Category Archives: New Resources

Border Criminologies: An Assessment of the Report of the Inquiry into the Use of Immigration Detention in the United Kingdom

osworth, Centre for Criminology, University of Oxford

ExtractPage1Today, the All Party Parliamentary Group on Refugees & the All Party Parliamentary Group on Migration published their Report of the Inquiry into the Use of Immigration Detention in the United Kingdom. Along with last night’s Channel 4 broadcast about staff in Yarl’s Wood IRC, this publication adds to the growing critique of the current system. Although not an official publication of the House of Commons or the House of Lords, the Report represents the views of a range of politicians and suggests that there may be appetite for change, at least after the national election in May.

The report has taken six months to produce. Coming in at just under 80 pages, it synthesises testimonies from three public hearings and a selection of written submissions. It also draws on committee members’ visits to some detention sites in the UK and a trip to Sweden. Expert advice at the hearings was provided by a selection of NGOs, medics, civil servants, current and former detainees, although not, inexplicably, by academic researchers. So, what does the report actually say?

Full article available on the Border Criminologies website at:  http://bordercriminologies.law.ox.ac.uk/immigration-detention-inquiry-report/

 

Novel: The Blue Between Sky and Water by Susan Abulhawa

It was interesting to read the recent newspaper review article of the author and human rights activist Susan Abulhawa’s latest novel entitled, “”The Blue Between Sky and Water.”  The article in the London Metro `In defiance of disaster’ reflects on the author’s work in attempting to document the lives of women in Gaza.

As Abulhawa outlines:

At the centre of thee it all are the women. The matriarchs, the gossips, the healers, the lost, the dreamers, the artists and the sandcastle makers … They are the women I met in my imagination, in documentaries, in person, in news clips .. They all carried Palestine wherever exile took them and I inherited from them the wound of an unredeemed history.”

The official pres release provides further details of the novel and is available to download as a PDF file here – Media Pack.

The official website for Susan Abulhawa, entitled Morning in Jenin, is located here:  http://morningsinjenin.com/

 

New Research Paper: The true human rights situation in Eritrea: the new UK Home Office Guidance as a political instrument for the prevention of migration

Please, find in following link this paper:

‘The true human rights situation in Eritrea: the new UK Home Office Guidance as a political instrument for the prevention of migration’
by Sara Palacios Arapiles.

Link to Paper:  http://sas-space.sas.ac.uk/6097/

This research paper aims at documenting the true situation in Eritrea,
in order to refute the credibility of the content and of some of the
sources of the new Guidance on Eritrea issued by the UK Home Office
(HO); and of the related policies that are being implemented in some
other countries, such as Israel. The HO country of origin Guidance
surprisingly claims that there are alleged signs of improvement inside
Eritrea for potential returnees. It is argued in this paper that the
reasons for this are entirely politically influenced, with the purpose
of preventing migration. The paper then brings to light the current
circumstances in the country – supported inter alia by the testimonies
gathered by the author, and the new findings of the UN Commission of
Inquiry on Human Rights in Eritrea- that would make the forcible return
of the Eritrean asylum-seekers and refugees unlawful.

 

New UNHCR report: 2014 Global Trends: World at War

New Publication from UNHCR:

UNHCR are pleased to announce that the following report has been published and is available for download via the UNHCR statistics website at:  www.unhcr.org/statisics

2014 Global Trends – World at War

UNHCRThe report provides an overview of the statistical trends and changes in global populations of concern to UNHC, i.e. refugees, returnees, stateless persons, and certain groups of internally displaced persons (IDPs), place din the context of major humanitarian developments and displacement during the year.

Some of the key findings of the report:

  • Global forced displacement has seen accelerated growth in 2014, once again reaching unprecedented levels. The year saw the highest displacement on record. By end-2014, 59.5 million individuals were forcibly displaced worldwide as a result of persecution, conflict, generalized violence, or human rights violations. This is 8.3 million persons more than the year before (51.2 million) and the highest annual increase in a single year.
  • Some 19.5 million persons were refugees, 14.4 million under UNHCR’s mandate and 5.1 million Palestinian refugees registered by UNRWA. The global figure included 38.2 million internally displaced persons and nearly 1.8 million asylum-seekers. If these 59.5 million persons were a nation, they would make up the 24th largest in the world.
  • An estimated 13.9 million individuals were newly displaced due to conflict or persecution in 2014. This includes 11.0 million persons newly displaced within the borders of their own country, the highest figure on record. The other 2.9 million individuals were new refugees.
  • For the first time, Turkey became the largest refugee-hosting country worldwide, with 1.59 million refugees. Turkey was followed by Pakistan (1.51 million), Lebanon (1.15 million), the Islamic Republic of Iran (982,000), Ethiopia (659,500), and Jordan (654,100).
  • More than half (53%) of all refugees worldwide came from just three countries: the Syrian Arab Republic (3.88 million), Afghanistan (2.59 million), and Somalia (1.11 million).
  • Over the course of 2014,some 126,800 refugees returned to their countries of origin. This figure was the lowest level of refugee returns since 1983.
  • A record high of nearly 1.7 million individuals submitted applications for asylum or refugee status in 2014. UNHCR offices registered 245,700 or 15 per cent of these claims. With 274,700 asylum claims, the Russian Federation was the world’s largest recipient of new individual applications, followed by Germany (173,100), the United States of America (121,200), and Turkey (87,800).
  • Children below 18 years of age constituted 51 per cent of the refugee population in 2014, up from 41 per cent in 2009 and the highest figure in more than a decade.

 

ToC: Refugee Survey Quarterly Table of Contents for June 1, 2015; Vol. 34, No. 2

Oxford Journals have published their latest Table of Contents alert for the latest issue of the Refugee Survey Quarterly journal.  Further details of the articles included in Volume 34 Number 2 (1 June 2015) are available as follows:

Articles

“Rather Than Talking in Tamil, They Should Be Talking to Tamils”: Sri Lankan Tamil Refugee Readiness for Repatriation
Miriam George, Wendy Kliewer, and Sebastan Irudaya Rajan
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 1-22
[Abstract]

From Ad Hoc to Universal: The International Refugee Regime from Fragmentation to Unity 1922–1954
Gilad Ben-Nun
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 23-44
[Abstract]

Refugees’ Conceptualizations of “Protection Space”: Geographical Scales of Urban Protection and Host–Refugee Relations
Eveliina Lyytinen
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 45-77
[Abstract]

Getting Refugees to Work: A Street-level Perspective of Refugee Resettlement Policy
Jessica H. Darrow
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 78-106
[Abstract]

Notes and Comments

Recognizing Refugee Status for Victims of Trafficking and the Myth of Progress
Satvinder S. Juss
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 107-123
[Abstract]

 

Publications: FMR 49 now online – Disasters and displacement in a changing climate

Forced Migration Review issue 49, entitled ‘Disasters and displacement in a changing climate’, is now online at www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters

In light of the projected increase in the frequency and intensity of disasters associated with climate change, the number of people displaced in the context of disasters will inevitably rise. Existing national, regional and international legal regimes, however, currently respond to only some of the protection concerns arising from such displacement. Crafting an appropriate response will demand a cross-sectoral approach that addresses different forms of human mobility and which also recognises the local knowledge, values and beliefs of affected communities.

This issue of FMR includes 36 articles on ‘Disasters and displacement in a changing climate’, five articles on ‘Female genital mutilation (FGM) and asylum in Europe‘, and five ‘general’ articles on: Cartagena +30, trafficking for human organs, animals and forced migration, refugee-state distrust on the Thai-Burma border, and sweet tea and cigarettes in Jordan.

The full list of contents, with web links, is given at the end of this email.

FMR 49 will be available online and in print in English, Arabic, French and Spanish.

The FGM mini-feature is also available as a separate pdf at www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/FGM.pdf.

If you do not regularly receive a print copy of FMR and would like to receive a print copy for your organisation, or multiple copies for onward distribution or for use in training or at conferences, please contact us at fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk.

This publication has been produced with the assistance of the European Union.

Details of our forthcoming issues – on ‘The Balkans 20 years on from the Dayton Agreement’ and ‘Thinking ahead: displacement, transition and solutions’ – can be found at www.fmreview.org/forthcoming.

Apologies for any cross-posting.

Best wishes,

Marion Couldrey & Maurice Herson
Editors, Forced Migration Review
fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk   www.fmreview.org
+44 (0)1865 281700 skype: fmreview
Follow FMR on Facebook and Twitter

FMR 49 Disasters and displacement in a changing climate – contents with web links

THEME ARTICLES

Foreword

Børge Brende (Government of Norway) and Didier Burkhalter (Government of Switzerland) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/brende-burkhalter

The Nansen Initiative: building consensus on displacement in disaster contexts Walter Kälin (The Nansen Initiative) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/kaelin

National Adaptation Plans and human mobility Koko Warner (UNU-EHS), Walter Kälin (Nansen Initiative), Susan Martin (Georgetown University) and Youssef Nassef (UNFCC) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/warner-kaelin-martin-nassef

Modelling displacement
Justin Ginnetti (Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/ginnetti

The state of the evidence
Susan Martin (Georgetown University)
www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/martin

The necessity for an ethnographic approach in Peru Geremia Cometti (Laboratoire d’Anthropologie Sociale, Paris) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/cometti

An integrated focus
William Lacy Swing (International Organization for Migration) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/swing

West Africa: a testing ground for regional solutions Julia Blocher, Dalila Gharbaoui and Sara Vigil (University of Liège) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/blocher-gharbaoui-vigil

Development and displacement risks
Glaucia Boyer and Matthew McKinnon (UNDP) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/boyer-mckinnon

Developing temporary protection in Africa Tamara Wood (University of New South Wales) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/wood

Climate effects on nomadic pastoralist societies Dawn Chatty and Troy Sternberg (University of Oxford) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/chatty-sternberg

Guidance for ‘managed’ relocation
Brent Doberstein and Anne Tadgell (University of Waterloo) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/doberstein-tadgell

Preparing for planned relocation
www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/planned-relocation

Lessons from planned relocation and resettlement in the past Jane McAdam (University of New South Wales) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/mcadam

Post-disaster resettlement in urban Bolivia Gemma Sou (University of Manchester) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/sou

Focusing on climate-related internal displacement Scott Leckie and Ezekiel Simperingham (Displacement Solutions) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/leckie-simperingham

Brazil’s draft migration law
Isabela Piacentini de Andrade (Universidade Positivo) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/piacentini

Disasters, displacement and a new framework in the Americas David James Cantor (Refugee Law Initiative) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/cantor

Temporary protection arrangements to fill a gap in the protection regime Volker Türk (UNHCR) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/tuerk

Refugees, climate change and international law María José Fernández (Universidad Católica de Salta, Argentina) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/fernandez

Displacement as a consequence of climate change mitigation policies Sara Vigil (University of Liège) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/vigil

Statelessness and environmental displacement Jessie Connell (Australian National University) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/connell

A role for strategic litigation
Matthew Scott (Lund University, Sweden)
www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/scott

Floods and migration in the Czech Republic Robert Stojanov (University of Prague), Ilan Kelman (University College London) and Barbora Duží (Czech Academy of Sciences) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/stojanov-kelman-duzi

‘One Safe Future’ in the Philippines
Lloyd Ranque and Melissa Quetulio-Navarra (Philippines government agency) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/ranque-quetulionavarra

Post-disaster resettlement in the Philippines: a risky strategy Alice R Thomas (Refugees International) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/thomas

Cross-border migration with dignity in Kiribati Karen E McNamara (University of Queensland) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/mcnamara

Land, disasters and mobility in the South Pacific Daniel Fitzpatrick (Australian National University) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/mcnamara

Not drowning but fighting: Pacific Islands activists Hannah Fair (University College London) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/fair

Samoa: local knowledge, climate change and population movements Ximena Flores-Palacios (Auckland University of Technology) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/florespalacios

Facilitating voluntary adaptive migration in the Pacific Bruce Burson (New Zealand Immigration and Protection Tribunal) and Richard Bedford (University of Waikato) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/burson-bedford

Integrating resilience in South Asia
Mi Zhou and Dorien Braam (Praxis Labs)
www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/zhou-braam

“Everyone likes it here”
Himani Upadhyay, Divya Mohan (TERI, India) and Ilan Kelman (University College London) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/upadhyay-mohan-kelman

Building adaptive capacity in Assam
Soumyadeep Banerjee, Suman Bisht and Bidhubhusan Mahapatra (International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, Nepal) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/banerjee-bisht-mahapatra

Mixed motivations and complex causality in the Mekong Jessica Marsh (Mekong Migration Network) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/marsh

One good reason to speak of ‘climate refugees’
François Gemenne (University of Liège and Sciences Po, Paris) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/gemenne

Governance questions for the international community Alexander Betts (Refugee Studies Centre) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/betts

Building respectful solutions

Colleen Swan (Kivalina City Council), Chief Albert P Naquin (Isle de Jean Charles Tribal Council) and Stanley Tom (Newtok Traditional Council) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/swan-naquin-tom

FGM ARTICLES

Female genital mutilation: a case for asylum in Europe Fadela Novak-Irons (UNHCR) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/novakirons

FGM: challenges for asylum applicants and officials Christine Flamand (INTACT) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/flamand

The medicalisation of female genital mutilation Pierre Foldes and Frédérique Martz (Institut en Santé Génésique) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/foldes-martz

The Istanbul Convention: new treaty, new tool Elise Petitpas (End FGM European Network) and Johanna Nelles (Council of Europe) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/pettipas-nelles

Changing attitudes in Finland towards FGM Saido Mohamed and Solomie Teshome (Finnish League for Human Rights) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/mohamed-teshome

GENERAL ARTICLES

The Cartagena process: 30 years of innovation and solidarity Carlos Maldonado Castillo (UNHCR) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/castillo

Trafficking for human organs
Vladimir Makei (Government of Belarus)
www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/makei

Sweet tea and cigarettes: a taste of refugee life in Jordan Rana B Khoury (Northwestern University) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/khoury

Refugee-state distrust on the Thai-Burma border Karen Hargrave (independent) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/hargrave

Animals and forced migration
Piers Beirne and Caitlin Kelty-Huber (University of Southern Maine) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/beirne-keltyhuber

 

Publication: Migrant Voice Newspaper

Further details on the latest issue of the Migrant Voice Newspaper.  The following text is taken from the Migrant Voice website:

The Migrant Voice newspaper will be distributed on Monday April 20th in Birmingham from 3-6pm at Moor Street station; in London on Tuesday the 21st from 4-7pm at Waterloo, Victoria and London Bridge stations and on April 28th from 4-7pm at Kings Cross, Euston, Oxford Circus and Paddington stations.

_____

Immigration is high on the news agenda and is being presented by some politicians as a burden on the country, feeding fears and fuelling prejudice. There are 7.8 million foreignborn nationals in the UK but they are largely underrepresented in mainstream British media.

Our research reveals that migrants’ voices are heard in only one in eight media stories on migration. Many of these articles reflect critical, sometimes explicitly negative, attitudes – not only towards migration policies but also migrants themselves.

Far from the idea that debating migration is off-limits, it turns out that the only people ‘banned’ from discussing it are migrants themselves.

Here, we place migrants at the centre of the debate and let them tell their stories.

We found that over 90 per cent of migrants feel at least partially integrated into British society yet feel totally excluded from the political conversation about migration. When politicians make ill-informed comments it creates distrust on both sides. Yet – thankfully – the vast majority of Britons feel positive about the migrants they encounter in their daily lives, and the feeling is mutual.

Migrant Voice aims to address the lack of balanced and accurate representation in the media and celebrate the contribution migrants make to the UK. Our paper includes vibrant, engaging and moving stories, created and distributed by migrants.

This year’s issue is particularly important as it coincides with Migrant Voice celebrating five years of movement building, mobilisation and engagement with the public debate.

In this issue we unveil a new ‘I am an Immigrant’ poster campaign which celebrates the immense contribution that immigrants make.

The posters, which go on display at hundreds of London tube stations and national railway stations this month, show immigrants are part of the fabric of British society.

We are also the first to report on the launch of the ‘Bloody Foreigners’ campaign mobilising migrant communities to give more blood, turning an old phrase on its head. It’s just one of the many ways today’s migrants are contributing to the health and wealth of our nation.

We give you a glimpse into the strong North Korean community in the UK, the largest defector community from that country in Europe.

We also take you on two long, horrifying journeys from Syria and Eritrea in search of safety in the UK.

And we share the inspirational story of Agnes, an orphan of the Rwandan genocide and a former child soldier, who is now settled in the UK and is campaigning to improve the lives of other children orphaned by war.

There are also stories about the everyday lives of migrants in Britain – in restaurants, on the sports field, in the arts, in business.

Many more stories are featured on our website www.migrantvoice.org.

We also want to hear your thoughts – write to us at [email protected]

We hope you enjoy reading our paper.

Nazek Ramadan Founder, Migrant Voice

To read the full paper: http://bit.ly/1GYTI9M

To request printed copies of the paper, please email [email protected]