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Call for Papers: “External and Internal Displacement: Impacts and Lessons Learned from Resettlement Processes”

Special Sessions – Winter 2016

New Pressures on Cities and Regions

Managing change in your local economy: have your views heard

Session organiser(s)

Andrew Beer, University of South Australia Business School

This meeting is part of an international research study looking at the ways in which key individuals and businesses at the local or regional level are involved in managing the processes of change in the economy.   Regions such as northern Adelaide are undergoing a substantial shift, with more change expected as production at Holden ends in 2017. This change will have knock on effects for other businesses, the community sector, the labour market and probably consumer confidence.  So what do business and community leaders do in response to these challenges?  How involved are you in driving this process of change, and what would you do if you had the capacity to reshape the economy?

This meeting covers these sorts of questions and looks at two scenarios: what happens when a large new business announces that it wants to enter your region, and what happens when they announce their closure.   We will discuss both possibilities, with the results written down and then included in the research.

The other nations participating in this study are Finland, the United Kingdom, Italy, Germany and the USA.  Our results will be compared with the outcomes from these places.  Once the project is finished, the results will be available on the web, or we can send them to you in hard copy or via email.

Submission guidelines

For more information: call Andrew Beer on 0409 696 485 or contact him on email on andrew.beer@unisa.edu.au

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Interpreting long-term urban economic transformation in cities

Session organiser(s)

Ron Martin, University of Cambridge

More information to follow.

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The Political Economy of Brexit

Session organiser(s)

David Bailey, Aston Business School and Leslie Budd, The Open University Business School

More information to follow.

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External and Internal Displacement: Impacts and Lessons Learned from Resettlement Processes

Session organiser(s)

Dr. Yehya Serag, associate professor of urban and regional planning (Ain Shams University- Cairo) and Dr. Abeer Elshater, associate professor of urban design (Ain Shams University – Cairo)

This spatial session aims to provide a review of the resettlement processes and programs on the mass displacement of people throughout the contemporary era. Worldwide, this review can give a solid ground for further innovations for this kind of crises in terms of a better life for all; the hosted and comer. The primary focus is on both displaced people whether they are internally displaced persons (IDPs) or externally displaced persons (refugees) and their impacts on the host territory of displacement. The internally displaced persons, on one hand, have not crossed an international boundary, but have, for whatever reason, fled their homes, causing internal demographic flows. On the other hand, different nations witnessed (and are witnessing) several flows of refugees. Both types of flows have their impacts on the host communities that they end up settling, affecting, for example, their socio-economic aspects, their built environment and reshaping of Human settlements, to mention a few.

Most refugees (58%) now live in cities, not in refugee camps. In cities, refugees face hard conditions and often have their basic rights denied. It is extremely challenging to support refugees in urban settings. As such, one of the aims of this session is to attempt to give a precise morphological analysis and define the process and scenarios of settled accommodation in the host communities. In most resettlement cases, several interventions are made by the host countries as well as International organizations, to provide direct aid for the displaced persons, but of course, such interventions might have their positive and negative impacts of the host communities.

This session aims to start a process of knowledge sharing on how the crises of displacement was and is dealt with, by the host communities and what are the impacts, benefits, and disadvantages of the resettlement processes. Our aim is to invite speakers from Europe and the Middle East to share their experiences and studies on the resettlement process, from its different aspects. This should be done while, taking into consideration that Europe is currently witnessing a flux of refugees as a result of the Syrian unrest. Simultaneously, some Middle Eastern countries (mainly Egypt, Jordan and Lebanon) witnessed and are witnessing several flows of both types of displaced people as a result of regional wars, domestic unrest, and large-scale development projects. Meeting resettlement demands have been dealt with previously in several cases in these countries, thus having a proper experience for dealing with such demands.

The intended outcomes of this session are to collect contributions in various fields such as urban planning and housing approaches and practice, heterodox concepts highlighting local and social economies indicators, strategies of displacement, and others to enhance our knowledge in the following topical areas (and possibly others):

The socio-economic pressures that face the host countries to participate in the resettlements of refugees, and IDPs in their territories.
The socio-economic impacts of the displaced people in the host communities and human settlements.
The physical impact of the resettlement on the built environment and housing sector.
The impact of resettlement on the services sector in the host communities.
The assessment of what the gender-related impacts of resettlement have been.
The role of international aid organizations in the resettlement initiatives
Types of internal displacement, their causes, and their impacts.

Submission guidelines

We welcome both theoretical and empirical papers to this theme. If you are interested in participating in this special session, please send a title and abstract (between 400 and 500 words) to:

Dr. Yehya Serag, associate professor of urban and regional planning (Ain Shams University- Cairo): yehya_serag@eng.asu.edu.eg

Dr. Abeer Elshater, associate professor of urban design  (Ain Shams University-Cairo): abeer.elshater@eng.asu.edu.eg

http://www.regionalstudies.org/conferences/special-sessions/special-sessions-winter-2016#246

 

Event listing Film Screening: A Syrian Love Story

Event:

A Syrian Love Story

16 June 2016  | 6:00pm–8:00pm | Click here to book your free ticket
Londonewcastle Project Space | 28 Redchurch St, London E2 7DP

Comrades and lovers Amer and Raghda met in a Syrian prison cell 15 years ago. When McAllister first meets their family in 2009, Raghda is back in prison leaving Amer to look after their 4 boys alone; but as the ‘Arab Spring’ sweeps the region, the family’s fate shifts irrevocably. Filmed over 5 years, the film charts their incredible odyssey to political freedom. For Raghda and Amer, it is a journey of hope, dreams and despair: for the revolution, their homeland and each other.

Known for his unique and intimate portraits, maverick director Sean McAllister (Liberace of Baghdad) received the Grand Jury prize at this year’s Sheffield Documentary Festival for this “Bergmanesque portrait of a relationship and love”.

Please note this is event is free, but pre-booking is essential due to limited capacity.

This event is part of our exhibition, Call me by my name: Stories from Calais and beyond, exploring the complexity and human stories behind the current refugee crisis, with a particular focus on the Calais camp.

 

Event: We are all migrants: an interactive workshop

Event:

We are all migrants: an interactive workshop

Facilitated by NOMAD (Nation of Migration Awakening the Diaspora) and performance artist Denys Blacker
18 June 2016  | 3-6pm | Free, no advanced registration required
Londonewcastle Project Space | 28 Redchurch St, London E2 7DP

Nomad (Nation of Migration Awakening the Diaspora) is an organisation working with young refugees in North London.

They will be presenting two interactive workshops that are open to public participation, in collaboration with the performance artist Denys Blacker

“We are all Migrants” is a workshop exploring the different topics and statements around migration and refugee and migrant issues. This activity will invite us to engage in a debate and meaningful discussions. We will take you on journey to explore and challenge the stigmas, taboos and labels attached to “refugee.”

“Call Me By My Name” is a performance workshop during which we will explore the many names we have been called by others. the labels that we ourselves and others use to describe how we look and who we are; the insulting and the complimentary, the affectionate and the funny. The performance is open to audience participation and discussion.

The workshops are free.
No previous experience is necessary.

Link from Migration Museum website:  migrationmuseum.org/event/interactive-workshop-we-are-all-migrants/

 

Migration Museum: Call me by my name: stories from Calais and beyond

Call me by my name: stories from Calais and beyond

2 June – 22 June 2016  | 12pm–8pm (open every day) | Free admission
Londonewcastle Project Space, 28 Redchurch St, London E2 7DP
Transport: Overground (Shoreditch High Street – 2 min walk), Tube (Old Street/Liverpool Street – 10 min walk), Bus (8, 23, 26, 35, 47, 48, 67, 149, 242, 388)

The Calais camp has become a potent symbol of Europe’s migration crisis. Public opinion on this ever- evolving shantytown and its inhabitants is polarised: to some a threatening swarm seeking entry to our already overstretched island-nation, to others a shameful symbol of our failed foreign policy. Amid such debate, it is easy to lose sight of the thousands of individuals who have found themselves in limbo in Calais, each with their own story and reasons for wanting to reach Britain.

Call me by my name: stories from Calais and beyond is a multimedia exhibition, taking place in a momentous month that sees both the EU referendum and Refugee Week. It explores the complexity and human stories behind the current migration crisis, with a particular focus on the Calais camp.

The exhibition features compelling works by established and emerging artists, refugees, camp residents and volunteers. These include a powerful new installation by award-winning artist Nikolaj Bendix Skyum Larsen, art by ALPHA using materials from the camp, drawings of Calais by illustrator Nick Ellwood, art and photography by camp residents, and an installation of lifejackets embedded with the stories of their wearers. It will serve as a forum for a range of discussions, film screenings and performances, including a poetry evening hosted by Michael Rosen. There will also be an opportunity for visitors to leave their responses, which will become part of an art piece by artist-in-residence, Cedoux Kadima.

The Migration Museum Project would like to thank the following donors for their generous grants and support, without which we would not have been able to stage this exhibition: Londonewcastle, Arts Council England, ESRC, Citizenship and Governance Research at The Open University, The University of Oxford’s Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS) and all of the generous contributors to our crowdfunding campaign, including Michael and Em O’Kane, David Warren, Richard Buccleuch and Tom Jupp. We would also like to thank Counterpoints Arts for their advice and support during the planning of this exhibition.

View and download the press release here.

Events associated with this exhibition:

Birds Crossing Borders drop in art workshop, 4 June 2016, 2 -4 pm

Poetry of Migration, 6 June 2016, 5:30 – 8:30 pm

What is Britishness? 14 June 2016, 7 – 9 pm

Join the conversation on Twitter using #CalaisStories. You can find us at @MigrationUK.
Share our Facebook event page and let us know if you’re coming to the exhibition!

Event: Liverpool ARK: The health and wellbeing of refugees

Liverpool ARK: The health and wellbeing of refugees

Join us at the first event organised by Liverpool ARK – Liverpool Asylum and Refugee Knowledge, the University of Liverpool interdisciplinary network on refugee studies.

This event will address the health and well-being of refugees, and aims to share current research in the field, link researchers and local experts, and develop an agenda to meet local challenges.

A team from the University of Liverpool’s Institute of Psychology Health and Society will present findings from several refugee health projects they have been involved with.

Booking Via Eventbrite:  www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/liverpool-ark-the-health-and-wellbeing-of-refugees-tickets-25315755105

Lunch and refreshments provided. [Foyer for refreshments]

Objectives

  1. Share current research in the field
  2. Link researchers and local experts
  3. Develop agenda to meet local challenges

Agenda

1.00 – 1.45:      Lunch

1.45 – 2.00:      Welcome and programme outline                 Chris Dowrick

2.00 – 3.00:      Sharing current research in the field

  • Responding to the health needs of asylum seekers and refugees: findings from the EUR-HUMAN project. Nadja van Ginneken
  • Building mental health research capacity of frontline workers in low resource settings: ethical and educational dimensions. Anna Chiumento
  • Evidence-based psychological interventions for asylum seekers and refugees: international perspectives. Atif Rahman
  • Improving access to high quality primary care: key results of the AMP and RESTORE programmes. Chris Dowrick

3.00 – 3.10:     Liverpool ARK – broad objectives                   Nuno Ferreira

3.10 – 3.15:      Refreshments

3.15 – 4.00:      Linking researchers and local experts

  • Workshops to consider the following topics: needs assessment; methods and evaluation of training; effective interventions; access to healthcare;

4.00 – 4.30:      Feedback and agenda setting:

  • What are our key research and implementation activities?
  • What are our key partnerships?

When Wednesday, 22 June 2016 from 13:00 to 16:30 (BST) – Add to Calendar Where University of Liverpool – Rendall Building, Seminar Room 11 – 74 Bedford St S, Liverpool, L69 7ZT – View Map

INVITATION: Europe’s refugee crisis – whose crisis is it?

INVITATION

Europe’s refugee crisis – whose crisis is it?

We are delighted to invite you to the discussion on our recently published report ‘Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Press Coverage’.

Date: Thursday 9 June 2016, 12–1pm

Venue: The Finnish Institute in London, Unit 1, 3 York Way, London N1C 4AE

Coffee and sandwiches will be served.

The study carried out by the Finnish Institute in London and the Finnish Cultural Institute for the Benelux focuses on how six European newspapers from three different countries covered the refugee and asylum seeker situation in January 2016. Newspapers examined were The Guardian and The Times from the UK, Helsingin Sanomat and Aamulehti from Finland, and Le Soir and De Morgen from Belgium.

The report will be presented by Johanna Sumuvuori, Head of Society Programme, Finnish Institute in London and Annukka Vähäsöyrinki, Head of Projects, Finnish Cultural Institute for the Benelux.  The guest speakers at the event include Milica Pesic, Executive Director of the Media Diversity Institute (UK), Gulwali Passarlay, Afghan refugee who is a published author, TEDx speaker, and a Politics major at the University of Manchester and Thomas Coombes, Media Manager on Global Issues, Amnesty International.

There are 59.5 million forcibly displaced people around the world. Last year, over 1 million asylum applications were filed in Europe. The movement of refugees on the continent in such a large scale was widely covered in European newspapers. The report on Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Press Coverage is launched in order to raise discussion on the role of media in dealing with the humanitarian crisis that concerns all of Europe.

Please find the report here: http://www.finnish-institute.org.uk/en/articles/1613-launching-a-new-report-refugee-crisis-in-european-newspapers

RSVP by 6 June 2016 to: mirja.syrjala@finnish-institute.org.uk

Please note that seats are limited.

Event: Occupy the Archives: Radical Histories & You (Part of the AntiUniversity Now Festival)

Occupy the Archives: Radical Histories & You (Part of the AntiUniversity Now Festival)

Host: Joanne Anthony (Hackney Archives)
Venue: Hackney Archives, Level 2 of Dalston CLR James Library, Dalston Square, E8 3BQ
Date: Thurs 9 June 2016
Time: 6-8pm

“Partial, inaccurate and exclusive history is of benefit to no-one and leads to a society in which citizens are not fully equipped with the knowledge to understand the past and hence the present, nor the power to challenge stereotypes, ignorance and racism.” [Northampton Black History Project]

Can you see yourself – your passions, everyday experiences, artistic or political expressions – reflected and celebrated in your local archives, museums or libraries? If not, why?

Building on last year’s Occupy event, we’ll now take a practical look at exploring:
– What radical collecting actually is?
– The power of archives to affect change for social justice
– Your role in making history & evening the balance in how our shared history is remembered.

Community-led campaigns to create an archive of active social and political movements are taking place across the world: from the Occupy movement, Radical publishers, LGBT to Trade Union, and Black-led cultural movements. We’ll continue to draw inspiration from these movements, along with pioneers like C.L.R James, in how we can create crucial counter-narratives.

Join us for a collective exploration of what we can all do to capture stories and memories that reverberate into the future.

Hackney Archives is keen to continue beyond the AntiUniversity Festival to offer a hub for community archives advice and to support an informal network of Radical Activist-Archivists, “where archives and social justice meets”.

All welcome – please book via Eventbrite https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/occupy-the-archives-radical-histories-you-part-of-antiuniversity-now-festival-tickets-25476358474

UCL Migration Research Unit (MRU) Student Conference: Moving Beyond Borders: Comparative Perspectives on Refuge

Moving Beyond Borders: Comparative Perspectives on Refuge

We invite you to join us at this year’s UCL Migration Research Unit (MRU) Student Conference which offers a forum for discussing the reception and integration of refugees in a number of different contexts.

Students from across the UK and Europe will present their research to initiate an interdisciplinary debate on refugee agency, non-conventional responses to the current migration ‘crisis’ and representational discourses. Attendees will be given a chance to reflect on how research involving refugees presents methodological and ethical challenges through a number of exciting panel discussions.

Have you ever reflected on how the media’s use of language and images influences our perception of refugees? Have you ever thought about how the architecture of reception centres influences refugees’ experiences? Are you interested in hearing about the situation in the Calais Camps from researchers on the ground?

Join us in discussing these and many more questions and think beyond borders.

Read the full conference programme here.

About the Migration Research Unit (MRU)

The Migration Research Unit is a critical nexus for research on migration across UCL and includes as members researchers from the department of geography and from across the social sciences and humanities at UCL. MRU members’ ongoing research contributes to key debates pertaining to diasporas and transnationalism, asylum and refugees, national and international migration policies, theorising movement and (im)mobilities, development and migration, and measuring and mapping migration. The MRU was established by Professor John Salt in 1988, and currently brings together academics whose research also directly informs their teaching and supervision of research students, including students taking the MSc in Global Migration. The MRU hosts an annural student conference, and regularly organises seminars and conferences to engage with and advance understandings of experiences and processes of and responses to different forms of migration. The MRU is co-directed by Professor John Salt, Dr Claire Dwyer and Dr Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh.

Keynote Address: Maurice Wren

Maurice Wren joined the Refugee Council as Chief Executive in March 2013, having previously been the Director of Asylum Aid (2002 – 2013). Prior to Asylum Aid, Maurice held senior positions in the homelessness field at Shelter and the Housing Associations Charitable Trust (HACT).  Maurice was a co-founder of the Independent Asylum Commission (2007-09) and of Detention Forum (2009-present). He is presently co-Chair of the National Asylum Stakeholder Forum at the Home Office and Chair of the Refugee Week Steering Group. Maurice is a Trustee of Migrant Voice; Every Casualty Worldwide; and the European Network on Statelessness; and was recently appointed a Patron of Action Foundation.

Booking: www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/moving-beyond-borders-comparative-perspectives-on-refuge-tickets-23198286700?aff=erelexpmlt

When
Friday, 3 June 2016 from 09:00 to 18:00 (BST) Add to Calendar
Where
University College London – Gower Street Pearson Building, London, WC1E 6BT – View Map

Event: Search and rescue at sea: a legal obligation?

Search and rescue at sea: a legal obligation?
Humanitarian and legal perspectives on the ‘Refugee Crisis’

An event co-organised by Middlesex UniversityAIRE Centre (Advice on Individual Rights in Europe), University of Palermo and CLEDU (Clinica Legale per i Diritti Umani)

Booking:  www.eventbrite.com/e/search-and-rescue-at-sea-a-legal-obligation-tickets-25139773740

Confirmed speakers

  • Giorgia Bevilacqua, Second University of Naples
  • Brad Blitz, Middlesex University
  • Elena Consiglio, CLEDU / University of Palermo
  • Anthony Cullen, Middlesex University
  • Alessio D’Angelo, Middlesex University
  • Ian Greatbatch, Kingston University
  • Roberta Greco, Saccucci Fares & Partners
  • Eleonore Kofman, Middlesex University
  • Nuala Mole, AIRE Centre
  • Violeta Moreno Lax, Queen Mary University
  • Markella Papadouli, AIRE Centre
  • Fulvio Vassallo Paleologo CLEDU / University of Palermo
  • Helena Wray, Middlesex University
  • Martin Xuereb, former director of MOAS

To download the full programme click here.

The context

Between January and May2016, over 150,000 migrants crossed the Aegean sea to reach Europe, mostly escaping the war in Syria. In the same period, nearly 30,000 people reached the Italian shores through the central Mediterranean route. The majority of them flee their countries because of war, conflict or persecutions. Many of the migrants, who, risking their lives, undertook an extremely dangerous journey to look for a better life in Europe or to get international protection, died because they were not rescued in time. The EU member states are bound by international and EU law to assist and protect them.

The EU member states carry out external sea borders surveillance operations aimed at preventing unauthorized border crossing. During such operations, they may intercept or rescue persons. The International Chamber of Shipping reported that the merchant vessels rescued around 40,000 people during 2014. This number increased significantly during 2015. More than 1,000 merchant ships have assisted migrant rescue operations since the crisis began to escalate and helped rescuing over 15,200 people in 2015. According to Frontex, their vessels rescued 150,000 lives in the Mediterranean Sea (59,000 in Italy and 91,000 in Greece).

Amongst other legal instruments, the International Convention on Salvage 1989 imposes a positive obligation on contracting states (EU members states included) to render assistance to any person in danger of being lost at sea. EU member states have also further positive obligations under international and EU law in order to ensure the safety of those seeking international protection and to prevent loss of life at sea.

The current dialogue on the issue so far offers lengthy press releases, shocking coffin photographs and an estimate of the number of people drowning in an attempt to reach safety. Tearful press obituaries and background policy analysis as to the reasons why this situation is occurring complete the picture of the ongoing debate at present. However, what is not heard so far is the voice of law: what are the obligations of the EU, its member states, and other neighboring countries towards the migrants attempting this risky journey? And importantly, are there any legal steps that can be taken in order to help eliminate deaths in the Mediterranean?
The event and its aims

Middlesex University (London), the Italian legal clinic CLEDU (Clinica Legale per i Diritti Umani) and the UK legal organisation AIRE Centre (Advice on Individual Rights in Europe) are working together to take forward this debate by holding a roundtable on the positive legal obligations of EU member states under international maritime law, EU law and national law towards migrants, asylum seekers and persons in distress at sea.

The roundtable will take place in London, at Middlesex University, on 8 June 2016, bringing together European experts on the subject.

It will include a thorough analysis of relevant rules and instruments of international maritime law adopted by EU member states, as well as a discussion of their different interpretations and implementations. The event aims to lead to a common, informed position paper, outlining the legal obligations of different stakeholders when dealing with migrants at sea.

The event is part of the ‘Migration at Middlesex’ 2016 seminar series and funded within the ‘impact strategy’ of Middlesex University research project ‘EVI-MED – Constructing an Evidence Base of Contemporary Mediterreanean Migrations’ (www.mdx.ac.uk/evimed)

To download the full programme click here.

When Wednesday, June 8, 2016 from 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM (BST) – Add to Calendar Where Middlesex University London – The Burroughs, London, NW4 4BT – View Map

 

Event: Research for Action and Influence conference

‘Research for Action & Influence’ Conference

Book Online:  www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/research-for-action-and-influence-conference-tickets-24866891542

The Evelyn Oldfield Unit is holding a half day conference presenting brand new evidence on the experiences of migrant and refugee communities in London.

The conference will conclude a 9 month accredited Research for Action & Influence course run by the Evelyn Oldfield Unit. This capacity building course for members of refugee and migrant community organisations develops their skills and trains them to become community researchers. Each of these researchers has been conducting research on issues affecting refugees and migrants living in London.

This year’s research topics include unaccompanied minors transitioning into adulthood, Latin American and Filipino grassroots campaigning, language as a barrier to accessing healthcare, health needs of Greek and Greek Cypriot women in north London, the role of churches in refugee integration, impact of domestic violence on children, secondary torture survivors, Somali youth crime, and trafficking and modern slavery among Bangladeshis in east London.

This event will feature the results of these studies as well as guest speakers from the refugee and migrant sector. A detailed programme of the conference will be announced nearer the time.

Guest speakers include:

Omar Khan, Runnymede Trust

Yuliana Topazly, Migrant Entrepreneurs Network

Umut Erel, The Open University, and Tracey Reynolds, University of Greenwich

Don Flynn, Migrants Rights Network

Elena Vacchelli, Social Policy Research Centre, Middlesex University

Lisa Doyle, Refugee Council

Michelline Safi Ngongo, Islington Councilor

+ Students presentations

The conference will take place at Resource for London, 356 Holloway Road, N7 6PA from 1.30-5.00pm.

Please book your free tickets on Eventbrite.

For any queries contact Andreja Mesaric at andreja@evelynoldfield.co.uk or 020 7697 4102.

When Thursday, 2 June 2016 from 13:30 to 17:00 (BST) – Add to Calendar Where Resource for London – 356 Holloway Road, London, N7 6PA – View Map

 

Event: Search and rescue at sea: a legal obligation?

Event:

Search and rescue at sea: a legal obligation?
Humanitarian and legal perspectives on the ‘Refugee Crisis’

Wednesday 8 June 2016, Middlesex University (London)

An event co-organised by Middlesex University, AIRE Centre (Advice on Individual Rights in Europe), University of Palermo and CLEDU (Clinica Legale per i Diritti Umani)

Between January and May 2016, over 150,000 migrants crossed the Aegean sea to reach Europe, mostly escaping the war in Syria. In the same period, nearly 30,000 people reached the Italian shores through the central Mediterranean route. The majority of them flee their countries because of war, conflict or persecutions. Many of the migrants, who, risking their lives, undertook an extremely dangerous journey to look for a better life in Europe or to get international protection, died because they were not rescued in time.

The current debates on the issue offer lengthy press releases, shocking photographs and estimates of the number of people drowning in an attempt to reach safety. Tearful press obituaries and background policy analysis as to the reasons why this situation is occurring complete the picture. However, what is not heard enough is the voice of the Law: what are the obligations of the EU, its member states, and other neighbouring countries towards the migrants attempting this risky journey? Are there any legal steps that can be taken in order to help eliminate deaths in the Mediterranean?

Middlesex University (London), the Italian legal clinic CLEDU (Clinica Legale per i Diritti Umani) and the UK legal organisation AIRE Centre (Advice on Individual Rights in Europe) are working together to take forward this debate by holding a roundtable on the positive legal obligations of EU member states under international maritime law, EU law and national law towards migrants, asylum seekers and persons in distress at sea. The roundtable will take place in London, at Middlesex University, on 8 June 2016, bringing together European experts on the subject.

For further information and to book a place visit:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/search-and-rescue-at-sea-a-legal-obligation-tickets-25139773740

 

Event: Placeless People: What can History Tell us About Today’s Refugee Crisis?

Event:

Placeless People: What can History Tell us About Today’s Refugee Crisis?

Organised by the University of East Anglia in collaboration with Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism

Date: Monday 20 June 2016

Venue: Birkbeck University of London, WC1E 7HX, Council Room, Torrington Square main entrance

Time: 9.00am (registration) 9.25am – 6.00pm

The aim of the workshop is to bring together experts in a range of fields – leading historians and scholars, policy makers, representatives from local government, NGOs, think tanks, advocacy groups and the media, to explore how history, in its broadest political, cultural and social senses, can usefully be employed to inform our understanding of the current refugee crisis and help shape our responses to it.

The workshop will address the following questions among others: are there connections between refugee crises in the past and the present? What lessons can be drawn? What kind of historical accounts do NGO’s and policy makers need to make their cases?  How might the recasting of refugee stories on a bigger historical canvas re-shape perception? And, most pressingly, how should policy and responses to the future be shaped by grasping that mass displacement may become the norm?

The day is organised into three panels. The presentations will be short, leaving plenty of time for discussion. The following speakers are confirmed:

Panel 1: Refugees Now – Representations and Perspectives

This session will ask those working with refugees and communities affected by the current refugee crisis to talk about the problems of the current terms of media and political debates.

  • Omar Khan, Runnymede Trust
  • Daniel Trilling, journalist, editor and author
  • Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, Refuge in a Moving World Network, University College London
  • Colin Yeo, immigration barrister and blogger, Garden Court Chambers

Panel 2: Lessons from History

This session will see historians exploring the different lessons we might draw from histories and the dangers of lazy historical comparisons.

  • Simon Behrman, University of East Anglia
  • Jessica Reinisch, Birkbeck, University of London
  • Peter Gatrell, University of Manchester
  • Tony Kushner, University of Southampton

Panel 3: Making History Now

This session will look at different ways of and attempts at documenting the current refugee crisis.

  • Lyndsey Stonebridge, University of East Anglia
  • Yousif Qasmiyeh, poet and writer
  • Zrinka Bralo, Migrants Organise and Open Democracy
  • Representative of Freed Voices from Detention Action

When Monday, 20 June 2016 from 09:00 to 18:00 (BST) – Add to Calendar Where Birkbeck, University of London – Council Room, Torrington Square main entrance, WC1E 7HX – View Map

Call for Applications – (Forced) Migration and Media Workshop – 13th of June, University of Leicester

Call for Applications – (Forced) Migration and Media Workshop – 13th of June, University of Leicester

Call for Applications – Workshop (Forced) Migration and Media at the University of Leicester

13th and 14th of June, 2016

This workshop consists of two days: the first day is targeted on academic knowledge sharing whereas the second day is aimed at dialogue with community organisations in and around Leicester. 

For the first day of this workshop – Monday, the 13th of June – we are looking for applicants who conduct research on how media and forced migration intersect. The deadline to submit your abstract is on the Sunday, the 15th of May, 23.59 GMT.

Delegates are more than welcome to also attend the workshop of the 14th of June.  

Outline Day 1 – Interdisciplinary Workshop aimed at academic knowledge exchange

Digital technologies have “woven themselves into the everyday lives of refugees” (Wilding and Gifford , 2013), opening up new spaces for agency and creativity. For example, 96% of the refugees in Uganda use mobile phones, which is a much higher percentage than the general population (Betts, 2014). We aim to bring together established and upcoming scholars from different areas together in order to further understand and increase our knowledge on the mediation of (forced) migration.

The academic interest for (forced) migrants and media is very topical given the influence of the ‘refugee crisis in Europe’- for instance in dehumanizing language regarding refugees and other migrants in the British media or the confusion about the realization that refugees own smartphones.

But while ethnographic research has indeed shown that diasporic communities are often vanguards of digital technologies and it is clear that forced migration and mediated connectivity are increasingly intertwined, critical research in this area is still lacking. The few notable exceptions show that media (mass media and social media) can influence one’s feelings of security, but can also provide opportunities to strategise and negotiate one’s position of insecurity (Aouragh, 2011; Collyer, 2007; Dekker and Engersen, 2012; Horst, 2006; Moore and Clifford, 2007; Wilding and Gifford, 2013).

We are looking for applicants who conduct research to further the understanding on how media and forced migration intersect. New and old media play a crucial role in the lives of (forced) migrants. Within this workshop we aim to explore how we can understand the intersections between different media forms, including people’s own media use, and (forced) migration. We bracket the forced, as we recognise that the label ‘refugee’ can have its own difficulties, and could even be considered as a governing tool appropriated by nation-states. This workshop could therefore also be opened up to people who consider mixed migration or challenge the distinction between economic and forced migrations in regard to media.

The workshop (see a detailed program in the attachment) includes interactive activities in which established scholars, new career researchers and post-graduate students from a wide variety of fields are able to learn from each other and write together. 

After a general opening and key note speeches, the keynote speaker will be working within a small group of early career researchers (max. 5/6 people) on a specific subject which is related to the one of the 4 streams.
The 4 streams are:
1. Media representations of (forced) migration.
2. Methodology, media and migration.
3. Trajectories of (forced) migrants.
4. Media power in the politics of (forced) migration.
For a more detailed description of these streams, please have a look at the attachment or on our Facebook event-page: Workshop (Forced) Migration and Media.

The objective of the afternoon session is creating a more informal space where researchers working on similar subjects can present their work with people working on similar issues and to someone who has a tracked record in the field.

In the closing plenary session we will look for bridges, and consider how we as academics can best engage to policies and practices.

We ask you to submit the title of your work, an abstract of maximum 300 words and a short motivation of maximum 200 words why your works fits best in what particular stream by Sunday, the 15th of May, 23.59 GMT to mediamigrationworkshop@gmail.com.

Accepted participants will be notified by the 20th of May.

Costs: Attendees are asked to contribute £10 each, in order to contribute to the travel costs of attendees without funding. Those attendees who have to travel far within the UK and do not have funding to cover travel costs can contact us for additional funding.

Full details on the streams and program can be downloaded as follows: Streams and Program – Workshop Forced Migration and Media.

For more information or any questions, please contact mediamigrationworkshop@gmail.com, Mirjam Twigt, mat35@le.ac.uk or Zakaria Sajir: zs70@le.ac.uk or contact us through the Facebook event-page: Workshop (Forced) Migration and Media.

For more information on the Community Impact Event on the 14th of June, please contact Idil Osman io40@le.ac.uk or Mirjam Twigt: mat35@le.ac.uk.

Event: Sites of Confinement: Confines, Control and Resistance at the Border

Event: Sites of Confinement: Confines, Control and Resistance at the Border
Thursday, 17 March 2016 09:0018:00

Campus Luigi Einaudi, University of Turin, Lungo Dora Siena 100/A – 10154, Turin, Italy
Room: E5

The aim of this day conference is to stimulate discussion around the ambiguity of sites of confinement with specific focuses on migration; race and racism; and physical, social and spatial bordering as control. Drawing together academics and activists working and campaigning across Europe, we aim to analyse the inconsistencies and contestations within pre-trial detention, administrative detention and the different forms of reception/confinement of asylum seekers, refugees and illegalised migrants. Alongside issues in control and punishment, the conference will emphasise forms of everyday resistance by those living in sites of confinement, as well as those campaigning for freedom.

Confirmed speakers include: Antigone Association, Monish Bhatia, Victoria Canning, Valeria Ferraris, Evgenia Iliadou, Simone Santorso, Alvise Sbraccia, No Borders, and Frances Webber

Conveners: Dr Victoria Canning, The Open University, victoria.canning@open.ac.uk and Dr Valeria Ferraris, University of Turin, valeria.ferraris@unito.it 
Conference Schedule

9.30 Welcome and Introduction:

Laura Scomparin, Head of Department of Law, University of Turin

Victoria Canning (Open University), Co-ordinator of the Prisons, Punishment and Detention Working Group

10:30-11:30  Panel 1: Perspectives on detention

Fernández-Bessa (University of Barcelona)
Simone Santorso (University of Padua)
Association Antigone

11.30 – 12.00 Coffee Break

12.00 – 13.30 Panel 2: Criminalisation of migrants

Alvise Sbraccia (University of Bologna)
Monish Bhatia (Abertay University)
Associazione Studi Giuridici Immigrazione (ASGI)

13.30-14.30 Lunch

14.30-16.30 Panel 3: Refugee crisis, border control and reception

Frances Webber (Institute of Race relations)
Evgenia Iliadou (The Open University)
Valeria Ferraris (University of Turin)
NO Borders Ventimiglia

17.00-18.00 Working Group Meeting and Resolution

Victoria Canning (Open University)

20.00 Social Dinner