TV Documentary on ITV (UK) Tonight: “Exposure: Islam’s Non-Believers”

TV Documentary Tonight: Exposure: Islam’s Non-Believers
Today 10:40pm – 11:40pm ITV, (United Kingdom)

Details of a documentary scheduled to air on the ITV Channel in the UK by the award-winning film-maker Deeyah Khan.  The documentary, entitled “Exposure: Islam’s Non-Believers” investigates the experiences of ex-Muslims, some of who have faced extreme discrimination, ostracism, psychological abuse and even violence as a result of renouncing their faith. In Britain, many are forced to lead double lives to hide their true beliefs, while others have been attacked by their families, resorted to self-harm or even taken their own lives.

Details from ITV:

Current affairs series. In this documentary, award-winning filmmaker Deeyah Khan investigates the lives of people who have left Islam as they face discrimination, ostracism, psychological abuse and even violence in the UK and around the world. In Britain, many ex-Muslims are forced to lead double lives and hide their true beliefs because of the stigma they face in their own communities. Deeyah speaks to former Muslims at risk of suicide, self-harm and abuse from their closest family members and reveals how some senior Bangladeshi British imams – mainstream figures in society – have called for the execution of atheist bloggers in Bangladesh.

 

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Sahrawi Asylum Seeker’s Detention Upheld

United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog

R (ML (Morocco)) v SSHD [2016] EWHC 2177 (Admin) (31 August 2016)

The Convention Relating to the Status of Stateless Persons 1954 expresses quite “profound concern” for stateless persons not protected by the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees 1951 and the UN calls for the “widest possible” protection of such persons’ fundamental rights and freedoms. Last year it was held in the case of Pham[2015] UKSC 19 that “stateless” in section 40(4) of the British Nationality Act 1981 has the same meaning as article 1(1) of the 1954 Convention. That was a memorable case but this one, which is from the troubled Maghreb region, also involves interesting facts. Ethnically the claimant was Sahrawi. ML begrudgingly said that he hated Morocco and told its authorities that he was Algerian. He suffered from a mental health disorder and offended serially amassing 14 convictions for 17 offences. His convictions…

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‘Integration’ Calls for a Broad Evaluative Judgment

United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog

Secretary of State for the Home Department v Kamara [2016] EWCA Civ 813 (11 August 2016)

It is nearly impossible to find an immigration judgment at the Court of Appeal level that does not mention any case law at all. The case of Alusine Kamara, a Sierra Leonean resident in the UK since he was a child, was one where Sales LJ dismissed the home secretary’s appeal against the decision of the Upper Tribunal which had allowed Kamara’s appeal on the basis that he was fully integrated into the UK and his deportation as a foreign criminal would interfere with his right to respect for his private life under article 8 of the ECHR. In 1993, Kamara arrived in the UK as a child with his sister. Both of them were under 10 and joined his adult half-sister resident in the UK with indefinite leave to remain and they lived…

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The Descent of Burundi – The Beginning of the Second Great Lakes Crisis?

The Urbanisation of Displacement

The displacement crisis in Burundi has been escalating apace since 2015, ignited by the re-election for a third consecutive term of President Nkurinziza. The resulting violence from this re-election has led to the deaths of numerous Burundian citizens and displacement on a massive scale to the neighbouring countries of Rwanda, Uganda and especially Tanzania, which is now hosting a population of just under 200,000 refugees in the Western part of the country, 133,000 of which are Burundian citizens. UNHCR is reporting multiple counts of rape of both men and women, and death by machete eerily reminiscent of the Rwandan genocide, and reports of increased violence by the group Imbonerakure, the youth wing of the ruling party. Arrests, disappearances and beatings continue unabated and it appears there is no peace in sight for the foreseeable future.

The scale of the Burundian crisis has been met with very little media attention outside…

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Narratives of Displacement International Conference Sept 23-24

Rumours and lies: ‘The refugee crisis is an information crisis’

‘We are living in darkness’: The heartbreaking suffering of refugees stranded in Greece

New CMS Report: Surge in Immigration in 2014 and 2015? The Evidence Remains Illusory

First U.S. Climate Refugees Fear Rising Seas Will Drown Their Heritage

Refugee Journalism Project: Putting Displaced Voices on the Front Page

Despite Cash Aid, Congolese Refugees in U.N. Camp Still Go Hungry

Call for Papers: “External and Internal Displacement: Impacts and Lessons Learned from Resettlement Processes”

Special Sessions – Winter 2016

New Pressures on Cities and Regions

Managing change in your local economy: have your views heard

Session organiser(s)

Andrew Beer, University of South Australia Business School

This meeting is part of an international research study looking at the ways in which key individuals and businesses at the local or regional level are involved in managing the processes of change in the economy.   Regions such as northern Adelaide are undergoing a substantial shift, with more change expected as production at Holden ends in 2017. This change will have knock on effects for other businesses, the community sector, the labour market and probably consumer confidence.  So what do business and community leaders do in response to these challenges?  How involved are you in driving this process of change, and what would you do if you had the capacity to reshape the economy?

This meeting covers these sorts of questions and looks at two scenarios: what happens when a large new business announces that it wants to enter your region, and what happens when they announce their closure.   We will discuss both possibilities, with the results written down and then included in the research.

The other nations participating in this study are Finland, the United Kingdom, Italy, Germany and the USA.  Our results will be compared with the outcomes from these places.  Once the project is finished, the results will be available on the web, or we can send them to you in hard copy or via email.

Submission guidelines

For more information: call Andrew Beer on 0409 696 485 or contact him on email on andrew.beer@unisa.edu.au

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Interpreting long-term urban economic transformation in cities

Session organiser(s)

Ron Martin, University of Cambridge

More information to follow.

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The Political Economy of Brexit

Session organiser(s)

David Bailey, Aston Business School and Leslie Budd, The Open University Business School

More information to follow.

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External and Internal Displacement: Impacts and Lessons Learned from Resettlement Processes

Session organiser(s)

Dr. Yehya Serag, associate professor of urban and regional planning (Ain Shams University- Cairo) and Dr. Abeer Elshater, associate professor of urban design (Ain Shams University – Cairo)

This spatial session aims to provide a review of the resettlement processes and programs on the mass displacement of people throughout the contemporary era. Worldwide, this review can give a solid ground for further innovations for this kind of crises in terms of a better life for all; the hosted and comer. The primary focus is on both displaced people whether they are internally displaced persons (IDPs) or externally displaced persons (refugees) and their impacts on the host territory of displacement. The internally displaced persons, on one hand, have not crossed an international boundary, but have, for whatever reason, fled their homes, causing internal demographic flows. On the other hand, different nations witnessed (and are witnessing) several flows of refugees. Both types of flows have their impacts on the host communities that they end up settling, affecting, for example, their socio-economic aspects, their built environment and reshaping of Human settlements, to mention a few.

Most refugees (58%) now live in cities, not in refugee camps. In cities, refugees face hard conditions and often have their basic rights denied. It is extremely challenging to support refugees in urban settings. As such, one of the aims of this session is to attempt to give a precise morphological analysis and define the process and scenarios of settled accommodation in the host communities. In most resettlement cases, several interventions are made by the host countries as well as International organizations, to provide direct aid for the displaced persons, but of course, such interventions might have their positive and negative impacts of the host communities.

This session aims to start a process of knowledge sharing on how the crises of displacement was and is dealt with, by the host communities and what are the impacts, benefits, and disadvantages of the resettlement processes. Our aim is to invite speakers from Europe and the Middle East to share their experiences and studies on the resettlement process, from its different aspects. This should be done while, taking into consideration that Europe is currently witnessing a flux of refugees as a result of the Syrian unrest. Simultaneously, some Middle Eastern countries (mainly Egypt, Jordan and Lebanon) witnessed and are witnessing several flows of both types of displaced people as a result of regional wars, domestic unrest, and large-scale development projects. Meeting resettlement demands have been dealt with previously in several cases in these countries, thus having a proper experience for dealing with such demands.

The intended outcomes of this session are to collect contributions in various fields such as urban planning and housing approaches and practice, heterodox concepts highlighting local and social economies indicators, strategies of displacement, and others to enhance our knowledge in the following topical areas (and possibly others):

The socio-economic pressures that face the host countries to participate in the resettlements of refugees, and IDPs in their territories.
The socio-economic impacts of the displaced people in the host communities and human settlements.
The physical impact of the resettlement on the built environment and housing sector.
The impact of resettlement on the services sector in the host communities.
The assessment of what the gender-related impacts of resettlement have been.
The role of international aid organizations in the resettlement initiatives
Types of internal displacement, their causes, and their impacts.

Submission guidelines

We welcome both theoretical and empirical papers to this theme. If you are interested in participating in this special session, please send a title and abstract (between 400 and 500 words) to:

Dr. Yehya Serag, associate professor of urban and regional planning (Ain Shams University- Cairo): yehya_serag@eng.asu.edu.eg

Dr. Abeer Elshater, associate professor of urban design  (Ain Shams University-Cairo): abeer.elshater@eng.asu.edu.eg

http://www.regionalstudies.org/conferences/special-sessions/special-sessions-winter-2016#246

 

Interview with Tim Finch: Why Britain Chose to Partially Privatize Refugee Resettlement

Hockey, Baseball, Refugees: An interactive tour of five camps in Greece

Reference by Supreme Court to CJEU: Does Enhanced Protection Depend on Permanent Residence?

United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog

Secretary of State for the Home Department v Franco Vomero (Italy) [2016] UKSC 49 (27 July 2016)

In analysing the future role of the courts in the post-Brexit legal landscape, Christina Lienen predicts a rise in EU law cases because of “people’s anxieties about their legal status and rights.” Noting that a number of complex EU law cases are pending before the Supreme Court, she concludes “that we will be in for a treat once the article 50 trigger is pulled.” Though a longstanding pre-Brexit matter, the case of Franco Vomero (FV) is one where the Supreme Court referred a series of questions about the interplay between of article 16 and article 28 of the Citizens’ Directive or 2004/38/EC. Almost four years ago, the Court of Appeal (Pill, Aikens and Rafferty LJJ, [2012] EWCA Civ 1199) held that a four-year period of imprisonment for manslaughter did not affect…

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Call for articles on Resettlement: Forced Migration Review

Call for papers on mobility, gender and family relations for flagship report

Caught in a Flow of Water

Child Migrant Stories

IMG_7802 Eylem outside her cafe Brew for Two in Hackney

My name is Eylem Binboga. I was born in 1976 in Kayseri in the middle of Turkey. I have one older sister, a younger brother, and my mum and dad. We lived in a small house which used to belong to the Armenians. Once my grandmother died, we moved into my granddad’s farm outside the village Kumarli Köyü. I loved the farm.

49425113 Turkish farm

I was out as soon as the sun rose and came home when it was dark. A person living in Germany had a summerhouse with lots of cherry trees. I used to steal a lot from that. Cherries stain not just your mouth, your teeth but also your clothes and hands. They knew you’d been stealing cherries [laughs].

And I loved sunflower seeds but sunflowers grow quite tall. So we had to break them and check if…

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Annual Conference on European Asylum Law 2016: Trier, Germany

Safe to Return: Asylum and Unlawful Exit from Iran

United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog

SSH and HR (illegal exit: failed asylum seeker) (CG) [2016] UKUT 308 (IAC) (29 June 2016)

With former home secretary Theresa May at the helm as prime minister, these days the British are preoccupied with hammering out a good Brexit deal with Europe. This intriguing case involved exiting Iran by illegal means. The invasion of Iraq in 2003 was a moment of huge disempowerment for secular Sunni Arabs. As the Chilcot Report has confirmed, military action was premature if not entirely misconceived and unjustified. Diplomatic options, which remained underutilised, were a far superior way of dealing with Saddam Hussein. Apart from successes for the historically betrayed Kurds who finally have some autonomy, a resurgent Iran has greatly benefitted from the lawlessness prevalent in the new Iraq and these days the leader of the Iranian army’s elite Quds force – which specialises in clandestine operations and foreign wars –

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No Section 83 Right of Appeal for Asylum Decision

United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog

MS (Uganda) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2016] UKSC 33 (22 June 2016)

This case is somewhat academic because it relates to the construction of section 83 of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002. The provision laid down an additional right of appeal specific to asylum claims and has been repealed by section 15(3) of the Immigration Act 2014 by a broader right of appeal but remains applicable to a limited class of persons such as MS. The appeal went to the Supreme Court against the decision of Elias, Lewison and Floyd LJJ, [2014] 1 WLR 2766, who dismissed MS’s appeal. Lord Neuberger (President), Lady Hale (Deputy President), Lord Wilson, Lord Hughes and Lord Toulson came to the same conclusion but for different reasons. MS was granted leave as a student in 2010 until April 2012 but before its expiry he claimed asylum on…

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One Year Photographing the Lives of Migrants

Jamiya VocApp: (Empower) Hacking Refugee Language Learning in Amsterdam

What does a University in Exile look like in the 21st century?

Let’s Avoid Politicizing the Genocide Against Yazidis

Justice in Conflict

yazidi-refugees Yazidi refugees present United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Special Envoy Angelina Jolie with a banner as she arrived at a refugee camp in southern Turkey (Photo: Umit Bektas / Reuters)

There is no doubt that genocidal acts have been perpetrated against the Yazidi people by the Islamic State (ISIS). A recent report by United Nations Commission of Inquiry on Syria has given credence to political declarations in the United States, European Union, United Kingdom, and elsewhere that ISIS is waging a campaign to exterminate the Yazidis. ISIS’s particular brand of violent and radical Islam is unambivalent in its zeal to destroy groups that stand in its way of building an Islamic caliphate. Not only has ISIS committed unspeakable atrocities against Yazidi people, but it has clearly articulated its intent to exterminate them. But not every way of recognizing a genocide is equally appropriate. Over the last week, Canada witnessed…

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Sweden: Migrant Children Face Barriers

The Quiet Crisis Of Europe’s Pregnant Refugees

Divided cities/Unequal Spaces: South Africa’s apartheid legacy photographed by drone

Out in School: Gender, Sexuality and Fundamentalism

Community Women Against Abuse

A Feminist Dissent Event

When: Friday, 1 July 2016 from 12:00 to 16:00 (BST) 

Where: Institute of Advanced Study, Milburn House, University of Warwick – View Map

This Workshop brings together researchers, teachers, community members, activists and policy practitioners to provoke an in-depth discussion on the question of sexuality (including sexual orientation) and fundamentalist religious beliefs and practices within schools. What kinds of conflicts arise in the interface of individual and communal religious beliefs and sexual and reproductive choice? What kinds of specific challenges do children who identify themselves as bisexual, gay, lesbian or trans come up against in terms of dealing with religious orthodoxies within schools, communities and families? How can educators, policy practitioners and feminists create space for such discussions to be “out”, and what kinds of practices and policies are best suited to ensure the well-being of children and the values of secularism, liberty and human rights?…

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Feminist Library Summer Benefit

Community Women Against Abuse

When: Saturday, 2 July 2016 from 14:00 to 22:00 (BST)

Where: Feminist Library – 5 Westminster Bridge Rd, London, SE1 7XW – View Map

The Feminist Library is fighting back against its recent eviction threat by organising a Summer Benefit on Saturday 2 July to help raise funds for new premises.

Experience the Feminist Library anew as artists, writers and musicians perform new and old works in spaces, nooks and crannies of the library, including a choral installation, one-to-one performances in a lift, the spectacular launch of the Feminist Library Survival Song and award winning novelist Ali Smith In Conversation. Playing us out will be Ana da Silva and Gina Birch of the legendary Raincoats!

Plus stalls, zines, signed copies of books, food, drink, dancing and a photobooth performance. Book now to avoid disappointment!

Tickets are available on eventbrite https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/feminist-library-summer-benefit-tickets-25693652406  at different price as it suits you…

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Workshop: Being Outside Afghanistan: Everyday Experiences of Social Becoming, Self‐Construction and Resource Mobilisation among Afghans Abroad

Commemoration Meeting on 22nd Anniversary of Shahid Janani Jahanara Imam

Community Women Against Abuse

By Ansar Ahmed Ullah

Today is the 22nd death anniversary of Jahanara Imam, a legendary Bengali feminist and the mother and a wife of founder martyrs, who fought and died for the independence of Bangladesh nation-state in 1971.  On the occasion of her anniversary, the Ekattorer Ghatak Dalal Nirmul Committee in London has organised a discussion at Iftar time to be held at Shaad restaurant, 13 Brick Lane. London E1 6PU.

 Jahanara Imam courtesy: Nirmul Committee. UK, 20 June 2016 Jahanara Imam courtesy: Nirmul Committee. UK, 20 June 2016

The committee invites everybody to the Discussion and Iftar in memory of our founder Martyrs Mother Shahid Janani Jahanara Imam to be held at 8.00pm today. The cost of iftar will be covered by attendees’ donation. We would like to request everyone to contribute ((ideally £10 per person) towards the cost of Iftar . We hope that you will join us to make the discussion useful and successful.

Please

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Underground Care: Syrian doctors quietly fill a treatment void in Turkey

Project Highlight: Jamiya Project – Delivering Higher Education to Syrian Refugees

Call for Abstracts (15 Aug): Refugee Research Methodologies Workshop, Turkey

Syria’s Romani refugees find sanctuary in Tarlabaşı, Istanbul: but for how long?

A Polgleish speaking cockney -Tomasz Wlodaraczyk

Child Migrant Stories

I was born in 1968 in Lodz, a Polish equivalent of 19th century, industrial Manchester. The old town is pleasing, secessionist architecture.

lodz-poland

Lodz Poland c.1970

lodz-prl Lodz Poland c.1970

The suburbs are communist brutalism.

lodz-polska Communist era apartment blocks in Lodz, 1967

Mother left when I was about seven or eight. I was quite young so I could move to different family members. They were given a 12-month sentence as I might not have been the best-behaved little boy.

My great grandmother was absolutely lovely. She was truly ancient, 90 something and had a lovely house just outside the city so it was gorgeous countryside. I had a good time there.

b293ada1cc8faef79ed9f0dc905b7c68 Countryside near Lodz

I lived with my father for a year or so because they were still together when my mother came here. They divorced when I was probably ten or something. He was a nice enough chap but liked the…

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How asylum seekers could help ease Finland’s tech skills shortage

Join the discussion on prosecuting sexual and gender-based crimes

SGBC ICC FORUM blog image A centre where women share experiences and weave baskets for income helped this 11-year-old girl in the Congolese town of Bunyakiri to start putting her rape ordeal behind her.  Photograph: Morgana Wingard/USAid

With the prosecution of sexual and gender-based crimes (sgbc) gaining momentum, this year’s International Criminal Court Forum focuses on the ICC prosecutor’s mission to end impunity for sexual violence as crimes against humanity, war crimes and means of genocide.

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Event listing Film Screening: A Syrian Love Story

Event:

A Syrian Love Story

16 June 2016  | 6:00pm–8:00pm | Click here to book your free ticket
Londonewcastle Project Space | 28 Redchurch St, London E2 7DP

Comrades and lovers Amer and Raghda met in a Syrian prison cell 15 years ago. When McAllister first meets their family in 2009, Raghda is back in prison leaving Amer to look after their 4 boys alone; but as the ‘Arab Spring’ sweeps the region, the family’s fate shifts irrevocably. Filmed over 5 years, the film charts their incredible odyssey to political freedom. For Raghda and Amer, it is a journey of hope, dreams and despair: for the revolution, their homeland and each other.

Known for his unique and intimate portraits, maverick director Sean McAllister (Liberace of Baghdad) received the Grand Jury prize at this year’s Sheffield Documentary Festival for this “Bergmanesque portrait of a relationship and love”.

Please note this is event is free, but pre-booking is essential due to limited capacity.

This event is part of our exhibition, Call me by my name: Stories from Calais and beyond, exploring the complexity and human stories behind the current refugee crisis, with a particular focus on the Calais camp.

 

Event: We are all migrants: an interactive workshop

Event:

We are all migrants: an interactive workshop

Facilitated by NOMAD (Nation of Migration Awakening the Diaspora) and performance artist Denys Blacker
18 June 2016  | 3-6pm | Free, no advanced registration required
Londonewcastle Project Space | 28 Redchurch St, London E2 7DP

Nomad (Nation of Migration Awakening the Diaspora) is an organisation working with young refugees in North London.

They will be presenting two interactive workshops that are open to public participation, in collaboration with the performance artist Denys Blacker

“We are all Migrants” is a workshop exploring the different topics and statements around migration and refugee and migrant issues. This activity will invite us to engage in a debate and meaningful discussions. We will take you on journey to explore and challenge the stigmas, taboos and labels attached to “refugee.”

“Call Me By My Name” is a performance workshop during which we will explore the many names we have been called by others. the labels that we ourselves and others use to describe how we look and who we are; the insulting and the complimentary, the affectionate and the funny. The performance is open to audience participation and discussion.

The workshops are free.
No previous experience is necessary.

Link from Migration Museum website:  migrationmuseum.org/event/interactive-workshop-we-are-all-migrants/

 

Seeking papers for the Panel ‘LGBTI refugees in the context of EU-Turkey migration policies’ (30 June)

Call for Abstracts (21 June): Connecting the Dots: Migration – Environment – Resilience

Mayor Of Paris Announces Plans for camp for migrants and refugees in the north of France’s capital

‘Unduly Harsh’ is an Ordinary English Expression

United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog

005MM (Uganda) & Anor v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2016] EWCA Civ 450 (20 April 2016)

These proceedings are about two foreign criminals, a drug dealer (MM, a Ugandan) and a fraudster (KO, a Nigerian). They pour cold water over the theory that criminally minded individuals are able to overcome expulsion from the UK against the odds by clever use of human rights law. Automatic deportation under section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007 is avoidable where a foreign criminal can demonstrate under human rights law that the effect on a qualifying child or partner would be unduly harsh. In circumstances where the deportation of a foreign criminal leads to the violation of ECHR rights, then under section 33(2)(a) of the 2007 Act that person should not be deported. The Immigration Act 2014 added fresh flavour to article 8. Because of conflicting tribunal authority…

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Refugee Council Archive at UEL Event: “Different Pasts: Shared Futures”: Showcasing UEL Initiatives Supporting Refugees

UEL and the Refugee Council Archive for Refugee Week Event:

“Different Pasts: Shared Futures”: Showcasing UEL Initiatives Supporting Refugees

Wednesday, 22nd June: 10.30am – 7pm
University of East London, Docklands Campus.
Refugee Council Archive (Ground Floor, Library) and Room DL.3.04

RWlogo ColourWe warmly welcome you to attend our UEL “Different Pasts: Shared Futures” event for Refugee Week 2016. We have organised a mix of sessions to help showcase the initiatives currently being undertaken by staff and students here at the University of East London to help support migrants and refugees and to showcase new projects and research to help promote and celebrate the contribution of refugees to the UK, and encourages a better understanding between communities.

Our Timetable of Events for the day will include:
10.30am – 11am:  Registration and Networking

11am-12.30pm: Living Narratives in the Calais Jungle. 
With confirmed Speakers: Dr. Aura Lounasmaa (UEL), Dr. Cigdem Esin (UEL) ,Dr Tahir Zaman, (SOAS/UEL) and Marie Godin, (International Migration Institute, University of Oxford).

1pm Onwards: Refugee Council Archive Open Afternoon and Exhibition. Location: Archive

1pm – 2pm: Film Screening: Performing the Archive: Living Narratives and the Politics of Performance.
A showcase of a recent civic engagement project with our second-year theatre studies students.

2pm-3pm: Archiving Living Histories of the Migration Experience: Living Refugee Archive (JPG) RedOral History, Archives and the Hidden Narratives of Migration.
Dr. Rumana Hashem and Paul Dudman, Archivist at UEL.

3pm – 4.30pm: Workshop: How can we engage with refugee communities and help document and preserve their life histories and enable their stories to be told?

Showcasing our latest civic engagement projects including the Living Refugee Archive and the Mental Health and Wellbeing Online Portal and introducing the IASFM Working Group and Oral History Society Migration SIG and the Migration and Asylum Network.  Led by Dr. Rumana Hashem and Paul Dudman.

4.30pm – 4.45pm: Break

4.45pm – 6pm: Brexit and the Migration Crisis: Redefining refugee, migration and conflict studies in a fragmented Europe?”

Roundtable discussion including past and present UEL Staff and Students on people-centred understandings of conflict and refugee movements and responses to global and refugee inactivates in light of current events. Chair: Professor Giorgia Dona.

6pm: Refreshments and Networking. Location: Ground Floor Library Foyer and Refugee Council Archive.

Organised in Conjunction with the Refugee Council Archive at UEL; the Centre for Narrative Research, Centres for Migration, Refugees and Belonging and Centres for Social Justice and Change at UEL.

Programme Information:

UEL is at the forefront of research and teaching within the fields of refugee, forced migration and conflict studies. Specialist postgraduate masters courses exist in Refugee Studies and Conflict Displacement and Human Security. If you would like to explore the issues discussed during today in further depth, we welcome enquiries in relation to the courses that we have on offer.
MA in Refugee Studies

A distinctive feature of this course is that it considers the perspective and experiences of the people forced to flee conflict, generalised violence, and human rights violations. It highlights social, cultural and community responses to people in search of sanctuary in the contexts of restrictive border practices. It encourages informed understanding about contemporary conflicts, forced displacement and human security.
Link: https://www.uel.ac.uk/Postgraduate/Courses/MA-Refugee-Studies
MA in Conflict Displacement and Human Security

The key aspects of your learning will be the focus on conflict and displacement. We value a people-centred approach and an emphasis on human security which combines both human rights and human development.

The course approaches development as an important security strategy and considers displacement a measure of human security. We will encourage you to adopt an independent critical approach to contemporary theories of conflict, human rights and human security.

Both of these courses are situated within the field of Global Studies at UEL and work in close contact with our research centres including the Centre for Migration Refugees and Belonging; the Centre for Narrative Research; and the Centre for Social Change and Justice. UEL is also the home of the Refugee Council Archive, hosted within the Docklands Library as part of a wider Archives provision, the Archive represents one of the largest collections of material documenting the history and development of refugee and forced migration issues with the UK.

Supreme Court on Detention, Deportation and Mental Illness

United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog

R (O) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2016] UKSC 19 (27 April 2016)

Heaven knows: Yarl’s Wood IRC – the infamous British Gulag where pregnant women and children are locked up – may even make the likes of president Putin squirm on an off day. But rarely will the great British state cringe at the ugly truths lurking behind the scenes in detention centres operated by private contractors who profit from “indefinite” detention (and apparently also sexually prey on vulnerable people deprived of their liberty). A Nigerian national aged 38 who entered the UK illegally in late 2003 with her three-year old son, O suffered from mental health problems that instigated attempted suicide, other self-harm, hallucinations, unpredictable mood-swings and impulsive outbursts for which she received high doses of anti-psychotic and anti-depressant medication. She was detained at Yarl’s Wood for almost three years (2008-2011) purportedly justified by the…

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Migration Museum: Stories from Calais and Beyond

How I Got Here: Before I left Damascus I wondered: ‘Trenton, New Jersey … what is that?’

Supreme Court: EU Law Fails ‘Nuisance’ Algerian Criminal

United Kingdom Immigration Law Blog

R (Nouazli) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2016] UKSC 16 (20 April 2016)

Algeria and immigration bring to mind the image of radical Islam. For example, in a decade long deportation battle involving six Algerian men which represents a serious blow to UK counter-terrorism efforts, SIAC recently said: “It is not inconceivable that these appellants, if returned to Algeria, would be subjected to ill-treatment infringing article 3. There is a real risk of such a breach.” The home office is not pursuing a further appeal despite its insistence that it is “disappointed” with the ruling against the men, who are accused of having had “direct links” to Osama bin Ladin and are therefore seen as a “risk” by the authorities. But of course the context was radically different in the case of Rachid Nouazli, also an Algerian national who had serious problems of addiction to…

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Gallery

Book launch, ‘Voices from the ‘Jungle’

This gallery contains 2 photos.

Originally posted on Centrefornarrativeresearch's blog:
Please come along: It’s free! ‘Voices from the ‘Jungle” launch event Friday April 21, 2017, 7-9pm Rich Mix, 35 – 47 Bethnal Green Road, London, E1 6LA https://richmix.org.uk/ With Pluto Press and the Centre for…

Voices from the ‘Jungle’ Launch Event

Refugee Hosts

Refugee Hosts is pleased to share this announcement on behalf of Dr Tahir Zaman. Make sure you reserve a ticket for the Voices from the ‘Jungle’ launch event which takes place in Shoreditch, London, on Friday 21 April. The event will comprise of a panel reading and discussion of the new book Voices from the ‘Jungle’. The book features stories from those who experienced life in the Calais Camp, and offers a critical insight into the role narration, storytelling and creativity can play in enhancing our understanding of displacement. You can also read our Refugee Hosts blog and our creative archive. for more on the theme of narrative and displacement, which we will be exploring in more detail through a series of creative writing and translation workships with nine local communities in Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey affected by conflict-induced displacement from Syria.

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BOOK YOUR PLACE HERE.

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How the ‘guerrilla archivists’ saved history – and are doing it again under Trump

Discard Studies

Morgan Currie, University of California, Los Angeles and Britt S. Paris, University of California, Los Angeles

On Inauguration Day, a group of students, researchers and librarians gathered in a nondescript building on the north side of the University of California, Los Angeles campus, against a backdrop of pelting rain.

The group had organized in protest against the new U.S. administration. But, instead of marching and chanting, participants were there to learn how to “harvest,” “seed,” “scrape” and ultimately archive websites and data sets related to climate change.

The need for such work quickly became palpable. Within hours of Trump’s inauguration ceremony, official statements on anthropogenic, or man-made, climate change vanished from governmental websites, including whitehouse.gov and that of the Environmental Protection Agency.

The UCLA event was one of several “data rescue” missions that have cropped up around the U.S., supervised by the Environmental Data Governance Initiative

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Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 12/16/2016

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily News and Updates from ReliefWeb 12/16/2016

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 12/15/2016

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily News and Updates from ReliefWeb 12/15/2016

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.