Tag Archives: CMRB

CMRB: New Research on the Middle East, Monday 14th December 2015, 4 – 6pm, Docklands Campus

Please find below details regarding the Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging’s next event.

New Research on the Middle East
Monday 14th December 2015, 4 – 6pm
Docklands Campus, UEL (Room EB.G.06)

Giulia Daniele, CMRB, UEL

Women, Reconciliation and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: The Road Not Yet Taken

Sharri Plonski, SOAS

New Borders – Carving a Palestinian Space into the Mixed City of Jaffa-Tel Aviv

Eylem Atakav, UEA

‘Until Every Child is Safe’: Representing ‘Legitimised’ Abuse and Child Brides on Screen

The event is free but space is limited so please book a place(s) at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/new-research-on-the-middle-east-tickets-19618716108

ABSTRACTS

Women, Reconciliation and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: The Road Not Yet Taken, Giulia Daniele

My talk is founded on the theoretical analysis and the fieldwork evaluation reported on in my Ph.D. dissertation, which has been published by Routledge in the form of a book entitled Women,Reconciliation and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: The Road Not Yet Taken. One of the main objectives of my research has been to analyse the most significant Palestinian and Israeli women’s political initiatives that have been influenced by and, in the majority of cases, prevented by obstacles associated with the Israeli military occupation in the last decade.

Despite the majority of women’s political proposals and actions have been relegated to the margins of the mainstream arena, a few of them have succeeded in finding alternative politics and approaches that have assisted them in their commitment to the struggle to end the Israeli military occupation. In such a framework, the academic salience of my study is the provision of an additional contribution to the current debate on the process of making Palestinian and Israeli women activists more visible, and the importance of this process as being one of the most meaningful ways in which to open up areas of enquiry around relevant prospects for a fair resolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Giulia Daniele is currently Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Centro de Estudos Internacionais (CEI) of the Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL) and Visiting Research Fellow at the Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB) of the University of East London (UEL).

After obtaining her Bachelor Degree in International Studies (2005) and Master’s Degree in International Relations and Human Rights (2007) at the University of Torino, she completed her Ph.D. in Politics, Human Rights and Sustainability under a co-tutelle agreement between the University of Exeter and Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies in April 2012.

Since 2005 she has conducted fieldwork researches in the West Bank, Gaza Strip, Israel and Tunisia. She also acquired useful experience with her involvement in the International Election Observation Mission for the Palestinian elections in January 2006, in the international cooperation project called EPIC (European, Palestinian and Israeli Cities for Health and Social Partnership) sponsored by the World Health Organization in December 2006, and when she was a research intern at the Office of the Vice President of the European Parliament in Brussels in Autumn 2008.

Her main research interests broadly cover the following fields: Middle East politics (focusing on Palestine/Israel), women’s political activism in the Middle East and North Africa, social movements, gender and feminist studies, conflict resolution and ethno-national narratives.

Her first book is entitled Women, Reconciliation and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: The Road Not Yet Taken (Routledge, 2014).

 New Borders – Carving a Palestinian Space into the Mixed City of Jaffa-Tel Aviv, Sharri Plonski

Acts of subversive cartography have become a common practice of Palestinian-citizen resistances inside Israel. Intertwined as part of the dialectic, if asymmetrical, relationship that exists between ‘power’ and ‘resistance’, they act as a window both into the apparatuses employed to colonise Palestinian space inside Israel and the insurgent practices different communities have articulated in response. This encounter – between Zionist erasures and the struggle to root and re-entrench Palestinian space – produces the particular story, the particular space, in which both are housed, the lines and borders of which are articulated and disrupted through unique spatial relations. In this talk, we will explore the everyday and catalytic resistances that re-map, re-sign and reclaim Palestinian space in Jaffa-Tel Aviv. Through an exploration of a spectrum of practices, we investigate how power is activated, disarticulated and reshaped through struggle that is both present and absent from Israeli-Zionist productions of space; and how struggle is articulated and mediated by the same conditions.

Dr. Sharri Plonski earned her PhD from the Department of Development Studies, at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, where she is currently a postdoctoral associate. She also works as an associate lecturer at Brunel University, where she teaches a courseon the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Her thesis will be published in 2016 as part of the new SOAS Palestine Studies Book Series with I.B. Taurus as the Struggle for Space: Ordinary and Extraordinary Resistances by Palestinian citizens of an Israeli-Jewish State.

‘Until Every Child is Safe’: Representing ‘Legitimised’ Abuse and Child Brides on Screen

According to the UNICEF report entitled ‘Ending Child Marriage: Progress and Prospects’ (2013), there are 700 million women who were married as children, and 280 million girls are at risk of becoming child brides. In Turkey, according to the reports written by feminist organisations 1 in 3 marriages there is a child. These figures are alarming and signal the need for further and urgent research in the field. Working on a documentary film on ‘child brides’ in Turkey is my first exposure to filmmaking, therefore it poses challenges to me as an academic, who focuses on theories around feminism and media rather than filmmaking practice.

In this paper, I will critically reflect upon and share the findings of my research into the representation of child brides in the media, with the aim of answering a key question: what kind of a visual language is used in the Turkish media in the depiction of girls as brides? I argue that on screen portrayals of married girls are presented as individualised stories of victims, and they reinforce a focus on tradition and religion rather than identify issues inherent in the law, politics and society. In linking theory and practice, I will also present an account of the methodological issues around representation in the production of my documentary on ‘child brides’ in Turkey. The film explores what happens after child marriage by focusing on the stories of four women and making their experiences visible, in an attempt to contribute to and advance debates around this significant, complex and emotionally charged human rights issue which has often been discursively silenced.

Eylem Atakav is Senior Lecturer in Film and Television Studies at the University of East Anglia where she teaches courses on women and film; women, Islam and media; and Middle Eastern cinemas. She is the author of Women and Turkish Cinema: Gender Politics, Cultural Identity and Representation (Routledge, 2012) and editor of Directory of World Cinema: Turkey (Intellect, 2013).  Her academic interests are on Middle Eastern film and television; representation of ‘honour’ crimes in the media, and transnational women’s cinema.

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb and facebook.com/CMRBuel

 

CMRB Event: MORE TICKETS – Gender, Fundamentalism and the ‘Prevent Agenda’

The Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB) at UEL are pleased to confirm that more tickets have just been made available for:

GENDER, FUNDAMENTALISM AND THE ‘PREVENT AGENDA’

Organised by University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) and SOAS’ Centre for Gender Studies.

This seminar will take place on Saturday 17th October 2015, 2–5pm, in B102, Brunei Gallery,  SOAS, London, WC1H 0XG
www.soas.ac.uk/gallery/visit/

Speakers:

Tehmina Kazi, British Muslims for Secular Democracy
Irene Zempi, Nottingham Trent University
Aisha Phoenix, Goldsmiths
Rahila Gupta, Southall Black Sisters

The event is free but space is limited so please register at genderfundamentalismprevent.eventbrite.co.uk

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) and SOAS’ Centre for Gender Studies are pleased to announce the following seminar:

GENDER, FUNDAMENTALISM ANDTHE ‘PREVENT AGENDA’

This seminar will take place in B102, Brunei Gallery,

SOAS, London, WC1H 0XG

www.soas.ac.uk/gallery/visit/

Saturday 17th October 2015, 2–5pm

Speakers:

Tehmina Kazi, British Muslims for Secular Democracy

Irene Zempi, Nottingham Trent University

Aisha Phoenix, Goldsmiths

Rahila Gupta, Southall Black Sisters

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at genderfundamentalismprevent.eventbrite.co.uk

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb and facebook.com/CMRBuel

For more info on Centre for Gender Studies: http://www.soas.ac.uk/genderstudies/

Speakers Biographies

Tehmina Kazi, British Muslims for Secular Democracy

Tehmina is the Director of British Muslims for Secular Democracy (www.bmsd.org.uk), a group of Muslim democrats working to raise awareness about democracy, particularly secular democracy, within British Muslim communities and the wider public. Tehmina is executive producer of the documentary film Hidden Heart (hiddenheartfilm.com) and was also a freelance consultant for English PEN’s Faith and Free Speech in Schools project. Tehmina is a trustee of Hope Not Hate (www.hopenothate.org.uk), an advisory board member of the Measuring Anti-Muslim Attacks (tellmamauk.org) project, an Inclusive Mosque Initiative (inclusivemosqueinitiative.org/about/) committee member, and was a judge for the Accord Coalition’s (accordcoalition.org.uk) Inclusive Schools Award, 2014. Tehmina was named one of the BBC’s 100 Women (www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-29758792) in October 2013 and 2014, and held the Eric Lane Fellowship at Clare College, Cambridge from January to March 2014. She is a Centenary Young Fellow of the RSA.

 

Irene Zempi, Nottingham Trent University

Irene is currently working as a Lecturer in Criminology at Nottingham Trent University. Prior to this position Irene was a Teaching Fellow in Criminology at the University of Leicester. She has a PhD in Criminology and an MSc in Criminology from the University of Leicester, and a BSc in Sociology from Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences in Athens, Greece. As a practitioner, Irene has extensive experience working with victims of volume crime, domestic violence, hate crime and anti-social behaviour at Victim Support. For her doctoral research, Irene examined the topic of Islamophobia and the targeted victimisation of Muslim women who wear the niqab (face veil). The study included individual and focus group interviews with niqab-wearing women at mosques, Muslim schools and Islamic centres, as well as an ethnographic approach whereby Irene wore the full veil in public in Leicester. This study was the first ever one to examine the experiences of women wearing the niqab as victims of anti-Muslim hate crime in the UK and therefore is an important piece of work in the field of hate crime studies. Irene has published widely on issues of Islamophobia and anti-Muslim hate crime. Her most recent project involves the first ever study to examine both online and offline experiences of anti-Muslim hate crime of ‘visible’ Muslim men and women in the UK, with Dr Imran Awan from Birmingham City University. This study was commissioned and funded by the Measuring Anti-Muslim Attacks (Tell MAMA) Project.

 

Aisha Phoenix, Goldsmiths

Aisha Phoenix is completing an ESRC-funded PhD in Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London on how Palestinian university students narrate their lives under occupation. Her research is based on interviews she conducted with Muslim young men and women in the West Bank. She has also conducted research on Somali young women sixth form students in the UK and hierarchies of belonging. Her research interests also include colourism; prejudice on the basis of skin shade. She has a Masters in Social Research from Goldsmiths and one in Social Anthropology of Development from SOAS. Aisha has worked as a journalist and writes freelance articles. She has a Postgraduate Diploma in Newspaper Journalism from City University and a BA in Arabic and Modern Middle Eastern Studies from Oxford University. Her publications include: ‘Colourism and the Politics of Beauty’ (2014), Feminist Review, 108, 97-105; ‘Racialisation, relationality and riots: intersections and interpellations’ (2012), Feminist Review, 100, 52-72 (with Ann Phoenix) and ‘Somali Young Women and Hierarchies of Belonging’ (2011), YOUNG: Nordic Journal of Youth Research. Vol. 19, 3: 313-331.

 

Rahila Gupta, Southall Black Sisters

Rahila Gupta is a freelance journalist, writer and activist. In 1989, she joined the management committee of Southall Black Sisters, an advocacy and campaigning women’s group set up in 1979 for women escaping domestic violence and, in 2004, she founded the Nihal Armstrong Trust which funds families of children with cerebral palsy to buy cutting-edge equipment and services. With Kiranjit Ahluwalia she wrote Provoked, the story of a battered woman who killed her violent husband and co-wrote the screenplay based on the book and released as a film in 2007. Her last book, Enslaved, on immigration controls, published in 2007, was said to be ‘one of the most vital books of the new century’. Her verse play Don’t Wake Me: The Ballad of Nihal Armstrong was nominated for three awards and was selected by the British Council as part of their showcase in Edinburgh 2013 and went on tour to USA and India in 2014. Her articles are published in the Guardian, New Humanist, New Internationalist and openDemocracy among other magazines, journals and websites. She is currently working on a radio play inspired by Jimmy Mubenga. Additionally, she and Bea Campbell are hoping to collaborate on a book, Why Doesn’t Patriarchy Die? which will investigate how patriarchy fits with diverse political systems.


More details can be found on the attached flyer. Please circulate widely.

CMRB: Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel online paper series

CMRB, the Runnymede Trust and the Centre for Palestine Studies, London Middle East Institute, SOAS are delighted to announce the publication of:

“Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel” online paper series, edited by Nira Yuval-Davis and Jamie Hakim.

The series aims to to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel from within an anti-racist normative framework

The first tranche of articles can be found at http://www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/publications.htm, and includes:

Nira Yuval-Davis and Jamie Hakim, ‘Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel Series Introduction’

Antony Lerman, ‘The “New Anti-Semitism”’

Hilary Aked, ‘The Undeniable Overlap: Right-wing Zionism and Islamophobia’

Helga Embacher and Jan Ryback, ‘Anti-Semitism in Muslim Communities and Islamophobia in the Context of the Gaza War 2014: The Example of Austria and Germany’

Anabelle Sreberny, ‘The Idea of Jewish Anti-Semitism and Recuperating the “Semites”’

Keith Kahn-Harris, ‘The Interplay between Internal and External Factors in the Stimulation of Intra-Jewish conflict over Israel and Antisemitism’

Stefano Bellin, ‘How Should We Speak About the Jews and the Palestinians? Constructing a Non-Racist Space for Criticism’

The series has been constructed as an open-ended forum for dialogue between academics, activists and interested parties differently situated across the globe. We will consider all submissions that explore any aspect of how anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms and the question of Palestine/Israel intersect, from within an anti-racist normative framework. Please e-mail your submission to j.hakim@uel.ac.uk.

This series has been given the front page of openDemocracy the week commencing Wednesday 28th September. Each day of that week one of five of the articles will be published at www.opendemocracy.net.

Best,
Nira Yuval-Davis and Jamie Hakim
CMRB

CMRB Event: Gender, Fundamentalism and the ‘Prevent Agenda’

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) and SOAS’ Centre for Gender Studies are pleased to announce the following seminar:

GENDER, FUNDAMENTALISM AND THE ‘PREVENT AGENDA’

This seminar will take place on Saturday 17th October 2015, 2–5pm, in B102, Brunei Gallery,  SOAS, London, WC1H 0XG
www.soas.ac.uk/gallery/visit/

Speakers:

Tehmina Kazi, British Muslims for Secular Democracy
Irene Zempi, Nottingham Trent University
Aisha Phoenix, Goldsmiths
Rahila Gupta, Southall Black Sisters

The event is free but space is limited so please register at genderfundamentalismprevent.eventbrite.co.uk

More details can be found below:

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) and SOAS’ Centre for Gender Studies are pleased to announce the following seminar:

 

GENDER, FUNDAMENTALISM ANDTHE ‘PREVENT AGENDA’

This seminar will take place in B102, Brunei Gallery,

SOAS, London, WC1H 0XG

www.soas.ac.uk/gallery/visit

Saturday 17th October 2015, 2–5pm

Speakers:

Tehmina Kazi, British Muslims for Secular Democracy

Irene Zempi, Nottingham Trent University

Aisha Phoenix, Goldsmiths

Rahila Gupta, Southall Black Sisters

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at genderfundamentalismprevent.eventbrite.co.uk

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb and facebook.com/CMRBuel
For more info on Centre for Gender Studies: http://www.soas.ac.uk/genderstudies/

Speakers Biographies

Tehmina Kazi, British Muslims for Secular Democracy

Tehmina is the Director of British Muslims for Secular Democracy (www.bmsd.org.uk), a group of Muslim democrats working to raise awareness about democracy, particularly secular democracy, within British Muslim communities and the wider public. Tehmina is executive producer of the documentary film Hidden Heart (hiddenheartfilm.com) and was also a freelance consultant for English PEN’s Faith and Free Speech in Schools project. Tehmina is a trustee of Hope Not Hate (www.hopenothate.org.uk), an advisory board member of the Measuring Anti-Muslim Attacks (tellmamauk.org) project, an Inclusive Mosque Initiative (inclusivemosqueinitiative.org/about/) committee member, and was a judge for the Accord Coalition’s (accordcoalition.org.uk) Inclusive Schools Award, 2014. Tehmina was named one of the BBC’s 100 Women (www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-29758792) in October 2013 and 2014, and held the Eric Lane Fellowship at Clare College, Cambridge from January to March 2014. She is a Centenary Young Fellow of the RSA.

 

Irene Zempi, Nottingham Trent University

Irene is currently working as a Lecturer in Criminology at Nottingham Trent University. Prior to this position Irene was a Teaching Fellow in Criminology at the University of Leicester. She has a PhD in Criminology and an MSc in Criminology from the University of Leicester, and a BSc in Sociology from Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences in Athens, Greece. As a practitioner, Irene has extensive experience working with victims of volume crime, domestic violence, hate crime and anti-social behaviour at Victim Support. For her doctoral research, Irene examined the topic of Islamophobia and the targeted victimisation of Muslim women who wear the niqab (face veil). The study included individual and focus group interviews with niqab-wearing women at mosques, Muslim schools and Islamic centres, as well as an ethnographic approach whereby Irene wore the full veil in public in Leicester. This study was the first ever one to examine the experiences of women wearing the niqab as victims of anti-Muslim hate crime in the UK and therefore is an important piece of work in the field of hate crime studies. Irene has published widely on issues of Islamophobia and anti-Muslim hate crime. Her most recent project involves the first ever study to examine both online and offline experiences of anti-Muslim hate crime of ‘visible’ Muslim men and women in the UK, with Dr Imran Awan from Birmingham City University. This study was commissioned and funded by the Measuring Anti-Muslim Attacks (Tell MAMA) Project.

 

Aisha Phoenix, Goldsmiths

Aisha Phoenix is completing an ESRC-funded PhD in Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London on how Palestinian university students narrate their lives under occupation. Her research is based on interviews she conducted with Muslim young men and women in the West Bank. She has also conducted research on Somali young women sixth form students in the UK and hierarchies of belonging. Her research interests also include colourism; prejudice on the basis of skin shade. She has a Masters in Social Research from Goldsmiths and one in Social Anthropology of Development from SOAS. Aisha has worked as a journalist and writes freelance articles. She has a Postgraduate Diploma in Newspaper Journalism from City University and a BA in Arabic and Modern Middle Eastern Studies from Oxford University. Her publications include: ‘Colourism and the Politics of Beauty’ (2014), Feminist Review, 108, 97-105; ‘Racialisation, relationality and riots: intersections and interpellations’ (2012), Feminist Review, 100, 52-72 (with Ann Phoenix) and ‘Somali Young Women and Hierarchies of Belonging’ (2011), YOUNG: Nordic Journal of Youth Research. Vol. 19, 3: 313-331.

 

Rahila Gupta, Southall Black Sisters

Rahila Gupta is a freelance journalist, writer and activist. In 1989, she joined the management committee of Southall Black Sisters, an advocacy and campaigning women’s group set up in 1979 for women escaping domestic violence and, in 2004, she founded the Nihal Armstrong Trust which funds families of children with cerebral palsy to buy cutting-edge equipment and services. With Kiranjit Ahluwalia she wrote Provoked, the story of a battered woman who killed her violent husband and co-wrote the screenplay based on the book and released as a film in 2007. Her last book, Enslaved, on immigration controls, published in 2007, was said to be ‘one of the most vital books of the new century’. Her verse play Don’t Wake Me: The Ballad of Nihal Armstrong was nominated for three awards and was selected by the British Council as part of their showcase in Edinburgh 2013 and went on tour to USA and India in 2014. Her articles are published in the Guardian, New Humanist, New Internationalist and openDemocracy among other magazines, journals and websites. She is currently working on a radio play inspired by Jimmy Mubenga. Additionally, she and Bea Campbell are hoping to collaborate on a book, Why Doesn’t Patriarchy Die? which will investigate how patriarchy fits with diverse political systems.

 

REGISTRATION OPEN – Borderscapes: Borders and Bordering in Contemporary Europe (EUBORDERSCAPES Policy & Impact Conference)

EUBorderscapes_CMRBCMRB (The Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) at the University of East London is delighted to announce:

Borderscapes: Borders and Bordering in  Contemporary Europe (EUBORDERSCAPES Policy & Impact Conference)

The conference will take place:

Date: 10th–12th November 2015
Location: Docklands Campus, University of East London, E16 2RD, nearest tube: Cyprus DLR (http://www.uel.ac.uk/campuses/docklands/)

The conference is free but registration is compulsory at: borderscapesconference.eventbrite.co.uk

If you would like to attend the conference dinner (the evening of Tuesday 10th November) please purchase a ticket in addition to the free conference ticket. The cost of the dinner is £30 + administration fee.

On the evening before the conference (Monday 9th November), Prof. Saskia Sassen will be delivering a public lecture as part of the University of East London’s ‘Scholarship and the Social Sciences in a Global Era’ conference to celebrate the launch of UEL’s School of Social Sciences. The event is free and open to the public. Any queries regarding Prof. Sassen’s lecture should be directed to:  SocSciLaunch@uel.ac.uk

Full details for the Borderscapes conference can be found on the attached flyer. Conference outline below. A full programme will be announced shortly.

Conference Outline

Plenary Panels

Plenary 1: Reporting Research Findings
Prof. James Scott (University of Eastern Finland), Prof. Nira Yuval-Davis (University of East London/Umea University), Dr. Elena Nikiforova (Centre for Independent Research, St Petersburg)’ Dr. Christophe Sohn (Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research)

Plenary 2: EU and UK Policy Makers and Activists Discussing Borderings and Borderscapes in Europe
Keith Vaz MP (Chair of Home Affairs Committee), Don Flynn (Migrants’ Rights Network), Maria Giovanna Manieri (Platform for International Cooperation on Undocumented Migrants), Paolo Salieri (Directorate General for Migration, Home Affairs, European Commission)

Plenary 3: Locations and Dislocations of Borders: theoretical discussion
Dr. Chiara Brambilla (University Of Bergamo), Dr. Kathryn Cassidy (University of East London), Dr. Cathal McCall (Queen’s University, Belfast) Prof. Henk van Houtum (Radboud University, Nijmegen)

Plenary 4: Social and Political Impacts of Contemporary European Bordering
Rita Chadha (Refugee and Migrant Forum of Essex and London) Lucy Jones (Doctors of the World, UK), Dr. Georgie Wemyss (University of East London), Mirjam Karoly (Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe, Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights)

Parallel Sessions

Panel 1 – Post-Soviet Borders: Shifting concepts and competing rhetorical strategies
Panel 2 – Re-Bordering of Post-Socialist space
Panel 3 – Europeanisation versus Euroscepticism
Panel 4 – The Global Border-Drama of the European Union
Panel 5 – EU Borders and Geopolitics of Neighbourhood
Panel 6 – European Union Cross-Border Peace-Building In Crisis?
Panel 7 – Unpacking the Benevolence of Cross-Border Cooperation and Integration
Panel 8 – Roma and Bordering
Panel 9 – Schengen/ Non Schengen Borders
Panel 10 – Everyday Bordering in the Metropolitan City 1
Panel 11 – Everyday Bordering in the Metropolitan City 2
Panel 12 – Migrant Writing and Popular Culture
Panel 13 – Art and Cultural Representation Across Borders
Panel 14 – Theatre Workshop

Film Festival (produced by EUBORDERSCAPES partners)
‘Houdoud Al Bahr/The Mediterranean Frontiers’ (University of Bergamo)
‘The Invisible Enemy Across the Wall: Israeli and Palestinian Children’s Perspective of the “Other”’ (Ben Gurion University of the Negev)
‘Everyday Borders’ (UEL)
‘The Colour of the Sea: A filmic border experience in Ceuta’ (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona)

Walks:
‘Growing up on the 73 Bus – A tale of Three Synagogues’ Prof. David Newman (Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)
‘Bordering the Docks’ Dr.Georgie Wemyss (University of East London)

Event: Black Lives Matter – the implications for the UK context CMRB seminar series – UEL

The Cente for Migration, Refugees ad Belonging at UEL seminar:

Black Lives Matter – the implications for the UK context

CMRB seminar series – ALL WELCOME

4pm to 6pm, Monday 12th October in EBG. 06, East Building, Docklands Campus, UEL

The mass mobilisation against police violence and continuing state racism represented by Black Lives Matter has refocused global attention on the issue of state violence and state-sponsored killings.This event encourages us to consider the UK context and suggests ways forward for campaigners against state racism and violence in Britain.

Speakers:

Adam Elliott-Cooper, Department of Geography, University of Oxford

How #BlackLivesMatter changed resistance

Stephanie Lightfoot-Bennett, United Family and Friends campaign

UFFC is a coalition of those affected by deaths in police, prison and psychiatric custody. UFFC supports others in similar situations.

UFFC hold an annual procession in memory of those who have died in custody. This year the procession will be held on 31 st October 2015. Assemble at 12 noon in Trafalgar Square to march to Downing Street. The organisers ask that you wear black.

 

CMRB AGM 2015 + Lesvos, the European island in the crossroads of two major humanitarian crises, Erene Kaptani

CMRB (The Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) is delighted to invite you to:

CMRB Annual General Meeting 2015

Date: Monday 28th September 2015
Time: 15.00-16.15
Place: EB.G.07, Docklands Campus, University of East London, E16 2RD, nearest tube: Cyprus DLR
(http://www.uel.ac.uk/campuses/docklands/)

ALL WELCOME

The  CMRB AGM 2015 Agenda is available for download.

After the AGM, CMRB will be hosting:

Lesvos, the European island in the crossroads of two major humanitarian crises, by Erene Kaptani

Date: Monday 28th September 2014
Time:16.30-18.00
Place: EB.3.07, Docklands Campus, University of East London

Abstract:
On Lesvos, both the survival of the ‘locals’ and ‘refugees’ depends on decisions made in European Institutions. Refugees are currently arriving on the island at a time when an unprecedented process of underdevelopment is occurs in at the hands of these institutions.

In this presentation, the speaker, who has been involved since 2009 with refugees arriving to her hometown, reflects on the way refugee arrivals are managed by the different statutory and non statutory European bodies. This presentation envisages creating an understanding and a discussion on what the social and political changes between Greece and Europe have been in the past five months and how these continue to affect the management and monitoring of refugees. It aims to encourage a discussion of the trends formed, by both European institutions and society, regarding their humanitarian and social welfare responses.

Details included on attached flyer. Please circulate widely.

Please RSVP to j.hakim@uel.ac.uk<mailto:j.hakim@uel.ac.uk> for both the AGM and Erene Kaptani’s presentation

Best regards
Jamie Hakim
CMRB