Tag Archives: Publications

New Report: Measuring well-governed migration – The 2016 Migration Governance Index

New Report:

Measuring well-governed migration – The 2016 Migration Governance Index

Poorly managed migration can lead to harm, danger and insecurity, says a report from the Economist Intelligence Unit. It can encourage migrant smuggling and human trafficking, as well as social unrest, xenophobia and discrimination—as observed amid Europe’s ongoing “migration crisis”. It can also create missed opportunities when receiving and sending countries are blocked from harnessing the development gains available through mobility.

Well-governed migration brings profound benefits to both “receiving” and “sending” countries. Receiving countries get productive workers who fill key gaps in the labour market and help their demographic profiles. Sending countries receive billions of dollars in remittances from their overseas workers, attract investment from affluent members of their diaspora, and leverage the benefits of “circular migration” when returning emigrants bring back their skills, expertise, contacts and personal wealth.

Text courtesy of Migrants’ Rights Network – Poorly managed migration harmful says report.

 

INVITATION: Europe’s refugee crisis – whose crisis is it?

INVITATION

Europe’s refugee crisis – whose crisis is it?

We are delighted to invite you to the discussion on our recently published report ‘Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Press Coverage’.

Date: Thursday 9 June 2016, 12–1pm

Venue: The Finnish Institute in London, Unit 1, 3 York Way, London N1C 4AE

Coffee and sandwiches will be served.

The study carried out by the Finnish Institute in London and the Finnish Cultural Institute for the Benelux focuses on how six European newspapers from three different countries covered the refugee and asylum seeker situation in January 2016. Newspapers examined were The Guardian and The Times from the UK, Helsingin Sanomat and Aamulehti from Finland, and Le Soir and De Morgen from Belgium.

The report will be presented by Johanna Sumuvuori, Head of Society Programme, Finnish Institute in London and Annukka Vähäsöyrinki, Head of Projects, Finnish Cultural Institute for the Benelux.  The guest speakers at the event include Milica Pesic, Executive Director of the Media Diversity Institute (UK), Gulwali Passarlay, Afghan refugee who is a published author, TEDx speaker, and a Politics major at the University of Manchester and Thomas Coombes, Media Manager on Global Issues, Amnesty International.

There are 59.5 million forcibly displaced people around the world. Last year, over 1 million asylum applications were filed in Europe. The movement of refugees on the continent in such a large scale was widely covered in European newspapers. The report on Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Press Coverage is launched in order to raise discussion on the role of media in dealing with the humanitarian crisis that concerns all of Europe.

Please find the report here: http://www.finnish-institute.org.uk/en/articles/1613-launching-a-new-report-refugee-crisis-in-european-newspapers

RSVP by 6 June 2016 to: mirja.syrjala@finnish-institute.org.uk

Please note that seats are limited.

New Report: Shifting Ground: Views on immigration during the long term and during election campaigns

A new study by Ipsos MORI looking at how British attitudes towards immigration have changed over the long term and during election campaigns is published today. The report, “Shifting Ground”, combines existing data with new findings from a longitudinal study which followed voters during, throughout, and after the 2015 General Election campaign in order to track changes in individuals’ attitudes.

The study finds concerns about immigration have indisputably risen over the long term. The importance of immigration as an issue facing Britain on the Economist/Ipsos MORI Issues Index reached record levels in 2015, with 56% of the public mentioning it in September; the highest level ever recorded since the series started in the 1970s.

As well as growing concern overall, there were changes in the profile of people who are concerned about the issue. In particular, in the early 2000s there was relatively little difference between the oldest and youngest generations on concern about immigration, but in the last few years there is a growing generational divide with older generations having become much more concerned than younger generations.

Download PDF

Read Full Article: Shifting Ground: Views on immigration during the long term and during election campaigns.

 

 

New Report: OU research highlights benefits and risks of smartphones for refugees

New Report:

OU research highlights benefits and risks of smartphones for refugees

Today (16 May) marks the launch of a new academic report by the Open University, Mapping Refugee Media Journeys: Smart Phones and Social Media Networks. The research identified a huge gap in the provision of relevant, reliable and timely news and information for and with refugees that is endangering their lives.

“Our research suggests that the information and news needs of refugees are not sufficiently taken into account by governments and news organisation as they make perilous journeys from war-torn parts of the world to Europe and when they arrive. EU member states have failed to develop a coherent policy strategy to deal with refugees entering Europe,” said Marie Gillespie, OU Professor of Sociology and a member of the OU’s Citizenship and Governance priority research area.

“News and government agencies are effectively reneging on their responsibility under the UN Refugee Charter to provide information and news that can assist their search for protection and safety because they fear that they might be accused of facilitating and encouraging refugees to come to Europe. It’s now such a politicised issue.”

“Quick tech fixes don’t work.”

The research uses an innovative mix of methods: serial interviews with Syrian and Iraqi refugees as they make their journeys, an analysis of news media coverage of refugees and a ‘big data’ analysis of refugee social networks on Facebook and Twitter by computer scientists. It involves interviews with staff at the European Commission, among international broadcasters and non-governmental organisations (NGOs). It provides a best practice guide for those providing digital resources for refugees.

The report reveals that refugees access the news and information they need through their mobile phones mainly via links sent by trusted friends and family, as well as by smugglers. The smartphone is both a resource and a threat on their journeys. It is an essential navigation, translation and networking tool but it is also a threat as the digital traces refugees leave behind make them vulnerable to surveillance by extremists and smugglers. The smartphones also contain an ever-expanding photo album of violence and abuse that they may have witnessed.

The need for security forces refugees to go underground digitally where they use avatars and encrypted services to get vital information from smugglers and handlers whom they have to rely on and sometimes trust more than government sources and mainstream media.

Read full press release – OU research highlights benefits and risks of smartphones for refugees.

Mapping Refugee Media Journeys: Smart Phones and Social Media Networks was produced by The Open University and France Mèdias Monde.

Read more about OU research in Citizenship and Governance.

 

New Publication: Entitlement and belonging: social restructuring and multicultural Britain

New Publication:

Entitlement and belonging: social restructuring and multicultural Britain

An IRR discussion paper on the Housing and Planning and Immigration Bills 2015-16.

Entitlement_and_Belonging_coverThe Housing and Planning and Immigration Bills, currently going through parliament, contain measures which are central to the Conservatives’ stated belief in cohesive ‘One Nation’ government. In a discussion paper published by the IRR today, criminologist Dr Jon Burnett argues that the rapid social transformation that will inevitably take place through these mutually-reinforcing housing and immigration measures will be destructive for social cohesion. In fact, the break-up and displacement of multicultural neighbourhoods, coupled with the extended reach of immigration policing, will accentuate extremes of inequality in the inner city and lead to a marked deterioration in the quality of life for BAME communities.

Focusing largely on London, Entitlement and belonging suggests that a ‘SUS culture’ is developing in the UK as the ‘hostile environment principle’, long- established in immigration policy, is extended into housing. The government argues that nationally-implemented ‘right to rent’ checks, imposing a duty on landlords to carry out immigration profiling and allowing summary eviction of  tenants, are ‘justifiable’ measures aimed at forcing out those who have no legal right to stay in the country. Yet even its own evaluation provided compelling evidence of discrimination against BAME citizens.

According to Dr Burnett, author of the research: ‘In rolling out the measures, the government risks rolling out discrimination. Equally concerning though is the ideological assumptions underpinning the legislation about “who” belongs in particular localities. The poor in multicultural neighbourhoods are being dispossessed of their rights and uprooted from where they live. They have been deemed eminently disposable.’

The IRR hopes that this publication can encourage as wide a discussion as possible about the legislation as well as the wider goals of ‘One Nation’ government. IRR Director, Liz Fekete, asks: ‘Given that the cosmopolitan and multicultural nature of London was our brand in the  Olympic bid,  shouldn’t we be concerned when multicultural London is abandoned in favour of  a more elitist and monocultural urban future?’

Entitlement and belonging: social restructuring and multicultural Britain can be downloaded here (pdf file, 401kb)

Article reblogged from the Institute of Race Relations – www.irr.org.uk/news/entitlement-and-belonging-social-restructuring-and-multicultural-britain/

 

CMRB: Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel online paper series

CMRB, the Runnymede Trust and the Centre for Palestine Studies, London Middle East Institute, SOAS are delighted to announce the publication of:

“Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel” online paper series, edited by Nira Yuval-Davis and Jamie Hakim.

The series aims to to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel from within an anti-racist normative framework

The first tranche of articles can be found at http://www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/publications.htm, and includes:

Nira Yuval-Davis and Jamie Hakim, ‘Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel Series Introduction’

Antony Lerman, ‘The “New Anti-Semitism”’

Hilary Aked, ‘The Undeniable Overlap: Right-wing Zionism and Islamophobia’

Helga Embacher and Jan Ryback, ‘Anti-Semitism in Muslim Communities and Islamophobia in the Context of the Gaza War 2014: The Example of Austria and Germany’

Anabelle Sreberny, ‘The Idea of Jewish Anti-Semitism and Recuperating the “Semites”’

Keith Kahn-Harris, ‘The Interplay between Internal and External Factors in the Stimulation of Intra-Jewish conflict over Israel and Antisemitism’

Stefano Bellin, ‘How Should We Speak About the Jews and the Palestinians? Constructing a Non-Racist Space for Criticism’

The series has been constructed as an open-ended forum for dialogue between academics, activists and interested parties differently situated across the globe. We will consider all submissions that explore any aspect of how anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms and the question of Palestine/Israel intersect, from within an anti-racist normative framework. Please e-mail your submission to j.hakim@uel.ac.uk.

This series has been given the front page of openDemocracy the week commencing Wednesday 28th September. Each day of that week one of five of the articles will be published at www.opendemocracy.net.

Best,
Nira Yuval-Davis and Jamie Hakim
CMRB

Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine of Israel on openDemocracy

This week, Nira Yuval-Davis and Jamie Hakim are guest editing a section of openDemocracy called ‘Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine of Israel’, based on the ongoing CMRB project of the same name.

The introduction to the section can be found here: https://opendemocracy.net/mirrorracisms/nira-yuval-davis-jamie-hakim/anti-jewish-anti-muslim-racisms-question-of-palestineisrael.

Every day this week we will be publishing one or two papers on openDemocracy from our CMRB online paper series which is co-sponsored by the Runnymede Trust and the Centre for Palestine Studies, London Middle East Institute, SOAS: http://www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/publications.htm.

The first openDemocracy article, co-authored by Nira and Jamie can be found here: https://opendemocracy.net/mirrorracisms/nira-yuval-davis-jamie-hakim/introducing-feature-anti-jewish-anti-muslim-racisms-palestine-israel

Over the course of the week openDemocracy will be publishing articles by Antony Lerman, Sami Zubaida, Hilary Aked, Annabelle Sreberny, Keith Kahn-Harris, Stefano Bellin, Helga Embacher and Jan Rybak.