Tag Archives: Publications

New Research Paper: The true human rights situation in Eritrea: the new UK Home Office Guidance as a political instrument for the prevention of migration

Please, find in following link this paper:

‘The true human rights situation in Eritrea: the new UK Home Office Guidance as a political instrument for the prevention of migration’
by Sara Palacios Arapiles.

Link to Paper:  http://sas-space.sas.ac.uk/6097/

This research paper aims at documenting the true situation in Eritrea,
in order to refute the credibility of the content and of some of the
sources of the new Guidance on Eritrea issued by the UK Home Office
(HO); and of the related policies that are being implemented in some
other countries, such as Israel. The HO country of origin Guidance
surprisingly claims that there are alleged signs of improvement inside
Eritrea for potential returnees. It is argued in this paper that the
reasons for this are entirely politically influenced, with the purpose
of preventing migration. The paper then brings to light the current
circumstances in the country – supported inter alia by the testimonies
gathered by the author, and the new findings of the UN Commission of
Inquiry on Human Rights in Eritrea- that would make the forcible return
of the Eritrean asylum-seekers and refugees unlawful.

 

New UNHCR report: 2014 Global Trends: World at War

New Publication from UNHCR:

UNHCR are pleased to announce that the following report has been published and is available for download via the UNHCR statistics website at:  www.unhcr.org/statisics

2014 Global Trends – World at War

UNHCRThe report provides an overview of the statistical trends and changes in global populations of concern to UNHC, i.e. refugees, returnees, stateless persons, and certain groups of internally displaced persons (IDPs), place din the context of major humanitarian developments and displacement during the year.

Some of the key findings of the report:

  • Global forced displacement has seen accelerated growth in 2014, once again reaching unprecedented levels. The year saw the highest displacement on record. By end-2014, 59.5 million individuals were forcibly displaced worldwide as a result of persecution, conflict, generalized violence, or human rights violations. This is 8.3 million persons more than the year before (51.2 million) and the highest annual increase in a single year.
  • Some 19.5 million persons were refugees, 14.4 million under UNHCR’s mandate and 5.1 million Palestinian refugees registered by UNRWA. The global figure included 38.2 million internally displaced persons and nearly 1.8 million asylum-seekers. If these 59.5 million persons were a nation, they would make up the 24th largest in the world.
  • An estimated 13.9 million individuals were newly displaced due to conflict or persecution in 2014. This includes 11.0 million persons newly displaced within the borders of their own country, the highest figure on record. The other 2.9 million individuals were new refugees.
  • For the first time, Turkey became the largest refugee-hosting country worldwide, with 1.59 million refugees. Turkey was followed by Pakistan (1.51 million), Lebanon (1.15 million), the Islamic Republic of Iran (982,000), Ethiopia (659,500), and Jordan (654,100).
  • More than half (53%) of all refugees worldwide came from just three countries: the Syrian Arab Republic (3.88 million), Afghanistan (2.59 million), and Somalia (1.11 million).
  • Over the course of 2014,some 126,800 refugees returned to their countries of origin. This figure was the lowest level of refugee returns since 1983.
  • A record high of nearly 1.7 million individuals submitted applications for asylum or refugee status in 2014. UNHCR offices registered 245,700 or 15 per cent of these claims. With 274,700 asylum claims, the Russian Federation was the world’s largest recipient of new individual applications, followed by Germany (173,100), the United States of America (121,200), and Turkey (87,800).
  • Children below 18 years of age constituted 51 per cent of the refugee population in 2014, up from 41 per cent in 2009 and the highest figure in more than a decade.

 

Publication: Migrant Voice Newspaper

Further details on the latest issue of the Migrant Voice Newspaper.  The following text is taken from the Migrant Voice website:

The Migrant Voice newspaper will be distributed on Monday April 20th in Birmingham from 3-6pm at Moor Street station; in London on Tuesday the 21st from 4-7pm at Waterloo, Victoria and London Bridge stations and on April 28th from 4-7pm at Kings Cross, Euston, Oxford Circus and Paddington stations.

_____

Immigration is high on the news agenda and is being presented by some politicians as a burden on the country, feeding fears and fuelling prejudice. There are 7.8 million foreignborn nationals in the UK but they are largely underrepresented in mainstream British media.

Our research reveals that migrants’ voices are heard in only one in eight media stories on migration. Many of these articles reflect critical, sometimes explicitly negative, attitudes – not only towards migration policies but also migrants themselves.

Far from the idea that debating migration is off-limits, it turns out that the only people ‘banned’ from discussing it are migrants themselves.

Here, we place migrants at the centre of the debate and let them tell their stories.

We found that over 90 per cent of migrants feel at least partially integrated into British society yet feel totally excluded from the political conversation about migration. When politicians make ill-informed comments it creates distrust on both sides. Yet – thankfully – the vast majority of Britons feel positive about the migrants they encounter in their daily lives, and the feeling is mutual.

Migrant Voice aims to address the lack of balanced and accurate representation in the media and celebrate the contribution migrants make to the UK. Our paper includes vibrant, engaging and moving stories, created and distributed by migrants.

This year’s issue is particularly important as it coincides with Migrant Voice celebrating five years of movement building, mobilisation and engagement with the public debate.

In this issue we unveil a new ‘I am an Immigrant’ poster campaign which celebrates the immense contribution that immigrants make.

The posters, which go on display at hundreds of London tube stations and national railway stations this month, show immigrants are part of the fabric of British society.

We are also the first to report on the launch of the ‘Bloody Foreigners’ campaign mobilising migrant communities to give more blood, turning an old phrase on its head. It’s just one of the many ways today’s migrants are contributing to the health and wealth of our nation.

We give you a glimpse into the strong North Korean community in the UK, the largest defector community from that country in Europe.

We also take you on two long, horrifying journeys from Syria and Eritrea in search of safety in the UK.

And we share the inspirational story of Agnes, an orphan of the Rwandan genocide and a former child soldier, who is now settled in the UK and is campaigning to improve the lives of other children orphaned by war.

There are also stories about the everyday lives of migrants in Britain – in restaurants, on the sports field, in the arts, in business.

Many more stories are featured on our website www.migrantvoice.org.

We also want to hear your thoughts – write to us at [email protected]

We hope you enjoy reading our paper.

Nazek Ramadan Founder, Migrant Voice

To read the full paper: http://bit.ly/1GYTI9M

To request printed copies of the paper, please email [email protected]

New Publication: UNHCR report: 2014 Mid-Year Trends

UNHCR are pleased to announce the release of the 2014 Mid-Year Trends report, which is now available and may be downloaded from the UNHCR statistics website at: www.unhcr.org/statistics.

The report provides a statistical overview of refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced persons (IDPs), returnees, stateless persons and other persons of concern to UNHCR for the period of 1 January to 30 June 2014. It is the second time only UNHCR is able to provide a global update at mid-year thanks to increased efforts put in place by both Headquarters and field colleagues.

The purpose of the report is to provide a snapshot of main trends in the number of persons of concern to UNHCR over this period, rather than providing a comprehensive overview of global trends in forced displacement. The report’s key findings show a dramatic deterioration in forced displacement during the first half of the year:

–       The total population of concern to UNHCR stood at 46.3 million at mid-2014, the highest level on record;

–       The global number of refugees at mid-2014 was estimated at 13.0 million, 1.3 million more than at the end of 2013;

–       The number of IDPs protected/assisted by UNHCR stood at 26 million, the highest on record;

–       The total number of persons of concern to UNHCR seeking protection within or outside the borders of their countries during the first half of 2014 exceeded 5.5 million individuals; and

–       Syrians have become the largest refugee population under UNHCR’s mandate, overtaking Afghans, who had held that position for more than three decades. At more than 3 million as of June 2014, Syrian refugees account for 23 per cent of all refugees under the organization’s mandate.

I hope that you will find the 2014 Mid-Year Trends report useful and interesting.

 

New publications: ‘EU Asylum Procedures and the Right to an Effective Remedy’; ‘The Reception of Asylum Seekers under International Law’ (discounts available)

New publications: ‘EU Asylum Procedures and the Right to an Effective Remedy’; ‘The Reception of Asylum Seekers under International Law’ (discounts available).

Adequate and fair asylum procedures are a precondition for the effective exercise of rights granted to asylum applicants, in particular the prohibition of refoulement. In 1999 the EU Member States decided to work towards a Common European Asylum System. In this context the Procedures Directive was adopted in 2005 and recast in 2013. This directive provides for important procedural guarantees for asylum applicants, but also leaves much discretion to the EU Member States to design their own asylum procedures.

This book examines the meaning of the EU right to an effective remedy in terms of the legality and interpretation of the Procedures Directive in regard to several key aspects of asylum procedure: the right to remain on the territory of the Member State, the right to be heard, the standard and burden of proof and evidentiary assessment, judicial review and the use of secret evidence.

Table of contents: http://www.hartpub.co.uk/pdf/9781849465458.pdf

Marcelle Reneman is Assistant Professor in the Migration Law Section of the Department of Constitutional and Administrative Law at the VU University Amsterdam.

May 2014, 428pp, Hbk, 9781849465458
RSP:  £60 / €78
Discount Price: £48 / €62.40
To receive the 20% discount online write ref: AM9 in the voucher code field and click ‘apply’: http://www.hartpub.co.uk/BookDetails.aspx?ISBN=9781849465458

 

New Book By UEL’s Maritsa Poros (et al): Key Concepts in Migration

From the Sage Website:

This book provides lucid and intuitive explanations of the most important migration concepts as used in classrooms, among policymakers, and in popular and academic discourse. Arguing that there is a clear need for a better public understanding of migration, it sets out to clarify the field by exploring relevant concepts in a direct and engaging way. Each concept:

  • Includes an easy to understand definition
  • Provides real-world examples
  • Gives suggestions for further reading
  • Is carefully cross-referenced to other related concepts

It is an ideal resource for undergraduate and post-graduate students studying migration in sociology, politics, development and throughout the social sciences, as well as scholars in the field and practitioners in governmental and non-governmental organizations.

Further details:  Key Concepts in Migration.

 

Publication: The evolving picture of displacement in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan: An evidence-based overview

From the IDMC website:

Some 4 million people were displaced when Typhoon Haiyan hit the central Philippines on November 8th 2013. In spite of the wealth of information generated, it has been difficult to form a coherent understanding of the evolving and complex displacement situation, which is critical to guide policy and prioritize responses on the ground.

Six months on, while most displaced people have remained in their original homes areas or returned to them, more than 2 million people are still without adequate housing. This includes over 26,000 displaced people in temporary shelter sites. Many thousands more are unclear on whether they will be permitted to return to live in unsafe locations.

This report shows how gaps in the information – and in the way that information is created and shared – leaves some of the most vulnerable people invisible and potentially excluded from sustainable return or relocation and resettlement options. With the next typhoon season just around the corner, the importance of recognizing their particular needs becomes all the more urgent.

Download the pdf