Tag Archives: Refugee Studies Centre

RSC Workshop: Refuge from Syria

The Syrian Humanitarian Disaster: Understanding Perceptions, Aspirations and Behaviour in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey

Wednesday, 09 December 2015
The Garden Room, Oxford Department of International Development, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TB
Hosted by Refugee Studies Centre

This one-day workshop will be held on 9 December 2015 to engage researchers and practitioners with findings from recent research into the perceptions, aspirations and behaviour of refugees from Syria, host community members, and practitioners in Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan. Professor Dawn Chatty will present her British Academy funded research on this theme alongside a number of other researchers and practitioners with recent experience in this area. The workshop aims to promote greater understanding of the unique socio-historical context of the Syrian humanitarian disaster in each of the regional hosting countries by addressing specifically changing perceptions and aspirations. In addition the workshop hopes to present examples of good practice and lessons learned from practitioners in all countries bordering on Syria.

The speed with which Syria disintegrated into extreme violence and armed conflict shocked the world and left the humanitarian aid regime in turmoil as agencies struggled to respond to the growing displacement crisis on Syria’s borders. The mass displacement has now  reached Northern Mediterranean shores as well as Central European borders. It has left the neighbouring states of Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan in a quandary as to how to effectively provide protection for these people seeking refuge. None have granted the displaced refugee status; each has established temporary measures to deal with this crisis. In many cases the displaced and the host communities have not been consulted and thus tensions have quickly emerged among host communities, displaced Syrians and humanitarian policy-makers and practitioners. That tension, despair and hopelessness has seen thousands leave the region over the past year in search for survival in dignity. This workshop aims to explore the different perceptions and aspirations of Syria’s refugees, humanitarian assistance practitioners, and the host community. It also seeks to probe what social factors with the host community, will, when circumstances permit, positively contribute to the reshaping and re-integration of Syrian society post-conflict.

Provisional programme now available >>

If you are interested in attending and taking part, kindly contact Ariell Ahearn on ahearn.ariell@gmail.com

 

Events: RSC Workshop: Refuge from Syria, 9 December 2015

RSC Workshop: Refuge from Syria
The Syrian Humanitarian Disaster: Understanding Perceptions, Aspirations and Behaviour in Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey

Date: Wednesday, 9 December 2015
Location: The Garden Room, Oxford Department of International Development, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TB

This one-day workshop will be held on 9 December 2015 to engage researchers and practitioners with findings from recent research into the perceptions, aspirations and behaviour of refugees from Syria, host community members, and practitioners in Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan. Professor Dawn Chatty will present her British Academy funded research on this theme alongside a number of other researchers and practitioners with recent experience in this area. The workshop aims to promote greater understanding of the unique socio-historical context of the Syrian humanitarian disaster in each of the regional hosting countries by addressing specifically changing perceptions and aspirations. In addition the workshop hopes to present examples of good practice and lessons learned from practitioners in all countries bordering on Syria.

The speed with which Syria disintegrated into extreme violence and armed conflict shocked the world and left the humanitarian aid regime in turmoil as agencies struggled to respond to the growing displacement crisis on Syria’s borders. The mass displacement has now  reached Northern Mediterranean shores as well as Central European borders. It has left the neighbouring states of Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan in a quandary as to how to effectively provide protection for these people seeking refuge. None have granted the displaced refugee status; each has established temporary measures to deal with this crisis. In many cases the displaced and the host communities have not been consulted and thus tensions have quickly emerged among host communities, displaced Syrians and humanitarian policy-makers and practitioners. That tension, despair and hopelessness has seen thousands leave the region over the past year in search for survival in dignity. This workshop aims to explore the different perceptions and aspirations of Syria’s refugees, humanitarian assistance practitioners, and the host community. It also seeks to probe what social factors with the host community, will, when circumstances permit, positively contribute to the reshaping and re-integration of Syrian society post-conflict.

A programme of the workshop speakers and timetable will be made available shortly. If you are interested in attending and taking part, kindly contact Dawn.Chatty@qeh.ox.ac.uk or Tamsin.Kelk@qeh.ox.ac.uk

Details online at: www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/rsc-workshop-refuge-from-syria

Refugee Studies Centre: Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture taking place on 4 November 2015

‘We do not want to become refugees’: Human mobility in the age of climate change  

Professor Walter Kälin (Envoy of the Chairmanship of the Nansen Initiative, and Professor of Constitutional and International Law, University of Bern)

Time and date: 5pm, 4 November 2015

Location: Oxford University Museum of Natural History, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PW

Registration: The lecture is free to attend and open to all but registration is required.

Disaster displacement is one of the big humanitarian challenges of our times and is likely to significantly increase in the context of climate change. Building on the work of the Nansen Initiative on disaster-induced cross-border displacement, the lecture will explore different tools available to address displacement and other forms of disaster related human mobility.

About the speaker 

Professor Walter Kälin is a Swiss international human rights lawyer, legal scholar, and advocate. Currently, he is Professor of Constitutional and International Law at the Faculty of Law of the University of Bern (Switzerland), and Envoy of the Chairmanship of the Nansen Initiative. He served as a member of the UN Human Rights Committee until the end of 2014. From 2004 until 2010, he was the Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General on Internally Displaced Persons. Professor Kälin is the author of numerous works including The Face of Human Rights (2004) and The Law of International Human Rights Protection (2009). He received his doctor of law from the University of Bern and his LL.M. from Harvard University.

The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception

 

Events: Refugee Studies Centre Public Seminar Series

Refugee Studies Centre Michaelmas term Public Seminar Series

Theme: Refugee Economies

Series convenors: Professor Alexander Betts and Dr Naohiko Omata.

In recent academic and policy arenas in forced migration, the issue of how to understand refugees’ economic lives has emerged as one of the most pressing agendas. This seminar series will therefore gather leading scholars who have been working on related issues in order to consolidate the empirical and theoretical knowledge of refugee economies. Speakers will be convened from diverse and inter-disciplinary backgrounds from anthropology, economics, and political science. In addition to knowledge building, this seminar series is intended to initiate nurturing wider networks of researchers working on economic lives of refugees and to establish a common space for exchanging ideas, discussing findings and challenges.

Links to each seminar, as well as speaker biographies, can be found below. Seminars take place on Wednesdays at 5pm in Seminar Room 1, Queen Elizabeth House, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford, except for the Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture which will take place at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History. There is also an additional special seminar on Tuesday 13 October at 1-2pm, details below. For any enquiries, please contact rsc@qeh.ox.ac.uk.

13 October, Special lunchtime seminar, 1-2pm Africa after neo-abolition: asylum politicization, expert testimony, and the legacy of anti-trafficking advocacy Professor Benjamin N. Lawrance (Rochester Institute of Technology, NY, USA)

Location: Meeting Room A, Queen Elizabeth House, 3 Mansfield Road http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/africa-after-neo-abolition

14 October

no seminar

21 October

Refugee economies: forced displacement and development Professor Alexander Betts (RSC) http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/refugee-economies-forced-displacement-&-development

28 October

“Displacement economies: thinking through the paradoxes of crisis and creativity”

Professor Amanda Hammar (University of Copenhagen) http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/displacement-economies

4 November

ANNUAL HARRELL-BOND LECTURE *

‘We do not want to become refugees’: Human mobility in the age of climate change Professor Walter Kälin (Envoy of the Chairmanship of the Nansen Initiative, and Professor of Constitutional and International Law, University of Bern)

Location: Oxford University Museum of Natural History. Registration is required for this lecture. Please contact: anneli.chambliss@qeh.ox.ac.uk

http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/harrellbond2015

11 November

Navigating Nakivale: the borderland economy of a refugee camp Professor Morten Bøås (The Norwegian Institute of International Affairs) http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/navigating-nakivale

18 November

The economic consequences of refugee return: evidence from Burundi and Tanzania Professor Carlos Vargas-Silva (COMPAS, University of Oxford) http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/economic-consequences-of-refugee-return

25 November

Being Oromo in Nairobi’s ‘Little Mogadishu’: Eastleigh’s Ethiopian refugees and their livelihoods Dr Neil Carrier (African Studies Centre, University of Oxford) http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/being-oromo

2 December

From macro-economy to political economy: situating the refugee development discourse at the large scale Professor Roger Zetter (RSC) http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/from-macro-economy-to-political-economy

 

Special lunchtime seminar, Refugee Studies Centre, Tuesday 13 October, 1-2pm

Please find below details of a special lunchtime seminar at the Refugee Studies Centre on Tuesday 13 October, from 1-2pm (www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/africa-after-neo-abolition ):

Africa after neo-abolition: asylum politicization, expert testimony, and the legacy of anti-trafficking advocacy
Speaker: Professor Benjamin N. Lawrance (Rochester Institute of Technology, NY, USA)

Location: Meeting Room A, Queen Elizabeth House, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TB

African trafficking survivors struggle with anti-immigrant rhetoric and migration securitization in throughout the Global North. Globalization has elevated the importance of documentation; individuals fleeing trafficking face high thresholds to prove captive, coerced, or imprisoned status. This talk explores asylum politicization in Europe and North America and the role of millennial anti-trafficking advocacy in resisting it. Asylum claims (from Togo, Benin, Ghana, Sierra Leone, and Nigeria) provide unique insight into how trafficking survivors struggle for recognition as social persons. West African case histories show how experts and lawyers in the US and the UK mobilize documentation to resist anti-migration policy.

This is an additional public seminar, open to all.

About the Speaker
Benjamin N. Lawrance holds the Barber B. Conable Jr. Endowed Chair in International Studies at the Rochester Institute of Technology, NY, USA. A graduate of Stanford University and University College London, his research interests include comparative and contemporary slavery, human trafficking, cuisine and globalization, human rights, refugee issues and asylum policies. His forthcoming book, Amistad’s Orphans: An Atlantic Story of Children, Slavery, and Smuggling (Yale 2015) examines West African child smuggling in the 19th century. His other books examine asylum, refugee issues, expert testimony, historical and contemporary trafficking in women and children in Africa. His essays appear in the Journal of African History, Biography, Slavery & Abolition, African Economic History, Anthropological Quarterly, Cahiers d’Études Africaines, and the African Studies Review, among others. Professor Lawrance is a legal consultant on the contemporary political, social and cultural climate in West Africa. He has served as an expert witness for over two hundred and seventy asylum claims of West Africans in the U.S., Canada, the U.K, the Netherlands, Israel, and many other countries, and his opinions have featured in appellate rulings in the U.S. and the U.K. He volunteers as a country conditions expert for Amnesty International USA.

Seminar in Oxford: Not so Exceptional? Understanding the Canada-US Border as a Place of Law, Arbel & Goold, 11 May

Please join Border Criminologies and the Refugee Studies Centre for a special seminar with Efrat Arbel and Benjamin Goold, Allard School of Law, University of British Columbia, Canada, entitled:

Not so Exceptional? Understanding the Canada-US Border as a Place of Law.’

When: Monday, 11 May 2015, 13:00-14:30

Where: Senior Common Room, Faculty of Law, St Cross Building, University of Oxford

About the seminar

With the steady, global movement towards the securitization of borders in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 attacks, scholars across various disciplinary fields have analyzed state borders as ‘states of exception,’ sites in which, as Giorgio Agamben provocatively describes, ‘a temporary suspension of the rule of law on the basis of a factual state of danger, is … given a permanent spatial arrangement, which as such nevertheless remains outside the normal order.’ This paper argues against this approach. It suggests that the ‘state of exception,’ as described by Giorgio Agamben and Carl Schmidt, does not properly account for the legal and material realities of contemporary state borders. The paper advances this argument by analyzing how legal power is organized, asserted, and exercised along the Canada-US border. In addition, it seeks to develop a set of criteria by which claims of exceptionalism at the border might be tested, and compares the border with other sites―such as prisons―which also have the potential to become states of exception. In doing so, it strives to develop a site-specific understanding that better illuminates the legal implications of the policies and practices that currently govern the Canada-US border, and to ensure that current debates properly recognize the role of law in constructing the border.

About the speakers

Efrat Arbel is Assistant Professor of Law at the University of British Columbia. Dr Arbel researches and publishes in constitutional law, refugee law, Aboriginal law, and prison law. Combining her academic work with legal practice, Dr Arbel is also engaged in advocacy and litigation involving refugee and prisoner rights.

Benjamin Goold is a Professor of Law and Associate Dean, Academic Affairs, at the University of British Columbia. At present, Professor Goold is working on two major research projects, the first a major field study of undercover policing and covert surveillance practices in the UK (with Bethan Loftus and Shane Mac Giollabhui), and the second a study of how security products are bought, sold, and consumed (with Ian Loader and Angelica Thumala).

Events: Refugee Studies Centre Annual Elizabeth Colson Lecture | Innocence: understanding a political concept

On Wednesday 10 June at 5pm, Professor Miriam Ticktin of The New School for Social Research will deliver the RSC’s Annual Elizabeth Colson Lecture. Professor Ticktin will speak on ‘Innocence: understanding a political concept’. All are warmly invited to attend. More details, including information on how to register, are below, or visit our website: http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/Colson2015.

Abstract

With the grounding assumption that innocence plays a central role in the politics of forced migration and asylum, this lecture will delve into the idea of innocence, trying to understand it and render its workings more legible, and arguing that it is a political – not simply a religious or moral – concept. By examining the figure of the child, the trafficked victim, the migrant, asylum seeker, the enemy combatant and the animal, Professor Ticktin will suggest that innocence sets up hierarchies of humanity, all the while feeding an expanding politics of humanitarianism. Ultimately, she will ask if innocence is a concept we want to protect.

About the speaker

Miriam Ticktin is Associate Professor of Anthropology at The New School for Social Research and co-director of the Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility. She received her PhD in Anthropology at Stanford University, in co-tutelle with the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris, France, and an MA in English Literature from Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar. Before coming to the New School, Miriam was an Assistant Professor in Women’s Studies and Anthropology at the University of Michigan, and also held a postdoctoral position in the Society of Fellows at Columbia University.

Professor Ticktin’s research has focused in the broadest sense on what it means to make political claims in the name of a universal humanity. She has been interested in what these claims tell us about universalisms and difference, about who can be a political subject, on what basis people are included and excluded from communities, and how inequalities get instituted or perpetuated in this process. She is the author of Casualties of Care: Immigration and the Politics of Humanitarianism in France (University of California Press, 2011; co-winner of the 2012 William A. Douglass Prize in Europeanist Anthropology) and co-editor (with Ilana Feldman) of In the Name of Humanity: the Government of Threat and Care (Duke University Press, 2010), along with many other articles and book chapters. She is a founding editor of the journal Humanity: An International Journal of Human Rights, Humanitarianism and Development. Next year she will be a fellow at Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study. register

Location

The lecture takes place in the Garden Room at the Oxford Department of International Development, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford, OX1 3TB.

Register

Registration is required for this event. To RSVP, please contact the Centre Administrator, Anneli Chambliss Howes, at anneli.chambliss@qeh.ox.ac.uk or on +44 01865 281720.