Tag Archives: UEL

Refugee Council Archive at UEL Event: “Different Pasts: Shared Futures”: Showcasing UEL Initiatives Supporting Refugees

UEL and the Refugee Council Archive for Refugee Week Event:

“Different Pasts: Shared Futures”: Showcasing UEL Initiatives Supporting Refugees

Wednesday, 22nd June: 10.30am – 7pm
University of East London, Docklands Campus.
Refugee Council Archive (Ground Floor, Library) and Room DL.3.04

RWlogo ColourWe warmly welcome you to attend our UEL “Different Pasts: Shared Futures” event for Refugee Week 2016. We have organised a mix of sessions to help showcase the initiatives currently being undertaken by staff and students here at the University of East London to help support migrants and refugees and to showcase new projects and research to help promote and celebrate the contribution of refugees to the UK, and encourages a better understanding between communities.

Our Timetable of Events for the day will include:
10.30am – 11am:  Registration and Networking

11am-12.30pm: Living Narratives in the Calais Jungle. 
With confirmed Speakers: Dr. Aura Lounasmaa (UEL), Dr. Cigdem Esin (UEL) ,Dr Tahir Zaman, (SOAS/UEL) and Marie Godin, (International Migration Institute, University of Oxford).

1pm Onwards: Refugee Council Archive Open Afternoon and Exhibition. Location: Archive

1pm – 2pm: Film Screening: Performing the Archive: Living Narratives and the Politics of Performance.
A showcase of a recent civic engagement project with our second-year theatre studies students.

2pm-3pm: Archiving Living Histories of the Migration Experience: Living Refugee Archive (JPG) RedOral History, Archives and the Hidden Narratives of Migration.
Dr. Rumana Hashem and Paul Dudman, Archivist at UEL.

3pm – 4.30pm: Workshop: How can we engage with refugee communities and help document and preserve their life histories and enable their stories to be told?

Showcasing our latest civic engagement projects including the Living Refugee Archive and the Mental Health and Wellbeing Online Portal and introducing the IASFM Working Group and Oral History Society Migration SIG and the Migration and Asylum Network.  Led by Dr. Rumana Hashem and Paul Dudman.

4.30pm – 4.45pm: Break

4.45pm – 6pm: Brexit and the Migration Crisis: Redefining refugee, migration and conflict studies in a fragmented Europe?”

Roundtable discussion including past and present UEL Staff and Students on people-centred understandings of conflict and refugee movements and responses to global and refugee inactivates in light of current events. Chair: Professor Giorgia Dona.

6pm: Refreshments and Networking. Location: Ground Floor Library Foyer and Refugee Council Archive.

Organised in Conjunction with the Refugee Council Archive at UEL; the Centre for Narrative Research, Centres for Migration, Refugees and Belonging and Centres for Social Justice and Change at UEL.

Programme Information:

UEL is at the forefront of research and teaching within the fields of refugee, forced migration and conflict studies. Specialist postgraduate masters courses exist in Refugee Studies and Conflict Displacement and Human Security. If you would like to explore the issues discussed during today in further depth, we welcome enquiries in relation to the courses that we have on offer.
MA in Refugee Studies

A distinctive feature of this course is that it considers the perspective and experiences of the people forced to flee conflict, generalised violence, and human rights violations. It highlights social, cultural and community responses to people in search of sanctuary in the contexts of restrictive border practices. It encourages informed understanding about contemporary conflicts, forced displacement and human security.
Link: https://www.uel.ac.uk/Postgraduate/Courses/MA-Refugee-Studies
MA in Conflict Displacement and Human Security

The key aspects of your learning will be the focus on conflict and displacement. We value a people-centred approach and an emphasis on human security which combines both human rights and human development.

The course approaches development as an important security strategy and considers displacement a measure of human security. We will encourage you to adopt an independent critical approach to contemporary theories of conflict, human rights and human security.

Both of these courses are situated within the field of Global Studies at UEL and work in close contact with our research centres including the Centre for Migration Refugees and Belonging; the Centre for Narrative Research; and the Centre for Social Change and Justice. UEL is also the home of the Refugee Council Archive, hosted within the Docklands Library as part of a wider Archives provision, the Archive represents one of the largest collections of material documenting the history and development of refugee and forced migration issues with the UK.

CMRB AGM 2015 + Lesvos, the European island in the crossroads of two major humanitarian crises, Erene Kaptani

CMRB (The Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) is delighted to invite you to:

CMRB Annual General Meeting 2015

Date: Monday 28th September 2015
Time: 15.00-16.15
Place: EB.G.07, Docklands Campus, University of East London, E16 2RD, nearest tube: Cyprus DLR
(http://www.uel.ac.uk/campuses/docklands/)

ALL WELCOME

The  CMRB AGM 2015 Agenda is available for download.

After the AGM, CMRB will be hosting:

Lesvos, the European island in the crossroads of two major humanitarian crises, by Erene Kaptani

Date: Monday 28th September 2014
Time:16.30-18.00
Place: EB.3.07, Docklands Campus, University of East London

Abstract:
On Lesvos, both the survival of the ‘locals’ and ‘refugees’ depends on decisions made in European Institutions. Refugees are currently arriving on the island at a time when an unprecedented process of underdevelopment is occurs in at the hands of these institutions.

In this presentation, the speaker, who has been involved since 2009 with refugees arriving to her hometown, reflects on the way refugee arrivals are managed by the different statutory and non statutory European bodies. This presentation envisages creating an understanding and a discussion on what the social and political changes between Greece and Europe have been in the past five months and how these continue to affect the management and monitoring of refugees. It aims to encourage a discussion of the trends formed, by both European institutions and society, regarding their humanitarian and social welfare responses.

Details included on attached flyer. Please circulate widely.

Please RSVP to j.hakim@uel.ac.uk<mailto:j.hakim@uel.ac.uk> for both the AGM and Erene Kaptani’s presentation

Best regards
Jamie Hakim
CMRB

 

UEL International Development Undergraduate Conference

We are delighted to inform you of an exciting opportunity for undergraduate students and those who have recently graduated.

We have extended the deadline for abstracts.

Is Sustainable Development Possible ?  Economic, Social and Environmental Frictions.

 7th November 2015

Students at University of East London (UEL), in partnership with the European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI) are pleased to invite you to the fifth student-led undergraduate conference for development at UEL.

The conference gives students a unique opportunity to debate their work in a public forum, receive feedback from academic scholars, meet students from a range of international universities and network with potential employers.

Past student presenters have described the event as “a high-value learning experience” and “a great place to take the first step of presenting at conferences”.

We are confident in the fantastic opportunity this conference offers and encourage you to cascade the call for papers and information of the conference to students and recent graduates. You are most welcome to attend yourself and we urge you to inspire students to attend and participate in the conference as we feel that it will be an invaluable experience for all.

Further information is available at: http://www.uel-undergraduate-conference.co.uk/ Alternatively, we can be contacted directly at organization@uel-undergraduate-conference.co.uk

CMRB Event: ‘Beyond the Beast of Austerity: Inequality and the lives we hope to lead’, Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya

CMRB Event:

‘Beyond the Beast of Austerity: Inequality and the lives we hope to lead’, Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya

CMRB is delighted to announce the following seminar:

‘Beyond the Beast of Austerity: Inequality and the lives we hope to lead’, Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL)

This seminar will take place 4-6pm, Monday 12th January 2014 in EB G.06, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD (http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/)

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at beyondthebeastofausterity.eventbrite.co.uk

Full details can be found on the attached flyer. Please circulate widely.

Queries should be directed to: j.hakim@uel.ac.uk

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) is pleased to announce the following seminar:

Beyond the Beast of Austerity:
Inequality and the lives we hope to lead

This seminar will take place in EB G.06, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD
http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

Monday 12th January 2014, 4–6pm

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at
beyondthebeastofausterity.eventbrite.co.uk

Abstract: The language, logic and practices of austerity seem to have saturated everyday life. In the process, we have lived through a concerted attack on ideas of entitlement and equality. This paper tries to understand the manner and nature of the shift in popular discourse and institutional practices brought about through austerity measures. The paper argues that (i) austerity is not and has never been designed as a short-term measure (ii) austerity represents an attempt to reshape the political terrain in a manner that dismantles many of the partial gains of the twentieth century (iii) this dismantling goes far beyond a cutting of service provision and threatens to corrode social connections and confound the articulation of entitlement, solidarity or conviviality. As always, the question is how we think beyond the constraints of this unhappy moment.

Bio: Professor Gargi Bhattacharyya is Professor of Sociology at the University of East London. She has written extensively in the area of ‘race’ and racisms, sexuality, global cultures and the ‘war on terror’. She is completing a book with Palgrave Macmillan on equality and justice in a post-austerity world.

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb

 

CMRB Event: Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel

CMRB Event:

Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel

A full conference programme is now available for the following event:

‘Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel’

Date: Monday 9th February 2015
Time: 09.00–18.30
Place: School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG

To register use the following link: ajamrqpisoas.eventbrite.co.uk

Full price tickets – £20
Concessionary tickets (All students; Staff associated with sponsoring organisations) – £15

The conference programme can be downloaded from the CMRB website: www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/events.htm

This conference seeks to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are being constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel. In particular it seeks to examine how the histories of Zionist settlement, anti-colonial and nation-building struggles and 20th century warfare in the Middle East region are being transformed in the current historical conjuncture. Of particular importance in this context will be ideological and political alliances that have emerged locally, regionally and globally around notions such as the ‘New Antisemitism’, and ‘Islamophobia’ and how these relate to racialised discourses against Jews and Muslims. Drawing on the expertise of scholars and activists from a variety of backgrounds, the aim of the conference will be to serve as a first step for building a transversal anti-racist political vision that will aim to destabilize some of the oppositional dichotomies which are currently hegemonic in discourses around Jews, Muslims and Middle East politics.

The conference is sponsored by University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging, SOAS’s Centre for Palestine Studies (London Middle East Institute), the Runnymede Trust and the LSE Centre for the Study of Human Rights.

Further Details:

University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging, SOAS’s Centre for Palestine Studies (London Middle East Institute), the Runnymede Trust, and the LSE Centre for the Study of Human Rights are delighted to announce:

Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel

This conference will take place at: School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG
Map and directions here:

Monday 9th February 2015, 09.00–18.30

To register use the following link: ajamrqpisoas.eventbrite.co.uk

Registration details
Early bird (ends 30 Nov 2014) – £15
Concessionary (All students; Staff associated with sponsoring organisations) – £15
Full price – £20
All enquiries to be directed to j.hakim@uel.ac.uk

This conference seeks to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are being constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel. In particular it seeks to examine how the histories of Zionist settlement, anti-colonial and nation-building struggles and 20th century warfare in the Middle East region are being transformed in the current historical conjuncture. Of particular importance in this context will be ideological and political alliances that have emerged locally, regionally and globally around notions such as the ‘New Antisemitism’, and ‘Islamophobia’ and how these relate to racialised discourses against Jews and Muslims. Drawing on the expertise of scholars and activists from a variety of backgrounds, the aim of the conference will be to serve as a first step for building a transversal anti-racist political vision that will aim to destabilize some of the oppositional dichotomies which are currently hegemonic in discourses around Jews, Muslims and Middle East politics.

PROGRAMME
9-9.30 Coffee and registration

9.30-10 Welcome by organizers

10-11.15 Plenary panel 1: The Role of the Palestine/Israel Question in Racialised Discourses on Jews
Speakers: David Rosenberg (Jewish Socialist Group), Yasmin Rehman (Cross government working group on hate crimes), Prof. Robert Fine (Warwick), Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL).
Chair: Prof. Gilbert Achcar (SOAS)

11.15-12.30 Parallel sessions

1. Palestine/Israel in the Media
Speakers: Dr. Anne De Jong (University of Amsterdam), Dr David Kaposi (UEL), Hagai van der Horst (SOAS), Prof. Annabelle Sreberny (SOAS).
Chair: Dr. Karim Murji (OU)

2. Rightward Bound: Palestine/Israel and right wing movements across the globe
Speakers: Hilary Aked (Bath University), Dr. Farid Hafez (University of Salzburg), Omran Shroufi (Freie Universität Berlin), Dr. Aaron Winter (UEL).
Chair: Richard Kuper (JfJfP)

3. Historicising Conflicts and Palestine/Israel
Speakers: Dr. Emily Gottreich (Berkley), Alma R Heckman (UCLA), Dr. Gil Hochberg (UCLA), Dr James Renton, (Edge Hill University).
Chair: Dr. Georgie Wemyss (UEL)

4. Unexpected alliances: tracing contemporary racisms and anti-racisms in the context of Palestine/Israel
Speakers: Stefano Bellin (UCL), Dr. Keith Kahn Harris (Birkbeck), Anna-Esther Younes (IHEID), Dr. Marcel Stoetzler (Bangor).
Chair: Prof. Floya Anthias (UEL)

12.30-1.30 Lunch

1.30-2.45 Plenary panel 2: The Role of the Palestine/Israel Question in Racialised Discourses on Muslims.
Speakers: Prof. Haim Bresheeth (SOAS), Dr. Muhammad Idrees Ahmad (University of Stirling), Dr. Dina Matar (SOAS), Dr. Subir Sinha (SOAS).
Chair: Omar Khan (Runnymede Trust)

2.45-4 Parallel discussion workshops.

Chairs: Prof. Annabelle Sreberny (SOAS), Prof. David Feldman (Birkbeck), Gita Saghal (CSS), Prof. Avishai Ehrlich (Academic College, Tel Aviv-Yaffa).

4-4.30 Tea break

4.30-6 Plenary panel 3: The Interrelationships between Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racialised Discourses
Speakers: Prof. Gilbert Achcar (SOAS); Prof. Yosefa Loshitzky (SOAS); Prof. Sami Zubaida (Birkbeck).
Chair: Dr. Jamie Hakim (UEL/UEA)

5.30-6.30 Final session: The Way Forward, led by Prof. Nira Yuval-Davis (UEL)
A full conference programme including paper titles, abstracts and speaker bios is available from the CMRB website

 

CMRB Event at UEL: Hierarchy, Inequality and Stratification: classing intersectionality and intersectionalising class, Prof. Floya Anthias (UEL)

CMEB Event:

Hierarchy, Inequality and Stratification: classing intersectionality and intersectionalising class, Prof. Floya Anthias (UEL)

CMRB is delighted to announce the following seminar:

‘Hierarchy, Inequality and Stratification: classing intersectionality and intersectionalising class’, Prof. Floya Anthias (UEL)

This seminar will take place 4-6pm, Monday 26th January 2014 in EB G.06, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD (http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/)

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at floyaanthiascmrb.eventbrite.co.uk

Full details can be found on the attached flyer. Please circulate widely.

Queries should be directed to: j.hakim@uel.ac.uk

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) is pleased to announce the following seminar:

Hierarchy, Inequality and Stratification: classing intersectionality and intersectionalising class

This seminar will take place in EB G.06, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD

http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

Monday 26th January 2014, 4–6pm

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at

floyaanthiascmrb.eventbrite.co.uk

Abstract: The complexity of social divisions and their inter-relations, both as analytical categories and categories of practice asks us to rethink the terms that we use for understanding both ‘identity’ formations and forms of inequality. In this paper I cross reference debates on class and debates on intersectionality. These debates rarely engage with each other. I will argue that both debates fail in different ways. Intersectionality debates rarely provide a clear analysis of the role of class formation in power relations. Stratification approaches rarely engage with the inter-relationships of different modalities of power, for example around gender and race in ways that don’t subordinate them to ‘class’. I will reflect critically on some approaches to class that attempt to move away from a traditional focus on relations of production and labour markets, thereby attempting to incorporate gender and ethnicity into class theory and the newer more culturally nuanced political economy. I will also consider how intersectional frameworks could be developed in ways that attend more centrally to classed social relations.

An analysis of hierarchy and inequality needs to rethink some major categories of social analysis including notions of materiality and culture (daunting to say the least apropos the Marxisant demise), needs to be more global in scope (surprisingly lacking in the literature given the prominence of debates on globalisation and the critique of methodological nationalism) and consider particularly how transnational mobilities and  related social exclusions and boundaries  set up new forms of social stratification and inequality. Global inequalities, the challenges to secularism, fundamentalisms and the racialisation of religion are particularly important in the current period.

Bio: Prior to becoming a Professor of Sociology at UEL in 2013 Floya Anthias was Professor of Sociology and Social Justice at the University of Roehampton (where she remains as Emeritus Professor). She has also been Professor of Sociology at the University of Greenwich and Oxford Brookes University.

Her main academic writings have explored different forms of stratification, social hierarchy and inequality, and how they interconnect. Her research spans a range of theoretical and empirical concerns relating to this.  This has included a focus on racism, diaspora and hybridity, multiculturalism, gender and migration, labour market disadvantages and class position.  Her most recent work has been developing the concept of translocational positionality as a way of addressing some of the difficulties identified with concepts of hybridity, identity and intersectionality. She has published on these issues in a range of top peer reviewed journals.

Floya’s books include Woman Nation State, Palgrave (with N. Yuval Davis), Racialised Boundaries: nation, race, ethnicity, colour and class and the anti racist struggle (with N Yuval-Davis), Routledge, Ethnicity, Class, Gender and Migration, Greek Cypriots in Britain, Avebury, Into the Margins: Migration and Exclusion in Southern Europe, (with G. Lazaridis), Ashgate, Gender and Migration in Southern Europe: women on the move (with G. Lazaridis), Berg, Rethinking Anti-racisms: from theory to practice, (with Cathie Lloyd), Routledge, Paradoxes of Integration: Female Migrants in Europe, (with M. Kontos and M. Morokvasic), Springer, Contesting Integration, Engendering Migration, Palgrave (with M. Pajnik), and  Work and the Challenges of Belonging (with M. Pajnik), Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb

Event at UEL: The rights of women seeking asylum: The role of research and civic engagement in securing the rights of women to protection

MA in Refugee Studies
Feminist Research Group
and
Centre for Social Justice and Change
UEL
Seminar & Lecture Series

The rights of women seeking asylum:
The role of research and civic engagement in securing the rights of women to protection

Date: Monday, December 15, 2014
Time: 6 to 8 pm
Room: EB.G 07, Docklands Campus

All welcome!

Speakers:
Debora Singer MBE
Policy and Research Manager, Asylum Aid
Gabriella Bettiga
Immigration Solicitor, Lawrence Lupin Solicitors

This seminar engages with the question of how to secure the rights of women seeking asylum. In doing so, it examines why women’s experiences of persecution have tended to be excluded from the dominant interpretation of the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees, and explores why women are often unable to benefit equitably from protection under the Refugee Convention. In the past decade, Asylum Aid has been working, lobbying and campaigning to secure the rights of women to protection under the Geneva Convention. Asylum Aid is a NGO based in London which provides free legal representation to asylum seekers and has a national profile in the UK.  Its Women’s Project, set up in 2000, aims to enable women fleeing serious human rights violations to gain protection in the UK through its casework, research, lobbying and campaigning. By discussing their work, the seminar will point to the way in which research and civic engagement can gradually bring the change and improve the lives of women seeking asylum.

Debora Singer is Policy and Research Manager at Asylum Aid where she has worked since May 2004.  She manages the Women’s Project and lobbies and campaigns on issues affecting women asylum seekers.  As part of this work, Debora launched the Charter of rights of women seeking asylum in 2008, to persuade the UK to adopt a gender sensitive asylum system.

Before joining Asylum Aid, Debora worked as Policy Manager at Victim Support focusing on issues of sexual violence, domestic violence and human rights as they affected victims of crime.  In 2006 she obtained a distinction for her Masters degree in Refugee Studies at University of East London. Asylum Aid published her MA Dissertation research on women asylum seekers and international human rights mechanisms, which has had an impact on various campaigns and policy documents. Debora has become well known for her persistence and enthusiasm in lobbying strategically and achieving long term impacts. A well-respected campaigner, responsible for a series of creative campaigns on the rights of women seeking asylum Debora was awarded an MBE for services to women in the 2012 New Year Honours List.

Her most recent publications include chapters in edited volumes: Gender in Refugee Law: From the Margins to the Centre, Arbel, E. et al. Eds. Routledge 2014; and Moving in the Shadows: Violence in the lives of minority women and children, Rehman, Y. et al. Eds. Ashgate 2013.

Gabriella Bettiga, is an Immigration Solicitor at Lawrence Lupin Solicitors since 2003. She is Head of the firm’s Supervisors, as well as Manager of the fast-track and detention scheme. She is in charge of the firm’s training programme and regularly delivers training courses.

Her private casework has included the points-based system as well as human rights, asylum and outside-the-rules applications. She also regularly deals with Judicial Reviews and Court of Appeal matters. Gabriella studied an LLM in Human Rights (in particular the rights of the child), Islamic law, Immigration and Asylum law at the School of Oriental and African Studies.

Gabriella is a Trustee at Asylum Aid and a member of the Women’s Project Committee promoting the Women’s Asylum Charter. She has been involved with various NGOs in several projects and policy work in relation to gender issues in asylum claims and detention.

 

UEL International Development Undergraduate Conference: Defining Global Citizenship: Development, Politics and Social Changes

The University of East London’s 4th Undergraduate Conference

This conference will be taking place on Saturday, 8th of November 2014 at the University of East London, Docklands Campus in London, England (for more information please see Venue).

The theme of the conference is “Defining Global Citizenship: Development, Politics and Social Changes”

Students have been invited to write papers on the topics they feel are current today, and to give their views on where development work needs to change.

The Conference is a one day event, and will provide varying forms of review and feedback to suit the varying levels of work that will be submitted. We welcome presentations in different forms, for example poster presentations and short documentaries. All accepted works will be presented, and some of the works will be selected for review by a panel of academic experts, charity executives and journal publishers. All participants and attendees will receive certificates for their attendance, and the participants will be given a book containing all the works that were presented at the conference.

THE AIMS OF THE CONFERENCE ARE:

  • To improve the skills and confidence of all the students involved as they write papers to deadline, debate their work in a public forum and receive feedback from academics from various backgrounds and industry leaders.
  • To allow students the chance to gain recognition of their work from people outside of their universities.
  • To network and develop links with students from other universities.
  • To expose the students to publishers and leaders in their field.

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE CONFERENCE:

  • Keynote speaker;
  • Film screening;
  • Photo competition;
  • Plenary sessions;
  • Writing and publication workshop from the Reinvention Team;
  • Saturday evening networking event for the opportunity to network with other students, speakers, members of the panels and NGOs.

Further details:

Website:  www.uel-undergraduate-conference.co.uk/about-the-conference.php

Call for Papers: UEL International Development Undergraduate Conference on:Defining Global Citizenship: Development, Politics and Social Change

CALL FOR PAPERS:

UEL International Development Undergraduate Conference on:Defining Global Citizenship: Development, Politics and Social Change

Undergraduates from the University of East London, in partnership with the European Association of Development Research & Training Institutes (EADI), are pleased to invite you to submit* your paper to the University’s forth student led undergraduate conference for development.
8th November 2014

~
University of East London
Docklands Campus
London, UK
Have you just finished your undergraduate dissertation or project? Are you proud of a piece of your degree work? Are you thinking of postgraduate study or just starting on a Masters programme? Then submit an abstract to International Development Student Conference at UEL!
*There is no fee for submission of papers or attendance at the conference.

Why should I attend?

If you have never been to an academic conference before, and never presented your work in a conference setting, then this is a great opportunity to get some experience and find out how it all works. This is a conference organised by undergraduate students, for undergraduate students and we want to hear about the research and work you have been doing.

Who can submit a paper?

Students from a wide variety of disciplines including: anthropology, international development and development studies, international politics and international relations, history, sociology and more. We welcome papers from undergraduate students and students graduating in 2014.

When and where is the conference?

The conference will be held at the Docklands Campus of University of East London, UK on Saturday 8th November. It is a one day event including an evening reception following the conference. However, on Friday 7th there will be a welcoming reception for those able to attend.

What happens at the conference?

Successful entrants will be given the unique opportunity to debate their work in a public forum, receive feedback from academic scholars, interact with publishers and field leaders, meet students from diverse universities and network with a variety of NGOs.

This open conference will centre on subjects pertaining to International Development and International Politics. All participants will be presented with a certificate confirming their attendance and an online journal will be produced presenting the top papers.

What are the paper submission guidelines?

We welcome written papers as well as other forms of presentation such as short documentaries and photo exhibitions. All accepted works will be presented, having been reviewed by a panel consisting of academic experts and publishers.
Undergraduate papers in the region of 2000-5000 words will be accepted. We welcome coursework and other papers. A maximum word limit of 6000 words is in place for those who would like to submit their dissertations.

Papers should address one or more of the following themes.

  • War, Conflict and Migration
  • Intersecting inequality in Society (including gender, age, class, ethnicity)
  • Governance, Institutions and State Building
  • Civil Society, Social Movements and Grassroots Organizations
  • Population Growth, Resources, Environment
  • Sustainable Development, Energy, Climate Change
  • Food and Agriculture, Food Security
  • Cultural and Social Transformation
  • Role of Social Media
  • European and International Human Rights Law/ Theories of Justice
  • Tourism Impact  Post-conflict Reconstruction  Modern Slavery and Trafficking
  • Millennium Development Goals and post-MDG agendas

When should papers be submitted?
15st June 2014

Abstract submission deadline
10st July 2014

Delegates informed if abstract has been accepted
10th September 2014

Papers to be submitted in electronically
20th November 2014

Delegates informed of academic feedback from paper

Contact details:
Email: Organization@uel-undergraduate-conference.co.uk
Website: www.uel-undergraduate-conference.co.uk
Facebook Page: UEL International Development Undergraduate Conference.
https://www.facebook.com/idconference?ref=hl

CMRB Online Publications

NiraCMRB is delighted to announce the publication of the two latest instalments in our on-line publications series.

The first is ‘Sociology, Politics, Thinking and Acting: A festschrift for Nira Yuval-Davis’ and is based on presentations given at the event. The second is ‘London: City of Paradox’ and is based on presentations given at a conference of the same name, hosted at the University of East London in April 2012. Both are edited by Paolo Cardullo, Rahila Gupta and Jamie Hakim.

Both publications are available to download from www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/publications.htm.

UEL Symposium – Young people: Child Sexual Exploitation and Trafficking

The Centre for Social Justice and Change, School of Law and Social Sciences, University of East London, is pleased to announce the symposium:

Young People, Child Sexual Exploitation and Trafficking

Speakers:

Professor Jenny Pearce Director of the International Centre Researching Child Sexual Exploitation, Violence and Trafficking, University of Bedfordshire
‘Young people, child sexual exploitation and trafficking: critical issues from research and practice’

Katriona Ogilvy-Webb Team Manager, Barnardo’s London Service for Sexually Exploited, Missing and Trafficked Children
‘Exploring the influences that impact on children’s and young people’s perceived normalization of Child Sexual Exploitation.’

Wednesday 30th April, 4-6pm
University of East London
University Square, I Salway Road, Stratford, E15 1NF
Room G20

Please find the detailed programme in attachment and feel free to circulate.
You are all warmly invited to attend.
If you have any enquiry please contact: Anna Marsden (marsden2@uel.ac.uk<mailto:marsden2@uel.ac.uk>)

 

Events: UEL Centre on Human Rights in Conflict Spring Seminar Series

The Centre on Human Rights in Conflict is pleased to announce its seminar series for this semester.  Please feel free to share this email with other colleagues and students.

Wednesday 19th February

4-5.30pm

The Endtimes of Human Rights

Stephen Hopgood, Reader in International Relations and co-Director of the Centre for the International Politics of Conflict, Rights and Justice (CCRJ), SOAS

Wednesday 5th March

4-5.30pm

Complementarity in the line of fire: The Catalysing Effect of the International Criminal Court in Uganda and Sudan

Dr. Sarah Nouwen, University Lecturer in International Law, Cambridge

Wednesday 19th March

4-5.30pm

Local voices in internationalised justice?  Civil parties at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

Johanna Herman, Research Fellow, Centre on Human Rights in Conflict, UEL

Wednesday, 23 April 2014

4-5.30pm

The Hague Approach:  Six Principles for Achieving Sustainable Peace in Post Conflict Situations 

Dr. Abiodun Williams, Director, Hague Institute for Global Justice

Wednesday, 30 April 2014

4-5.30pm

Exploring the crisis in the Central African Republic

Jérémie Gilbert, Reader in Law, University of East London and Valerie Arnould, Research Fellow, University of East London

Wednesday 7th May

4-5.30pm

Negotiating Justice? Judicial Accommodation of Politics in the Kenyan ICC Cases and Its Implications for the Legitimacy of International Justice

Thomas Obel-Hansen, International Law, US International University in Nairobi

All Welcome, refreshments provided

Seminars will take place in Room US.G.20, University Square Stratford, 1 Salway Road, Stratford E15 1NF

Directions to University Square Stratford:http://www.universitysquarestratford.ac.uk/find-us.htm

For further information, please visit www.uel.ac.uk/chrc

Or contact Johanna Herman at j.herman@uel.ac.uk