Tag Archives: Online Resources

CMRB: Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel online paper series

CMRB, the Runnymede Trust and the Centre for Palestine Studies, London Middle East Institute, SOAS are delighted to announce the publication of:

“Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel” online paper series, edited by Nira Yuval-Davis and Jamie Hakim.

The series aims to to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel from within an anti-racist normative framework

The first tranche of articles can be found at http://www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/publications.htm, and includes:

Nira Yuval-Davis and Jamie Hakim, ‘Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel Series Introduction’

Antony Lerman, ‘The “New Anti-Semitism”’

Hilary Aked, ‘The Undeniable Overlap: Right-wing Zionism and Islamophobia’

Helga Embacher and Jan Ryback, ‘Anti-Semitism in Muslim Communities and Islamophobia in the Context of the Gaza War 2014: The Example of Austria and Germany’

Anabelle Sreberny, ‘The Idea of Jewish Anti-Semitism and Recuperating the “Semites”’

Keith Kahn-Harris, ‘The Interplay between Internal and External Factors in the Stimulation of Intra-Jewish conflict over Israel and Antisemitism’

Stefano Bellin, ‘How Should We Speak About the Jews and the Palestinians? Constructing a Non-Racist Space for Criticism’

The series has been constructed as an open-ended forum for dialogue between academics, activists and interested parties differently situated across the globe. We will consider all submissions that explore any aspect of how anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms and the question of Palestine/Israel intersect, from within an anti-racist normative framework. Please e-mail your submission to j.hakim@uel.ac.uk.

This series has been given the front page of openDemocracy the week commencing Wednesday 28th September. Each day of that week one of five of the articles will be published at www.opendemocracy.net.

Best,
Nira Yuval-Davis and Jamie Hakim
CMRB

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Resources: URBAN DISPLACEMENT: Discussion hosted on urb.im

URBAN DISPLACEMENT: Discussion hosted on urb.im

Urban Refugees in partnership with URB.im are now hosting a live online discussion focused on possible solutions to the challenges faced by urban refugees and IDPs and the key role of CBOs until the 23rd June: http://urb.im/c140609

Our featured panellists are experts Erin Mooney, Archie Law, Simone Haysom, Dale Buscher, Louise Olliff, Loren B. Landau, PhD, and Jeff Crisp.

Today most refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) live in urban settings, not in camps, due in part to the numerous advantages cities offer, including economic opportunities and freedom of movement. This phenomenon of urban displacement is not new, but has received little attention over the years. Assisting and advocating for refugees and IDPs scattered in urban areas is incredibly challenging for organizations that are often ill-equipped to assist populations in urban environments.

Recently, this phenomenon has gained more visibility, particularly since the onset of the Syrian refugee crisis. The question now is to understand how better to support and assist the growing number of urban refugees and IDPs. Self-help groups and community-based organizations have proven that they can play a critical role in the protection of their own communities. Supporting their work and their initiatives, as well as increasing collaboration between humanitarian and development organizations, could be part of the solution.

We would like to encourage you all to visit the website and leave comments in the discussion threads. Your individual insights would be highly valued as we hope to make the debate as stimulating and as balanced as possible. Visit http://urb.im/ now to join the conversation.

New resources: LGBTI Refugee Project Portal (Organization for Refuge, Asylum and Migration)

New web portal to help rising numbers of LGBTI refugees fighting for safety
http://portal.oraminternational.org/?utm_source=World+Refugee+Day+-+Portal+Launch+%28Non-Press%29&utm_campaign=World+Refugee+Day&utm_medium=email

On World Refugee Day (20 June 2014), ORAM – the Organization for Refuge, Asylum and Migration – is today launching a new online portal to help official bodies and NGOs share approaches to protecting LGBTI refugees and to adopt best practices in the face of rising persecution of LGBTI people globally.

The LGBTI Refugee Project Portal showcases projects and approaches that enhance the protection of LGBTI forced migrants in the areas of refugee status determination, policy development and research, practical protection measures and staff development. ORAM is encouraging posting of projects that will lead to better treatment of LGBTI refugees across the globe.

ORAM says the recent upsurge in the marginalization and persecution of millions of LGBTI people across the world has led to the number of refugee claims rising sharply, and yet only a small percentage are disclosing their sexual orientation or gender identity as the cause, for fear of further persecution or rejection. Even when the refugees do come out, many refugee agencies are not handling their claims properly or sensitively.

In addition to launching the portal, ORAM is calling on the UNHCR to maintain and release statistics about the LGBTI refugees within its protection mandate. It says that only with accurate data can the crisis be appropriately addressed. ORAM is also calling on all government and intergovernmental bodies to ensure the appropriate training of their staff, to recognize genuine LGBTI asylum claims and to better understand what it means to be an LGBTI refugee, to help ensure they are sensitively and appropriately treated.

Some jurisdictions deny bona fide LGBT refugee claims, telling applicants to go home and conceal their sexual orientation or gender identity. In November 2013, the European Union Court of Justice ruled that this practice is no longer acceptable. ORAM points out there is an urgent need for all bodies processing asylum claims to undergo training that is in-depth and nuanced to convey the complex nature of LGBTI identities and claims. In the past year, ORAM has trained hundreds of refugee professionals including UNHCR, at tens of locations. The organization is working with Columbia University with US State Department funding to assess the impact of LGBT training on refugee professionals.

Neil Grungras, founder and Executive Director of ORAM, said: “LGBTI people are among the most persecuted individuals in the world. We encourage all agencies and NGOs working with refugees to share examples of good practice through our portal in the hope it will help others to improve approaches and lead to safety for the many LGBTI refugees currently fighting for their survival.”

For more information on the LGBTI Refugee Project Portal, visit: http://portal.oraminternational.org/

 

New resources: Annotated Bibliography – Refugee Claims Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity

This is to inform you that Mary Kapron (a JD student at uOttawa) and I have posted an annotated bibliography on refugee claims based on sexual orientation and gender identity. You can find the document at the following SSRN page:

http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2457503

This annotated bibliography gives an account of legal and social sciences research sources related to refugee claims based on sexual orientation and gender identity. The bibliography, which focuses primarily on English language publications, includes close to 200 items that fall into the following two categories of research sources:

(1)   scholarly publications on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) refugees and asylum-seekers and the refugee determination process;
(2)   reports from international, inter-governmental and non-governmental organizations on the same topic.

Research sources are first organized topically according to the definition of a Convention refugee under the 1951 United Nations Convention relating to the Status of Refugees. As a second listing, we have provided a geographical classification of the sources that focus on specific countries or regions. Finally, we have included an alphabetical listing by author of all of the research sources we were able to locate for this project.

We hope you will find this a useful research tool.

 

New publications: Migration Policy Centre blog: ‘On the Anti-Politics of Anti-Trafficking

Source: Forced Migration Discussion List.

The Migration Policy Centre (MPC) is delighted to present you its new Blog entry:

On the Anti-Politics of Anti-Trafficking: http://blogs.eui.eu/migrationpolicycentre/on-the-anti-politics-of-anti-trafficking/
by Neil Howard, Marie Curie Fellow at the MPC

Arguably, in Europe as elsewhere, ‘trafficking’ is still commonly understood as being about nasty, frequently male criminals who capture and enslave innocent women and children, usually for sex. The way the anti-trafficking field ‘deals’ with trafficking reflects these representations. Though there have been some advances, the dominant policy emphasis is still on getting the right laws passed, on ramping up prosecutions, on strengthening borders, and on ‘raising awareness’ by telling potential migrants that migrating is a bad idea because it could leave them vulnerable to traffickers. What has been the result of all this? Why is discourse so reductive and policy so ineffective? What are possible alternatives?

Come and visit the MPC blog:
http://blogs.eui.eu/migrationpolicycentre/
Come and visit the MPC website:
http://www.migrationpolicycentre.eu/
Follow the MPC on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/MigrationPolicyCentre/

The United Nations History Project website

Online Resource:

The United Nations History Project
unhistoryproject.org/

We would like to take this opportunity to highlight the work of the United Nations History Project in facilitating access to a broad range of information broadly relating to the history of the United Nations.  Coordinated by Dr Heidi J. S. Tworek, in conjunction with Harvard Asia Center and the Joint Center for History and Economics and Harvard and Cambridge, and supported by the United Nations Foundation, the United Nations History Project,

The project aims to illustrate the scholarly importance of studying the history of the United Nations and international organizations in general.

It is a starting point for scholars who wish to research in UN archives or find online materials related to the UN. The website provides comprehensive guides to physical and online sources on the United Nations. It also collates many of the research guides on the United Nations that already exist. In addition, leading scholars on the UN have written about their experiences working in UN archives and discuss further research possibilities.

(Link:- unhistoryproject.org/index.html).

The United Nations History Project website offers a range of teaching materials to help support the study of UN history. The website is divided into four main sections, incorporating:
  • Researching the UN.  Provides details on how to research the history of the United Nations, encompassing online and physical archive collections; research guides; statistics and researcher experiences.
  • Teaching UN History.  This section highlights Syllabi in relation to the teaching of UN history.
  • Major Themes on UN History.  Highlights thirteen major themes of UN History and their relevant sources of information, encompassing the likes of Environment; Governance; Health; Human Rights; and Peace and Security.
  • Scholarly Networks.  Encompassing further details in relation to scholarly networks supporting the study of the United Nations and its history.
The United Nations History Project therefore represents a very important resources for the history and development of the United Nations, whilst also providing an opportunity to help connect both archivists, scholars and researchers.
We are also very pleased to announce that a couple of our own archival collections based here at the University of east London  are now listed on the UN History Project website.  Further details can be highlighted as follows:
The website offers a set of teaching materials for UN history. There are annotated bibliographies, timelines, and featured sources on thirteen major themes of UN history. There are resources from a course taught on the global history of the UN at Harvard in spring 2011 as well as a compilation of other syllabi on UN topics. – See more at: http://unhistoryproject.org/index.html#sthash.fFQJ2OUZ.dpuf
It is a starting point for scholars who wish to research in UN archives or find online materials related to the UN. The website provides comprehensive guides to physical and online sources on the United Nations. It also collates many of the research guides on the United Nations that already exist. In addition, leading scholars on the UN have written about their experiences working in UN archives and discuss further research possibilities. – See more at: http://unhistoryproject.org/index.html#sthash.fFQJ2OUZ.dpufIt is a starting point for scholars who wish to research in UN archives or find online materials related to the UN. The website provides comprehensive guides to physical and online sources on the United Nations. It also collates many of the research guides on the United Nations that already exist. In addition, leading scholars on the UN have written about their experiences working in UN archives and discuss further research possibilities.(See more at: unhistoryproject.org/index.html#sthash.hBqbQ7Aa.dpuf)
The project aims to illustrate the scholarly importance of studying the history of the United Nations and international organizations in general. – See more at: http://unhistoryproject.org/index.html#sthash.hBqbQ7Aa.dpuf

Please do take time to investigate and explore this fabulous resource.  Further information on the United Nations History Project can be found as follows:

The United Nations History project can be contacted at:  unitednationshistory@gmail.com

 

Reminder: Refugee Archive Online Resources Survey

DSCF5929Thank you to everyone that has already taken the time to complete our short 10 question survey in relation to the Refugee Archive Online and Email Resources Survey! This is a very gentle reminder that we would welcome as many responses as possible and, if you can, please take a few minutes to complete this survey and the feedback received will be very useful for us!

This blog/website  was initially established, in conjunction with a Refugee-research Jiscmail Listserv, to help support the Refugee Council Archive, located at the University of East London, and to help disseminate information in relation to refugee and forced migration issues. We would very much like to receive your feedback in relation to how our online resources are being utilised and how this could be developed in the future to best support the needs of our users!

The survey is anonymous but if you wish to receive a response to any issues you have raised, please include your name and email address in the section at the end of the survey.

Link to Survey:-  www.surveymonkey.com/s/GZ79ZR3

The survey will also be available as a link from a page from our blog, please visit:  Refugee Archive Online & Email Resources Survey.

Many thanks and best wishes,

Paul Dudman
Archivist
library-archives@uel.ac.uk