monday 2nd March 2014, 4–6pm

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at

                                              aaronwinter.eventbrite.co.uk                          

Abstract: Just prior to, and following, the election of Obama for a second term in 2011/12, there were widespread reports of far-right activists stating their intention to leave the United States as exiles, secede from it or create their own nation out of fear of the alleged threat he poses to white Christian America. In addition to such secessionism and separatism, there has also been a rise in far and more ‘mainstream’ right-wing survivalism (which emerged in the context of Obama’s first election and the economic crisis). Yet, this far-right secessionism, separatism and survivalism, as well as race-based anti-government enmity, have their origins in the post-civil rights 1970s, as responses to the effects of the perceived loss of white supremacy brought about by Civil Rights. Corresponding to this, it was a period that also saw a transformation of far-right racism, from that which asserted and assumed white supremacy and hegemony over African-Americans and the nation to those that asserted and assumed white victimhood and persecution by a federal government that abandoned them. This paper will trace the history of white secessionism, separatism and survivalism, as well as corresponding responses on the far and mainstream right to whiteness ‘in crisis’ in the post-civil rights era. I argue that they both emerge (and converge) as responses to social, political and economic ‘crisis points’ that encourage or exacerbate right wing fears about the state of the nation and racial anxieties (albeit ones based on more structural political and economic issues), including not only civil rights and Obama, but Vietnam, the cold war, oil and farm crises, and 9/11.

Dr Aaron Winter is Senior Lecturer in Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of East London. His research is on organised racism, right-wing extremism and terrorism. He is co-editor of Discourses and Practices of Terrorism: Interrogating Terror (Routledge, Critical Terrorism Studies, 2010) and Reflexivity in Criminological Research Experiences with the Powerful and the Powerless (Palgrave, 2014), and co-convenor of the British Sociological Association’s (BSA) Race and Ethnicity Study Group.

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb

 

Greece: another refugee dies in Police custody!

Originally posted on clandestina:

Mohamed Kamara from Guinea, 21-years old, is one more refugee who died in Police custody, due to lack of health care. He came to Greece in 2012. He attempted to leave through Patras port but was arrested and imprisoned for eight months in Corinth detention center.

According to his friends he applied for asylum but was given a negative answer in mid January 2015. After that he was arrested again on February 7 and on February 9 he was transferred to Kifissia Police Station in Athens. There he kept complaining about his health. Finally, on February 20, he was move in a comatose state to a hospital where he died. According to information he had been in almost comatose state for 24 hours before he was transfered to a hospital!

View original

AA (Afghanistan): What is the Scope of the Tracing Duty?

Originally posted on United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog:

The Supreme Court looks set to hear a trio of Afghan asylum cases next week. The fact that AA (Afghanistan) (Appellant)UKSC 2014/0081 and TN and MA (Afghanistan) (AP) (Appellants)UKSC 2014/0047 involve children does not detract from the truly macabre nature of the ongoing conflict in that country. A panel of justices consisting of Lord Neuberger, Lady Hale, Lord Wilson, Lord Hughes and Lord Toulson will hear these important cases on 3 and 4 March 2015. The AA case, which concerns the extent of the tracing duty, is considered in this post and the TN and MA cases are explored in the next post. In AA, using the services of an agent arranged by his maternal grandfather, the appellant entered the UK in mid-2011 concealed in a lorry. He claimed asylum and contended that subsequent to the death of his father, said to be a Taliban commander…

View original 1,668 more words

TN & MA (Afghanistan): Is JR an Effective Remedy for UASCs?

Originally posted on United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog:

Like the case of AA (Afghanistan), the cases of TN and MA (Afghanistan) (AP) (Appellants)UKSC 2014/0047 also involve the Reception Directive and regulation 6 of the Asylum Seekers (Reception Conditions) Regulations 2005 which impose on the Home Office the duty to endeavour to trace the members of a minor’s family as soon as possible after he makes a claim for asylum. Of course, TN and MA’s narratives are also related to Afghanistan’s endless war but as discussed below all these cases also involve further legal dilemmas. TN and MA arrived in the UK as unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (or ‘UASCs’). They were granted discretionary leave to remain, until they reached the age of 17½, after they had reached 16½. Since the said leave was for less than a year, the appellants did not enjoy a right of appeal against refusal of their asylum claims under section 83(2) of the

View original 2,575 more words

Events: Eastside Community Heritage Lecture Series 2015 to include Talk on Refugee Council Archive

Events:

Eastside Community Heritage Lecture Series 2015

We are pleased to be able to circulate details of the forthcoming Eastside Community Heritage Lecture Series for 2015.  The lecture series will begin on Thursday 26 February with a talk giveEastsiden by Jan Pimblett from the London Metropolitan Archives and wil continue with talks from Sara Griffiths from The National Archives, on Thursday 28 April, and Arthur Torrington CBE on the 24 September.  The events are free but booking is recommended.  Full details of each of the speakers and the subject of their presention are available to download from the Eastside flyer for futher information: Eastside Community Heritage Lecture Series 2015 flyer (PDF File).

Without wisinhing to overly flag up our participation in this project, Paul Dudman the Archivist at UEL will be giving one of the talks which is scheduled to take place on Thursday 18th June and details of which are as follows:

Thursday, 18th June, 6.30pm – 8.30pm
Eastside Community Heritage Lecture Series 2015
Paul Dudman, Archivist, Refugee Archives at UEL

As part of the Eastside Community Heritage Annual Lecture Series for 2015, I will be giving a talk and the focus of this presentation will be to investigate the role of Archives in preserving the history of the refugee experience through a
case study of the Refugee Archives at the University of East London.

As part of our Archival holdings here at UEL, we do currently hold Eastside’s East London People’s Archive oral history collection.  This oral history collection preserves the oral history recordings of the various projects “conducted by Eastside Community Heritage document the lives of ‘ordinary’ people in East London. Topics include World War Two, women’s history, markets, boxing, ethnic groups in East London, food and parks.”

Also available are DVDs on East London local history produced by Eastside Community Heritage comprising Eastside voices: from Canning Town to Custom House, 2003; My Roots, Our Heritage, 2006 and Our Brick Lane, 2007. Published books and booklets on East London local history, chiefly published by Eastside Community Heritage including A Working Class War and Hidden Lives: stories from the East End and an index to photographs collected as part of projects by Eastside Community Heritage comprising of black and white thumbnail reproductions.
(Reference: Eastside Community Heritage).

Please contact the UEL Archives on library-archives@uel.ac.uk for further information on how to access these materials.

Deception: Entry Clearance and the Meaning of ‘False’

Originally posted on United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog:

deceptionBegum (false documents and false statements) [2015] UKUT 41 (IAC) (8 December 2014)

Despite having visited the UK in the past, Mehmooda Begum, a Pakistani, was refused a visa to visit her son and daughter-in-law. She was not found to be in breach of immigration law during her past visits but supplied an accommodation report in her subsequent application which came to be investigated by the Entry Clearance Officer (ECO, Abu Dhabi). The accommodation in question was the home of the sponsor. There was no quarrel about it being spacious enough to accommodate Mehmooda Begum. However, the purported authors of the report disowned it and the application was therefore refused. The First-tier judge decided that the requirements of the immigration rules for visitors were met but that the ECO was right to refuse the application under the general grounds for refusal, i.e. because the applicant had made a false…

View original 606 more words

Call for Papers – Workshop: “Representation of minorities: perspectives and challenges” University of York, 15 May 2015

Call for Papers:

Workshop: “Representation of minorities: perspectives and challenges”
University of York, 15 May 2015

***DEADLINE: 20 February***

The aim of this workshop is to discuss new approaches to the study of minority representation, especially turning the attention from who represents minorities to how minority representation takes place. While the question of how democracy can represent diversity (or fails to do so) is pressing both in academia and in public discourse, there has been so far little interchange between researchers who study this issue. The main goal of this workshop is to start a conversation among graduate students and early-career scholars working in the field of political representation both theoretically and empirically, in order to create a fruitful scholarly network and engender a wider, multifaceted debate and promote future collaborations.

We are interested both in contributions that deal theoretically with the meaning, content and goals of group representation and in contributions that analyse empirically the political representation of specific minorities (ethnic minorities, religious minorities, racial minorities, migrants). We are also interested in contributions that look at these issues from an intersectional perspective (including class and gender). From a theoretical perspective, we are particularly interested in papers that discuss a relationship between a claims-making approach to representation and normative issues of responsiveness. Some of the main empirical questions that will be discussed are: What is effective representation, and is it the same in all institutional and cultural settings? Are minority political empowerment, democratic stability, inter-ethnic conflict management, and policy responsiveness complementary goals? Can they be achieved through the same institutions and forms of representation? What is the potential of informal representation through minority councils or civil society?

The one-day workshop will be focused on debate, with a combination of short presentations, roundtables, open discussions and a keynote speech by Professor Michael Saward. Selected papers will have to be submitted by 20 April 2015. The papers will be circulated in advance among participants, in order to ensure high-quality feedback and discussion. Additional feedback on individual papers will be provided by the staff from the Department of Politics at the University of
York. Selected papers from the workshop will be submitted as a Special Issue in an academic journal.

This event is supported by the British International Studies Association Postgraduate Network (BISA PGN), and the Department of Politics and the Conflict, Security and Development research cluster at the University of York. A maximum of 10 grants will be awarded to participants to partially cover
travel and accommodation costs. However, we invite all participants to also apply for funding from their own institutions.

Paper proposals should be submitted by 20 February 2015 through this link:
http://form.jotformeu.com/form/50213182049345

Please do not hesitate to contact the organisers for any further information: Jelena Loncar
(jl1406@york.ac.uk), Licia Cianetti (l.cianetti@ucl.ac. uk, lcianetti@gmail.com)

Event: Migrants at Work: Immigration & Vulnerability in Labour Law Cathryn Costello & Mark Freedland (editors)

Migrants at Work: Immigration & Vulnerability in Labour Law

Cathryn Costello & Mark Freedland (editors)

A Launch Event

Seminar Room 1, Oxford Department of International Development,

Queen Elizabeth House, 3 Mansfield Rd, Oxford OX1 3TB

In association with COMPAS, the Faculty of Law, the Refugee Studies Centre and Oxford University Press

Friday, 13th February 2015

2:30pm             Welcome from the Editors

2:45pm             Migration Law on the Labour Law Curriculum

Professor ACL Davies (University of Oxford)

3pm                  ‘Modern Slavery’ and Migrant Workers:  Panacea or Panopticon?

Professor Julia O’Connell-Davison (University of Nottingham)

Dr Virginia Mantouvalou (UCL)

Professor Bernard Ryan (University of Leicester)

Professor Bridget Anderson (COMPAS)

4:15pm             Illegality after Hounga:  On Firewalls and other Fantasies?

Professor Alan Bogg (University of Oxford)

Dr Cathryn Costello (University of Oxford)

4:45pm                        Developing the Migrants at Work Research Agenda

5:30pm             Drinks’ Reception –QEH Foyer

CMRB Event Today: ‘Hierarchy, Inequality and Stratification: classing intersectionality and intersectionalising class’, Prof. Floya Anthias (UEL)

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) is pleased to announce the following seminar:

Hierarchy, Inequality and Stratification: classing intersectionality and intersectionalising class

 This seminar will take place in EB G.06, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD

http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

Monday 26th January 2014, 4–6pm

 The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at

floyaanthiascmrb.eventbrite.co.uk

Abstract: The complexity of social divisions and their inter-relations, both as analytical categories and categories of practice asks us to rethink the terms that we use for understanding both ‘identity’ formations and forms of inequality. In this paper I cross reference debates on class and debates on intersectionality. These debates rarely engage with each other. I will argue that both debates fail in different ways. Intersectionality debates rarely provide a clear analysis of the role of class formation in power relations. Stratification approaches rarely engage with the inter-relationships of different modalities of power, for example around gender and race in ways that don’t subordinate them to ‘class’. I will reflect critically on some approaches to class that attempt to move away from a traditional focus on relations of production and labour markets, thereby attempting to incorporate gender and ethnicity into class theory and the newer more culturally nuanced political economy. I will also consider how intersectional frameworks could be developed in ways that attend more centrally to classed social relations.

An analysis of hierarchy and inequality needs to rethink some major categories of social analysis including notions of materiality and culture (daunting to say the least apropos the Marxisant demise), needs to be more global in scope (surprisingly lacking in the literature given the prominence of debates on globalisation and the critique of methodological nationalism) and consider particularly how transnational mobilities and  related social exclusions and boundaries  set up new forms of social stratification and inequality. Global inequalities, the challenges to secularism, fundamentalisms and the racialisation of religion are particularly important in the current period.

Bio: Prior to becoming a Professor of Sociology at UEL in 2013 Floya Anthias was Professor of Sociology and Social Justice at the University of Roehampton (where she remains as Emeritus Professor). She has also been Professor of Sociology at the University of Greenwich and Oxford Brookes University.

Her main academic writings have explored different forms of stratification, social hierarchy and inequality, and how they interconnect. Her research spans a range of theoretical and empirical concerns relating to this.  This has included a focus on racism, diaspora and hybridity, multiculturalism, gender and migration, labour market disadvantages and class position.  Her most recent work has been developing the concept of translocational positionality as a way of addressing some of the difficulties identified with concepts of hybridity, identity and intersectionality. She has published on these issues in a range of top peer reviewed journals.

Floya’s books include Woman Nation State, Palgrave (with N. Yuval Davis), Racialised Boundaries: nation, race, ethnicity, colour and class and the anti racist struggle (with N Yuval-Davis), Routledge, Ethnicity, Class, Gender and Migration, Greek Cypriots in Britain, Avebury, Into the Margins: Migration and Exclusion in Southern Europe, (with G. Lazaridis), Ashgate, Gender and Migration in Southern Europe: women on the move (with G. Lazaridis), Berg, Rethinking Anti-racisms: from theory to practice, (with Cathie Lloyd), Routledge, Paradoxes of Integration: Female Migrants in Europe, (with M. Kontos and M. Morokvasic), Springer, Contesting Integration, Engendering Migration, Palgrave (with M. Pajnik), and  Work and the Challenges of Belonging (with M. Pajnik), Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb

Table of Contents Alert: International Journal of Refugee Law Table of Contents for Volume 26, Number 4, (December 2014)

Oxford Journals have published their latest Table of Contents Alert for the International Journal of Refugee Law.  Details of the content included in Vol. 26, No. 4, (1 December 2014) are detailed below:

Articles

The Contemporary International Law Status of the Right to Receive Asylum
William Thomas Worster
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 477-499
[Abstract]

The Safe Country of Origin Concept in European Asylum Law: Past, Present and Future
Matthew Hunt
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 500-535
[Abstract]

UNHCR’s Involvement with IDPs – ‘Protection of that Country’ for the Purposes of Precluding Refugee Status?
Bríd Ní Ghráinne
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 536-554
[Abstract]

Expanding Protection in Africa? Case Studies of the Implementation of the 1969 African Refugee Convention’s Expanded Refugee Definition
Tamara Wood
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 555-580
[Abstract]

Palestinian Refugees and the Syrian Uprising: Filling the Protection Gap during Secondary Forced Displacement
Noura Erakat
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 581-621
[Abstract] [Full Text] [PDF] [Request Permissions]

Case Law

Febles v. Canada (Citizenship and Immigration) Supreme Court of Canada
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 622-654
[Extract]

Case BVerwG 10 C 7.13: German Federal Administrative Court
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 655-669
[Extract]

Matter of A-R-C-G- et al., Respondents
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 670-676
[Extract]

FTZK v Minister for Immigration and Border Protection
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 677
[Extract]

Documents

Guidelines on Temporary Protection or Stay Arrangements
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 678-686
[Extract]

Statement by Volker Türk: Director of International Protection
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 687-699
[Extract]

Submissions of the Intervener: The Queen (on the Application of B) v The Director of the Legal Aid Casework
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 700-715
[Extract]

Book Reviews

Gender in Refugee Law. From the Margins to the Centre
Hannah Baumeister
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 716-718
[Extract]

Humanitarian Law in Action in Africa
Hannah Baumeister
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 719-720
[Extract]

European Asylum Law and the Rights of the Child
Helmut Sax
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 721-724
[Extract]

Protection of Refugees and Displaced Persons in the Asia Pacific Region
Ivan Shearer
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 724-727
[Extract]

The Ethics of Immigration
Dr Baerbel Heide Uhl
Int J Refugee Law 2015 26: 727-729
[Extract]

 

France: Migrants, Asylum Seekers Abused and Destitute.

Originally posted on Wessex Solidarity:

Investigate Reports of Police Abuse in Calais, Provide Shelter.

Read full article on Human rights watch.Francais

A group of Iranian migrants and asylum seekers keeping warm in a camp in Calais in November, 2014. © 2014 Human Rights Watch

(Paris) – Asylum seekers and migrants living in destitution in the port city of Calais experience harassment and abuse at the hands of French police, Human Rights Watch said today. The abuses described to Human Rights Watch include beatings and attacks with pepper spray as the migrants and asylum seekers walked in the street or hid in trucks in the hope of traveling to the United Kingdom.

Several thousand asylum seekers and migrants, most from Sudan, Eritrea, and Ethiopia, are living in makeshift camps or in the streets in Calais. Some said that their treatment by police, a lack of housing for asylum seekers, and delays in the French asylum…

View original 86 more words

News You May Have Missed (17-23 January)

Originally posted on The Human Rights Warrior:

A student at the Hamar Jajab School in Mogadishu holds a peace-themed comic book for children produced by UNSOM during the commemoration of Somalia’s ratification of the Convention on the Rights of the Child on 20 January 2015. UN Photo/Ilyas Ahmed A student at the Hamar Jajab School in Mogadishu holds a peace-themed comic book for children produced by UNSOM during the commemoration of Somalia’s ratification of the Convention on the Rights of the Child on 20 January 2015. UN Photo/Ilyas Ahmed

There was some good news about human rights around the world this week.  

SOMALIA has become the 195th state party to ratify the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). A ceremony was held to mark the ratification at a local school in the Somali capital of Mogadishu.  In agreeing to be bound by the treaty, the government of Somalia is obligating itself to take steps to improve the lives of its youngest citizens.   The CRC is the most widely ratified human rights treaty in existence.  Once Somalia’s ratification is officially deposited with the UN, the United States and South Sudan will be the only countries in…

View original 988 more words

Call for Abstracts: “The quantitative approach to the analysis of migration and migrants’ integration in the host society” ECSR, Collegio Carlo Alberto and Milan Turin Joint SPRING SCHOOL: Deadline for Applications 15th February 2015

NASP/GSSPS is pleased to announce the Third Edition

ECSR, COLLEGIO CARLO ALBERTO AND MILAN-TURIN JOINT SPRING SCHOOL on

“The quantitative approach to the analysis of migration and migrants’ integration in the host society”

March the 23rd – the 27th, 2015

Collegio Carlo Alberto

Via Real Collegio 30, Moncalieri (Turin), Italy

The topic for the third edition of the ECSR Spring School is “The quantitative approach to the analysis of migration and migrants’ integration in the host society”.

The School is promoted by ECSR, Collegio Carlo Alberto and by the universities of Milan and Turin in the frame of the NASP, Network for the Advancement in Social and Political Studies. It provides high-quality training on leading-edge theories and methodological approaches to the quantitative analysis of contemporary migrations and of the integration of migrants in the host societies. Particular attention will be given to the children of immigrants and their position in the social stratification of receiving societies. A limited number of doctoral students and young researchers will participate to a five-day, full-immersion course, including:

  1. a) lectures on key current issues in the field;
  2. b) an intensive course on the longitudinal analysis of the life course of migrants and their offspring (including hands-on practical work);
  3. c) the opportunity to present their work and have it discussed by leading scholars in the field.

The School is organized by Gabriele Ballarino (University of Milan), Tiziana Caponio (Collegio Carlo Alberto and University of Turin), Fabrizio Bernardi (ECSR, EUI), Irena Kogan (University of Mannheim) and Lucinda Platt (London School of Economics).

Faculty

Gabriele Ballarino (University of Milan), Fabrizio Bernardi (ECSR, EUI), Héctor Cebolla Boado (UNED, Madrid), Tiziana Caponio (Collegio Carlo Alberto and University of Turin), Renzo Carriero (University of Turin), Jörg Dollmann (MZES, Mannheim), Helga de Valk (Vrije Universiteit Brussel), Marc Helbling (WZB, Berlin), Irena Kogan (University of Mannheim), Tiziana Nazio (University of Turin), Lucinda Platt (London School of Economics) and Cristina Solera (University of Turin).

Applications

Applications have to be sent by email ( mito.school@unimi.it) by February, the 15th, and will include:

  1. a) an abstract of the paper that will be presented (up to 500 words);
  2. b) a short summary of PhD thesis project or of current research (up to 3 pages);
  3. c) a brief CV (one page).

Priority in admission will be given to students from Institutions that belong to the ECSR. Admission to the School is free of charge. Admitted students will be provided with hotel accomodation, all lunches and the social dinner. Other dinners and travel expenses to and from Turin will not be covered.

 

For information:

 

Prof. Gabriele Ballarino mito.school@unimi.it

European Network on Statelessness Conference Announcement & Call for Papers

The European Network on Statelessness (ENS) is pleased to announce its conference “None of Europe’s Children Should be Stateless” which will take place in Budapest from 2-3 June 2015.

None of Europe’s Children Should be Stateless”
Budapest, 2-3 June 2015

The United Nations estimates that a child is born stateless, somewhere in the world, every ten minutes. States are failing to fulfil the right of every child to acquire a nationality – a fundamental children’s right, laid down in the Convention in the Rights of the Child. In this region too, statelessness continues to arise because European states are failing to ensure that all children born within Europe’s borders or to European citizen parents acquire a nationality. For those affected, statelessness can mean lack of access to other rights and services, denied opportunities, unfulfilled potential and a sense of never quite belonging. It brings hardship and anguish to children and their parents alike.

The European Network on Statelessness (ENS) is campaigning for an end to childhood statelessness in Europe. This goal is also central to the #ibelong campaign, spearheaded by UNHCR, to end all statelessness globally by 2024. To realise children’s right to a nationality in Europe, the phenomenon and the challenges need to be better understood. Different stakeholders must also unite to identify and share good practices so that these challenges can be addressed.

This conference is a central activity of the ENS campaign “None of Europe’s Children should be Stateless”. It will provide a platform for sharing new research on the causes and impact of childhood statelessness in Europe. It will also provide a forum for the sharing of knowledge on legal, policy and programming interventions that can help to realise children’s right to a nationality. It is a venue for scholars, practitioners and policy makers to come together and discuss how to ensure that no more of Europe’s children suffer statelessness. The conference will last a day and a half, commencing in the morning of June 2nd and running until lunchtime on June 3rd. The first day will focus on sharing information on challenges, opportunities and good practices through presentations and panel discussions. The second day will be more forward-looking and encourage participants, on the basis of the lessons learned, to jointly identify potential areas for further action and collaboration to end childhood statelessness in Europe.

Call for Papers

The call for papers for this conference is now open. We welcome submissions for presentations by scholars and practitioners, dealing with research, policy or projects that relate to childhood statelessness in Europe. Presentations may focus on a specific country or group of countries, or consider a particular theme. We are particularly interested in presentations that identify good practices with respect to the prevention of childhood statelessness and those which provide a further insight into the impact of statelessness on children in Europe. We also welcome presentations that explore the role of different stakeholders in addressing the issue, including actors such as child rights organisations, legal aid providers, ombudspersons and National Human Rights Institutions, EU and Council of Europe bodies and journalists.

To submit a proposal to present at this conference, please send the following information to info@statelessness.eu before 15 February 2015: your name, affiliation, country of work and email address, an abstract of your proposed presentation (max. 250 words) and 5-8 accompanying keywords. ENS will inform you by 1 March 2015 whether your proposal has been accepted.

A more detailed conference announcement, including information about the programme, speakers and how to register, will be issued in March through the ENS website (www.Statelessness.eu) and mailing list. Please note that there is no registration fee for the conference but speakers and general participants will be required to cover all costs related to their travel to and lodging in Budapest.

About the European Network on Statelessness (ENS)

ENS is a network of NGOs, academic initiatives and individual experts committed to addressing statelessness in Europe – currently with over 90 members in more than 30 European countries. This year’s ENS Annual General meeting will take place immediately after the conference during the afternoon of 3 June 2015. This is only open to ENS members but details on how to join the network are available on the ENS website here – we would particularly welcome applications from child rights organisations. For further information contact ENS Director Chris Nash at chris.nash@statelessness.eu

Download a PDF of the conference announcement here

The Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion is an expert partner for the ENS campaign “None of Europe’s Children Should be Stateless”.

 

Call for Paper Proposals: Conference on Islam in Russia

Call for Paper Proposals:

Conference on Islam in Russia
October 15 and 16, 2015
Deadline to apply: February 1, 2015
Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University
http://daviscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events/conference-islam-russia

The Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University invites submissions of paper proposals for an international conference on Islam in Russia.

Islam in Russia takes many forms, from the Tatars’ moderate EuroIslam to traditional Sufism in the Caucasus to the radicalized Salafi ideas found among a minority of young Muslims throughout the country. These different Muslim identities interact with a state that has in recent years come to be increasingly dominated by ethnic Russian and Orthodox Christian identities. At the same time, the strengthening of the Russian state has led it to increase its influence on Muslim religious practices and the everyday lives of Russian Muslims.

The Crimean crisis of 2014 has again highlighted the significance of Islam in contemporary Russia. The Russian government tried to mobilize state-supported Muslim organizations to sway Crimean Tatars to its side. This strategy was consistent with Moscow’s long-standing practice of co-opting religious groups by appointing a state-sanctioned representative. Since the time of Catherine the Great, Islamic authorities were expected to promote interpretations of Islam that supported the state. Needless to say, attempting to co-op believers into supporting a particular religious interpretation runs the risk of alienating those who disagree with the official interpretation. The resulting power struggles have played an important role in shaping Muslim identity in Russia in the post-Soviet period.

This conference will focus on what it means to be a Muslim in Russia today and how these meanings are reflected in Russian political life. Conference participants will examine the variety of Muslim identities in modern Russia and also consider the evolving role of Muslims in Russian history.

Suggested Themes
We are interested in papers from a range of disciplinary perspectives that address the history, evolution, and future of Muslim communities, cultures, and identities in Russia. We encourage papers that move beyond the description of particular populations or institutions and introduce analyses of the problems, paradoxes, contradictions, and challenges involved in thinking about Muslims in Russia.

The following themes are suggested as guides for the formulation of topics for paper proposals:

  • History of Muslims in Russia
  • Radical Islam in the Caucasus
  • Integrated Islam across Russia
  • Islamic Society and the Russian State
  • Muslim Migrants across Russia

Papers will also be considered on any other themes relevant to the role of Islam and Muslim populations in Russia. Note that the working language of the conference is English: all papers must be submitted and presented in English.

Graduate Student Workshop
In addition to the conference, a smaller graduate student workshop will be held immediately prior to the conference. The workshop will allow graduate students pursuing research projects related to Islam in Russia to get feedback and suggestions for their work from both their peers and from senior scholars participating in the conference. Travel funding will be available for students attending from outside the Boston area.

Submitting a Proposal
Junior and senior scholars in the humanities and social sciences, as well as others working in relevant areas, are eligible to apply, irrespective of citizenship or country of residence. Proposals should be submitted via the conference website. Students applying to participate in the graduate student workshop should follow the same process as regular applicants, noting their graduate student status in the appropriate place on the online application form.

The deadline for submitting proposals is February 1, 2015. All materials must be submitted in English. Decisions will be announced by May 1, 2015. Presenters must submit their final conference papers by Sept 15, 2015. Selected papers will be considered for publication in a special issue of Problems of Post-Communism.

The Davis Center will cover presenters’ expenses for travel, lodging, and meals. A modest honorarium will also be provided (contingent on presenter’s eligibility to receive payment).

Project Organizers
Timothy Colton, Morris and Anna Feldberg Professor of Government and Russian Studies, Chair of the Government Department, Harvard University

Dmitry Gorenburg, Editor, Problems of Post-Communism, and Associate, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University

More Information
Please contact the Davis Center at 617-495-4037 or daviscenter@fas.harvard.edu with any questions about this event.

The conference and student workshop are made possible by the generous support of Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Call for Papers: ESA ABSTRACT DEADLINE REMINDER : Sociology of Migration at the 12th ESA Conference

The Call for Papers for the next ESA-conference (25-28 August 2015,
Prague) is now online. The general conference theme is “Differences,
Inequalities, and Sociological Imagination”.

RN 35 – Sociology of Migration will organise a series of sessions at this
conference. Below you find our RN-CfP!

Abstracts need to be submitted through ESA’s online submission system by
01 February 2015: http://esa12thconference.eu/abstract-submission

CfP: RN 35 at the 12th ESA Conference (25-28/08/2015, Prague)

ESA Research Network 35 ‘Sociology of Migration’ provides a platform for
all scholars who deal with questions of immigration and emigration,
inclusion and exclusion, and diversity within Europe. The call for papers
for our RN programme at the upcoming 12th ESA conference (25–28 August
2015, Prague) is now open. The theme of this conference – Differences,
inequalities and sociological imagination – provides a fruitful basis to
continue discussions started at earlier RN activities, as well as for
moving to new subject areas.

Differences, inequalities, and imaginations – and especially the links and
tensions within this triad – have concerned migration research from its
beginning. Of course, the emphases varied over time. During the 1990s and
2000s, the focus was put rather strongly on aspects of (cultural)
difference, on questions of ethnicity, identity, and belonging. Partly due
to the obvious and urgent crises and contradictions of neoliberal
globalisation, inequalities have resurfaced as key concerns of
sociological enquiries over the past few years. Lately, the question of
how the interplay between differences and inequalities is structured by
political agency and discourses has risen in the agenda, most notably in
recent studies on migration regimes. Political imaginations play a crucial
role here – most obviously, but by far not exclusively the idea of
national belonging. This is very different from a second form of
imagination, that has so far received little attention: the sociological
task of imagining alternative futures.

We invite paper proposals that relate to the general theme of the
conference. Authors may submit their abstract to one of the specific
sections described below. If they prefer not to declare a specific
session, their papers – if accepted – will be considered as part of our
general sessions. Abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and need to
be submitted through ESA’s online submission system by 01 February 2015.

1. General session: Differences, inequalities and sociological imagination
– RN35 Sociology of Migration

SEE ABOVE FOR THE GENERAL CALL – YOU CAN SUBMIT ANY PAPER UNDER THIS
CATEGORY WHICH DOES NOT FIT TO THE SESSIONS DESCRIBED BELOW.

2. Migrant students: new directions in migration research

Session organisers: Renee Luthra (University of Essex) and Lucinda Platt
(London School of Economics)

The internationalisation of education, combined with the increase in visa
restrictions on labour migration in many traditional receiving societies,
have resulted in an upsurge in student migrants both in absolute terms and
as a proportion of overall migrant flows. Between 1975 and 2011 the number
of foreign students worldwide increased from 0.8 million to 4.3 million.
Yet, this group of migrants remains relatively under-researched. When they
are considered, current research tends to cover them in broader
discussions of highly skilled migrants or in the context of the free
movement or exchange programmes experienced by inter EU migrants more
generally. An emerging qualitative literature charts seem of their
personal struggles, ambiguities and trajectories, and suggest that such
broad frameworks do not do justice to the complexities of this migration
stream. In this session, we invite papers that address theoretical and
empirical questions relating to current student migration. Papers might
cover comparisons across origin or destination countries, subsequent
trajectories of student migrants in either the country of study or on
return to the country of origin, investment in study as a family strategy,
returns to international study, or other topics relevant to the
determinants, characteristics or consequences of migration for education.

3. Escaping power relations or helping to maintain social order?
Informality in migration research

Session organiser: Małgorzata Irek (COMPAS, University of Oxford)

As Keith Hart put it, in our times the capitalist state is the dominant
social form. Everything that happens beyond this form he called informal.
The state is a territorial unit, closed within clearly defined borders and
possessing its own legal system and bureaucratic apparatus claiming the
monopoly of violence and guarding the existing power system,
hierarchically organised from the most privileged at its top, through the
‘gens modestes’ as Bourdieu called the ordinary people, to the
‘precariate’ at the bottom of the social ladder. The lowest place in this
hierarchy of power is reserved for the informal immigrants, excluded from
human rights enjoyed by all other groups. Informality, in turn, is a lack
of form, which makes it a continuous category, lacking boundaries, and
thus infinite. This concept is wider than the popular, developed by the
American economists definition of ‘informality’ understood as economic
activities that are not reported to a taxman, as well as the concept of
‘irregularity’ used after Portes with reference to migration regulations.
So, while the state is a finite and fixed form which controls only a
fragment of human experience, informality is a vast category describing a
universal human condition, allowing to appreciate migration as a natural
part of human experience, rather than its rapture. Asking whether informal
activities of migrants defy existing inequalities, have a revolutionary
potential or perhaps save the power system from radical changes, the
proposed panel invites contributions of scholars who explore how the
relationship between the state and informality is described and theorized
in the migration research.

4. Migration and Social Change: European perspectives

Session Organisers: Remus G. Anghel (Romanian Institute for Research on
National Minorities, Cluj) and Margit Fauser (Bielefeld University)

Migration and transnational dynamics involve increasingly more people
around the world, linking localities of origin and destination in ever
more extensive webs of social ties, transfers and exchanges. In this
session, we want to discuss the manifold forms of change migration leads
to, in regions of destination as well as in regions of origin. Debates on
the migration-development nexus, remittances and social remittances point
towards the social and cultural changes brought about as a consequence of
migration. In this vein, an emerging scholarship has started to
investigate the consequences of migration in many places of origin. Still,
there is a further need to unfold the types and forms of migration-induced
social change worldwide, and in comparative perspective. Therefore,
migration and development debates need to be located within a more
comprehensive understanding of the social changes produced by migration.
Rather than focusing on ‘Great Transformations’, meso-level changes seem
of particular interest. We aim to bring forth a view on Europe as a
destination, acknowledging the different migration streams, their
composition and histories that may have different implications for change
‘back home’. Hence, what types of meso-level changes can we observe? Are
migrants challengers to local social orders? How do changes confront the
established systems of economic, political, and social power and
inequality? How do local cultural understandings change? What significance
does migration have for cities and villages of origin? And how can such
processes be researched and understood in places that are simultaneously
affected by many other global dynamics? These are some of the question we
wish to address with this session. We invite methodological, empirical and
theoretical engagements with these issues.

5. Promoting Social Imagination at the Global Level: A discussion about
Migration and Intercultural Integration

Session Organisers: Rina Manuela Contini (University of Chieti-Pescara)
and Mariella M. Herold (Northern Arizona University)

Globalization processes and dynamic transnational migrations are bringing
about remarkable demographic differences in European societies. The flow
of migrants from Eastern Europe, Africa, and other parts of the world are
also creating new social, economical and educational inequities which are
forcing EU nation states to reflect on these differences and imagine
solutions. New immigrants bring with them cultural practices, foods, forms
of art and expression, and perspectives on all aspects of human experience
that daily transform the cultural fabric of their communities and of host
countries–which are also transformed and enriched by these new cultural
experiences. Dichotomies between “natives” and “newcomers” emerge, as well
as new forms of identities and distinctions between “them” and “us”, as
expressed in politics and in the art and literature of marginality,
patterns of adaptation and integration. There are also sources of conflict
between generations within immigrant communities. In addition, schools and
teachers do not feel prepared to educate diverse children with many
proficiency levels and diverse languages. Societal inequities cannot be
understood in isolation and they need to be understood from a global
perspective. This session gathers international researchers from Europe,
the US, and other parts of the world to examine new paradigms, policies
and practices for the development of an inclusive intercultural and
transnational framework, in order to reduce inequities. This is necessary
to positively integrate culturally-diverse families, children and
adolescents into schools and societies.

6. The inequalities referring to the right to mobility in a context of
Globalization

Session Organiser: Catherine Wihtol de Wenden (Director of research, CNRS,
CERI Science-Po, Paris)

The right to mobility is one of the less well shared rights all over the
world, underlying the gap between those who are subject to visas and the
others who can freely cross the borders at world scale. This leads to
numerous statuses that refer to the segmentation of this right:
“illegals”, “regional migration”, “short term residents and workers”, all
statuses that conduct to less mobility and more settlement in precarious
lives. This session will focus on theoretical and field study approaches
on fragile migrant populations included in the new types of migration in,
to or from European countries.

7. ‘Policing Ethnicity: Between the Rhetoric of Inclusion and the
Practices and Policies of Exclusion’

Session organisers: Abby Peterson (University of Gothenburg) and Malin
Åkerström (University of Lund)

Policing will be broadly understood in this session as all those
activities involved in the provision of security and/or the maintenance of
order, expanding our gaze from the usual criminal justice agencies to also
include the new multiple modes of policing, for example, private security,
policing partnerships with local authorities and civil society
associations, etc. The papers can interrogate policing in different ways:
as the patterns of social control, or as the governance of inclusion and
exclusion, along the dynamic and interrelated dimensions of ethnicity,
class and gender. How does the provision of (physical) security by the
multiple new modes of policing construct a topography of ‘insiders’ who
enjoy the benefits of the policies and ‘outsiders’ who bear their burdens?
Who is consigned to the ‘outside’ , who is invited in the ‘inside’ and how
does this process occur? How do countries police their borders, both
internal and external? The papers in this session will address how the
rhetoric of inclusion is all too often at odds with the practices and
policies of exclusion and control.

8. Family dynamics and inequalities in migration

Session organisers : Muriel Dudt (University of Strasbourg), Elise Pape
(EHESS, Paris/University of Strasbourg), Catherine Delcroix (University of
Strasbourg)

This session proposal deals with migrant family dynamics and social,
political and economic inequalities. How are migrant families affected by
the inequalities linked to the depth and acceleration of globalization?
What strategies do they develop in order to fight those inequalities? This
session encourages contributions on the following themes: How do
transnational families (Bryceson and Vuorela 2002) deal with
“South-North”/”East-West” inequalities, for example through remittances or
migration strategies within the family? What are, in an intersectional
perspective, the impacts of age, gender or “race” on the social
positioning of the family members in the different contexts they live in?
What role does the transmission of languages play in this process?
Furthermore, how do migrant families deal with inequalities they may
experience in their country of arrival, for example in the fields of
access to social and political rights? If families are affected by
processes of domination that can trigger tensions between the individuals,
they can also be a « space » where original strategies can be created in
order to fight inequalities. Family members can for instance share a
common « minority » status that can bring them closer as they share
experiences of discrimination. What then are the struggles in which they
can support each other or which are the struggles that may create distance
among them? The session pays specific attention to how the chosen
methodological approach affects the scientific findings. Papers discussing
the role of languages in families and working from an intergenerational
and multisited perspective are particularly welcome.

9. Migration and Multiculturalism: Making sense of the popular politics of
resentment

Session Organisers: Ipek Demir (University of Leicester) and Gurminder K.
Bhambra (University of Warwick)

The backlash against multiculturalism and the rise of anti-immigration
sentiment have both been dominant themes in European social and political
discourse in recent years. Leading European politicians (e.g. Cameron,
Merkel, Sarkozy), public figures and sociologists (e.g. Habermas, Beck)
have appeared to disown the multicultural and post-colonial legacies of
Europe in favour of a more traditional mono-culturalism whether of
nationalism or cosmopolitanism. There also exist increasingly explicit
anti-immigration stances and policies by parties and movements such as the
UK Independence Party and that of Golden Dawn in Greece. It is no
coincidence that the stances on migration and multiculturalism emerged
simultaneously, draw on similar perspectives and also overlap
significantly in their rhetorical claims. How can/should sociologists make
sense of these developments using the insights of literature and research
on both migration and multiculturalism? What kind of overlapping themes
emerge? Taking the ‘popular politics of ethnic and cultural resentment’ as
the starting point, papers in this session will examine connections and
overlapping theoretical insights, and empirical examples evident in the
debates on both migration and multiculturalism.

10. Refugees’ Everyday Life Worlds and the Production of Societal
Inequalities in Europe

Session Organisers: Elisabeth Scheibelhofer (University of Vienna) and
Vicki Täubig (University of Siegen)

Refugees face manifold restrictions on their stay in Europe. As asylum
seekers, they are usually faced with social exclusion, marginalisation
and, in some cases, the fight for survival. Usually, they are forced to
lead a passive life and often face racism, or difficulties in finding
adequate schooling for their children and healthcare. After having been
granted asylum they have, to a great extent, equal rights with other
citizens. It is only at that stage that it is demanded of them to actively
and rapidly ’integrate’ into European societies, often without sufficient
means. Those whose applications for asylum have been rejected are
transformed into illegal refugees without any rights. Refugee studies
connect global processes of societal change and biographic or group
struggles for a self-determined life and societal recognition. Firstly,
this session invites both theoretical and empirical contributions.
Secondly, we are interested in comparative and/or long-term case studies,
of the living conditions of refugees. Papers that suggest answers to the
question of how people organize themselves in the face of others and “how
they organize themselves vis-á-vis broader structural situations” (Clarke
2005: 109) are especially welcome. Thirdly, we cordially invite
contributions that focus on historical and political analyses in order to
reach a better understanding of these ongoing societal processes. Papers
should address the question of production and reproduction of social
inequalities. The session organisers plan to produce a special issue
within an international journal containing session contributions.

11. Inclusion, exclusion and precarious employment of migrant workers in
Europe

Session Organiser: Olena Fedyuk (University of Strathclyde, Glasgow)

The session aims to move the debate beyond the perspective that situates
migrants’ exclusion and inclusion solely in migration processes. The
central concern is to explore how migration is experienced in gendered,
ethnic and class terms. Specifically, how these categories intersect with
each other and the larger transformations of global capital and local
labor relationships. Current academic debates conceptualise migration as
an integral part of such transformations. This suggests that migration
should be understood in the context of the ongoing changes in employment
regimes, i.e. liberalization, flexibilisation and precarisation of labour
around Europe as well as ideologies accompanying these practices, which
have an impact on an individual’s subjectivity. Against the backdrop of
these changes in employment and migration regimes, we scrutinize processes
of inclusion and exclusion as a continuum of social positions. The session
aims at fostering a debate on how to conceptualize those processes in
relation to empirical studies of migrants’ work trajectories.

The session welcomes papers, which critically engage with concepts of
inclusion and exclusion, citizenship and precarisation, and which tackle
macro, micro and meso- level of migratory flows and practices. The purpose
is to examine the political economy of the recent transformations in
employment, migration and care regimes, and to situate ethnographic
examples from Europe within this context in order to explore migrants’
individual and collective responses to these transformations.

12. (Successful) migrant integration: whose responsibility is it?

Session organiser: Markéta Seidlová (Charles University in Prague, Prague)

The integration of immigrants has always had a strong local (and
especially urban) dimension (Borkert et al., 2007), while cities always
served as “machines of integration” (Bosswick, Heckmann, 2006). The
un/success of integration policies is measured by comparing data from
selected fields between the “majority society” and immigrant minorities
(Entzinger, Biezeveld, 2003). Usually four main fields of integration are
distinguished: socioeconomic; cultural; legal and political integration;
and the attitude of the host society (Heckmann, Schnapper, 2003). It is
also stated that the probability of a successful social and economic
integration of an immigrant into the host society depends not only on
his/her human capital, but also on his/her particular country of origin,
“race” and belonging to a specific ethnic community (Castles, 2008).

In this panel, we would like to approach the socioeconomic integration of
immigrants from different perspectives and on different scales of
analysis. How can the determinants of immigrant integration be addressed
by national governments and local councils in order to boost immigrants’
access to the labour market? To what extent do immigrants themselves use
their social networks to get incorporated into their host society? Are
there differences between the integration strategies taken by immigrant
minorities in specific local places or coming from diverse environments?
Are the integration policies adopted by the countries of Eastern and
Western Europe different? These are the issues that this panel aims to
address.

13. Access to fair and transparent qualifications recognition – a right or
a privilege?

Session Organiser: Beata Sokolowska (Trinity College Dublin)

Ongoing globalisation has led to European societies that are becoming
increasingly diverse. On one hand, progressing globalisation evokes demand
for equity and provision of high quality information. On the other hand,
European countries face unacceptably high rates of unemployment and are
concerned about social inclusion. Exploring academic and social aspect of
the recognition of foreign qualifications in the European context is
important for a number of reasons. Firstly, migrants who move from one
country to another are often interested in seeking the recognition of
their qualification so they can access regulated or unregulated
professions and/or pursue further studies in their host country. Secondly,
fair recognition of migrants’ skills and educational attainment should
facilitate transferability of already acquired knowledge and social
competence. Thirdly, recognition of foreign qualifications acts as a
mechanism to place international awards in the context of particular
education and training systems, which is of great importance, particularly
in the context of labour market activation; access, transfer and
progression (ATP) and the recognition of prior learning (RPL). In terms of
contributing to social cohesion, the recognition of qualifications and
competencies of migrants is decisive. However, only a few European
countries offer this service free of charge (e.g., Ireland).Finally, there
is a limited availability of information on the impact of recognition of
foreign qualifications for migrant employability and social cohesion. This
session calls for papers on this topic that will reflect how information
barriers may be removed and how this may contribute to a greater social
equality for migrants within Europe.

Call for Papers: 1st Annual Workshop – White Rose Migration Research Postgraduate Network

White Rose Migration Research Postgraduate Network:

1st POSTGRADUATE WORKSHOP ON MIGRATION

“Reframing the Migration Debate”

CALL FOR PAPERS

ICoSS, University of Sheffield, 11th June 2015

Keynote Speaker:

Professor Andrew Geddes (Politics Department, University of Sheffield)

The White Rose Migration Research Postgraduate Network, in collaboration with The University of Sheffield Migration Research Group, invites submissions for the 1st Postgraduate Workshop on Migration. The aim of the workshop is to provide a space of discussion and dissemination for early career researchers (either doctoral or postdoctoral researchers) working on different topics and across different disciplines in relation to migration. This will be an opportunity to showcase your research, preliminary research findings and any other ‘work in progress’ with a critically engaged audience from across the White Rose Universities. This workshop will facilitate the development of networks and foster future research collaborations.

This year the workshop is inviting postgraduate students and early career researchers from different disciplines to critically discuss and reflect about different aspects of migrants’ experiences. With an increase in restrictive policies, the perceived need to secure borders and anti-migrant sentiment, this workshop extends an invitation to researchers, who wish to challenge pejorative migrant discourses through engagement in a comprehensive discussion of migrants displacement and the integration process into a new ‘place’. We are interested in papers that contribute to “reframing the migration debate”, with innovative approaches that allow us to explore migrants citizenship, contribution and resistance in the context of the challenges they face. Suggested topics include, but are in no way limited to:

  • Migrants as active citizens exercising agency.
  • Challenges to migrants’ ability to contribute to society, such as the impact of migration on capital and subsequently integration.
  • Relationship between governance, the management of migration and integration.
  • New dynamics and patterns of migration.
  • Exploration of the role played by different institutions in civil society in relation to migration flows e.g. the media, NGO’s, etc.
  • Alternative theoretical/empirical perspectives on migration.

 

Abstracts in all areas of migration and from all disciplines will be considered. The workshop welcomes research and work in progress about broad heterogeneous groups including documented, undocumented and forced migrants.

Abstracts submission

Abstracts should be no longer than 300 words and should be submitted via the following link by 15th March 2015:

https://docs.google.com/a/sheffield.ac.uk/forms/d/1Jktog5NPvrtOCcT4GCNx2tkUz2OO2klj0ybvVv0ywX0/viewform?usp=send_form

(If the link is broken please copy and paste in your browser)

Conference Registration Deadline: 30 April 2015

All students planning to attend the workshop to join the discussion should register via the link below
https://docs.google.com/a/sheffield.ac.uk/forms/d/1AOLLArJCMaOFdTBCG1EwX0XlNzkWf6a5N1oVA3YNI2M/viewform?usp=send_form
(If the link is broken please copy and paste in your browser)

*The event is FREE to all attendants, and lunch and refreshments will be provided. However, participants will be responsible for covering their own travel costs.

*There will be a limited number of travel grants available for accepted abstracts.

If you have any questions please contact Michaela Bruckmayer (m.bruckmayer@sheffield.ac.uk) or Marcia Vera (marcia.vera@sheffield.ac.uk)

 

Call for Abstracts: The Balkans Peace Program (BPP) Summer 2015: International Development, Politics, and Post-Conflict Societies – Kosovo and the Balkans

Call for Abstracts:

The Balkans Peace Program (BPP) Summer 2015: International Development, Politics, and Post-Conflict Societies – Kosovo and the Balkans is an educational program that provides students enrolled in a university outside of Kosovo and the region with the opportunity to spend three weeks in Kosovo studying and learning about development in practice in a post-conflict area right in the middle of Europe. Participants of the program will also visit three other Balkans countries, Albania (listed no. 4 in the New York Times‘ list of places to go in 2014), Macedonia, and Montenegro. This is the fourth annual Balkans Peace Program.

The program consists of three key components:

  1. one academic course(of 7 ECTS credits or its equivalent in Canadian/American credits, i.e. 3 credits) on International Development, Politics, and Post-Conflict Societies: Kosovo and the Balkans and meetings with government officials in Kosovo;
  2. a tour of historic and tourist sitesof Kosovo, Montenegro, Albania, and Macedonia;
  3. cultural immersion – students will be paired with local host brothers and sisters and get to spend time with their families so as to learn about the Albanian culture, traditions, and hospitality in Kosovo;
  4. publication opportunity- provided you submit your BPP paper (essay) in time and as per given guidelines, you may be included in the BPP 2015 edited book scheduled to be published in the fall of 2015.

BPP Summer 2015 takes place from 3 to 24 May 2015. Participants will be accommodated in Gjilan, the fourth largest city in Kosovo, with a population of about 95,000, located on the southeast corner of Kosovo, some 45 km southeast of Prishtina, the capital.

Application Deadline: 2 March 2015. Scholarships Available.

For more information on the program, to apply, and to see testimonials from previous participants, please visit the program’s website: http://www.bislimi.org/balkansprogram.htm

Direct questions to: bpp@bislimi.org or Mr. Rinor Shkodra, BPP Coordinator, rinor@bislimi.org

 

ICC may investigate possible war crimes in Palestinian territories

Originally posted on Follow The Money:

ICC  prosecutor Fatou Bensouda

http://www.theguardian.com/law/2015/jan/16/icc-possible-war-crimes-palestinian-territories

The prosecutor of the international criminal court in The Hague has launched an initial examination to consider whether war crimes have been committed in the occupied Palestinian territories and whether any crimes identified meet the criteria for a fully fledged investigation.

Although the first step, announced by prosecutor Fatou Bensouda, is largely a procedural one, it is still highly significant, threatening to plunge the court into one of the most high-profile cases it has taken on – and one that could ultimately lead to Israeli and Palestinian officials facing charges.

The initial examination was announced in a statement by Bensouda, who said she would pursue the issue with “full independence and impartiality”.

In the first instance, the court will have to decide whether potential crimes may have been committed and whether those alleged crimes meet the level of seriousness to come under the court’s jurisdiction.

“A preliminary examination is…

View original 102 more words

Human Rights Watch cites police abuse of migrants in French port

Originally posted on NEW POWER:

migrants

PARIS (Reuters) – African migrants camped in the northern French port of Calais in hopes of eventually reaching Britain are subject to police beatings and harassment, Human Rights Watch said on Tuesday.

The New York-based group (HRW) called on the French government to open an investigation into what it called “routine ill-treatment” by police towards the approximately 2,400 migrants and asylum seekers living in the open air or in make-shift tents near the busy port.

The migrants, many of whom have crossed into France from Italy, are escaping humanitarian crises in Africa and the Middle East. Most come from Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia and Syria.

The port has long been a magnet for illegal migrants trying to reach Britain, where they believe they are more likely to find work than in France, or already have relatives.

“The French government must put an end to police violence and honor its pledge to…

View original 263 more words

Big Changes in Sri Lanka, but Little Hope for Justice?

Originally posted on Justice in Conflict:

JiC is thrilled to welcome Kate Cronin-Furman for this guest-post on the potential for justice and accountability in the wake of recent – and significant – political changes in Sri Lanka. Kate is a human rights lawyer and Ph.D. candidate in political science at Columbia University. Her research focuses on international justice and accountability for mass atrocities. She is also the co-author of the blog Wronging Rights.

Ousted: Rajapaska (Photo: Reuters) Ousted: Mahinda Rajapaska (Photo: Reuters)

Sri Lanka’s January 8 presidential election shocked the world. The removal of strongman Mahinda Rajapaksa from office and peaceful transfer of power have triggered an outpouring of optimism about Sri Lanka’s democratic future. But on one key set of issues it’s not clear that regime change heralds progress: post-war reconciliation and accountability for international crimes committed during Sri Lanka’s long civil war.

In power for a decade, Rajapaksa had made every effort to stay there, amending the…

View original 1,086 more words

BSA Citizenship Study Group Launch Event: Citizenship in the European Union

BSA Citizenship Study Group Launch Event: Citizenship in the European Union Monday 16th of February 2015 BSA Meeting Room, London

Keynote Speakers:

Prof Nira Yuval-Davis (UEL), Dr Michal Garapich (University of Roehampton) andDr Aaron Winter (UEL), Dr Nick Stevenson (University of Nottingham)

Recent immigration/citizenship policy restrictions and the prevalence of anti-immigration sentiments are making an increased re-emergence across Europe and beyond. The 2014 European Election witnessed Euro-sceptic and right-wing nationalist parties making unprecedented gains inFrance, Denmark, Finland as well as the UK by running campaigns on populist anti-immigration and anti-EU policies. Of course, the growth in support for far-right, anti-European, anti-immigrant parties is nothing new in Europe and offers a chilling echo of the 1930s.

Already, different sides of the political spectrum have started to predict the collapse of the Euro and many are speculating about the lasting impact of the rise of far right parties on the continent and what this mean for European citizenship. Some scholars argue that European citizenship can be realised across national borders (see e.g. Friedman 2005), while others would question this by focusing on the enduring power of the nation-state. The latter group of scholars stress that intensified globalisation can result in a defensive return to ‘the local’ in the face of the uncertainties caused by, for instance, the global capitalist pursuit of multi-national companies (see e.g. Geschiere 2009). The modern nation-state project of distinguishing citizens from non-citizens, or those perceived to be national ‘insiders’ from national ‘outsiders’, is witnessed in legal measures such as the clamping down on non-EU/EEA migrants with the introduction of a points-based migration system in the UK (Home Office 2008). However, even EU-migrants from certain nationalities have recently been affected by restrictions in the British context (Fox et al. 2012), suggesting that the European social project is far from being realised. The prevailing political and media rhetoric in a specific country can further contribute to and reinforce a ‘hierarchy of citizenship’ and the division of people into different categories that are bestowed unequal value and treatment (Statham 2003). The effect of this political/media rhetoric might, ultimately, be to legitimise or ‘naturalise’ anti-immigration sentiments and, in the process, ordinary people might be unaware of the fact that by reproducing such rhetoric they run the risk of partaking in everyday forms of racism (Essed 1991).

In an age when every person holding the nationality of an EU/EEA country is automatically a citizen of the EU/EEA – giving every EU/EEA citizen the right to free movement within the union – this event brings together scholars to debate European citizenship and why the far right is gaining support across Europe.

Timetable

10.15-10.45 Registration and Refreshments

10.45-11.00 Introduction

11.00-12.15 Keynote Speaker 1: Dr Michal Garapich
(Roehampton University) ‘Race’, diversity and political participation
in London: The Polish Experience

12.15-12.30 Refreshment Break

12.30-13.45 Keynote Speaker 2: Prof Nira Yuval-Davis (University of East
London) ‘Everyday bordering as a technology of control of diversity
and discourses on diversity’

13.45-14.45 Lunch

14.45-16.00 Keynote Speaker 3: Dr Aaron Winter (University of East
London) ‘Immigration, Securitization, Citizenship and the Far Right’

16.00-16.15 Refreshment Break

16.15-17.30 Keynote Speaker 4: Dr Nick Stevenson (University of Nottingham)
‘Post-Citizenship, the New Left and the Democratic Commons’

17.30-17.40 Closing Remarks

This event costs £28 for BSA student members, £38 for BSA-members and £45 for non-BSA members.

Refreshments and lunch are included.

Early booking is recommended, as we anticipate this to be a popular event. There will be 35 places available.

The event will take place at the BSA meeting room in Imperial Wharf London.
To register for the event please go to BSA event page. The direct link to the booking page is: http://portal.britsoc.co.uk/public/event/eventBooking.aspx?id=EVT10408

For academic queries, please contact Dr Kristoffer Halvorsrud: krha@rcn.no For further info contact: events@britsoc.org.uk or (0191) 383 0839 For more info about the BSA Citizenship Study Group:https://bsacitizenship.wordpress.com/2014/10/11/welcome-to-the-bsa-citizenship-study-group-blog/

Refugee Law Initiative seminar: ‘Voting Rights of Refugees’ – Dr Ruvi Ziegler (Reading)

You are cordially invited to this Refugee Law Initiative seminar next week:

Voting Rights of Refugees’ – Dr Ruvi Ziegler (Reading)
Thursday 22nd January, 1800-1930
Conference Room, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, London, WC1B 5DR

– Dr Ziegler will argue in this seminar that recognised 1951 Convention refugees should have the right to vote in the political community where they reside, assuming that the political community is a democracy and that its citizens have the right to vote. The basis of his contention is that the right to political participation in some political community is a basic right from the point of view of dignity and the protection of one’s interests; and that such refugees are effectively excluded, physically and symbolically, from the political community of their state of origin to which they are unwilling and/or unable to return. The state of asylum is, for the time being, the only community in which there is any realistic prospect of political participation on the refugees’ part. The argument also turns on the fact that the state of refuge has become the refugee’s home, namely the place where she is settled indefinitely, that is until the legal and factual circumstances change leading to cessation of her refugee status. Hence for these reasons, such refugees should be considered as a special category of non-citizen residents.

The event is free and open to the public. You can guarantee your place by registering at: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/voting-rights-of-refugees-tickets-13327702517?aff=eorg

 

Final Conference of the Project Made Real Alternatives to Immigration Detention in the EU: The Time for Implementation

Final Conference of the Project Made Real Alternatives to Immigration Detention in the EU: The Time for Implementation

Brussels, Friday 6th February 2015
Organised by the Odysseus Academic Network (ULB) &
Co-financed by the European Union

The Odysseus Academic Network (Université libre de Bruxelles – ULB) is hosting the final conference of the project MADE REAL (Making Alternatives to Detention in Europe a Reality by Exchanges, Advocacy and Learning), on Friday 6th February at the ULB (Salle DUPREEL), 44, avenue Jeanne, in 1050 Brussels, Belgium.

The MADE REAL project addresses the knowledge and implementation gaps concerning alternatives to detention for asylum seekers and migrants in the EU. It is an unprecedented collaboration between academics and non-governmental organisations in 13 EU Member States. It combines research on the legal framework and practices, training sessions and a range of advocacy and communication activities at national and EU level.

The conference will critically analyses the notion of alternatives to detention and its relevance in the EU context, present a range of practices in selected Member States and the principles underlying administrative decision-making and judicial control on both detention and alternatives to detention. Panelists include civil society representatives, judges, academics, EU policy-makers and representatives of international organizations.

The organisers invite all interested parties (such as policy-makers, civil society representatives, lawyers, judges, attorneys, State, EU and international officials, academics researchers, students) to attend the conference and visit the project’s webpage ulb.ac.be/assoc/odysseus/index2.html

Please consult the programme of the conference.

Registration is free but mandatory by email to odysseus@ulb.ac.be before February 2nd.

For further information contact: odysseus@ulb.ac.be or alicebloomfieldULB@gmail.com

“Land grabbing” in Africa: An emerging legal framework highlights a lack of accountability for the UK’s role in the violation of land rights

Originally posted on minorities in focus:

RebeccaLast month, in honour of Human Rights Day on the 8th of December, the London law firm Leigh Day hosted an event entitled “‘Land Grabs,’ Human Rights, and the UK.” Rebecca Marlin, MRG’s legal Fellow, reports back.

View original 1,215 more words

Asylum and Sexual Orientation: Lost Opportunities in the CJEU

Originally posted on United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog:

Screen-Shot-2014-08-12-at-2.11.14-PMJoined Cases C-148/13 to C-150/13, A, B, C v Staatssecretaris van Veiligheid en Justitie, UNHCR intervening, EU:C:2014:2406 (02 December 2014)

As Lord Hope DPSC (as he then was) explained some years ago, the High Contracting Parties to the to the Convention relating to the Status of Refugees 1951 did not envisage persecution for reasons of homosexuality as a problem. Lord Hope linked the rise of intolerance to the rise of Christianity and Islam in Africa and Asia and he was dismayed at the punishments some states impose on homosexuals. Noting the widening gulf between the developed and developing world on the issue of gay (read “LGBTI”) rights, the eminent jurist remarked that “[i]t is one of the most demanding social issues of our time” and he considered it crucially important that gay people are provided with the protection – “no more … but certainly no less” –…

View original 2,365 more words