Tag Archives: research

New Research Paper: The true human rights situation in Eritrea: the new UK Home Office Guidance as a political instrument for the prevention of migration

Please, find in following link this paper:

‘The true human rights situation in Eritrea: the new UK Home Office Guidance as a political instrument for the prevention of migration’
by Sara Palacios Arapiles.

Link to Paper:  http://sas-space.sas.ac.uk/6097/

This research paper aims at documenting the true situation in Eritrea,
in order to refute the credibility of the content and of some of the
sources of the new Guidance on Eritrea issued by the UK Home Office
(HO); and of the related policies that are being implemented in some
other countries, such as Israel. The HO country of origin Guidance
surprisingly claims that there are alleged signs of improvement inside
Eritrea for potential returnees. It is argued in this paper that the
reasons for this are entirely politically influenced, with the purpose
of preventing migration. The paper then brings to light the current
circumstances in the country – supported inter alia by the testimonies
gathered by the author, and the new findings of the UN Commission of
Inquiry on Human Rights in Eritrea- that would make the forcible return
of the Eritrean asylum-seekers and refugees unlawful.

 

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The United Nations History Project website

Online Resource:

The United Nations History Project
unhistoryproject.org/

We would like to take this opportunity to highlight the work of the United Nations History Project in facilitating access to a broad range of information broadly relating to the history of the United Nations.  Coordinated by Dr Heidi J. S. Tworek, in conjunction with Harvard Asia Center and the Joint Center for History and Economics and Harvard and Cambridge, and supported by the United Nations Foundation, the United Nations History Project,

The project aims to illustrate the scholarly importance of studying the history of the United Nations and international organizations in general.

It is a starting point for scholars who wish to research in UN archives or find online materials related to the UN. The website provides comprehensive guides to physical and online sources on the United Nations. It also collates many of the research guides on the United Nations that already exist. In addition, leading scholars on the UN have written about their experiences working in UN archives and discuss further research possibilities.

(Link:- unhistoryproject.org/index.html).

The United Nations History Project website offers a range of teaching materials to help support the study of UN history. The website is divided into four main sections, incorporating:
  • Researching the UN.  Provides details on how to research the history of the United Nations, encompassing online and physical archive collections; research guides; statistics and researcher experiences.
  • Teaching UN History.  This section highlights Syllabi in relation to the teaching of UN history.
  • Major Themes on UN History.  Highlights thirteen major themes of UN History and their relevant sources of information, encompassing the likes of Environment; Governance; Health; Human Rights; and Peace and Security.
  • Scholarly Networks.  Encompassing further details in relation to scholarly networks supporting the study of the United Nations and its history.
The United Nations History Project therefore represents a very important resources for the history and development of the United Nations, whilst also providing an opportunity to help connect both archivists, scholars and researchers.
We are also very pleased to announce that a couple of our own archival collections based here at the University of east London  are now listed on the UN History Project website.  Further details can be highlighted as follows:
The website offers a set of teaching materials for UN history. There are annotated bibliographies, timelines, and featured sources on thirteen major themes of UN history. There are resources from a course taught on the global history of the UN at Harvard in spring 2011 as well as a compilation of other syllabi on UN topics. – See more at: http://unhistoryproject.org/index.html#sthash.fFQJ2OUZ.dpuf
It is a starting point for scholars who wish to research in UN archives or find online materials related to the UN. The website provides comprehensive guides to physical and online sources on the United Nations. It also collates many of the research guides on the United Nations that already exist. In addition, leading scholars on the UN have written about their experiences working in UN archives and discuss further research possibilities. – See more at: http://unhistoryproject.org/index.html#sthash.fFQJ2OUZ.dpufIt is a starting point for scholars who wish to research in UN archives or find online materials related to the UN. The website provides comprehensive guides to physical and online sources on the United Nations. It also collates many of the research guides on the United Nations that already exist. In addition, leading scholars on the UN have written about their experiences working in UN archives and discuss further research possibilities.(See more at: unhistoryproject.org/index.html#sthash.hBqbQ7Aa.dpuf)
The project aims to illustrate the scholarly importance of studying the history of the United Nations and international organizations in general. – See more at: http://unhistoryproject.org/index.html#sthash.hBqbQ7Aa.dpuf

Please do take time to investigate and explore this fabulous resource.  Further information on the United Nations History Project can be found as follows:

The United Nations History project can be contacted at:  unitednationshistory@gmail.com

 

Oxford Migration Studies Society 1st Annual Conference ​4 May 2013 University of Oxford

Oxford Migration Studies Society 1st Annual Conference

​4 May 2013,  University of Oxford

Call for Papers

About the Society

The Oxford Migration Studies Society is a not-for-profit, student-run, graduate studies society that includes in its membership students from all disciplines across University of Oxford who share an interest in Migration.  Two of the society’s central tenets are:

— To build networks across institutional and disciplinary boundaries

— To generate dialogue both between universities but, equally of importance, amongst universities and practitioners

​The Oxford Migration Studies Society presents its 1st Annual Conference as a first step to realizing the important goal of connecting academic scholarship to real-world practice.

The Oxford Migration Studies Society​ Conference

The Oxford Migration Studies Society 1st Annual Conference to be held Saturday, 4 May 2013, provides an interdisciplinary forum that hopes to connect scholars and practitioners with an interest in migration from around the world.  This year’s conference, themed ‘Theory and Practice’, will explore different approaches to understanding migration as a fundamental part of today’s world, highlight the way practice can inform theory, and discuss how academic theory can be used in real-world situations to understand the importance of migration for all involved.  The Society welcomes papers from all disciplines and practitioners around the world and papers can focus on the migration experience from the state’s perspective, the migrant’s perspective, the migration industry’s perspective in sending and receiving countries as well as on the journey.  The Society encourages the submission of papers about migration in any region in the world and which use various methodologies.

Submission abstracts are due on Saturday, 9 February 2013.  Full papers will be due Sunday, 31 March 2013.  Please send all submissions to Oxford Migration Studies Society at oxford.mss@gmail.com.  Include in the subject heading: Conference Submission – your name – title of your paper. Please note that the word limit for abstract is 200 words.

Accepted presenters will be put in contact with distinguished professors from Oxford International Migration Institute (IMI), Center for Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS), and the Refugee Studies Center (RSC) for feedback and comments on their submissions.

Contact

The conference will be held in Oxford, United Kingdom

Contact Oxford Migration Studies Society for any further questions: oxford.mss@gmail.com.

All submissions are to be submitted at: oxford.mss@gmail.com. Include in the subject heading: Conference Submission – your name – title of your paper.

Travel Bursary

Partial travel funding will be granted to student and practitioner participants.  Please download the funding application and submit the application along with your abstract before Saturday, 9 February 2013.

Further Information:  http://cheukk.wix.com/oxfordmigration#!conference/c1iwz

 

Call For Papers: RefugeSpecial Issue: Environmentally Induced Displacement (29.2)

Call For Papers: Special Issue: Environmentally Induced Displacement (29.2)

REFUGE vol. 29(2)

Special Issue: Environmentally Induced Displacement

Guest Editors:  Pablo S. Bose and Elizabeth Lunstrum

This special issue will explore the phenomenon of environmentally induced displacement (EID).  From climate change to extractive industries, from ‘natural’ disasters to increased urbanization, from conservation to mega-projects, landscapes and peoples’ place on them are being transformed at an unprecedented scale across the globe.  We suggest that these as well as many other processes provoke specific forms of environmentally induced displacement and forced migration, confronting communities with the loss of their land and other vital resources.  Many of the most affected groups are often vulnerable to begin with, lacking secure rights and access to resources and to formal recourse once these are jeopardized.  This special issue explores the phenomenon of EID through both conceptual as well as empirical work.  We invite submissions that address a range of questions such as: What constitutes environmental displacement?  What practices and discourses help to organize and rationalize these processes?  What are the demographic impacts of environmental displacement?  How have various local and international actors responded to environmentally induced displacement?  What are some of the definitional debates regarding ‘environmental refugees’ and their place within the international protection system?

Successful submissions may come from a wide range of conceptual backgrounds concerned with environmentally induced displacement. A variety of research interests will be explored with the objective of providing theoretical and practical insights on matters such as adaptation and internal coping strategies, livelihoods and sustainable development, prevention prospects, disaster risk management, regional concerns, cross-border legal implications, humanitarian responses, state action and inaction, and environmentally induced versus other forms of displacement (e.g. conflict, developmental, etc).

Contributions may be submitted either in English or French and will be published in the language of submission. They should generally not exceed 7500 words, or 30 double-spaced pages, and must be typed and submitted in electronic form. All submissions are subject to a double-blind peer review process by independent experts. Shorter papers, including commentaries and book reviews, are also welcome. REFUGE adheres to the Chicago Manual of Style for social science papers and to the Canadian Guide to Uniform Legal Citation for papers in the legal discipline (see style  guide for details). Papers must be prepared with full citation endnotes rather than with a bibliography. Papers should include an abstract of approximately 100-150 words, highlighting the central arguments and/or findings of the paper. Papers should also include 1-2 sentences indicating institutional affiliation. Comme indiqué ci-dessus, nous publions également des articles en français. Le format doit être conforme aux normes exigées pour les articles rédigés en anglais.

 

Submission Deadline: February 28, 2013

For further information, please contact: the Editor of Refuge, c/o Centre for Refugee Studies, York Research Tower, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto (Ontario), Canada M3J 1P3

refuge@yorku.ca     http://www.yorku.ca/refuge

ISSN: 1920-7336

 

Call for Papers: Taming the Demons: Comparative Colloquium on Xenophobia & Social Cohesion in Contemporary South Africa. Johannesburg, 13-14 May 2013

Source: Forced Migration Discussion List.

CALL FOR PAPERS

Taming the Demons: Comparative Colloquium on Xenophobia & Social Cohesion in Contemporary South Africa. Johannesburg, 13-14 May 2013 (http://www.migration.org.za/vacancy/2012/taming-demons-comparative-colloquium-xenophobia-social-cohesion-contemporary-south-afri)

***Closing date 01 March 2013***

The expansion and diversification of South Africa’s urban centres and rural communities have generated new social relationships and forms of conflict and conviviality. Five years ago, these changes resulted in a two week period of violence that left scores dead and tens of thousands displaced. Many of the victims were from beyond the country’s borders. Others were South Africans living amongst fellow citizens who did not want them there. Elsewhere, people from similarly diverse backgrounds continued to live side by side; if not always collaborating, then at least forging more or less inclusive forms of accommodation. In all cases-conflictive or convivial-examining these relationship offers important insights into the changing nature of South Africa’s on-going socio-economic and political transformations. On the fifth anniversary of the 2008 ‘xenophobic’ attacks, this colloquium will explore comparative perspectives on the roots of violence, the politics of conflict and the governance of diversity.

At issue are the ethics of living with diversity, the nature of social membership and the means of building unity in a country still characterised by division, inequality and faltering and fragmented institutions. At the same time, ‘ordinary’ South Africans and other residents both draw on and contest official discourses of exclusion and cohesion when they experience, debate and forge their own vernacular meanings and modalities of community. Moving beyond intertwined rhetorics and research surrounding anti-foreigner/anti-outsider violence (and potential preventive measures), this colloquium seeks fresh, comparative and interdisciplinary perspectives that will contribute to a book, special issue of a journal or other publications reflecting on discourses and practices surrounding social diversity in contemporary South Africa.

Hosted by the African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS) at the University of the Witwatersrand, the event will bring together scholars and critics from diverse perspectives to critically examine the scholarship, practices and discourses-official and popular-around cohesion, consider the ethical, ideological and empirical assumptions informing them and discuss the various (dis)connections of official discourses with vernacular meanings and expressions of community and cohesion amongst the country’s diverse residents.

Supported in part by the South Africa Netherlands Research Programme on Alternatives in Development (SANPAD), the colloquium is part of the ACMS’s Communities of Diversity Research Theme, which interrogates the meaning of community and social difference in contemporary South Africa.

The colloquium will include a series of fifteen minutes presentations, based on article length papers (approximately 6000 words) circulated in advance of the meeting. Each paper will have one or two respondents who will also serve as discussants. Following the debate, the papers will be collected and published as an edited volume or special issue of an accredited journal. Depending on the content, excerpts from the papers may be published as an e-book, magazine or newspaper insert.

We invite scholars, critics and policy-makers to submit paper proposals which engage theoretically, empirically and/or normatively with one or more of the following (or related) topics:

*     Idioms and practices of social cohesion in diverse South African contexts;

*     Meanings of community, belonging and criteria for membership in South Africa;

*     Territorial space and understanding of rights and entitlements in South Africa;

*     Race, ethnicity, nationality, autochthony, class and South African national identity;

*     Modalities of conflict, coexistence and cooperation;

*     Difference, tolerance, discrimination, inclusion and exclusion.

Please send your expression of interest and a 200-word abstract to: tamingdemons@migration.org.za by close of business on Friday, 1 March 2013.

Authors of accepted abstracts/papers will be invited to present. The colloquium will be convened on 13-14 May 2013 at the Wits University Campus. Registration is free and limited financial assistance is available for travel.

 

Call for Papers: Rivalry and Conflict?: Dutch-Portuguese Colonial Exchanges, 1580-1715

Filipa Ribeiro da Silva (University of Macau) and Catia Antunes (Leiden University) are organizing a Panel on “Rivalry and Conflict?: Dutch-Portuguese Colonial Exchanges, 1580-1715” to be held at the International Conference Colonial (Mis)Understandings: Portugal and European in Global Perspective, 1450-1900, sponsored by the CHAM and taking in Lisbon on 17-20 July, 2013.

Paper proposals for our panel are most welcome.

Please note that only paper proposals written in English will be accepted by the Conference organizers and submissions must be done online via the application system. To access the system please use the following link: http://www.nomadit.co.uk/cham/cham2013/panels.php5?PanelID=2299

CFP Deadline: 8 February 2013

Panel Abstract:

Rivalry and Conflict?: Dutch-Portuguese Colonial Exchanges, 1580-1715

In 2005, Ernst van Veen and Leonard Blussé stated that ‘the rivalry and conflict between the European nations in Asia […] were naturally connected to some extent with political developments in Europe itself’. This assumption is rooted in a long tradition initiated by Charles Boxer that stresses the situations of rivalry, conflict and warfare as catalysts for the rise and fall of empires. This panel will challenge the premise that rivalry and conflict were the main engines behind European entrepreneurship overseas, contemplating the hypothesis that cooperation, collaboration and ‘co-existence’ often provided better and perpetual results in the general pursuit of empire, being it at a financial, commercial, military or religious level. We will look at the Dutch-Portuguese cooperation in Western Africa, Brazil and Asia in the search for the common mechanisms of cooperation and negotiation used in the Atlantic and Asia by agents of empire of two apparently opposing colonial powers.

For any inquiries, please do not hesitate to contact us at fsilva@umac.mo  or c.a.p.antunes@humleidenuniv.nl.

To obtain further details about the conference, please use the following link:
http://www.cham.fcsh.unl.pt/CHAMInternacionalConference.html

 

Call for Papers: Migration: Global Development, New Frontiers

Migration: Global Development, New Frontiers Interdisciplinary conference on migration jointly organised by the NORFACE Research Programme on Migration and the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM) at UCL 10 – 13 April, 2013 University College London Paper submission deadline: 16 December, 2012

Call for Papers:  http://www.norface-migration.org/sites/index.php?site=5&page=1

Further Information:

Migration: Global Development, New Frontiers

To download the poster for the call for papers, please click here

Invited Academic Speakers include: Richard Alba, Jagdish Bhagwati, François Bourguignon, Leah Boustan, David Card, Barry Chiswick, Claudia Diehl, Frederic Docquier, Ayse Guveli, Jens Hainmueller, Anthony Heath, Jennifer Hunt, Frank Kalter, Ethan Lewis, Mirca Madianou, Valentina Mazzucato, David McKenzie, Judi Mesman, Kaivan Munshi, Giovanni Peri, Lucinda Platt, Imran Rasul and Jeffrey Reitz.

Academic Podia on:

  • Transnational and Multicultural Lives
  • Ethnicity, Religion and Discrimination
  • First and Second Generation Migrants
  • Migration and Knowledge Spill-overs
  • Migration and Development
  • New Frontiers in Migration Data

Policy Podia on:

  • How should Governments Best Address World Trends in Migration?
  • Migration: the Key Challenge for the EU?

Invitation to submit: The NORFACE Research Programme on Migration and the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM) at UCL are jointly organising a large interdisciplinary conference on migration.  The conference will be held from 10th – 13th April, 2013 at University College London. It will feature invited talks, contributed sessions and a number of academic podia on topics at the frontier of the migration research agenda, as well as two policy events, where high level practitioners, politicians and media representatives will discuss migration related issues.

We welcome scholars from economics, sociology, psychology, demography, anthropology, development studies, and other disciplines with an interest in migration issues, to submit innovative papers on any aspect related to migration.  Papers and abstracts should be submitted electronically,  using the on-line submission link below.

Submission Guidelines: Submissions for presentation should include an abstract (max. 250 words) and a full paper.

Submission Deadline: Submissions of full papers (pdf files) for contributed sessions are expected by 16th December, 2012.

To submit a paper, please click here

Acceptance decisions will be communicated to the submitters by 31st January, 2013.

Presentation Format: The selected papers will be grouped by category. There will be parallel sessions, with four presentations in each session. Each parallel session will be two hours long. Each presenter will be allocated 30 minutes, including time for discussion.

Other: Travel and accommodation expenses should be covered by the participants themselves. However, there will be a limited number of registration fee waivers for participants under exceptional circumstances.