Category Archives: New Resources

New Report: Shifting Ground: Views on immigration during the long term and during election campaigns

A new study by Ipsos MORI looking at how British attitudes towards immigration have changed over the long term and during election campaigns is published today. The report, “Shifting Ground”, combines existing data with new findings from a longitudinal study which followed voters during, throughout, and after the 2015 General Election campaign in order to track changes in individuals’ attitudes.

The study finds concerns about immigration have indisputably risen over the long term. The importance of immigration as an issue facing Britain on the Economist/Ipsos MORI Issues Index reached record levels in 2015, with 56% of the public mentioning it in September; the highest level ever recorded since the series started in the 1970s.

As well as growing concern overall, there were changes in the profile of people who are concerned about the issue. In particular, in the early 2000s there was relatively little difference between the oldest and youngest generations on concern about immigration, but in the last few years there is a growing generational divide with older generations having become much more concerned than younger generations.

Download PDF

Read Full Article: Shifting Ground: Views on immigration during the long term and during election campaigns.

 

 

New Report: OU research highlights benefits and risks of smartphones for refugees

New Report:

OU research highlights benefits and risks of smartphones for refugees

Today (16 May) marks the launch of a new academic report by the Open University, Mapping Refugee Media Journeys: Smart Phones and Social Media Networks. The research identified a huge gap in the provision of relevant, reliable and timely news and information for and with refugees that is endangering their lives.

“Our research suggests that the information and news needs of refugees are not sufficiently taken into account by governments and news organisation as they make perilous journeys from war-torn parts of the world to Europe and when they arrive. EU member states have failed to develop a coherent policy strategy to deal with refugees entering Europe,” said Marie Gillespie, OU Professor of Sociology and a member of the OU’s Citizenship and Governance priority research area.

“News and government agencies are effectively reneging on their responsibility under the UN Refugee Charter to provide information and news that can assist their search for protection and safety because they fear that they might be accused of facilitating and encouraging refugees to come to Europe. It’s now such a politicised issue.”

“Quick tech fixes don’t work.”

The research uses an innovative mix of methods: serial interviews with Syrian and Iraqi refugees as they make their journeys, an analysis of news media coverage of refugees and a ‘big data’ analysis of refugee social networks on Facebook and Twitter by computer scientists. It involves interviews with staff at the European Commission, among international broadcasters and non-governmental organisations (NGOs). It provides a best practice guide for those providing digital resources for refugees.

The report reveals that refugees access the news and information they need through their mobile phones mainly via links sent by trusted friends and family, as well as by smugglers. The smartphone is both a resource and a threat on their journeys. It is an essential navigation, translation and networking tool but it is also a threat as the digital traces refugees leave behind make them vulnerable to surveillance by extremists and smugglers. The smartphones also contain an ever-expanding photo album of violence and abuse that they may have witnessed.

The need for security forces refugees to go underground digitally where they use avatars and encrypted services to get vital information from smugglers and handlers whom they have to rely on and sometimes trust more than government sources and mainstream media.

Read full press release – OU research highlights benefits and risks of smartphones for refugees.

Mapping Refugee Media Journeys: Smart Phones and Social Media Networks was produced by The Open University and France Mèdias Monde.

Read more about OU research in Citizenship and Governance.

 

Table of Contents Alert: International Journal of Refugee Law

Oxford Journals have just published their latest Table of Contents journal alert for the International Journal of Refugee Law.  Further details on the articles included in  Vol. 28, No. 1 (March 2016) are detailed below:

Editorial

Editorial
Jane McAdam
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 1-6
[Extract]

Articles

The Origins of UNHCR’s Global Mandate on Statelessness
Matthew Seet
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 7-24
[Abstract]

Fleeing Cartels and Maras: International Protection Considerations and Profiles from the Northern Triangle
Nicolás Rodríguez Serna
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 25-54
[Abstract]

The Almaty Process: Improving Compliance with International Refugee Law in Central Asia
Cynthia Orchard
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 55-84
[Abstract]

Lack of State Protection or Fear of Persecution? Determining the Refugee Status of North Koreans in Canada
Seunghwan Kim
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 85-108
[Abstract]

Case Law Summaries

Case Law Summaries
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 109-115
[Extract]

Documents

Note on International Protection: Executive Committee of the High Commissioner’s Programme
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 116-134
[Abstract]

Statement by Volker Türk: Assistant High Commissioner for Protection, UNHCR
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 135-147
[Extract]

Alternatives to Detention: Executive Committee of the High Commissioner’s Programme
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 148-155
[Abstract]

Agenda for the Protection of Cross-Border Displaced Persons in the Context of Disasters and Climate Change: October 2015
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 156-162
[Extract]

Book Reviews

Adjudicating Refugee and Asylum Status: The Role of Witness, Expertise, and Testimony
Julia Muraszkiewicz
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 163-166
[Extract]

EU Security and Justice Law: After Lisbon and Stockholm (Modern Studies in European Law)
Christopher Harding
Int J Refugee Law 2016 28: 166-168
[Extract]

 

New Publication: Entitlement and belonging: social restructuring and multicultural Britain

New Publication:

Entitlement and belonging: social restructuring and multicultural Britain

An IRR discussion paper on the Housing and Planning and Immigration Bills 2015-16.

Entitlement_and_Belonging_coverThe Housing and Planning and Immigration Bills, currently going through parliament, contain measures which are central to the Conservatives’ stated belief in cohesive ‘One Nation’ government. In a discussion paper published by the IRR today, criminologist Dr Jon Burnett argues that the rapid social transformation that will inevitably take place through these mutually-reinforcing housing and immigration measures will be destructive for social cohesion. In fact, the break-up and displacement of multicultural neighbourhoods, coupled with the extended reach of immigration policing, will accentuate extremes of inequality in the inner city and lead to a marked deterioration in the quality of life for BAME communities.

Focusing largely on London, Entitlement and belonging suggests that a ‘SUS culture’ is developing in the UK as the ‘hostile environment principle’, long- established in immigration policy, is extended into housing. The government argues that nationally-implemented ‘right to rent’ checks, imposing a duty on landlords to carry out immigration profiling and allowing summary eviction of  tenants, are ‘justifiable’ measures aimed at forcing out those who have no legal right to stay in the country. Yet even its own evaluation provided compelling evidence of discrimination against BAME citizens.

According to Dr Burnett, author of the research: ‘In rolling out the measures, the government risks rolling out discrimination. Equally concerning though is the ideological assumptions underpinning the legislation about “who” belongs in particular localities. The poor in multicultural neighbourhoods are being dispossessed of their rights and uprooted from where they live. They have been deemed eminently disposable.’

The IRR hopes that this publication can encourage as wide a discussion as possible about the legislation as well as the wider goals of ‘One Nation’ government. IRR Director, Liz Fekete, asks: ‘Given that the cosmopolitan and multicultural nature of London was our brand in the  Olympic bid,  shouldn’t we be concerned when multicultural London is abandoned in favour of  a more elitist and monocultural urban future?’

Entitlement and belonging: social restructuring and multicultural Britain can be downloaded here (pdf file, 401kb)

Article reblogged from the Institute of Race Relations – www.irr.org.uk/news/entitlement-and-belonging-social-restructuring-and-multicultural-britain/

 

ToC Alert: International Journal of Refugee Law Vol. 27, No. 4 (December 2015)

Oxford Journals have published their latest journal table of contents alert for the International Journal of Refugee Law. Further details of the articles included in Vol. 27, No. 4 (December 2015) are detailed as follows:

Editorial

Why Europe Does Not Have a Refugee Crisis
Geoff Gilbert
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 531-535
[Extract]

Articles

‘Turning Back the Boats’: Australia’s Interdiction of Irregular Migrants at Sea
Andreas Schloenhardt and Colin Craig
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 536-572
[Abstract]

ICC Witnesses and Acquitted Suspects Seeking Asylum in the Netherlands: An Overview of the Jurisdictional Battles between the ICC and Its Host State
Tom de Boer and Marjoleine Zieck
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 573-606
[Abstract]

Explaining Delayed Cessation: A Case Study of Rwandan Refugees in Zimbabwe
Andrew Stobo Sniderman
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 607-624
[Abstract]

The Protection Paradox: Why Hasn’t the Arrival of New Media Transformed Refugee Status Determination?
Rosemary Byrne
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 625-648
[Abstract]

Opinion

Credibility Assessment in Claims based on Persecution for Reasons of Religious Conversion and Homosexuality: A Practitioners Approach
Uwe Berlit, Harald Doerig, and Hugo Storey
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 649-666
[Extract]

Case Law

Religious Persecution Subsequent to Conversion: Courts are not bound to baptising pastor’s assessment of sincerity of change of faith
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 667-674
[Extract]

Case Law Summaries

Case Law Summaries
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 675-681
[Extract]

Document

Guidance Note on Refugee Claims Relating to Crimes of Lèse Majesté and Similar Criminal Offences
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 682-693
[Extract]

Book Reviews

Survival Migration: Failed Governance and the Crisis of Displacement
Hannah Baumeister
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 694-697
[Extract]

Refugees and the Myth of Human Rights: Life Outside the Pale of the Law
Julia Muraszkiewicz
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 697-700
[Extract]

EU Asylum Procedures and the Right to an Effective Remedy
Dr Helen O’Nions
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 701-703
[Extract]

The Global Reach of European Refugee Law
Marija Jovanović
Int J Refugee Law 2015 27: 703-707
[Extract]

Table of Contents Alert: Refugee Survey Quarterly, Vol. 34, No. 4 (December 2015)

Oxford Journals have released the latest table of contents alert for their Refugee Survey Quarterly journal.  Further details of the articles included in Volume 34 Number 4 (December 2015) can be found below:

Articles

A Continuum of Violence? Linking Sexual and Gender-based Violence during Conflict, Flight, and Encampment
Ulrike Krause
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 1-19
[Abstract]

The Constitutive Effects of Time: Understanding the Evolution and Innovation of Refugee Governance along the Thai-Burmese Border
Patrick Cottrell
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 20-44
[Abstract]

The Contribution of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights to the Protection of Irregular Immigrants’ Rights: Opportunities and Challenges
Ana Beduschi
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 45-74
[Abstract]

Australia’s Operation Sovereign Borders: Discourse, Power, and Policy from a Crimmigration Perspective
Patrick van Berlo
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 75-104
[Abstract]

Under the Gaze of the State: ICT Use and State Surveillance of Eritrean Refugees in Italy
Matthew E. Opas and David A. McMurray
Refugee Survey Quarterly 2015 34: 105-125
[Abstract]

 

Migration Studies Table of Contents for Alert November 1, 2015; Vol. 3, No. 3

Oxford Journals have published the latest table of contents alert for their journal Migration Studies.  Further details of the articles include din Vol.3 No. 3 (November 2015) are as follows:

Editorial

‘An inborn restlessness’: Migration and exile in a turbulent world
Alan Gamlen
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 307-314
[Extract]

Articles

Labour market activity, occupational change and length of stay in the Gulf
Mathias Czaika and María Villares Varela
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 315-342
[Abstract]

Editor’s Choice: The happiness of international migrants: A review of research findings
Martijn Hendriks
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 343-369
[Abstract]

Deporting social capital: Implications for immigrant communities in the United States
Jacqueline Hagan, David Leal, and Nestor Rodriguez
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 370-392
[Abstract]

The case against removal: Jus noci and harm in deportation practice
Barbara Buckinx and Alexandra Filindra
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 393-416
[Abstract]

The winner takes it all: Internal migration, education and wages in Ethiopia
Niels-Hugo Blunch and Caterina Ruggeri Laderchi
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 417-437
[Abstract]

Capital and mobility in the stepwise international migrations of Filipino migrant domestic workers
Anju Mary Paul
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 438-459
[Abstract]

 

Reviews

Values and Vulnerabilities: The Ethics of Research with Refugees and Asylum Seekers. Edited by Karen Block, Elisha Riggs and Nick Haslam.
James Milner
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 460-463
[Extract]

Child Migration and Human Rights in a Global Age. By Jacqueline Bhabha.
Pablo Ceriani Cernadas
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 463-465
[Extract]

Illegality, Inc.: Clandestine Migration and the Business of Bordering Europe. By Ruben Andersson.
Lucy Hovil
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 465-467
[Extract]

Immigration Economics. By George Borjas.
Pia M. Orrenius
Migrat Stud 2015 3: 467-469
[Extract]