Tag Archives: book launch

Refugee Law Initiative Book Launch: Seeking Asylum in the European Union

You are warmly invited to a panel discussion and a wine reception to launch a new volume, Seeking Asylum in the European Union: Selected Protection Issues Raised by the Second Phase of the Common European Asylum System (Brill 2015), published in the RLI International Refugee Law book series.

Against the backdrop of the ‘refugee crisis’ and amid questions surrounding the suitability – and indeed future – of the Common European Asylum System, this panel event provides an opportunity to assess the ‘second phase’ of the Common European Asylum System and look to the future of European cooperation on asylum.

– Keynote: Professor Hélène Lambert

– Chair: Professor Vincent Chetail 

– Discussants: Dr Céline Bauloz, Meltem Ineli-Ciger, Dr Sarah Singer and Dr Vladislava Stoyanova

– Friday 19 February 2016, 1800-2000

– Senate Room, Senate House, London, WC1E 7HU

The event is free. To guarantee your place please register at http://bit.ly/1EGRX2I.

Book Launch at the RLI: Seeking Asylum in the European Union Edited by C. Bauloz, M. Ineli-Ciger, S.Singer and V.Stoyanova: 19 February 2016, 1900-2030

Book Launch:

SEEKING ASYLUM IN THE EUROPEAN UNION
EDITED BY C. BAULOZ, M. INELI-CIGER, S. SINGER & V. STOYANOVA
19 FEBRUARY 2016, 18:00-20:30
SENATE ROOM, SENATE HOUSE, LONDON, WC1E 7HU

71967The Refugee Law Initiative is pleased to invite you to the launch of the exciting new volume Seeking Asylum in the European Union: Selected Protection Issues Raised by the Second Phase of the Common European Asylum System edited by Dr Céline Bauloz, Dr Meltem Ineli-Ciger, Dr Sarah Singer and Dr Vladislava Stoyanova (International Refugee Law Series, Brill/Nijhoff, 2015).

Including a keynote presentation from Professor Hélène Lambert (University of Westminster), the book launch will provide the opportunity to discuss the most pressing issues raised by the second phase of the Common European Asylum System in light of the current ‘refugee crisis’. Discussions will be followed by a drinks reception.

The event is free. To guarantee your place please register at http://bit.ly/1EGRX2I.

Flyer Attached (in PDF format).

Event: Migrants at Work: Immigration & Vulnerability in Labour Law Cathryn Costello & Mark Freedland (editors)

Migrants at Work: Immigration & Vulnerability in Labour Law

Cathryn Costello & Mark Freedland (editors)

A Launch Event

Seminar Room 1, Oxford Department of International Development,

Queen Elizabeth House, 3 Mansfield Rd, Oxford OX1 3TB

In association with COMPAS, the Faculty of Law, the Refugee Studies Centre and Oxford University Press

Friday, 13th February 2015

2:30pm             Welcome from the Editors

2:45pm             Migration Law on the Labour Law Curriculum

Professor ACL Davies (University of Oxford)

3pm                  ‘Modern Slavery’ and Migrant Workers:  Panacea or Panopticon?

Professor Julia O’Connell-Davison (University of Nottingham)

Dr Virginia Mantouvalou (UCL)

Professor Bernard Ryan (University of Leicester)

Professor Bridget Anderson (COMPAS)

4:15pm             Illegality after Hounga:  On Firewalls and other Fantasies?

Professor Alan Bogg (University of Oxford)

Dr Cathryn Costello (University of Oxford)

4:45pm                        Developing the Migrants at Work Research Agenda

5:30pm             Drinks’ Reception –QEH Foyer

Book launch invite: Migration, Space and Transnational Identities: The British in South Africa, January 23rd

The Centre for Citizenship, Identities and Governance (CCIG, The Open University) would like to invite you to a book launch event: Migration, Space and Transnational Identities.The British in South Africa, co-authored by Daniel Conway (The Open University) and Pauline Leonard (University of Southampton). This timely text explores the lives, histories and identities of white British-born immigrants in South Africa, twenty years after the post-apartheid Government took office.

This event will take place on Friday, the 23d of January, from 6 to 8, at The Open University in London(Camden Town, Room 2).  Further details online:

http://www.open.ac.uk/ccig/events/book-launch-migration-space-and-transnational-identities

Confirmed speakers will be, in addition to the authors (Daniel Conway and Pauline Leonard):

  • Prof Robin Cohen, Emeritus Professor and Former Director of the International Migration Institute, University of Oxford. Co-Editor of the Migration, Diasporas and Citizenship Series, Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Prof Karen O’Reilly, Professor of Sociology at Loughborough University and author of International Migration and Social Theory (Palgrave).
  • Prof Melissa Steyn, South African Research Chair (National Research Foundation) in Critical Diversity Studies and Director of the Wits Centre for Diversity Studies, University of the Witwatersrand

This event is free and open to all – within the limit of the number of places available!

If you’d like to attend, please register online:

http://www.open.ac.uk/ccig/events/book-launch-migration-space-and-transnational-identities

Book Launch ‘Lives in Motion’ 25 Sept

Thurs 25 Sept 2014, 3.30pm, WTA, Goldsmiths, University of London

The Sociology PhD party will be launching a new book by one of our doctorate students Angelo Martins Junior who has authored

‘Lives in Motion: notebooks of an immigrant in London’ (2014, published by Whyte Tracks).

Based on ethnographic research with Brazilians working in the service sector in London, this book presents a documentary narrative of lives, journeys and stories of people on the move, presenting tales of both triumph and woe.

http://www.whytetracks.eu.com/livesinmotion.html

Discussant: Yasmin Gunaratnam (Sociology Dept, Goldsmiths), author of Death of the Migrant: bodies, borders and care (2013), Narrative & Stories in Health Care and Researching Race and Ethnicity: Methods, Knowledge and Power (2003). She is a member of both the Media Diversified and Feminist Review collectives.  http://www.gold.ac.uk/sociology/staff/gunaratnam/

Chair of discussion: Nirmal Puwar (Sociology Dept, Goldsmiths), author of Space Invaders: race, gender and bodies out of place (2003) and Curating Sociology (forthcoming. She has co-edited 15 collections and is Co-Director of the Methods Lab.

http://www.gold.ac.uk/sociology/staff/puwar/

Thurs 25 Sept 2014, 3.30pm, WTA, Goldsmiths, University of London, Lewisham Way, New Cross, London SE14 6NW.

For further details of this event email: sop02amj@gold.ac.uk

 

Book Launch: ‘Secure the borders!’ The cost and consequences of Europe’s ‘fight against irregular migration’

The Civil Society and Human Security Research Unit is pleased to invite you to.
‘Secure the borders!’ The cost and consequences of Europe’s ‘fight against irregular migration’

5.00-6.30pm, Tuesday 14 October 2014
The Venue, Saw Swee Hock Student Centre, LSE

Speakers: Dr Ruben Andersson, Dr Nicholas De Genova, Mr Jeremy Harding, Dr Cecilia Malmström

Chair: Prof Mary Kaldor

The summer of 2014 has been yet another season of misery at Europe’s southern frontiers. The unseaworthy boats carrying migrants and refugees towards an uncertain destiny and destination have again multiplied along Italian shores, despite the large investments in more patrols, surveillance and coordination at the borders. Elsewhere, in Spain and Greece, a similar story repeats. A decade on from the founding of Europe’s border agency Frontex, the challenges at the border seem as steep and intractable as ever. In this time, Europe has developed ever more complex initiatives for tracking, halting, returning and assisting undocumented migrants seeking southern European shores, involving an expanding range of sectors: European border guards and African security forces, humanitarians and policymakers, academics and intelligence experts, defence companies and data managers. What are the stakes for these diverse and at times conflictive groups working on irregular migration at and beyond the EU external borders? Who are the winners and losers among them – and are they succeeding in their job of ‘managing the frontiers’? To mark the launch of Illegality, Inc. (UC Press), this event grapples with such difficult questions about the ‘business of bordering Europe’ in the boats’ wake – while also suggesting ways in which the suffering at the borders may be alleviated in the future.

Ruben Andersson (@ruben_andersson) is AXA Postdoctoral Research Fellow at LSE’s Civil Society and Human Security Research Unit.

Nicholas De Genova is a Reader in Urban Geography at King’s College, London.

Jeremy Harding is a contributing editor to the London Review of Books.

Cecilia Malmström (@MalmstromEU) is the EU Commissioner for Home Affairs.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSEborders

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis. For any queries see LSE Events FAQ (http://www.lse.ac.uk/publicEvents/LSEEventsFAQ.aspx) or contact us at events@lse.ac.uk or 0207 955 6043.

 

Events: Book launch: Enduring Violence: Everyday life and conflict in eastern Sri Lanka

Source: Forced Migration Discussion List.

BOOK LAUNCH

Enduring Violence: Everyday life and conflict in eastern Sri Lanka by Rebecca Walker

Date: Thursday, 14th November

Time: 16:00 – 18:00

Venue: Centre for Indian Studies in Africa (CISA), 36 Jorissen Street, Braamfontein

(opposite Senate House, corner Henri and Jorissen)

PANELISTS:

Prof Dilip Menon (Centre for Indian Studies in Africa, CISA)

Adele Kirsten  (Gun Free South Africa)

Richard Smith (Action Support Centre)

RSVP: Reshmi Singh 011 717 4020  reshmi.singh@wits.ac.za

Abstract

 Located in the war-torn eastern province of Sri Lanka, this book provides a rich ethnography of how Tamilspeaking communities in Batticaloa live through and make sense of a violence that shapes everyday life itself. The core of the book comes from the author’s two-year close interaction with a group of (mainly women) human rights activists in the area. The book describes how the activists work in clandestine, informal ways to support families whose loved ones have been threatened, disappeared or killed and how they build networks of trust within the context of everyday violence. As Sri Lanka faces up to the enormity of the task of ‘post-war reconciliation’, this book aims to create a wider conversation about grief, resistance and healing in the context of violence and its long afterlife.