Category Archives: Courses

Courses: CMRS Winter Short Courses (January 24th – February 11th, 2016)

Center for Migration and Refugee Studies

Winter Short Courses January 24th  – February 11th, 2016

The Center for Migration and Refugee Studies (CMRS) at The American University in Cairo (AUC) is offering the following three short courses during the month of January and February 2016:

1.      Designing research with urban displaced populations in MENA region (Jan 24 – 28, 2016)

2.      International Refugee Law (Jan 31 – Feb 4  , 2016)

3.      Euro -Mediterranean Refugee and Migration Crisis: Origins, Effects, Responses (Feb 7 – 11, 2016)

1. Eligibility for all courses:
Requirements: These courses are offered for undergraduate and postgraduate students, and researchers as well as practitioners working with migrants and refugees. A minimum knowledge of displacement and migration terminologies and context is a requirement for participation in any of the three courses.

All courses are conducted in English and no translation facilities are provided.  Participants should have a sufficient command of the English language. Each course will run from 9 am till 5pm for five days.

Interested applicants can apply for one course or for all the three courses.
Number of Participants: minimum of 12 in each course
NB: Non- Egyptian applicants are strongly encouraged to apply early in order to have enough time to obtain their visa.

2. Dates and Location: CMRS courses will take place between Sunday 24th of January and 11th of February at the AUC Tahrir Campus in Downtown Cairo. The exact location and room numbers will be forwarded to accepted participants before the start of the courses.

3. Courses’ Descriptions

3.1 Designing research with urban displaced populations in MENA region   (Jan 24 – 28, 2016)

This course is intended for practitioners from national governments, international inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), and national and inter-national non-governmental organizations (NGOs), working with migrants and refugees in urban settings. It is also for junior researchers, undergraduates and post-graduates in social sciences working on topics related to migrants and refugees.

The course will provide essential tools and techniques needed to conduct research and needs-assessments with displaced populations. It will help participants:

·   Identify the appropriate research methods for their target groups and subject matter.

·   Select the appropriate sample frame/s and sampling techniques.

·   Create research tools to reflect the aims and objectives of the research.

·   Consider the contextual limitations and challenges in conducting research with migrants and refugees.

·   Understand the ethical considerations vis-à-vis interaction with respondents.

The course will cover mixed research methods with an emphasis on qualitative techniques namely: Focus Group Discussions, Semi-Structured Interviews, in-depth interviews and ethnographies. It will lay out the pros and cons of the different methods and sampling techniques.   It will discuss in-depth the implications of reflexivity on the data collection, analysis and outcomes. It will also look at ethical considerations and challenges in conducting research with beneficiaries.

The course includes lectures and application of methods. Participants will be expected through a group project to apply one of the research methods through a practical exercise with refugee and migrant respondents in Egypt on a topic of interest.

Requirements: A minimum knowledge of displacement and migration terminologies is a requirement for the course participation. Knowledge of research is not required.

About the Instructor: Sara Sadek is a PhD Candidate at the Center for Applied Human Rights at the Politics Department at the University of York, UK. She obtained her B.A in Political Science at the American University in Cairo (AUC) in 2003 and her M.A in Refugee Studies at the University of East London (UEL) in UK in 2007. She is currently a consultant and trainer in the field of migration and protection in Egypt and MENA region. She has lead and participated in a series of medium to large-scale needs assessments and research projects using quantitative and qualitative methods including:  large-scale surveys, focus group discussions, interviews and ethnographies.  She worked as a researcher and consultant for international organizations and academic institutions. To name a few: Center for Migration and Refugee Studies (CMRS) at the American University in Cairo (AUC), the International Organization for Migration (IOM), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Save the Children International (SC), Swiss Development Cooperation, the University of East London, the French Institute for the Near East (IFPO), Duke University, and Center for Applied Human Rights at the University of York, UK. Research topics covered:  Libyan migrants, civil society-state relations, trafficking and smuggling, mixed migratory flows, domestic labor, unaccompanied minors, survivors of Sexual and Gender-based Violence, Diaspora and transnational communities, child protection, livelihoods and socio-economic rights, citizenship, narratives of displacements and transitional justice.

3.2 International Refugee Law (Jan 31 – Feb 4, 2016)

The course will provide post-graduate students, international agency staff, NGO workers, lawyers and others working with refugees or interested in refugee issues with an introduction to the international legal framework which governs the protection of refugees.  Through lectures, case studies and  small group discussions, course participants will learn about the basic features of international refugee law through the lens of the 1951 Refugee Convention, looking at the elements of the definition(s) of “refugee,” who is excluded from the definition, the role of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the process by which refugee status is determined, the rights of refugees under international law, the ethical and professional obligations of those representing refugees, and other issues of refugee policy.  A background in law is useful but not required.

About the Instructor: Parastou Hassouri has previously taught international refugee law at the American University of Cairo and has extensive experience in the field of international refugee law and refugee and immigrant rights and migration policy. Most recently, She has been serving as a consultant with the Refugee Status Determination (RSD) Unit at the UNHCR office in Ankara, Turkey.  Her previous consultancies with the UNHCR have been at the Zaatari Refugee Camp in Jordan and the UNHCR office in Moscow.  Parastou has also done extensive research in the field of refugee and migration law.  As a researcher/consultant for the Geneva-based NGO Global Detention Project, she conducted research on the issue of the migration-related detention in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries.  She also conducted research on the resettlement of Iraqi refugees out of the Middle East to third countries for the New York City-based NGO,  Human Rights First.  Her previous experience includes working as a Legal Advisor and Sexual and Gender-Based Violence Focal Point at Africa and Middle East Refugee Assistance (AMERA) in Cairo.  Her experience in the United States includes serving as an Attorney Advisor at the Immigration Courts of New York City and Los Angeles and working as an immigration attorney in private practice in New York City.  In addition, she designed and directed the Immigrant Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey, where she focused on responding to ethnic profiling and other forms of anti-immigrant backlash in the United States in the aftermath of the attacks of September 11.

3.3 Euro -Mediterranean Refugee and Migration Crisis: Origins, Effects, Responses (Feb 7 – 11, 2016)

This short course analyzes the causes of the current refugee and migration crisis in the Euro-Mediterranean region, the manifestation and expression of the experience across the region, the ensuing consequences, and the range and effectiveness of law and policy responses. The course is useful for those working in international, national, and non-governmental organizations that engage with migration and asylum issues, particularly those working in the Euro-Mediterranean region, and to post-graduate students in migration and refugee studies, Middle East and Euro-Mediterranean studies, as well as in related fields. Through lectures, case studies, and discussions, this one-week intensive course provides a rigorous critical overview of the current migration and refugee crisis and its short and long-term regional implications. Questions explored include: What are the political, economic, environmental, social, and cultural drivers of the current migration? Issues considered include conflict, governance, human rights, underdevelopment, inequality, demography, labor markets, climate change, desertification, drought, religious and ethnic discrimination, and xenophobia. What are the projected trends in these areas? How effective are international and regional laws and policies in ensuring that migration and asylum processes are orderly and humane? Do laws and policies logically flow from what we know of the origins of this migration, the present reality, and projections for coming migrations? If not, what measures could move us towards greater effectiveness? These questions are explored through regional case studies, including migration from Syria, Iraq, Libya, and Yemen; migration from the Horn of Africa and the Sahel transiting through North Africa and the Middle East towards Europe; intersection with ongoing migration from the Balkans and Eastern Europe; and responses in transit and destination states in North Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. A background in international relations, political science, or international law is useful but not required for participation.

About the Instructors:

Ibrahim Awad is Professor of Global Affairs and Director of the Center for Migration and Refugee Studies at the American University in Cairo. He has worked for the League of Arab States, the United Nations, and the International Labour Organization, holding positions of Secretary of the Commission, UN-ESCWA; Director, ILO Sub-regional Office for North Africa; and Director, ILO International Migration Programme. Dr Awad is a political scientist and political economist and his research interests and publications encompass international migration, employment, human and labour rights, development, politics and political transitions in the Middle East and North Africa, international relations, global governance and European integration.

Usha Natarajan is Assistant Professor of Law and Associate Director of the Center for Migration and Refugee Studies at the American University in Cairo. Her research and publications are multidisciplinary, utilizing third world and postcolonial approaches to international law to provide an interrelated understanding of the relationship between international law and issues of development, migration, environment and conflict. Dr Natarajan explores the interplay of these issues globally and in the Arab region. Prior to joining AUC in 2010, she worked with various international organizations including UNDP, UNESCO and the World Bank on law reform initiatives in Asia.

Deadlines for submitting application for all courses are:

·         15th of December, 2015

·         Deadline for paying course deposit (30% of the course’s fee- 150$) is 31st of December, 2015

Application Information:

To apply for the courses:

1. Fill out the application form. The form is available on CMRS website:  http://www.aucegypt.edu/GAPP/cmrs/outreach/Pages/ShortCourses.aspx

2. Send the application form to cmrscourses@aucegypt.edu with your most recent C.V; Att. Ms. Naseem Hashim

Applicants may apply to and be accepted in more than one course. Please do not hesitate to contact cmrscourses@aucegypt.edu if you have any difficulty with the application process.
Applicants accepted for the course will be notified by email within a week after the deadline for submitting the application.

Fees and Scholarship:

The fee for each course is $ 500. Participants are expected to pay a 30% of the total fees ($150) as a deposit. Please pay attention to the deposit deadline and kindly note that the deposit is non-refundable.  More information on payment method will be provided to accepted participants.

Tuition fees will cover course material and two coffee breaks per course day. All participants are kindly requested to secure their visa and organise and cover expenses for their travel to and from Egypt, as well as their accommodation and local transportation in Egypt.

Independent researchers and students can apply for the limited number of scholarships. Scholarships are not intended for participants who can be funded by their own institutions.

Course: Applied Research Methods with Hidden, Marginal and Excluded Populations

Source: Forced Migration List – List Archives: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/forced-migration.html

Applied Research Methods with Hidden, Marginal and Excluded Populations (2Q)
School in Social Science Data Analysis, University of Essex (UK)
27-31 July 2015 (full time)

Detailed program: HERE
http://www.essex.ac.uk/summerschool/media/pdf/Outlines/2Q.pdf

The course (11th Edition) provides an introduction to research methods in conducting research, both qualitative and quantitative, with marginal, hidden and excluded populations, with a specific focus on equity related research. The course introduces the main theories and research approaches on hard-to-reach populations (such as migrants, displaced population, victims of human rights violations, LGBT, drug addicted, child soldiers, victims of violence) , using different frameworks and techniques.

This intensive course will provide tools to address key quantitative and qualitative issues such as the lack of known sampling frame; the difficulties in reaching the target group; the concepts of impact, attribution and contribution; and the political dimension of research findings. The course explores topics such as: estimation and sampling techniques; participatory research; evidence-based policy versus policy-based evidence; innovation, crowdsourcing , innovation and the use of technology; the art of combining qualitative and quantitative methods; and ethical considerations arising when conducting research with hidden and marginalized populations.

Topics :

1) Quantitative methods:
– Cluster sampling
– Adaptive cluster sampling
– Time location sampling
– Small area estimation
– Capture and Recapture
– Respondent Driven Sampling RDS (intro)
– Social network analysis applied to hard-to-reach populations (introduction)

2) Qualitative methods
– Participatory research methods
– Rapid assessment
– Positive deviance

3) Ethics and Research

4) Innovation and the use of technology: SMS, crowd sourcing and mapping
– Using SMS and mobile phones for research and data collection, online survey,
– Crowdsourcing and mapping: Ushahidi (introduction)

Course description, contact and registration  HERE
https://www.essex.ac.uk/summerschool/pages/courses/session2/2q.html

Contacts :
www.essex.ac.uk/summerschool
Select Course 2Q

Courses: CMRS Summer Short Courses, American University in Cairo

Center for Migration and Refugee Studies
Summer Short Courses May 24th  – June 11th, 2015

The Center for Migration and Refugee Studies (CMRS) at The American University in Cairo (AUC) is offering the following three short courses during the month of May and June 2015:

1.       Displaced by Armed Conflict: Protection under International Law (May 24  – 28, 2015)
2.       International Refugee Law (May 31 – June 4, 2015)
3.       Diaspora and transnationalism  (June 7 – 11, 2015)

1. Eligibility for all courses:

Requirements: These courses are offered for undergraduate and postgraduate students, and researchers as well as practitioners working with migrants and refugees. A minimum knowledge of displacement and migration terminologies and context is a requirement for participation in any of the three courses.

All courses are conducted in English and no translation facilities are provided.  Participants should have a sufficient command of the English language. Each course will run from 9 am till 5pm for five days.

Interested applicants can apply for one course or for all the three courses.

Number of Participants: minimum of 12 in each course

NB: Non- Egyptian applicants are strongly encouraged to apply early in order to have enough time to obtain their visa.

2. Dates and Location

CMRS courses will take place between Sunday 24th of May and 11th of June at the AUC Tahrir Campus in Downtown Cairo. The exact location and room numbers will be forwarded to accepted participants before the start of the courses.

3. Courses’ Descriptions

3.1 Displaced by Armed Conflict: Protection under International Law (May 24 – 28, 2015)

This course provides an introduction to the international legal framework protecting those displaced by armed conflict. It is useful to post-graduate students and those working in international, national and non-governmental organizations that engage with internationally displaced persons, particularly those working with situations of mass displacement. Through lectures, case studies, and discussions, this one-week intensive course introduces the different areas of international law that govern conflict-induced displacement. Questions explored include: How does international humanitarian law, especially the four Geneva Conventions and their Protocols, protect displaced peoples? How does international humanitarian law intersect with international refugee law and international human rights law? What are temporary or complementary protection regimes? What are the protection gaps faced by those displaced by armed conflict? How have states and international organizations such as UNHCR and ICRC adapted to manage these gaps? These questions are explored through case studies from the Arab region, including displacement from Palestine, Iraq and Syria. A background in law is useful but not required for participation.

About the Instructors: Jasmine Moussa (PhD, LLM, MA, BA, LLB) is assistant professor of law at the American University in Cairo (AUC), where she teaches public international law and the law of armed conflict and the use of force. Before joining AUC, Dr. Moussa completed her PhD in Law at the University of Cambridge (2014). Her recent research projects focused on the relationship between international humanitarian law and the law on the use of force, as well as the development of the theory and practice of humanitarianism in the Arab region. She has also worked on legal affairs and human rights affairs at the Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Other engagements include providing legal advise to several international non-governmental organizations and think tanks.

Usha Natarajan (PhD, MA, LLB, BA) is assistant professor of international law at the Department of Law and the Center for Migration and Refugee Studies in the American University in Cairo. Her research is multidisciplinary, utilizing third world and postcolonial approaches to international law to provide an interrelated understanding of the relationship between international law and issues of development, migration, environment and conflict. Dr Natarajan explores the interplay of these issues globally and in the Arab region, with a particular focus on Iraq as well as the ongoing Arab uprisings. Prior to joining AUC in 2010, she served as Legal Research Fellow for Human Rights and Poverty Eradication at the Center for International Sustainable Development Law at McGill University, and taught international law at the Australian National University. She has worked with various international organizations including UNDP, UNESCO and the World Bank on law reform initiatives in Asia, including Indonesia during its democratic transition, and in post-independence Timor-Leste.

3.2 International Refugee Law (May 31 – June 4, 2015)

The course will provide post-graduate students, international agency staff, NGO workers, lawyers and others working with refugees or interested in refugee issues with an introduction to the international legal framework which governs the protection of refugees.  Through lectures, case studies and  small group discussions, course participants will learn about the basic features of international refugee law through the lens of the 1951 Refugee Convention, looking at the elements of the definition(s) of “refugee,” who is excluded from the definition, the role of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the process by which refugee status is determined, the rights of refugees under international law, the ethical and professional obligations of those representing refugees, and other issues of refugee policy.  A background in law is useful but not required.

About the Instructor: Parastou Hassouri has previously taught international refugee law at the American University of Cairo and has extensive experience in the field of international refugee law and refugee and immigrant rights and migration policy. Most recently, as a consultant with the Global Detention Project, she researches the issue of migration-related detention in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries.  Her previous experience also includes serving as a consultant with the UNHCR in the Zaaatari Refugee Camp in Jordan, and with the UNHCR office in Moscow.  Prior to that, as a consultant for Human Rights First, she conducted extensive research on the resettlement of Iraqi refugees out of the Middle East to third countries.  She has worked as a Legal Advisor and Sexual and Gender-Based Violence Focal Point at Africa and Middle East Refugee Assistance (AMERA) in Cairo.  Her experience in the United States includes serving as an Attorney Advisor at the Immigration Courts of New York City and Los Angeles and working as an immigration attorney in private practice in New York City.  In addition, she designed and directed the Immigrant Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey, where she focused on responding to ethnic profiling and other forms of anti-immigrant backlash in the United States in the aftermath of the attacks of September 11.

3.3 Diaspora and transnationalism (June 7 – 11, 2015)

The concepts of Diaspora and transnationalism both refer to cross-border processes and are becoming increasingly prominent to understand patterns in international migrations, the meaning of State borders, identities constructions and socio-economic relationships. The aim of the course is to define those processes, looking at Diasporic groups and their relationship to both host countries and (real or perceived) homeland, as well as analyzing the social formations and transformations induced by transnationalism. Following the review of theoretical literature, we will focus on the methods used to study Diasporic communities and transnationalism and engage in a series of case studies.

About the instructor: Alexandra Parrs is a sociologist and she teaches at the Center for Migration and Refugee Studies. She has taught graduates courses on integration, citizenship transnationalism, migration and international relations. She received her doctorate in sociology in 2009. She has taught in the US, Oman, Burma and Egypt. Her areas of research are migrations, ethnic minorities, integration, transnationalism, and gender. She is currently working on a book on Egyptian Gypsies.

Deadlines for submitting application for all courses are:

·         24th of April, 2015
·         Deadline for paying course deposit (30% of the course’s fee- 150$) is 3rd of May, 2015

Application Information:

To apply for the courses:

1. Fill out the application form. The form is available on CMRS website:
http://www.aucegypt.edu/GAPP/cmrs/outreach/Pages/ShortCourses.aspx

2. Send the application form to cmrscourses@aucegypt.edu with your most recent CV; Att. Ms. Naseem Hashim

Applicants may apply to and be accepted in more than one course. Please do not hesitate to contact cmrscourses@aucegypt.edu if you have any difficulty with the application process.
Applicants accepted for the course will be notified by email within a week after the deadline for submitting the application.

Fees and Scholarship:

The fee for each course is $ 500. Participants are expected to pay a 30% of the total fees ($150) as a deposit. Please pay attention to the deposit deadline and kindly note that the deposit is non-refundable.  More information on payment method will be provided to accepted participants.

Tuition fees will cover course material and two coffee breaks per course day. All participants are kindly requested to secure their visa and organise and cover expenses for their travel to and from Egypt, as well as their accommodation and local transportation in Egypt.

Independent researchers and students can apply for the limited number of scholarships. Scholarships are not intended for participants who can be funded by their own institutions.

Courses: CESI International Summer School on Refugee Law – Western Balkans in focus, Sarajevo, July 2015

Source: Forced Migration List – List Archives: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/forced-migration.html

The Centre for Refugee and IDP Studies (CESI) of the Faculty of Political Sciences in Sarajevo

Invites you to register for the International Summer School on Refugee Law – Western Balkans in focus, with Professor Emerita Barbara Harrell-Bond

Date: 6-16th of July, 2015

University of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

In the last decade countries of Western Balkans, including Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) and Serbia have been transformed from refugee producing countries to host countries for asylum-seekers and refugees. Moreover, due to ongoing wars and prolonged hostilities in Syria and other parts of the world, it is expected that the number of persons seeking an international protection in the region will grow, thus making further development of the three countries asylum systems an important task.

This year’s International Summer School on refugee law and refugee rights will offer a specific focus on the refugee law and asylum rights in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia. We aim to gather students from different countries with social sciences background, NGO workers and activists to discuss the current challenges of access to international refugee protection in the countries of the Western Balkans, and the responsibilities of both citizens and the state towards them.

The Summer School will employ an interactive learning environment using documentary films and open discussions enabling participants to both contribute to and gain an in-depth knowledge of asylum adjudication procedures, reception and integration policies.

Our training program will cover the following modules:
•       Assessment of 1951 Refugee Convention and 1967 Protocol
•       The Relevance of International Human Rights Law to Flight from Persecution
•       UNHCR Guidelines on International Protection: “Membership of a particular social group” within the context of Article 1A(2).
•       Assessment of the Female Genital Cutting debate in Africa
•       Convention on the Rights of the Child: Unaccompanied Minor/Separated Children
•       UNHCR Guidance Note on Refugee Claims Relating to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity
•       Statelessness
•       The ethics of Refugee Law
•       Psycho-Social Issues: Medical Evidence in Asylum and Human Rights Appeals
•       Use of Country of origin Information assessment
•       Credibility Assessment in Asylum Procedures
•       Establishment and development of Asylum systems in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia
•       Refugee Status Determination (RSD) Procedures in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia
•       Reception and integration of Refugees in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia
•       Detention in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia
•       Transit migration, readmission and irregular migration in the Western Balkans
•       UNHCR Guidelines on the Application in Mass Influx Situations of the Exclusion Clauses
•       Internal Protection/Relocation/Flight Alternatives
•       Providing Legal Aid to Refugees: Starting a Refugee Legal Aid Clinic?

Instructors at the course are experienced and committed lawyers, scholars, practitioners and activists in the field that will bring a comparative and locally focused perspective to the international protection debate. They are led by Professor Emerita Barbara Harrell-Bond, being with us for the third time, supporting CESI work and helping the development of the refugee studies in Bosnia and Herzegovina/ WB region, Nedim Kulenović, doctoral candidate and a lawyer at the Association “Vaša prava Bosnia and Herzegovina”, providing free legal aid in the sector for international protection, Radoš Đurović, LL.M International Law, Belgrade University, Asylum Protection Center-APC, Belgrade, Serbia, Drago Župarić-Iljić, Junior Research Assistant at the institute for Migration and Ethnic Studies, Zagreb, Croatia, Victoria Smythies, Juris Doctorate, LL.M. International Law, University of Vienna, Grants writer, British Red Cross , Gabriel Bonis, MA, International Relations from Queen Mary, University of London, Refugee Caseworker, British Red Cross and Dr. Selma Porobić , CESI director and forced migration scholar.

The school is open to students from all social sciences backgrounds with admission fee of 500Euros/with considerable discount offered to the participants from the WB region, covering school programme with materials, supervision, tutoring, certificate of participation, food and beverage during the 10-days long training and activities.

CESI invites you to conduct the registration for the ISS 2015 by sending your letter of interest and CV by 1st of June, 2015 by email to cesi@fpn.unsa.ba

Courses: Summer School in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration, 20 Jul.-14 Aug. 2015, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

APPLICATIONS NOW OPEN

REFUGEE PROTECTION AND FORCED MIGRATION

20 July – 14 August 2015

Humboldt Summer University (HUWISU), Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

http://huwisu.de/courses/details/117/

Applications are invited for this year’s Summer School in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration to be held at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

This course examines the protection regime pertaining to refugees, internally displaced persons (IDPs), and stateless persons. It gives special attention to the evolving set of legal norms, institutions, and procedures that have emerged from the international community’s resolve to protect refugees and other forced migrants.

Course Content

The course begins with an introduction to the international human rights and refugee protection regimes. It then continues with a historical perspective of the pre-United Nations initiatives to protect refugees and introduces the normative ethics and politics of refugee protection. That is followed by an analysis of both the legal and institutional pillars of the refugee regime, i.e. of the refugee definitions captured in various international instruments and of the protected granted by the UNHCR. The regional refugee regimes are then examined, specifically those developed in Africa, Latin America, and Europe. Last but not least, the course will review the protection of IDPs and of stateless persons. Throughout the course, case studies will be used so that students can translate into practice the legal instruments, theoretical concepts, and doctrine that they have learned.

The course program is available at:
http://huwisu.de/media_static/abteilung_internationales/2015/huwisu_refugee_protection_and_forced_migration_2015-2.pdf

Class size, credits, and certificate

The class size will amount up to 18 participants. Participants will receive a final grade certificate and 4 ECTS credit points only in the event of regular attendance (must be present 80% of the time), as well as active participation. Upon request a transcript of records can be issued.

Student profile

Participants must be at least 18 years old and possess a very good command of the English language as teaching is conducted in English (English: B2 – proof will be required). This course is destined to undergraduate law students and/or students with a strong interest in the topic.

Lecturer

Dr José H. Fischel de Andrade is a Senior Legal Officer with the UNHCR and UNHCR-designated judge at the French National Court of Asylum (CNDA). He also teaches at the University of Milano, the University of Paris 2 (Panthéon-Assas), the Paris Institut d’études politiques (Science-Po), and the Strasbourg-based International Institute of Human Rights. For further information please visit: http://unimi.academia.edu/JoseHFischeldeAndrade

Course structure

The course is composed of academic lessons and cultural and social activities. Lessons comprise lectures, group work, and discussion sessions. Participants will receive a total of 45 hours (one lesson equals 45 minutes). The lessons are held three times a week :
Tuesday 1.30pm – 3pm and 3.30pm – 5pm
Wednesday 1.30pm – 3pm and 3.30pm – 5pm
Friday 9am – 10.30am and 11am – 11.45am

Regarding the cultural and social activities, a guided tour and visit of the German Parliament (Deutscher Bundestag), theatre and/or museum visits and a sightseeing tour Berlin/Potsdam are planned.

Fees

585.00 Euro
Discounts:
– Alumni discounts: 50.00 Euro

Applications

Online: http://huwisu.de/courses/details/117/
Deadline: 1 June 2015, or when participant quota is reached.

For further information please visit our website or contact the coordinator Pierre Steuer: pierre.steuer@uv.hu-berlin.de

Courses: International Summer School in Forced Migration – application deadline 1 May 2015 (reminder)

Courses:

International Summer School in Forced Migration – application deadline 1 May 2015 (reminder)

Please note: We are currently experiencing some technical problems with our online application form for the Summer School. We are working to fix these issues and hope to have them resolved soon. In the meantime, if you have difficulties submitting the form, there is now a Word form available at www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/summer-school which you can download, fill in and send back to us by email. If you have applied within the last three weeks and you have any concerns, please contact us at summer.school@qeh.ox.ac.uk and we will be happy to assist you.

APPLICATIONS OPEN

Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford
International Summer School in Forced Migration 06-24 July 2015

Applications are invited to the 2015 International Summer School in Forced Migration, to be held at Wadham College, Oxford. The Summer School, now in its 26th year, offers an intensive, interdisciplinary and participative approach to the study of forced migration. It aims to enable people working with refugees and other forced migrants to examine critically the forces and institutions that dominate the world of the displaced. Beginning with reflection on the diverse ways of conceptualising forced migration, the course considers political, legal and wellbeing issues associated with contemporary displacement. Individual course modules also tackle a range of other topics, including globalisation and forced migration, and negotiating strategies in humanitarian situations.

Applications:

Online: www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/summer-school. For any enquiries please contact: summer.school@qeh.ox.ac.uk

Entry requirements:

Applicants should have:
1. experience of working with, or on issues related to, refugees or other forced migrants
2. a first degree as a minimum
3. proficiency in the English language. As a guide, foreign-language English speakers should be able to obtain a score of 7.00 in ELTS/IELTS or 570 in TOEFL.

The participants:

Typically comprising more than 40 nationalities, participants include host government officials, intergovernmental and non-governmental agency practitioners involved with assistance and policymaking for forced migrants, and researchers specialising in the study of forced migration. The course, which is residential, is held in Oxford. Teaching is conducted in English.

The teaching:

Lecturers and tutors include research staff, academics and professionals from the Refugee Studies Centre and other world-class institutions, drawn from a number of disciplines and practices including law, anthropology, politics, and international relations.

Fees:

For self-funded candidates: £3,300

Deadlines:

The closing date for applications is 1 May 2015. The closing date for receipt of course fees is 15 May 2015.

For more information: www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/summer-school

Courses: 2015 Summer Statelessness Course

2015 Statelessness Summer Course

This year, the 4th edition of the Statelessness Summer Course will take place from 3-7 August in Tilburg, the Netherlands. We are now accepting applications. Click here for details: http://www.institutesi.org/ourwork/summercourse.php. The application deadline is 15 April.

The Statelessness Summer Course is a 1-week intensive learning programme for practitioners on statelessness. The course is coordinated and run by the Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion, and is hosted by Tilburg University in the Netherlands (the course was previously run by the Tilburg Statelessness Programme, which now continues its activities under the flag of the Institute). As in previous years, the course is also held in partnership with Open Society Justice Initiative.

The course considers statelessness and the right to nationality from various angles. It deals with legal and policy issues associated with statelessness. Thirty selected participants from civil society, academia, governments and international organisations from around the world come together to learn about statelessness, explore fundamental questions of definition and legal frameworks, and to develop plans for action.

What the 2014 Statelessness Summer School participants had to say about the course:

“An eye opener on a serious humanitarian problem that few people know about.”
– Jeddi Armah, Assistant Minister for Legal Affairs at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Liberia

“Incredibly relevant, engaging and comprehensive course which not only satisfied me in terms of current queries but also made me adamant to do my best to remain in this exciting field for as long as possible.”
– Sophia Soares, UNHCR Malta

[Moderator’s note: please see relevant links below:

Institute on Statelessness and Inclusion: http://www.institutesi.org/

Tilburg University: http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/

Open Society Justice Initiative: http://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/about/programs/open-society-justice-initiative]

Courses: Conflict Transformation Across Borders Summer Institute Launches in Ecuador

Please let students, colleagues, and alumni know about this exciting new opportunity for hands-on learning in Latin America in June 2015!

The McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies of the University of Massachusetts-Boston, FLACSO-Ecuador, and the Center for Mediation, Peace, and Resolution of Conflict (CEMPROC) are pleased to announce:

Conflict Transformation Across Borders

This new summer institute will take place from June 10-30, 2015 in Quito, Ecuador at FLACSO, with graduate-level credit issued by UMass Boston. The program will focus on conflict and peace in border regions.

The program is coordinated by Dr. Jeff Pugh of UMass Boston (Dept. of Conflict Resolution, Human Security, and Global Governance) and Dr. Cecile Mouly of FLACSO-Ecuador (Dept. of International Studies and Communication), and will feature a series of high-level guest speakers (including former Ecuadorian Minister of Foreign Relations and UN Ambassador Francisco Carrion).  This course is designed to equip early-career professionals, graduate and advanced undergraduate students, and other future peacebuilders with practical tools, knowledge, and hands-on experience to understand the complexities of conflicts within and across border regions, and the types of interventions that can be used to transform these conflicts.

The program will include classroom discussion; trips to the Amazon cloud forest and the northern border region; practical skills training workshops on negotiation, cross-cultural communication, and proposal writing; and participants will design their own proposal for a peacebuilding intervention, receiving feedback from a panel of experienced experts in the field.

More details and applications are available online at http://www.umb.edu/academics/caps/international/conflict_transformation (the deadline to apply is March 1, 2015).

==============
Topics:
¨ Human vs. national security in border regions
¨ Transnational dimensions of peacebuilding
¨ Skills workshop: Conflict analysis
¨ Border disputes and binational peace processes:  Ecuador-Colombia and Ecuador-Peru
¨ Forced migration, refugees, and social conflict in migrant-receiving communities
¨ Skills workshop: Negotiation and mediation
¨ Skills workshop: Project proposal development
¨ Transnational environmental conflict
¨ Indigenous identity and ethnic conflict along borders
¨ Skills workshop: Cross-cultural and non-violent communication as peacebuilding resource
¨ Disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) and the Colombian armed conflict
¨ Local initiatives and national infrastructures for peace

Courses: Annual Summer Course on Refugees and Forced Migration (Centre for Refugee Studies, York University) – Early bird reduced fee until 31 January

*Please distribute widely*

**EARLY BIRD REDUCED FEE UNTIL JANUARY 31st**

Centre for Refugee Studies, York University
Annual Summer Course on Refugees and Forced Migration
May 4-8, 2015

EARLY BIRD DEADLINE: January 31, 2015

The 2015 Summer Course on Refugees and Forced Migration is an internationally acclaimed, non-credit course for academic and field-based practitioners working in the area of forced migration. It serves as a hub for researchers, students, practitioners, service providers and policy makers to share information and ideas. The Summer Course is housed within the Centre for Refugee Studies (CRS), York University. All participants who complete the full course receive a York University Centre for Refugee Studies Summer Course Certificate.

The Summer Course provides an interdisciplinary, interactive and experiential approach to the study of forced migration. Through attending lectures and related small group sessions, course participants develop a deepened understanding of the political, economic, social and cultural contexts of forced migration, and the major state and non-state institutions involved in refugee protection and advocacy.  Actors involved in the management of migration will also be examined. Participants will have an opportunity during the course for structured networking and idea collaboration through panels and small group discussion.

Participant Requirements:

The Summer Course is designed for academic and field-based practitioners working in the area of forced migration. Participants typically include government officials, non-government organization personnel, lawyers, university faculty, and graduate students. Applicants must have either academic or practical background in forced migration issues. If the background is strictly academic, a first degree is required. (Undergraduate students may apply to the course if they are completing their degree prior to the course start date.) Applicants must have English proficiency, as translation services are unfortunately not available.

Dates: May 4-8, 2015

Location: York University Keele Campus, Toronto, Canada

‘Early Bird’ Registration Fee: $975 CAD +13% HST (by January 31, 2015)

Registration Fee: $1400 CAD +13%HST (until April 1, 2015)

For more information, or to apply, please visit: http://crs.yorku.ca/summer or contact summer@yorku.ca

Course Deadline for March 2015 in-take: MA in Refugee Protection by distance-learning

Only 3 weeks left to apply for March 2015 in-take on

distance-learning Masters’ degree in Refugee Protection!

Only three weeks remain until 1 February 2015 – the deadline for applying for the March 2015 in-take on the innovative new distance-learning MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies.

The Masters’ programme is unique in the field in that it is the only MA available to be taken by distance-learning and also in being the only MA to offer two start dates per year. It is run by the Refugee Law Initiative, School of Advanced Study, University of London.

Why choose this Masters’ programme?

The new MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies by distance-learning enables students to acquire a rigorous legal, practical and theoretical understanding of refugee protection and forced migration, whilst developing expertise through a choice of optional modules.

Students hone self-reliance in using and critiquing law, policy and practice in the field, and learn how to gather, organise and deploy evidence to form balanced judgements and develop policy recommendations. They complete methodological training in researching refugees and have the opportunity to develop practical field skills in advocacy, campaigning and fund-raising.

Core modules are:

  • An Introduction to Refugee and Forced Migration Studies
  • Protecting Human Rights, Refugees and Displaced Persons in International Law
  • Dissertation, including Researching Refugees taught component

The cutting-edge optional modules include:

  • Securing Refugee Protection in Practice (practical)
  • Asylum Law in Europe: Towards Regional Harmonisation of International Protection
  • Asylum and Refugees in Africa and Latin America: Refugee Protection in the Global South
  • Advanced International Refugee Law
  • Internal Displacement in Law and Policy: War and Beyond
  • Statelessness, Nationality and the Protection of Stateless Persons
  • Gender, Sexual Identity and Age in the Refugee Context
  • Displacement, Healthcare and Humanitarian Action

Designed and run by the academic staff and wide network of experts at the Refugee Law Initiative, the MA is delivered through the renowned University of London International Programmes which has over 54,000 students in every corner of the globe studying on more than 180 different courses.

Why distance learning? 

The MA is unique in that it is the first ever postgraduate course on refugees to be offered by distance-learning. Students study this two-year online programme part-time, from the comfort of a home computer and accessing the course content through a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

The distance-learning format has various benefits.

  • Students can flexibly combine postgraduate study with ongoing professional and domestic commitments. No requirement to travel to London or even be online at set times.
  • Students are able to connect with an engaged and experienced cohort of fellow students all across the world, including students currently working in different capacities in the field
  • Students are taught by tutors who are leading experts and/or subject specialists currently working in academic and practitioner institutions across the globe
  • Students have maximum flexibility in choosing to enter the programme in one of two annual in-takes (October and March)

What is the difference between the March and October in-takes?

The March start date is intended to provide an additional element of flexibility to students on the MA, especially those who may be working alongside their studies, by allowing study on the programme to be commenced at two points during the year, i.e. March as well as October.

 

The only difference between the two start dates is the order in which two core modules and the two sets of optional modules are taken. Students on the March in-take begin their studies with the module An Introduction to Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (see above).

 

Who is it for?

This programme is designed for those who wish to develop their careers in a range of professional contexts in the refugee, human rights or humanitarian fields.

This includes those currently working for, or wishing to work for, international agencies such as the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the Red Cross movement, as well as governmental bodies and non-governmental organisations.

 

How do I apply?

The next application deadline is 1 February 2015. To find out more or to apply, please visit www.londoninternational.ac.uk/refugee-migration

 

For more information about the course please contact:

Dr David James Cantor
Refugee Law Initiative, School of Advanced Study, University of London
Tel: +44 (0) 20 7862 8827
E: david.cantor@sas.ac.uk

Courses: Georgetown University Certificate in International Migration Studies

Courses:

Georgetown University Certificate in International Migration Studies
We are pleased to announce the spring 2015 course schedule:
Washington-based courses:
Migration and Development (4-6 February)
Human Trafficking (4-6 March)
Refugees and Displaced Persons (15-17 April)
Global Trends in International Migration (12-15 May)
Migration and Security (3-5 June)
Online course:
Global Trends in International Migration (28 April-18 June)
The courses are taught by faculty at the Institute for the Study of International Migration at Georgetown University.
For more information and registration, please visit

Courses: Center for Migration and Refugee Studies – winter short courses 1-19 February 2015 (deadlines extended)

Courses: Center for Migration and Refugee Studies – winter short courses 1-19 February 2015 (deadlines extended)

The application deadlines for winter short courses at the Center for Migration and Refugee Studies at the American University in Cairo have been extended as follows:

• Refugees Hosted During Political Transitions: Understanding the Protection Needs of Vulnerable Migrants and Refugees (February 1-5, 2015). *New application deadline: 5 January 2015*. Deadline to pay deposit: 7 January 2015.
• Training Skills for Trainers of Psychosocial and Mental Health Workers in Countries Affected by Emergencies (February 8-12, 2015). *New application deadline: 8 January 2015*. Deadline to pay deposit: 10 January 2015.
• International Refugee Law (February 15-19, 2015). *New application deadline: 11 January 2015. Deadline to pay deposit: 13 January 2015.

Please find all course details and contact information below.

Best wishes,

FM List Moderator

________________________________________

Center for Migration and Refugee Studies
Winter short courses 1-19 February, 2015

The Center for Migration and Refugee Studies (CMRS) at The American University in Cairo (AUC) is offering the following three short courses during the month of February 2015:

• Refugees Hosted During Political Transitions: Understanding the Protection Needs of Vulnerable Migrants and Refugees (February 1-5, 2015)
• Training Skills for Trainers of Psychosocial and Mental Health Workers in Countries Affected by Emergencies (February 8-12, 2015)
• International Refugee Law (February 15-19, 2015)

Eligibility for all courses

Requirements: These courses are offered for undergraduate and postgraduate students, and researchers as well as practitioners working with migrants and refugees. A minimum knowledge of displacement and migration terminologies and context is a requirement for participation in any of the three courses.

All courses are conducted in English and no translation facilities are provided. Participants should have a sufficient command of the English language. The courses will be from 9 am till 5pm for five days.
Interested applicants can apply for one course or for all the three courses. Different deadlines are specified for each course as indicated below.

The fee for each course is $500. Independent researchers and students can apply for the limited number of scholarships. The scholarships cover only tuition waiver – applicants are responsible for their flight and accommodation.

Number of Participants: minimum of 12

NB: Non-Egyptian applicants are strongly encouraged to apply three weeks before the course start, in order to have enough time to obtain their visa.

Venue

All courses will take place in AUC Tahrir Campus in Downtown Cairo. The exact location and room numbers will be forwarded to accepted participants before the start of the courses.

Course Descriptions

Refugees Hosted During Political Transitions: Understanding the Protection Needs of Vulnerable Migrants and Refugees (February 1-5, 2015)

At times of political turmoil in host countries, refugees and migrants receive the least attention.  Being hit by waves of xenophobia and arbitrary policies, they become increasingly vulnerable. This course aims to examine the meaning and factors of vulnerability in the context of the protection framework through which service providers and refugees operate in transitioning host countries with a focus on Egypt. It will focus on understanding the needs of specific groups at risk such as: Unaccompanied Minors, SGBV survivors, Irregular migrants at the borders, Victims of Trafficking, Detainees, medically vulnerable and closed files or those with no permits. Using a variety of interactive methods including lectures, audiovisuals, group assignments and fieldwork, the course will cover the main protection challenges faced by migrants and service providers catering to them alike with a focus on Egypt. The course will look at the risks faced by vulnerable groups and opportunities they have manifested in community networks and service provision.  At the end of the course, participants in groups will explore case studies and will come up with recommendations for a protection framework in light of the local context. To learn from best practices, during the course, participants will be required to give an individual presentation on their area of expertise related to the overall theme of the course. The course will also host practitioner representing service providers catering to migrants and refugees as well as community leaders and community-based organizations.

About the Instructor

Sara Sadek is a PhD Candidate at the Center for Applied Human Rights, Politics Department at the University of York, UK. She obtained her B.A in Political Science at the American University in Cairo (AUC) and her M.A in Refugee Studies at the University of East London (UEL), UK. She is currently a consultant and trainer in the field of migration and protection in Egypt and MENA region. She has lead and participated in a series of medium to large-scale needs assessments and research projects in the realm of protection and migration as a researcher and consultant for international organizations and academic institutions. To name a few: the International Organization for Migration (IOM), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Save the Children (SC), Africa and Middle East Refugee Assistance (AMERA), Egyptian Foundation for Refugee Rights (EFRR), the Center for Migration and Refugee Studies (CMRS) at the American University in Cairo (AUC), University of East London, the French Institute for the Near East (IFPO), Duke University, and Center for Applied Human Rights at the University of York, UK. Research topics covered: trafficking and smuggling, mixed migratory flows, domestic labor, unaccompanied minors, survivors of Sexual and Gender-based Violence, Diaspora and transnational communities, child protection, livelihoods and socio-economic rights, citizenship, narratives of Iraqi and Syrian displacements, transitional justice and civil society groups. She has published widely on the topic of Iraqi displacement in MENA and urban refugees in Egypt. For the past few years, she has been engaged in a variety of initiatives and projects through providing trainings for government officials and civil society groups to bridge the gap between migrants and local communities.

Deadlines for submitting application for this course are:

• 5th of January, 2015
• Deadline for paying course deposit (30% of the course fee) is the 7th of January, 2015

Training Skills for Trainers of Psychosocial and Mental Health Workers in Countries Affected by Emergencies (February 8-12, 2015)

Refugees and migrants struggle with the mental health and psychosocial consequences of their experiences in the aftermath of wars, conflict, natural disasters and other emergencies. Efforts for mental health and psychosocial supportive services span the globe and are often part of aid operations. Professionals commonly need to prepare the teams to provide these services.

During this short course, participants will have opportunities to share their experiences and practice new skills. They will learn practical techniques for how they can best train the workers who will provide the psychosocial and mental health support during emergencies. They will learn how to design a curriculum that moves from theory to applied skills and about participatory and experiential training techniques including how to give an effective presentation, facilitate a discussion and practically use experiential training techniques, such as role play, drama and storytelling.

About the Instructor

Nancy Baron is the Director of the Psychosocial Services and Training Institute in Cairo and Global Psycho-Social Initiatives (GPSI). She received her Doctorate in Education at the University of Massachusetts, U.S.A., with a concentration in Family Therapy and Counseling Psychology. Since 1989, she has provided consultation, assessment, training, program design and development, research and evaluation for UN organizations and international and local NGOs in community and family focused psychosocial, mental health and peace building initiatives for conflict and post-conflict countries. She has lived and worked with emergency affected populations in the Middle East: Egypt, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Occupied Palestinian Territories; Jordan and Lebanon; in Africa: Burundi, Egypt, Guinea Conakry, Kenya, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan and Uganda; in Asia: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Indonesia, Japan and Sri Lanka; in Eastern Europe: Kosovo and Albania; in South America: Colombia; and in the South Pacific: Solomon Islands. Some of her related publications can be found on www.mhpss.net

Deadline for submitting applications to this course:

• 8th of January, 2015
• Deadline for paying course deposit (30% of the course fee) is the 10th of January, 2015

International Refugee Law (February 15-19, 2015)

The course will provide post-graduate students, international agency staff, NGO workers, lawyers and others working with refugees or interested in refugee issues with an introduction to the international legal framework which governs the protection of refugees.  Through lectures, case studies and  small group discussions, course participants will learn about the basic features of international refugee law through the lens of the 1951 Refugee Convention, looking at the elements of the definition(s) of “refugee,” who is excluded from the definition, the role of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the process by which refugee status is determined, the rights of refugees under international law, the ethical and professional obligations of those representing refugees, and other issues of refugee policy.  A background in law is useful but not required.

About the Instructor

Parastou Hassouri has previously taught international refugee law at the American University of Cairo and has extensive experience in the field of international refugee law and refugee and immigrant rights and migration policy. Most recently, as a consultant with the Global Detention Project, she researches the issue of migration-related detention in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries. Her previous experience also includes serving as a consultant with the UNHCR in the Zaaatari Refugee Camp in Jordan, and with the UNHCR office in Moscow. Prior to that, as a consultant for Human Rights First, she conducted extensive research on the resettlement of Iraqi refugees out of the Middle East to third countries. She has worked as a Legal Advisor and Sexual and Gender-Based Violence Focal Point at Africa and Middle East Refugee Assistance (AMERA) in Cairo. Her experience in the United States includes serving as an Attorney Advisor at the Immigration Courts of New York City and Los Angeles and working as an immigration attorney in private practice in New York City. In addition, she designed and directed the Immigrant Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey, where she focused on responding to ethnic profiling and other forms of anti-immigrant backlash in the United States in the aftermath of the attacks of September 11.

Deadlines for submitting applications to this course:

• 11th of January, 2015
• Deadline for paying course deposit (30% of the course fee) is the 13th of January, 2015

Application procedure for all courses:

1. Fill out the application form. The form is available on the CMRS website: http://www.aucegypt.edu/GAPP/cmrs/Pages/CMRS-Winter-2015-Short-Courses.aspx

2. Send the application form to cmrscourses@aucegypt.edu with your most recent C.V, Att. Ms. Naseem Hashim

Applicants may apply to and be accepted in more than one course. Please do not hesitate to contact cmrscourses@aucegypt.edu if you have any difficulty with the application process.

Applicants accepted for the course will be notified by email within a week after the deadline for submitting the application.

Participants are expected to pay a 30% of the total fees ($150) as a deposit. Please pay attention to the deposit deadline for each course and kindly note that the deposit is non-refundable. More information on payment method will be provided to accepted participants.

Tuition fees will cover course material and two coffee breaks per course day. Any other expenses are not included.

Center for Migration and Refugee Studies Winter Short Courses 1st – 19th of February, 2015

Center for Migration and Refugee Studies

Winter Short Courses 1st – 19th of February, 2015

The Center for Migration and Refugee Studies (CMRS) at The American University in Cairo (AUC) is offering the following three short courses during the month of February 2015:

  1. Refugees hosted during political transitions: Understanding the Protection Needs of Vulnerable Migrants and Refugees (February 1 – 5, 2015)
  2. Training Skills for Trainers of Psychosocial and Mental Health Workers in Countries Affected by Emergencies (February 8 – 12, 2015)
  3. International Refugee Law (February 15 – 19 , 2015)
  1. Eligibility for all courses:

Requirements: These courses are offered for undergraduate and postgraduate students, and researchers as well as practitioners working with migrants and refugees. A minimum knowledge of displacement and migration terminologies and context is a requirement for participation in any of the three courses.

All courses are conducted in English and no translation facilities are provided.  Participants should have a sufficient command of the English language. The courses will be from 9 am till 5pm for five days.

Interested applicants can apply for one course or for all the three courses. Different deadlines are specified for each course as indicated below.

The fee for each course is $ 500. Independent researchers and students can apply for the limited number of scholarships. The scholarships cover only tuition waiver – applicants are responsible for their flight and accommodation.

Number of Participants: minimum of 12

NB: Non- Egyptian applicants are strongly encouraged to apply three weeks before the course start, in order to have enough time to obtain their visa.

  1. Venue of the course: All courses will take place in AUC Tahrir Campus in Downtown Cairo. The exact location and room numbers will be forwarded to accepted participants before the start of the courses.
  2. Courses’ Descriptions

3.1 Refugees hosted during political transitions:  Understanding the Protection Needs of Vulnerable Migrants and Refugees (February 1 – 5, 2015)

At times of political turmoil in host countries, refugees and migrants receive the least attention.  Being hit by waves of xenophobia and arbitrary policies, they become increasingly vulnerable.  This course aims to examine the meaning and factors of vulnerability in the context of the protection framework through which service providers and refugees operate in transitioning host countries with a focus on Egypt. It will focus on understanding the needs of specific groups at risk such as: Unaccompanied Minors, SGBV survivors, Irregular migrants at the borders, Victims of Trafficking, Detainees, medically vulnerable and closed files or those with no permits. Using a variety of interactive methods including lectures, audiovisuals, group assignments and fieldwork, the course will cover the main protection challenges faced by migrants and service providers catering to them alike with a focus on Egypt. The course will look at the risks faced by vulnerable groups and opportunities they have manifested in community networks and service provision.  At the end of the course, participants in groups will explore case studies and will come up with recommendations for a protection framework in light of the local context. To learn from best practices, during the course, participants will be required to give an individual presentation on their area of expertise related to the overall theme of the course. The course will also host practitioner representing service providers catering to migrants and refugees as well as community leaders and community-based organizations.
About the Instructor: Sara Sadek is a PhD Candidate at the Center for Applied Human Rights, Politics Department at the University of York, UK. She obtained her B.A in Political Science at the American University in Cairo (AUC) and her M.A in Refugee Studies at the University of East London (UEL), UK. She is currently a consultant and trainer in the field of migration and protection in Egypt and MENA region. She has lead and participated in a series of medium to large-scale needs assessments and research projects in the realm of protection and migration as a researcher and consultant for international organizations and academic institutions. To name a few: the International Organization for Migration (IOM), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Save the Children (SC), Africa and Middle East Refugee Assistance (AMERA), Egyptian Foundation for Refugee Rights (EFRR),  the Center for Migration and Refugee Studies (CMRS) at the American University in Cairo (AUC), University of East London, the French Institute for the Near East (IFPO), Duke University,  and Center for Applied Human Rights at the University of York, UK. Research topics covered: trafficking and smuggling, mixed migratory flows, domestic labor, unaccompanied minors, survivors of Sexual and Gender-based Violence, Diaspora and transnational communities, child protection, livelihoods and socio-economic rights, citizenship, narratives of Iraqi and Syrian displacements, transitional justice and civil society groups. She has published widely on the topic of Iraqi displacement in MENA and urban refugees in Egypt. For the past few years, she has been engaged in a variety of initiatives and projects through providing trainings for government officials and civil society groups to bridge the gap between migrants and local communities.

Deadlines for submitting application for this course are:

  • 1st of January, 2015
  • Deadline for paying course deposit (30% of the course’s fee) is 5th of January, 2015

3.2 Training Skills for Trainers of Psychosocial and Mental Health Workers in Countries Affected by Emergencies (February 8 – 12, 2015)

Refugees and migrants struggle with the mental health and psychosocial consequences of their experiences in the aftermath of wars, conflict, natural disasters and other emergencies. Efforts for mental health and psychosocial supportive services span the globe and are often part of aid operations. Professionals commonly need to prepare the teams to provide these services.

During this short course, participants will have opportunities to share their experiences and practice new skills. They will learn practical techniques for how they can best train the workers who will provide the psychosocial and mental health support during emergencies. They will learn how to design a curriculum that moves from theory to applied skills and about participatory and experiential training techniques including how to give an effective presentation, facilitate a discussion and practically use experiential training techniques, such as role play, drama and storytelling.

About the Instructor: Nancy Baron is the Director of the Psychosocial Services and Training Institute in Cairo and Global Psycho-Social Initiatives (GPSI). She received her Doctorate in Education at the University of Massachusetts, U.S.A. with a concentration in Family Therapy and Counseling Psychology. Since 1989, she has provided consultation, assessment, training, program design and development, research and evaluation for UN organizations and international and local NGOs in community and family focused psychosocial, mental health and peace building initiatives for conflict and post-conflict countries. She has lived and worked with emergency affected populations in the Middle East: Egypt, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Occupied Palestinian Territories; Jordan and Lebanon; in Africa: Burundi, Egypt, Guinea Conakry, Kenya, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan and Uganda; in Asia: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Indonesia, Japan and Sri Lanka; in Eastern Europe: Kosovo and Albania; in South America: Colombia; and in the South Pacific: Solomon Islands. Some of her related publications can be found on www.mhpss.net

Deadline for submitting applications to this course:

  • 4th of January, 2015
  • Deadline for paying course deposit (30% of the course’s fee) is 8th of January, 2015

3.3 International Refugee Law (February 15 – 19, 2015)

The course will provide post-graduate students, international agency staff, NGO workers, lawyers and others working with refugees or interested in refugee issues with an introduction to the international legal framework which governs the protection of refugees.  Through lectures, case studies and  small group discussions, course participants will learn about the basic features of international refugee law through the lens of the 1951 Refugee Convention, looking at the elements of the definition(s) of “refugee,” who is excluded from the definition, the role of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the process by which refugee status is determined, the rights of refugees under international law, the ethical and professional obligations of those representing refugees, and other issues of refugee policy.  A background in law is useful but not required.

Parastou Hassouri has previously taught international refugee law at the American University of Cairo and has extensive experience in the field of international refugee law and refugee and immigrant rights and migration policy. Most recently, as a consultant with the Global Detention Project, she researches the issue of migration-related detention in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries.  Her previous experience also includes serving as a consultant with the UNHCR in the Zaaatari Refugee Camp in Jordan, and with the UNHCR office in Moscow.  Prior to that, as a consultant for Human Rights First, she conducted extensive research on the resettlement of Iraqi refugees out of the Middle East to third countries.  She has worked as a Legal Advisor and Sexual and Gender-Based Violence Focal Point at Africa and Middle East Refugee Assistance (AMERA) in Cairo.  Her experience in the United States includes serving as an Attorney Advisor at the Immigration Courts of New York City and Los Angeles and working as an immigration attorney in private practice in New York City.  In addition, she designed and directed the Immigrant Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey, where she focused on responding to ethnic profiling and other forms of anti-immigrant backlash in the United States in the aftermath of the attacks of September 11.

Deadlines for submitting applications to this course:

  • 8th of January , 2015
  • Deadline for paying course deposit (30% of the course’s fee) is 13th of January, 2015

Application procedure for all courses:

To apply for the courses:

  1. Fill out the application form. The form is available on CMRS website: http://www.aucegypt.edu/GAPP/cmrs/outreach/Pages/ShortCourses.aspx
  2. Send the application form tocmrscourses@aucegypt.edu with your most recent C.V; Att. Ms. Naseem Hashim

Applicants may apply to and be accepted in more than one course. Please do not hesitate to contact cmrscourses@aucegypt.edu if you have any difficulty with the application process.
Applicants accepted for the course will be notified by email within a week after the deadline for submitting the application.

Participants are expected to pay a 30% of the total fees ($150) as a deposit. Please pay attention to the deposit deadline for each course and kindly note that the deposit is non-refundable.  More information on payment method will be provided to accepted participants.

Tuition fees will cover course material and two coffee breaks per course day. Any other expenses are not included.

Courses: Summer Course on Refugees and Forced Migration (York University Centre for Refugee Studies)

Source: Forced Migration List.

Please distribute widely!

** REGISTRATION NOW OPEN! **

The Centre for Refugee Studies at York University is offering its annual Summer Course on Refugees and Forced Migration from May 4-8, 2015.

The Summer Course is an internationally acclaimed, non-credit course for academic and field-based practitioners working in the area of forced migration. It serves as a hub for researchers, students, practitioners, service providers and policy makers to share information and ideas.  The Summer Course is housed within the Centre for Refugee Studies (CRS), at York University in Toronto, Canada. All participants who complete the full course receive a York University Centre for Refugee Studies Summer Course Certificate.

2015 Summer Course topics will include:

– Forced displacement: International case studies

– Legal approaches to refugee studies

– UNHCR, the Convention and the international refugee regime

– Externalization of asylum

– Detention practices

– Urban refugees

– Refugee resettlement policy

– Internally displaced populations

– Sexual minority claims

– Environmentally-induced displacement

Dates: May 4-8, 2015

Location: York University, Toronto, Canada

Course Fee: $975 CAD +13% HST (by January 31, 2015)

Late Registration Fee: $1400 CAD +13%HST (February 1-April 1, 2015)

For more information, and to apply, please visit our website at

http://crs.yorku.ca/summer/

 

Courses: Center for Migration and Refugee Studies Winter Short Courses

Source: Forced Migration Listhttp://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/forced-migration.html.

Center for Migration and Refugee Studies
Winter Short Courses 1-19 February, 2015

The Center for Migration and Refugee Studies (CMRS) at The American University in Cairo (AUC) is offering the following three short courses during the month of February 2015:

. Refugees hosted during political transitions: Understanding the Protection Needs of Vulnerable Migrants and Refugees (February 1-5, 2015)
. Training Skills for Trainers of Psychosocial and Mental Health Workers in Countries Affected by Emergencies (February 8- 12, 2015)
. International Refugee Law (February 15-19 , 2015)

Eligibility for all courses

Requirements: These courses are offered for undergraduate and postgraduate students, and researchers as well as practitioners working with migrants and refugees. A minimum knowledge of displacement and migration terminologies and context is a requirement for participation in any of the three courses.

All courses are conducted in English and no translation facilities are provided. Participants should have a sufficient command of the English language. The courses will be from 9 am till 5pm for five days.
Interested applicants can apply for one course or for all the three courses. Different deadlines are specified for each course as indicated below.

The fee for each course is $ 500. Independent researchers and students can apply for the limited number of scholarships. The scholarships cover only tuition waiver – applicants are responsible for their flight and accommodation.

Number of Participants: minimum of 12

NB: Non-Egyptian applicants are strongly encouraged to apply three weeks before the course start, in order to have enough time to obtain their visa.

Venue

All courses will take place in AUC Tahrir Campus in Downtown Cairo. The exact location and room numbers will be forwarded to accepted participants before the start of the courses.

Course Descriptions

Refugees hosted during political transitions: Understanding the Protection Needs of Vulnerable Migrants and Refugees (February 1-5, 2015)

At times of political turmoil in host countries, refugees and migrants receive the least attention.  Being hit by waves of xenophobia and arbitrary policies, they become increasingly vulnerable.  This course aims to examine the meaning and factors of vulnerability in the context of the protection framework through which service providers and refugees operate in transitioning host countries with a focus on Egypt. It will focus on understanding the needs of specific groups at risk such as: Unaccompanied Minors, SGBV survivors, Irregular migrants at the borders, Victims of Trafficking, Detainees, medically vulnerable and closed files or those with no permits. Using a variety of interactive methods including lectures, audiovisuals, group assignments and fieldwork, the course will cover the main protection challenges faced by migrants and service providers catering to them alike with a focus on Egypt. The course will look at the risks faced by vulnerable groups and opportunities they have manifested in community networks and service provision.  At the end of the course, participants in groups will explore case studies and will come up with recommendations for a protection framework in light of the local context. To learn from best practices, during the course, participants will be required to give an individual presentation on their area of expertise related to the overall theme of the course. The course will also host practitioner representing service providers catering to migrants and refugees as well as community leaders and community-based organizations.

About the Instructor

Sara Sadek is a PhD Candidate at the Center for Applied Human Rights, Politics Department at the University of York, UK. She obtained her B.A in Political Science at the American University in Cairo (AUC) and her M.A in Refugee Studies at the University of East London (UEL), UK. She is currently a consultant and trainer in the field of migration and protection in Egypt and MENA region. She has lead and participated in a series of medium to large-scale needs assessments and research projects in the realm of protection and migration as a researcher and consultant for international organizations and academic institutions. To name a few: the International Organization for Migration (IOM), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Save the Children (SC), Africa and Middle East Refugee Assistance (AMERA), Egyptian Foundation for Refugee Rights (EFRR),  the Center for Migration and Refugee Studies (CMRS) at the American University in Cairo (AUC), University of East London, the French Institute for the Near East (IFPO), Duke University,  and Center for Applied Human Rights at the University of York, UK. Research topics covered: trafficking and smuggling, mixed migratory flows, domestic labor, unaccompanied minors, survivors of Sexual and Gender-based Violence, Diaspora and transnational communities, child protection, livelihoods and socio-economic rights, citizenship, narratives of Iraqi and Syrian displacements, transitional justice and civil society groups. She has published widely on the topic of Iraqi displacement in MENA and urban refugees in Egypt. For the past few years, she has been engaged in a variety of initiatives and projects through providing trainings for government officials and civil society groups to bridge the gap between migrants and local communities.

Deadlines for submitting application for this course are:

. 1st of January, 2015
. Deadline for paying course deposit (30% of the course fee) is the 5th of January, 2015

Training Skills for Trainers of Psychosocial and Mental Health Workers in Countries Affected by Emergencies (February 8-12, 2015)

Refugees and migrants struggle with the mental health and psychosocial consequences of their experiences in the aftermath of wars, conflict, natural disasters and other emergencies. Efforts for mental health and psychosocial supportive services span the globe and are often part of aid operations. Professionals commonly need to prepare the teams to provide these services.

During this short course, participants will have opportunities to share their experiences and practice new skills. They will learn practical techniques for how they can best train the workers who will provide the psychosocial and mental health support during emergencies. They will learn how to design a curriculum that moves from theory to applied skills and about participatory and experiential training techniques including how to give an effective presentation, facilitate a discussion and practically use experiential training techniques, such as role play, drama and storytelling.

About the Instructor

Nancy Baron is the Director of the Psychosocial Services and Training Institute in Cairo and Global Psycho-Social Initiatives (GPSI). She received her Doctorate in Education at the University of Massachusetts, U.S.A., with a concentration in Family Therapy and Counseling Psychology. Since 1989, she has provided consultation, assessment, training, program design and development, research and evaluation for UN organizations and international and local NGOs in community and family focused psychosocial, mental health and peace building initiatives for conflict and post-conflict countries. She has lived and worked with emergency affected populations in the Middle East: Egypt, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Occupied Palestinian Territories; Jordan and Lebanon; in Africa: Burundi, Egypt, Guinea Conakry, Kenya, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan and Uganda; in Asia: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Indonesia, Japan and Sri Lanka; in Eastern Europe: Kosovo and Albania; in South America: Colombia; and in the South Pacific: Solomon Islands. Some of her related publications can be found on www.mhpss.net

Deadline for submitting applications to this course:

. 4th of January, 2015
. Deadline for paying course deposit (30% of the course fee) is the 8th of January, 2015

International Refugee Law (February 15 – 19, 2015)

The course will provide post-graduate students, international agency staff, NGO workers, lawyers and others working with refugees or interested in refugee issues with an introduction to the international legal framework which governs the protection of refugees.  Through lectures, case studies and  small group discussions, course participants will learn about the basic features of international refugee law through the lens of the 1951 Refugee Convention, looking at the elements of the definition(s) of “refugee,” who is excluded from the definition, the role of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the process by which refugee status is determined, the rights of refugees under international law, the ethical and professional obligations of those representing refugees, and other issues of refugee policy.  A background in law is useful but not required.

About the Instructor

Parastou Hassouri has previously taught international refugee law at the American University of Cairo and has extensive experience in the field of international refugee law and refugee and immigrant rights and migration policy. Most recently, as a consultant with the Global Detention Project, she researches the issue of migration-related detention in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries. Her previous experience also includes serving as a consultant with the UNHCR in the Zaaatari Refugee Camp in Jordan, and with the UNHCR office in Moscow. Prior to that, as a consultant for Human Rights First, she conducted extensive research on the resettlement of Iraqi refugees out of the Middle East to third countries. She has worked as a Legal Advisor and Sexual and Gender-Based Violence Focal Point at Africa and Middle East Refugee Assistance (AMERA) in Cairo. Her experience in the United States includes serving as an Attorney Advisor at the Immigration Courts of New York City and Los Angeles and working as an immigration attorney in private practice in New York City. In addition, she designed and directed the Immigrant Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey, where she focused on responding to ethnic profiling and other forms of anti-immigrant backlash in the United States in the aftermath of the attacks of September 11.

Deadlines for submitting applications to this course:

. 8th of January, 2015
. Deadline for paying course deposit (30% of the course fee) is the 13th of January, 2015

Application procedure for all courses:

1. Fill out the application form. The form is available on the CMRS website: http://www.aucegypt.edu/GAPP/cmrs/Pages/CMRS-Winter-2015-Short-Courses.aspx

2. Send the application form to cmrscourses@aucegypt.edu with your most recent C.V, Att. Ms. Naseem Hashim

Applicants may apply to and be accepted in more than one course. Please do not hesitate to contact cmrscourses@aucegypt.edu if you have any difficulty with the application process.

Applicants accepted for the course will be notified by email within a week after the deadline for submitting the application.

Participants are expected to pay a 30% of the total fees ($150) as a deposit. Please pay attention to the deposit deadline for each course and kindly note that the deposit is non-refundable. More information on payment method will be provided to accepted participants.

Tuition fees will cover course material and two coffee breaks per course day. Any other expenses are not included.