Category Archives: New Resources

Publication of UK Government Immigration Statistics for January to March 2016

Publication of UK Government Immigration Statistics for January to March 2016 and Office for National Statistics Reports

EU migration agenda as a cloud, Nando Sigona, 2015Thank you to the The International Migration team at the Migration Statistics Unit, ONS for circulating the details of these on the day of release via the Migration Stats Jiscmail list.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has today, Thursday 26th May 2016, published the Migration Statistics Quarterly Report (MSQR). The report can be accessed from the following link:

The MSQR series brings together statistics on migration that are published by the ONS, Home Office, and the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP).

ONS have also released the Short-Term International Migration Annual Report (STIMAR). The report can be accessed from the following link:

ONS have also released a ‘UK Perspectives’ article on international migration, which can be accessed from the following link:

A press release has been published covering the above publications and providing more detail about the main messages. This can be accessed from the following link:

Yesterday, ONS also published the 2014-based Subnational Population Projections for England:

The Home Office’s Immigration Statistics January – March 2016 release is published today. It provides the latest figures on those subject to immigration control. The release is available at:

Listing of the data tables included in ‘Immigration statistics, January to March 2016’.
Immigration statistics, January to March 2016
Cross cutting staffing data for UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) and Immigration Enforcement (IE).

Estimates of Short-Term International Migration (1 -12 months, 3 – 12 months and 3 – 12 months UN definition) to and from the UK for England and Wales.

A user guide to Home Office immigration statistics.

User Guide to Home Office Immigration Statistics

Forced Migration Review issue 52 on ‘Thinking ahead: displacement, transition, solutions’

FMR52: Thinking ahead: displacement, transition, solutions.
May 2016

The new issue of FMR explores the ideas and practices that are being tried out in order to engage both development and humanitarian work in support of ‘transitions’ and ‘solutions’ for displaced people. What we need, says one author, is “full global recognition that the challenge of forced displacement is an integral part of the development agenda too”. FMR issue 52 includes 32 articles on ‘Thinking ahead: displacement, transition, solutions’, plus ten ‘general’ articles on other aspects of forced migration.

Reading and download options

Please note that both the magazine and the digest are published in A5 format (half of A4). In order to print them out properly, please use your printer’s ‘Booklet’ setting.

This issue of FMR will be available online and in print in English, Arabic, French and Spanish. The English versions of articles are also available in audio format.

Also available is the FMR 52 digest to help you gain easy online access to all the articles published in FMR 52. Formerly called the ‘Listing’, this is now in a new A5 format to match the magazine. It provides for each article: the title, the author(s) and their affiliation, the introductory sentences and links to the full article online. The digest will be available online and in print in all four languages.

If you would like printed copies of either the magazine or the digest, please email us at

Requesting copies
If you would like to receive a copy of FMR/FMR digest for your organisation, or if you require multiple copies for distribution to partners and policy/decision makers or for use at conferences/workshops, please contact the Editors at We will need your full postal address. (We prefer to provide the digest if large numbers are required for conferences and training, to save postage costs.)

Please help disseminate this issue as widely as possible by circulating to networks, posting links, mentioning it on Twitter and Facebook and adding it to resources lists. We encourage you to circulate or reproduce any articles in their entirety but please cite: Forced Migration Review issue 52

– See more at: 

New Report: Measuring well-governed migration – The 2016 Migration Governance Index

New Report:

Measuring well-governed migration – The 2016 Migration Governance Index

Poorly managed migration can lead to harm, danger and insecurity, says a report from the Economist Intelligence Unit. It can encourage migrant smuggling and human trafficking, as well as social unrest, xenophobia and discrimination—as observed amid Europe’s ongoing “migration crisis”. It can also create missed opportunities when receiving and sending countries are blocked from harnessing the development gains available through mobility.

Well-governed migration brings profound benefits to both “receiving” and “sending” countries. Receiving countries get productive workers who fill key gaps in the labour market and help their demographic profiles. Sending countries receive billions of dollars in remittances from their overseas workers, attract investment from affluent members of their diaspora, and leverage the benefits of “circular migration” when returning emigrants bring back their skills, expertise, contacts and personal wealth.

Text courtesy of Migrants’ Rights Network – Poorly managed migration harmful says report.


New Report: Shifting Ground: Views on immigration during the long term and during election campaigns

A new study by Ipsos MORI looking at how British attitudes towards immigration have changed over the long term and during election campaigns is published today. The report, “Shifting Ground”, combines existing data with new findings from a longitudinal study which followed voters during, throughout, and after the 2015 General Election campaign in order to track changes in individuals’ attitudes.

The study finds concerns about immigration have indisputably risen over the long term. The importance of immigration as an issue facing Britain on the Economist/Ipsos MORI Issues Index reached record levels in 2015, with 56% of the public mentioning it in September; the highest level ever recorded since the series started in the 1970s.

As well as growing concern overall, there were changes in the profile of people who are concerned about the issue. In particular, in the early 2000s there was relatively little difference between the oldest and youngest generations on concern about immigration, but in the last few years there is a growing generational divide with older generations having become much more concerned than younger generations.

Download PDF

Read Full Article: Shifting Ground: Views on immigration during the long term and during election campaigns.



New Report: OU research highlights benefits and risks of smartphones for refugees

New Report:

OU research highlights benefits and risks of smartphones for refugees

Today (16 May) marks the launch of a new academic report by the Open University, Mapping Refugee Media Journeys: Smart Phones and Social Media Networks. The research identified a huge gap in the provision of relevant, reliable and timely news and information for and with refugees that is endangering their lives.

“Our research suggests that the information and news needs of refugees are not sufficiently taken into account by governments and news organisation as they make perilous journeys from war-torn parts of the world to Europe and when they arrive. EU member states have failed to develop a coherent policy strategy to deal with refugees entering Europe,” said Marie Gillespie, OU Professor of Sociology and a member of the OU’s Citizenship and Governance priority research area.

“News and government agencies are effectively reneging on their responsibility under the UN Refugee Charter to provide information and news that can assist their search for protection and safety because they fear that they might be accused of facilitating and encouraging refugees to come to Europe. It’s now such a politicised issue.”

“Quick tech fixes don’t work.”

The research uses an innovative mix of methods: serial interviews with Syrian and Iraqi refugees as they make their journeys, an analysis of news media coverage of refugees and a ‘big data’ analysis of refugee social networks on Facebook and Twitter by computer scientists. It involves interviews with staff at the European Commission, among international broadcasters and non-governmental organisations (NGOs). It provides a best practice guide for those providing digital resources for refugees.

The report reveals that refugees access the news and information they need through their mobile phones mainly via links sent by trusted friends and family, as well as by smugglers. The smartphone is both a resource and a threat on their journeys. It is an essential navigation, translation and networking tool but it is also a threat as the digital traces refugees leave behind make them vulnerable to surveillance by extremists and smugglers. The smartphones also contain an ever-expanding photo album of violence and abuse that they may have witnessed.

The need for security forces refugees to go underground digitally where they use avatars and encrypted services to get vital information from smugglers and handlers whom they have to rely on and sometimes trust more than government sources and mainstream media.

Read full press release – OU research highlights benefits and risks of smartphones for refugees.

Mapping Refugee Media Journeys: Smart Phones and Social Media Networks was produced by The Open University and France Mèdias Monde.

Read more about OU research in Citizenship and Governance.


Table of Contents Alert: International Journal of Refugee Law

Oxford Journals have just published their latest Table of Contents journal alert for the International Journal of Refugee Law.  Further details on the articles included in  Vol. 28, No. 1 (March 2016) are detailed below:


Jane McAdam
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 1-6


The Origins of UNHCR’s Global Mandate on Statelessness
Matthew Seet
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 7-24

Fleeing Cartels and Maras: International Protection Considerations and Profiles from the Northern Triangle
Nicolás Rodríguez Serna
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 25-54

The Almaty Process: Improving Compliance with International Refugee Law in Central Asia
Cynthia Orchard
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 55-84

Lack of State Protection or Fear of Persecution? Determining the Refugee Status of North Koreans in Canada
Seunghwan Kim
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 85-108

Case Law Summaries

Case Law Summaries
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 109-115


Note on International Protection: Executive Committee of the High Commissioner’s Programme
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 116-134

Statement by Volker Türk: Assistant High Commissioner for Protection, UNHCR
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 135-147

Alternatives to Detention: Executive Committee of the High Commissioner’s Programme
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 148-155

Agenda for the Protection of Cross-Border Displaced Persons in the Context of Disasters and Climate Change: October 2015
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 156-162

Book Reviews

Adjudicating Refugee and Asylum Status: The Role of Witness, Expertise, and Testimony
Julia Muraszkiewicz
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 163-166

EU Security and Justice Law: After Lisbon and Stockholm (Modern Studies in European Law)
Christopher Harding
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 166-168


New Publication: Entitlement and belonging: social restructuring and multicultural Britain

New Publication:

Entitlement and belonging: social restructuring and multicultural Britain

An IRR discussion paper on the Housing and Planning and Immigration Bills 2015-16.

Entitlement_and_Belonging_coverThe Housing and Planning and Immigration Bills, currently going through parliament, contain measures which are central to the Conservatives’ stated belief in cohesive ‘One Nation’ government. In a discussion paper published by the IRR today, criminologist Dr Jon Burnett argues that the rapid social transformation that will inevitably take place through these mutually-reinforcing housing and immigration measures will be destructive for social cohesion. In fact, the break-up and displacement of multicultural neighbourhoods, coupled with the extended reach of immigration policing, will accentuate extremes of inequality in the inner city and lead to a marked deterioration in the quality of life for BAME communities.

Focusing largely on London, Entitlement and belonging suggests that a ‘SUS culture’ is developing in the UK as the ‘hostile environment principle’, long- established in immigration policy, is extended into housing. The government argues that nationally-implemented ‘right to rent’ checks, imposing a duty on landlords to carry out immigration profiling and allowing summary eviction of  tenants, are ‘justifiable’ measures aimed at forcing out those who have no legal right to stay in the country. Yet even its own evaluation provided compelling evidence of discrimination against BAME citizens.

According to Dr Burnett, author of the research: ‘In rolling out the measures, the government risks rolling out discrimination. Equally concerning though is the ideological assumptions underpinning the legislation about “who” belongs in particular localities. The poor in multicultural neighbourhoods are being dispossessed of their rights and uprooted from where they live. They have been deemed eminently disposable.’

The IRR hopes that this publication can encourage as wide a discussion as possible about the legislation as well as the wider goals of ‘One Nation’ government. IRR Director, Liz Fekete, asks: ‘Given that the cosmopolitan and multicultural nature of London was our brand in the  Olympic bid,  shouldn’t we be concerned when multicultural London is abandoned in favour of  a more elitist and monocultural urban future?’

Entitlement and belonging: social restructuring and multicultural Britain can be downloaded here (pdf file, 401kb)

Article reblogged from the Institute of Race Relations –