Tag Archives: Syria

RSC Workshop: Refuge from Syria

The Syrian Humanitarian Disaster: Understanding Perceptions, Aspirations and Behaviour in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey

Wednesday, 09 December 2015
The Garden Room, Oxford Department of International Development, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TB
Hosted by Refugee Studies Centre

This one-day workshop will be held on 9 December 2015 to engage researchers and practitioners with findings from recent research into the perceptions, aspirations and behaviour of refugees from Syria, host community members, and practitioners in Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan. Professor Dawn Chatty will present her British Academy funded research on this theme alongside a number of other researchers and practitioners with recent experience in this area. The workshop aims to promote greater understanding of the unique socio-historical context of the Syrian humanitarian disaster in each of the regional hosting countries by addressing specifically changing perceptions and aspirations. In addition the workshop hopes to present examples of good practice and lessons learned from practitioners in all countries bordering on Syria.

The speed with which Syria disintegrated into extreme violence and armed conflict shocked the world and left the humanitarian aid regime in turmoil as agencies struggled to respond to the growing displacement crisis on Syria’s borders. The mass displacement has now  reached Northern Mediterranean shores as well as Central European borders. It has left the neighbouring states of Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan in a quandary as to how to effectively provide protection for these people seeking refuge. None have granted the displaced refugee status; each has established temporary measures to deal with this crisis. In many cases the displaced and the host communities have not been consulted and thus tensions have quickly emerged among host communities, displaced Syrians and humanitarian policy-makers and practitioners. That tension, despair and hopelessness has seen thousands leave the region over the past year in search for survival in dignity. This workshop aims to explore the different perceptions and aspirations of Syria’s refugees, humanitarian assistance practitioners, and the host community. It also seeks to probe what social factors with the host community, will, when circumstances permit, positively contribute to the reshaping and re-integration of Syrian society post-conflict.

Provisional programme now available >>

If you are interested in attending and taking part, kindly contact Ariell Ahearn on ahearn.ariell@gmail.com

 

Events: RSC Workshop: Refuge from Syria, 9 December 2015

RSC Workshop: Refuge from Syria
The Syrian Humanitarian Disaster: Understanding Perceptions, Aspirations and Behaviour in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey

Date: Wednesday, 9 December 2015
Location: The Garden Room, Oxford Department of International Development, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TB

This one-day workshop will be held on 9 December 2015 to engage researchers and practitioners with findings from recent research into the perceptions, aspirations and behaviour of refugees from Syria, host community members, and practitioners in Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan. Professor Dawn Chatty will present her British Academy funded research on this theme alongside a number of other researchers and practitioners with recent experience in this area. The workshop aims to promote greater understanding of the unique socio-historical context of the Syrian humanitarian disaster in each of the regional hosting countries by addressing specifically changing perceptions and aspirations. In addition the workshop hopes to present examples of good practice and lessons learned from practitioners in all countries bordering on Syria.

The speed with which Syria disintegrated into extreme violence and armed conflict shocked the world and left the humanitarian aid regime in turmoil as agencies struggled to respond to the growing displacement crisis on Syria’s borders. The mass displacement has now  reached Northern Mediterranean shores as well as Central European borders. It has left the neighbouring states of Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan in a quandary as to how to effectively provide protection for these people seeking refuge. None have granted the displaced refugee status; each has established temporary measures to deal with this crisis. In many cases the displaced and the host communities have not been consulted and thus tensions have quickly emerged among host communities, displaced Syrians and humanitarian policy-makers and practitioners. That tension, despair and hopelessness has seen thousands leave the region over the past year in search for survival in dignity. This workshop aims to explore the different perceptions and aspirations of Syria’s refugees, humanitarian assistance practitioners, and the host community. It also seeks to probe what social factors with the host community, will, when circumstances permit, positively contribute to the reshaping and re-integration of Syrian society post-conflict.

A programme of the workshop speakers and timetable will be made available shortly. If you are interested in attending and taking part, kindly contact Dawn.Chatty@qeh.ox.ac.uk or Tamsin.Kelk@qeh.ox.ac.uk

Details online at: www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/rsc-workshop-refuge-from-syria

Forced Migration Review issue 47, entitled ‘The Syria crisis, displacement and protection’, is now online

Forced Migration Review issue 47, entitled ‘The Syria crisis, displacement and protection’, is now online at www.fmreview.org/syria

The 6.45 million displaced people inside Syria make this the largest IDP crisis in the world, with possibly also the largest number of people who are ‘trapped’. In addition, the number of refugees from Syria continues to increase. The international community has an opportunity to set up, from now, an effective response to what will clearly become protracted displacement. The authors of the 20 articles in this latest issue of FMR offer observations that could be of value in increasing the level of protection for the displaced and in shaping assistance to both the displaced and the countries and communities that are ‘hosting’ them.

The full list of contents, with web links, is given at the end of this page.

________________________________________

FMR 47 will be available online and in print in English, Arabic, French and Spanish.

An expanded contents Listing for this issue is also available, at www.fmreview.org/syria/FMR47listing.pdf

Requesting copies: If you do not regularly receive a print copy of FMR and would like to receive a print copy of FMR 47 or the Listing for your organisation, or multiple copies for onward distribution or for use in training or at conferences, please contact us as soon as possible at fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk. Please state how many copies you need (of full issue and/or Listing) in which languages, and provide a full postal address.

Please help disseminate this issue as widely as possible by circulating to networks, posting links, blogging, mentioning it on Twitter and Facebook and adding it to resources lists.

This issue has been published with the assistance of the Regional Development and Protection Programme, a three-year regional initiative for Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq, led by Denmark and with contributions from the EU, Denmark, Ireland, the Netherlands, UK and the Czech Republic.

See www.fmreview.org/forthcoming for details of forthcoming FMR issues.

If you no longer wish to continue receiving our occasional email alerts, please let us know.

With thanks and best wishes
Marion Couldrey & Maurice Herson
FMR Editors
fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk

Follow FMR on Facebook and Twitter

FMR 47 The Syria crisis, displacement and protection – contents with web links

The inheritance of loss
Nigel Fisher (United Nations)
www.fmreview.org/syria/fisher

Development and protection challenges of the Syrian refugee crisis
Roger Zetter (Refugee Studies Centre) and Héloïse Ruaudel (independent)
www.fmreview.org/syria/zetter-ruaudel

The refugee crisis in Lebanon and Jordan: the need for economic development spending
Omar Dahi (Hampshire College/Carnegie Middle East Center, Beirut)
www.fmreview.org/syria/dahi

Syrians contributing to Kurdish economic growth
Anubha Sood and Louisa Seferis (Danish Refugee Council)
www.fmreview.org/syria/sood-seferis

The role of host communities in north Lebanon
Helen Mackreath (American University of Beirut)
www.fmreview.org/syria/mackreath

Refugee activists’ involvement in relief effort in Lebanon
Frances Topham Smallwood (University of Amsterdam)
www.fmreview.org/syria/smallwood

Limited legal status for refugees from Syria in Lebanon
Dalia Aranki and Olivia Kalis (Norwegian Refugee Council)
www.fmreview.org/syria/aranki-kalis

Coping strategies among self-settled Syrians in Lebanon
Cathrine Thorleifsson (University of Oslo)
www.fmreview.org/syria/thorleifsson

Refugee by association
Blanche Tax (UNHCR)
www.fmreview.org/syria/tax

Protection challenges of mobility
Melissa Phillips and Kathrine Starup (Regional Mixed Migration Secretariat/Danish Refugee Council)
www.fmreview.org/syria/phillips-starup

A duty and a burden on Jordan
Saleh Al-Kilani (Jordanian Ministry of Interior)
www.fmreview.org/syria/alkilani

For beneficiary-led protection programming in Jordan
Sinead McGrath (International Catholic Migration Commission in Jordan)
www.fmreview.org/syria/mcgrath

If Israel accepted Syrian refugees and IDPs in the Golan Heights
Crystal Plotner (Al-Marsad, Arab Human Rights Centre in Golan Heights)
www.fmreview.org/syria/plotner

Gender, conscription and protection,and the war in Syria
Rochelle Davis, Abbie Taylor and Emma Murphy (Georgetown University)
www.fmreview.org/syria/davis-taylor-murphy

The vulnerability of Palestinian refugees from Syria
Leah Morrison (Oxford Brookes University)
www.fmreview.org/syria/morrison

The impact of displacement on disabled, injured and older Syrian refugees
Marcus Skinner (HelpAge International)
www.fmreview.org/syria/skinner

The mental health of Syrian refugee children and adolescents
Leah James, Annie Sovcik, Ferdinand Garoff and Reem Abbasi (Center for Victims of Torture)
www.fmreview.org/syria/james-sovcik-garoff-abbasi

The inside story: internal displacement in Syria
Erin Mooney (ProCap)
www.fmreview.org/syria/mooney

How the crisis is altering women’s roles in Syria
Zerene Haddad (Jesuit Refugee Service, Middle East and North Africa)
www.fmreview.org/syria/haddad

Mobility as a solution
Lucas Oesch (Groupe de recherches et d’études sur la Méditerranée et le Moyen Orient)
www.fmreview.org/syria/oesch

 

Events: Crisis in Syria: Conflict & Refugees (short films and panel discussion)

The Refugee Council, in collaboration with the Refugee Law Initiative at the School of Advanced Study, is hosting a film screening and panel discussion entitled ‘Crisis in Syria: Conflict & Refugees’. Four short documentary films on the Syrian crisis will be shown, followed by an expert panel discussion.

The panel discussion will include: Roland Schilling (UK representative, UNHCR), Olly Lambert (Filmmaker), Maurice Wren (CEO, Refugee Council and panel Chair), Sonia Koury (Syrian refugee doctor) and further speakers (TBC).

Date and time: Friday 22nd November, 6.30 – 9.00pm (refreshments will be served).

Location: Chancellor’s Hall, Senate House, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HU.

To book your free tickets please RSVP to rebecca.lancaster@refugeecouncil.org.uk.

www.refugeecouncil.org.uk/syria

 

Event: The Middle East: News and Narratives – City University’s Olive Tree Forum at the Inside Out Festival

Event:

The Middle East: News and Narratives – City University’s Olive Tree Forum at the Inside Out Festival

Thursday 24 October 2013, 7pm to 8.30pm. Doors open 6.30pm.

FREE but booking is essential.

College Chapel, King’s College London, Strand Campus, London WC2R 2LS

www.insideoutfestival.org.uk/2013/events/the-middle-east-news-and-narratives-city-universitys-olive-tree-forum-at-the-inside-out-festival/

How do we disentangle ‘news’ from media reports which are framed in terms of one or other of the competing ‘narratives’ about what’s happening in the Middle East? How do we decide whether the Syrian regime, the rebels or the Americans can be believed? Whose ‘narrative’ is the more compelling – the Israeli one or the Palestinian one, if we are to understand what drives their conflict?

Time was, we did not even talk in terms of ‘narratives’ at all. But since the 1990s it has become common parlance. Academics use the term to describe the mental maps that we all absorb as we grow up (from history lessons, literature, politics and family stories) that frame our understanding of who we are and our place in the world. Politicians talk about competing with each other and the media to ‘frame the national narrative’ so that it reinforces their view of the world and serves their interests.

We invite you to come and discuss what’s at stake in understanding the contemporary Middle East.

Panel

Rosemary Hollis – Professor of Middle East Policy Studies and Director of the Olive Tree Programme, City University London. Her book on Britain and the Middle East in the 9/11 Era was published in 2010, RIIA and Wiley Blackwell.

Dr James Rodgers – Academic (City University London) and journalist. During his BBC career (1995-2010), his postings included Moscow, Brussels, and Gaza where, from 2002-04, he was the only international journalist based in the territory. He is the author of No Road Home: Fighting for Land and Faith in Gaza (Abramis, 2013), and Reporting Conflict (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012).

Yoav Galai – Olive Tree scholar at City University London (2008-11) and prior to that Jerusalem-based photojournalist.

Bahaa Milhem – Palestinian journalist and TV presenter, Olive Tree scholar at City University London (2010-13)

New Reports and Publications, inc. RSC Working Papers, World of Work report 2013, Update on Syria

World of Work Report 2013: “Repairing the economic and social fabric”
Published by the International Labour Office, (ILO)

The study analyses the global employment situation five years after the start of the global financial crisis. It looks at labour market performance and projections both at the global and regional levels.

Download the full report (PDF in English only)
Download the summary (PDF)
See Also: United Nations News Centre Press Release and also an Independent Press Story.

Special Issue of The Citizen Artist News: ‘commemorating the University’s transformation into a Border Regime’
Access:  [Download Here]

The two worlds of humanitarian innovation
RSC Working paper 94
By Louise Bloom and Dr Alexander Betts

This paper considers the role innovation can play in making humanitarian action more sustainable and efficient while reducing dependency. Many organisations have begun to examine how innovation can help them deliver better services. However, this ‘top-down’ focus on organisational improvement, while vital, neglects the possibilities of ‘bottom-up’ innovation: the ways in which beneficiary populations can use their own talents and skills to foster self-reliance and long term solutions to their situations. The paper draws on innovation theory, design theory and participatory development approaches to build a research framework for examining this kind of innovation. Rather than viewing beneficiary populations solely as recipients of aid, the authors see them as actors with agency who can use their aspirations, skills and community resources to help craft sustainable and appropriate humanitarian solutions.

The authors are both part of the Humanitarian Innovation Project at the Refugee Studies Centre, where Dr Betts is Director and Ms Bloom is a Research Officer. Find out more about the Project at http://www.oxhip.org/.

[Access and Download Working Paper]

Writing the ‘Other’ into humanitarian discourse: Framing theory and practice in South-South humanitarian responses to forced displacement
RSC Working Paper 93
By Julia Pacitto and Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

This paper addresses the dearth of academic research into humanitarian responses by actors of the global South. It challenges the deeply-held assumption among both academics and practitioners that humanitarianism is chiefly a product of Enlightenment thinking and the nineteenth century missionary activity of Western religious groups. There is a great deal of academic literature on responses to humanitarian crises by institutions and actors of the global North. However, there is comparatively little on those responses by the global South, and in particular almost none on Southern responses to crises of forced displacement.

The paper argues in favour of a more nuanced conceptualisation of humanitarianisms, calling for more academic study of the various humanitarianisms of the South, and encouraging academics and practitioners to critically engage with the many different solidarities which can drive humanitarian action. It cites specific examples of South-South humanitarian responses to forced displacement in Asia, Latin America, Africa and the Middle East, including those of faith-based humanitarianism.

[Access and Download Working Paper]

UN Human Rights Council: Report of the independent international
commission of inquiry on the Syrian Arab Republic
Published 16 August 2013
[Download Report]

 

New Regional Publications on Europe; Syria; and Australia & New Zealand

Details of these new publications were originally circulated by Elisa Mason on the incredibly useful: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog.  Further details can be found on the website at:  http://fm-cab.blogspot.co.uk/

New Regional Publications on Europe

Annual Report on the Situation of Asylum in the European Union 2012 (EASO, 2013) [text via Refworld]

Brief Information Note on the Main Asylum-Related Legal Changes in Hungary as of 1 July 2013 (Hungarian Helsinki Committee, July 2013) [text via Refworld]

An EU-Turkey Readmission Agreement: Undermining the Rights of Migrants, Refugees and Asylum Seekers? (Euro-Mediterranean Human Rights Network, June 2013) [text via Oppenheimer Chair]

Frontier Europe: Human Rights Abuses on Greece’s Border with Turkey (Amnesty International, July 2013) [text]

Pope Francis Visits Lampedusa in Solidarity with Migrants and Residents (ICMC, July 2013) [text]

Sweden and Immigration: From Economic Migrants to Humanitarians (SSRN, Nov. 2012) [text]

UNHCR Comments and Recommendations on the Proposed Act Amending the International Protection Act (EVA 2013-1711-00240) (UNHCR, June 2013) [text]

UNHCR Comments and Recommendations on the Proposed Amendments to the Aliens Act in Slovenia (UNHCR, 2013?) [text]

New Regional Publications on Syria

Failing Syrian Refugees in Iraq’s Kurdish Region: International Actors Can Do More (Norwegian Refugee Council, June 2013) [text via ReliefWeb]

Iraq/Jordan/Turkey: Syrians Blocked from Fleeing War (Human Rights Watch, July 2013) [text]

Lebanese Contradictory Responses to Syrian Refugees Include Stress, Hospitality, Resentment, Policy Brief (Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs & Fafo, June 2013) [text]
– See also other materials related to this project.

Nowhere People: The Refugees of Syria by Moises Saman (Time Magazine LightBox, July 2013) [access]
– Photo essay.

Syria’s Spinoff Crisis (Brown Political Review, June 2013) [text]

Syrian Refugee Crisis: Can the Breaking Point Be Prevented? (Brookings-LSE Project on Internal Displacement, June 2013) [text]

Syrian Refugees in Turkey: The Limits of an Open Door Policy (UpFront Blog, June 2013) [text]

New Regional Publications on Australia & New Zealand

Opportunity:

Refugees & Australia, 1972-2012 [info]
– Special exhibit that runs until 12 May 2014 at the Migration Museum in Adelaide, Australia.

Publications:

A Better Way: Regional Cooperation, Policy Brief (Refugee Council of Australia, June 2013) [text]

Bob Carr and the Ghost of Philip Ruddock (Inside Story, July 2013) [text]

FactCheck: Are Asylum Seekers Really Economic Migrants? (The Conversation, July 2013) [text]

Just Hook around Tasmania and Pop across the Tasman (Inside Story, June 2013) [text]

No Country is an Island (Inside Story, June 2013) [text]

“Pragmatic Answers to the Asylum Seeker Question,” Eureka Street Extra (June 2013) [text]

Pushed to the Margins: Building Pathways towards Greater Social Inclusion for Refugee Women in Australia (Australian Centre for Leadership for Women, June 2013) [text via BroCAP]

“Why Bob Carr is Kidding Himself about Refugees,” Eureka Street, vol. 23, no. 13 (July 2013) [text]

World Refugee Day: New Zealand at Risk of Abusing Human Rights in the Name of Border Control (Amnesty International, June 2013) [text]

World Refugee Day 2013: Mangere Refugee Resettlement Centre (NZ Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, June 2013) [text]