Tag Archives: workshops

RSC Workshop: Refuge from Syria

The Syrian Humanitarian Disaster: Understanding Perceptions, Aspirations and Behaviour in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey

Wednesday, 09 December 2015
The Garden Room, Oxford Department of International Development, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TB
Hosted by Refugee Studies Centre

This one-day workshop will be held on 9 December 2015 to engage researchers and practitioners with findings from recent research into the perceptions, aspirations and behaviour of refugees from Syria, host community members, and practitioners in Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan. Professor Dawn Chatty will present her British Academy funded research on this theme alongside a number of other researchers and practitioners with recent experience in this area. The workshop aims to promote greater understanding of the unique socio-historical context of the Syrian humanitarian disaster in each of the regional hosting countries by addressing specifically changing perceptions and aspirations. In addition the workshop hopes to present examples of good practice and lessons learned from practitioners in all countries bordering on Syria.

The speed with which Syria disintegrated into extreme violence and armed conflict shocked the world and left the humanitarian aid regime in turmoil as agencies struggled to respond to the growing displacement crisis on Syria’s borders. The mass displacement has now  reached Northern Mediterranean shores as well as Central European borders. It has left the neighbouring states of Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan in a quandary as to how to effectively provide protection for these people seeking refuge. None have granted the displaced refugee status; each has established temporary measures to deal with this crisis. In many cases the displaced and the host communities have not been consulted and thus tensions have quickly emerged among host communities, displaced Syrians and humanitarian policy-makers and practitioners. That tension, despair and hopelessness has seen thousands leave the region over the past year in search for survival in dignity. This workshop aims to explore the different perceptions and aspirations of Syria’s refugees, humanitarian assistance practitioners, and the host community. It also seeks to probe what social factors with the host community, will, when circumstances permit, positively contribute to the reshaping and re-integration of Syrian society post-conflict.

Provisional programme now available >>

If you are interested in attending and taking part, kindly contact Ariell Ahearn on ahearn.ariell@gmail.com

 

CPD Accredited Workshop: The Fear of Female Genital Mutilation as Grounds for Seeking Asylum

EXTENDED DEADLINE: Please note there are still limited places available to attend the forthcoming workshop “The fear of female genital mutilation/cutting as grounds for seeking asylum”  This workshop has been rescheduled to take place on Wednesday 11 November 2015.    This workshop is CPD accredited by the CPD Standards Office (www.cpdstandards.com) .. Participants are eligible to claim 6 CPD hours at intermediate level.

Register online: http://www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk/fgm/

If you are a member of the Young Legal Aid Lawyers association(YLAL) or you work for a legal aid NGO you may register for a discounted rate (£135): http://www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk/product/fgm-workshop-young-lawyers-association-discounted-fee/

The Charity ’28 Too Many’ will also be highlighting their work to eradicate FGM  see: http://28toomany.org/events/

The Fear of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) as grounds for seeking asylum

Female Genital Mutilation is child abuse and torture. It is illegal in the UK, but the Home Office is consistently rejecting claims to refugee status made by women and girls who seek asylum because they fear they will be subjected to FGM if forced to return to their home countries.

This workshop will introduce participants to the types of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM); the laws against FGM in the UK and international law; the countries from where you may expect to receive asylum seekers; the potential health risk that result from FGM; how the fear of FGM is grounds for claiming asylum, constitutes child abuse, and where the claimant is an adult, FGM amounts to torture, inhumane and degrading treatment.

Topics reviewed will teach participants about the practice of FGM and its potential physical and psychological consequences.  Participants will engage with UK case law on FGM; learn to improve interviewing techniques; to provide imp representation to clients by engaging specialized County of Origin Information (COI) expert statements; and to anticipate and counter arguments for rejecting asylum claims based on FGM/C that may be mounted by Home Office Presenting Officers (HOPO).

DATE: Wednesday 11 November 2015, 8.45 a.m – 5.30 p.m

VENUE: St Aldates Room,  Oxford Town Hall, St Aldates, Oxford, OX1 1BX

REGISTER:  www.oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk/product/fgmc-workshop/

Registration deadline: 30 September, 2015– please note the deadline is extended as there are still some spaces available.

Fee: £200. The fee includes tuition, workshop materials, lunch and refreshments.

This workshop is suitable for: legal professionals, researchers, staff of NGOs, Government personnel and practitioners. (Knowledge of immigration law and/or FGM is assumed).

CONVENOR: Oxford Rights Workshops – Dr Barbara Harrell-Bond, Advisor.  Founder and former Director of the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford.

TUTORS:

LAUREN BUTLER: For the past eighteen years Lauren Butler has worked in refugee organisations including the Amnesty International Refugee Office in San Francisco and the Centre for Women War Victims in Zagreb, Croatia. Having relocated permanently to the UK she is now a senior immigration caseworker at Rochdale Law Centre, having conduct of asylum applications and appeals and coordinating a programme providing specialised legal services to women and girls seeking protection in the UK. She has acted on behalf of women with FGM/C-related claims from the Gambia, Nigeria, and Senegal.

BARBARA HARRELL-BOND: Dr Barbara Harrell-Bond, Emerata Professor, OBE, is a legal anthropologist who conducted research in West Africa from 1967-1982 while employed by the Departments of Anthropology, University of Edinburgh & University of Illinois-Urbana,USA, Afrika Studiecentrum, Leiden, Holland, & the Faculty of Law, University of Warwick. She founded/directed the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford (1982-96); conducted research in Kenya and Uganda (1997-2000), and was Adjunct Professor, American University in Cairo (2000-2008). She is now responsible for the information portal, www.refugeelegalaidinformation.org that promotes legal assistance for refugees around the world.

BRENDA KELLY: Dr Brenda Kelly is a consultant in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, sub-specialising in maternal-foetal medicine. She is also the clinical lead for FGM in Oxford, and has research interests in Pre-eclampsia and its link to CV health. She is part of the FGM National Clinical Group, a charity committed to improving services for women with FGM through education and training of health care professionals

LIANNE POPE: Detective Sergeant, Protecting Vulnerable People Department, Thames Valley Police works closely with the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner to promote awareness of FGM in the Thames Value region.

For any queries please contact:  Heidi El-Megrisi

admin@oxfordrightsworkshops.co.uk
www.oxfordrightsworkshops..co.uk
tel: + 44 (0) 7720601053

Events: RSC Workshop: Refuge from Syria, 9 December 2015

RSC Workshop: Refuge from Syria
The Syrian Humanitarian Disaster: Understanding Perceptions, Aspirations and Behaviour in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey

Date: Wednesday, 9 December 2015
Location: The Garden Room, Oxford Department of International Development, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TB

This one-day workshop will be held on 9 December 2015 to engage researchers and practitioners with findings from recent research into the perceptions, aspirations and behaviour of refugees from Syria, host community members, and practitioners in Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan. Professor Dawn Chatty will present her British Academy funded research on this theme alongside a number of other researchers and practitioners with recent experience in this area. The workshop aims to promote greater understanding of the unique socio-historical context of the Syrian humanitarian disaster in each of the regional hosting countries by addressing specifically changing perceptions and aspirations. In addition the workshop hopes to present examples of good practice and lessons learned from practitioners in all countries bordering on Syria.

The speed with which Syria disintegrated into extreme violence and armed conflict shocked the world and left the humanitarian aid regime in turmoil as agencies struggled to respond to the growing displacement crisis on Syria’s borders. The mass displacement has now  reached Northern Mediterranean shores as well as Central European borders. It has left the neighbouring states of Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan in a quandary as to how to effectively provide protection for these people seeking refuge. None have granted the displaced refugee status; each has established temporary measures to deal with this crisis. In many cases the displaced and the host communities have not been consulted and thus tensions have quickly emerged among host communities, displaced Syrians and humanitarian policy-makers and practitioners. That tension, despair and hopelessness has seen thousands leave the region over the past year in search for survival in dignity. This workshop aims to explore the different perceptions and aspirations of Syria’s refugees, humanitarian assistance practitioners, and the host community. It also seeks to probe what social factors with the host community, will, when circumstances permit, positively contribute to the reshaping and re-integration of Syrian society post-conflict.

A programme of the workshop speakers and timetable will be made available shortly. If you are interested in attending and taking part, kindly contact Dawn.Chatty@qeh.ox.ac.uk or Tamsin.Kelk@qeh.ox.ac.uk

Details online at: www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/rsc-workshop-refuge-from-syria

Course: Workshop on Refugee Testimonies and Advocacy, January 6-10, 2016 (Deadline Nov 1st)

Course: Workshop on Refugee Testimonies and Advocacy, January 6-10, 2016 (Deadline Nov 1st)

PROOF: Media for Social Justice is offering a workshop entitled, Witnessing: Working with Testimonies for Refugee Advocacy.

Co-facilitated by Dr. Anita Fabos, Associate Professor of International Development and Social Change, Clark University and Leora Kahn, Executive Director of PROOF: Media for Social Justice, the workshop is geared towards professionals and academics who work with refugees and other displaced people.

Application

For more information about the workshop and conveners, and to apply, visit http://proof.org/witnessing. Applications are due by November 1st.

Eligibility This non-credit workshop is open to practitioners, researchers, and students in the field of refugees, displacement, and forced migration. The workshop will be limited to a maximum of 20 participants. The language of this workshop is English; we are unfortunately unable to offer translation services.Venue The workshop will be held at Center for Social Innovation in New York City

601 West 26th Street.

Fees Tuition for the workshop is US $975, which includes course material, lunch and coffee breaks. Pay by December 1st for the early-bird rate of $925.

Scholarships There are two available tuition-only scholarships for refugee participants.

Free workshop: Analysing migration flows using the IMAGE studio workshop

Workshop: Analysing migration flows using the IMAGE studio workshop

19 – 20 November 2015

School of Geography, University of Leeds

This international workshop aims to provide hands on training in the use of the IMAGE Studio.

The IMAGE Studio is a bespoke software system that has been developed for the analysis of internal migration data, focusing specifically on matrices of origin-destination migration flows. The Studio was created as part of the IMAGE project, an international collaborative research program funded by the Australian Research Council, which aimed to develop a robust framework for comparing internal migration between countries around the world.

Key features of Studio include:

  • a suite of standard statistical indicators of internal migration capturing migration intensity, impact on the settlement system, distance and inter-regional connectivity
  • a spatial interaction model that measures the friction of distance
  • a facility to generate flexible geographies to address key methodological issues including the Modifiable Areal Unit Problem (MAUP)

The IMAGE Studio has been used to make comparisons of internal migration in a large number of countries, and is now being made available as a new resource to the academic community worldwide. Possible applications include:

  • computing robust measures of migration for individual countries, or groups of countries
  • comparing migration among sub-populations (e.g. by age or ethnicity) within a country
  • exploring the impacts of scale and zonation on migration measures (the MAUP)

This workshop will provide:

  • An overview of the IMAGE project including the Inventory and Repository
  • A systematic explanation of the structure of the Studio and its data requirements
  • Advice on running the Studio and a guide to its options
  • A review of UK Census origin-destination migration flow data available, its online access and its analysis using the Studio

Participants are encouraged to bring their own migration data to the workshop for use with the Studio.

The workshop is free to attend but places are limited so booking is required. Please book a place at http://ukdataservice.ac.uk/news-and-events/eventsitem/?id=4173

Few places remaining: Supporting human rights organisations to deliver insights from data

Helping human rights organisations develop impact from their data: An ESRC & UK Data Service workshop

Colchester, 29-30 October 2015

Are you a professional working in a civil society organisation that collects administrative, monitoring or evaluation data in the human rights arena, and who oversees strategy, reporting and campaigns?

Are you interested in improving the way your organisation can translate data into knowledge?

If so, please join our workshop with peer organisations, at the University of Essex on 29-30 October and help shape ways of managing and sharing data ethically, analysing the data, and gaining insight to develop impact from these rich data resources to promote your work.

The workshop will provide a forum for participants to discuss the opportunities and barriers to gaining meaningful insights from human rights data – their own data, data from other organisations and the wider data landscape. Through engaging with case studies, participants will learn about what strategies, tools and skills are required for civil society organisations to become successful knowledge managers and report and campaign effectively with data-based evidence. We will examine the most useful models to build capacity from your data.

Our prestigious speakers include Neil Serougi (Trustee, Freedom from Torture), David Walker (the Guardian), Emma Prest (DataKind UK), Nigel Fielding (Surrey University), Matt Williams (COSMOS, Cardiff University), Tracy Gyateng (New Philanthropy Capital), Christina Rowley (ESRC’s Civil Society Engagement), and Louise Corti and Libby Bishop (UK Data Service, University of Essex).

Participants will help us develop case studies focused on ethics, governance for and the practicalities of sharing data, and gaining insight from data; develop a catalogue of available data sources, identify skills and training gaps and build a suite of exemplar datasets to build capacity.

Critically, this event will also help the ESRC to define its next phase of civil society engagement.

If you are working in a civil society organisation which collects human rights data, charged with overseeing strategy and campaigns; or are an academic, or work for a public sector body engaged in this area of work, please contact bookings@ukdataservice.ac.uk to register your interest. Spaces are limited and participants will be expected to prepare short cases studies from their organisations in advance to bring along. Limited travel and accommodation bursaries are available for staff in civil society organisations.

To find out more about this event, please visit the events page.

 

Event: Workshop: Working with Testimonies for Refugee Advocacy

Workshop: Working with Testimonies for Refugee Advocacy

January 6-10, 2016
New York City

http://proof.org/witnessing/

PROOF: Media for Social Justice is offering a workshop on refugee and forced migration narratives entitled, Witnessing: Working with Testimonies for Refugee Advocacy. Co-facilitated by Dr. Anita Fabos, Associate Professor of International Development and Social Change, Clark University, and Leora Kahn, Executive Director of PROOF: Media for Social Justice, the workshop is geared towards professionals and academics who work with refugees and other displaced people.

 

For more information and to fill in an application, please visit http://proof.org/witnessing/