Category Archives: Seminars

INVITATION: Europe’s refugee crisis – whose crisis is it?

INVITATION

Europe’s refugee crisis – whose crisis is it?

We are delighted to invite you to the discussion on our recently published report ‘Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Press Coverage’.

Date: Thursday 9 June 2016, 12–1pm

Venue: The Finnish Institute in London, Unit 1, 3 York Way, London N1C 4AE

Coffee and sandwiches will be served.

The study carried out by the Finnish Institute in London and the Finnish Cultural Institute for the Benelux focuses on how six European newspapers from three different countries covered the refugee and asylum seeker situation in January 2016. Newspapers examined were The Guardian and The Times from the UK, Helsingin Sanomat and Aamulehti from Finland, and Le Soir and De Morgen from Belgium.

The report will be presented by Johanna Sumuvuori, Head of Society Programme, Finnish Institute in London and Annukka Vähäsöyrinki, Head of Projects, Finnish Cultural Institute for the Benelux.  The guest speakers at the event include Milica Pesic, Executive Director of the Media Diversity Institute (UK), Gulwali Passarlay, Afghan refugee who is a published author, TEDx speaker, and a Politics major at the University of Manchester and Thomas Coombes, Media Manager on Global Issues, Amnesty International.

There are 59.5 million forcibly displaced people around the world. Last year, over 1 million asylum applications were filed in Europe. The movement of refugees on the continent in such a large scale was widely covered in European newspapers. The report on Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Press Coverage is launched in order to raise discussion on the role of media in dealing with the humanitarian crisis that concerns all of Europe.

Please find the report here: http://www.finnish-institute.org.uk/en/articles/1613-launching-a-new-report-refugee-crisis-in-european-newspapers

RSVP by 6 June 2016 to: mirja.syrjala@finnish-institute.org.uk

Please note that seats are limited.

Seminar with Tamara Last on migrant deaths at EU borders, 1-2pm, 22 February 2016

Seminar with Tamara Last on migrant deaths at EU borders, 1-2pm, 22 February 2016

Please join Border Criminologies for a seminar with Tamara Last (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) entitled ‘Counting and Accounting for Migrant Deaths along the Southern External Borders of the EU.’

When: Monday, 22 February 2016, 1-2pm

Where: Seminar Room A, Manor Road Building, Manor Road, University of Oxford, OX1 3UQ

Abstract: The Deaths at the Borders Database is the first compilation of official, state-produced data about people who have died attempting to cross the Southern external borders of the EU and whose bodies were recovered in, or brought to, European soil. The information has been gathered primarily from death certificates registered in the civil registries of municipalities in Spain, Gibraltar, Italy, Malta, and Greece, that border non-EU countries. Previously, the only data available on ‘border deaths’ was sourced from news media. The Database has revealed two significant findings: Firstly, that the majority of migrants whose bodies are found remain unidentified by the local authorities responsible for their bodies. Secondly, that, with further analysis, the data could reveal trends in migrant mortality that may be used to evaluate the effect of different trends in migration and border policy. In addition to outlining these two preliminary findings, this presentation will discuss the research and methodology behind the Database, and the challenges faced in using the Database to investigate the relationship between migrant mortality and European migration and border policies.

About the speaker: Tamara Last is currently researching a PhD on the relationship between migrant mortality and European migration and border policies as part of the Human Costs of Border Control project at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. She has compiled a database of persons whose bodies were found in Spain, Gibraltar, Italy, Malta, or Greece, having died crossing the southern external borders of the EU. Prior to starting her PhD research, Tamara completed an MSc in Migration Studies from the University of Oxford, and specialized in migration, human rights, and international law during her Bachelors in Law at the University of Warwick. Tamara has previously worked with the Centre for Migration Studies at the University of Ghana (on the Migrating Out of Poverty project), the UN Research Institute for Social Development (on regional governance of migrants’ rights), and IOM-Nederland (on the development activities of Ethiopian and Ghanaian diaspora communities in the Netherlands).

All are welcome to attend. Sandwiches and refreshments will be provided.

IRiS Joint Seminar with Tamsin Barber (Oxford Brookes University) and Emma Mitchell (Macquarie University)

IRiS Joint Seminar with Tamsin Barber (Oxford Brookes University) and Emma Mitchell (Macquarie University).
5 November: 2.00-4.00pm, Courtyard Room, Park House, University of Birmingham

This is a joint seminar which draws together two studies concerned with superdiversity, one relating to multicultural perspectives of welfare in the Australian context, and the other concerned with processes of identification among second-generation Vietnamese in a superdiverse context. Further details of the speakers and their studies are below.

To book a place, please contact Ann Bolstridge a.bolstridge@bham.ac.uk<mailto:a.bolstridge@bham.ac.uk>

Dr Tamsin Barber – Oxford Brookes University
‘Oriental’ identities in Super-diverse Britain: the young Vietnamese in London.

A growing scholarship on super-diversity now considers questions of identity, belonging and the visibility of difference within super-diverse contexts (Gidley 2013, Knowles 2013, Wessendorf 2013). Notably, amidst this proliferation of difference, new challenges are raised about how we categorise people and how we might encounter them (Valentine 2013). Taking the focus of everyday lived experiences, this paper interrogates the role of super-diversity in shaping encounters across difference by exploring its dynamic effects upon individual and collective identities and belonging. Using the case study of the British-born Vietnamese as an overlooked and ‘invisible’ minority population in super-diverse London, it raises questions about whether or not super-diversity obscures the boundaries between groups leading to an increased inability to recognise or distinguish between groups and identities, and why this matters. Findings from empirical research with British-born Vietnamese suggest that super-diversity may offer new opportunities for the identity construction of groups (like the Vietnamese) by concealing ‘undesirable’ differences, while at other times, inhibiting these by reinforcing crude distinctions and marking the boundaries between ‘us’ and ‘them’ (the other/ stranger). The research explores the complex and creative ways in which the British-born Vietnamese are compelled to actively manage their identities within super-diverse contexts to negotiate a range of shifting and contradictory discourses of coercive Orientalisms, racial visibility and public invisibility in Britain.

Biography: I am Senior Lecturer in Sociology at Oxford Brookes University. My research interests are in the area of race, ethnicity, migration and identity and my recent book ‘Oriental Identities in Super-Diverse Britain’ focuses upon the Vietnamese community in Britain.

Emma Mitchell, Macquarie University and Visiting Doctoral Student
Vulnerability in superdiversity

The language of vulnerability is in popular usage in many spheres of public life, not least social policy. However, with the currency of the concept has come critique of the ways in which social groups come to stand as indicators of vulnerability and become categorised as ‘the vulnerable’, standing in for an analysis of the dynamics of vulnerability to specific risks – the how and the what of vulnerability (Levine 2004; Brown 2011). This paper thinks through the resonances of refining the conceptualisation of vulnerability with the (conceptual, methodological and policy) orientations of superdiversity. Superdiversity responds to the primacy of ethnic and racial categories over-determining research design and findings by highlighting increasing diversification in terms of migration and legal status, labour, along with gender and age (Vertovec 2007). Recent efforts to refine the analytic promise of the concept reiterate processes rather than categories of differentiation and diversification (Meissener and Vertovec 2014). Yet both concepts potentially lend themselves to the allure of categorisation when operationalised in social policy, betraying the conceptual promise of dynamic process. The conceptual exercise of relating superdiversity to debates about the rise of vulnerability may help refine the former. It is relevant also given that research on superdiversity remains inclined to focus on dynamics of marginalisation and disadvantage. The paper is drawn from an empirical study of multicultural perspectives of welfare and the cultural politics of welfare reform in Australia.

Biography: I am a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at Macquarie University. My doctoral research explores diverse moral and material economies of support and how they interact with welfare state provision. In particular I’m interested in how responsibility and vulnerability are experienced and expressed by those who are typically identified as vulnerable and compelled to be responsible in contemporary social policy.

 

Events: RLI Seminar on Asylum in Europe, 23 October 2015

RLI Seminar on Asylum in Europe, 23 October 2015

This year, our 6th annual Refugee Law seminar series at the Refugee Law Initiative addresses the challenges of refugee protection in the EU system. The series is made up exclusively of topical and original presentations from new and exciting researchers in the field, starting this week with…

– ‘FRONTEX Operations and Pre-emptive Humanitarianism: The “Rescue-Without-Protection” Paradigm’
– Dr Violeta Moreno-Lax

– Feiday 23 October 2015, 1800-1930
– Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London, WC1B 5DR

This timely seminar investigates the different phases in Frontex-coordinated missions at sea and their impact on access to international protection in the EU. It shows how the language of humanitarianism, illustrated by different joint operations in the past 10 years, has been co-opted and de-naturalised to respond to the instant necessities of those found in distress at sea, obviating the causes of flight and the consequences of pre-emption. It demonstrates how a ‘rescue without protection’ paradigm serves to legitimise operations ultimately aimed at preventing departures or deflecting protection seekers to points of embarkation across the Mediterranean, sparing them from the immediate dangers of irregular voyages without (real) opportunities to claim asylum in the EU. The un-sustainability of this approach will be tested against current events following the mass drowning of April 2015, the extension of Triton and the launch of EUNAVFOR Med.

Bio – Violeta Moreno-Lax is the EU Co-ordinator for the RLI. She is a Lecturer in Law at Queen Mary, University of London, where she teaches EU Law and EU Migration Law. She has previously taught at the Universities of Liverpool, Oxford, Louvain, and Nijmegen as well as at the College of Europe. She has also acted as consultant for the European Parliament and the European Commission, and has advised a number of governmental and non-governmental organisations active in the area of refugee and migrant rights. Her current research focuses on the interface between border control, migration management and international protection under EU and international law.

The event is free and open to the public. You can guarantee your place by registering through: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/refugee-law-initiative-university-of-london-3554876155.

 

Events: RLI Seminar Series 2015-16 – Asylum in Europe – Starting Friday, 23 October 2015 (IALS, 6 pm)

RLI Seminar Series 2015-16 – Asylum in Europe – Starting Friday, 23 October 2015 (IALS, 6 pm)

This is to announce the forthcoming Seminar Series on Asylum in Europe hosted by the Refugee Law Initiative of the University of London during the current academic year 2015/16.

The first session on access to international protection will take place on Friday, 23 October 2015, from 6 pm at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (London).

All details are below, attached and also available at: http://www.sas.ac.uk/rli/whats-on

Attendance is free, but registration recommended: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/refugee-law-initiative-university-of-london-3554876155

Thank you for spreading the word!

Looking forward to seeing you there,

Violeta Moreno-Lax

PROGRAMME

Access to Protection in Europe: Pre-emptive Humanitarianism and the “Rescue without Protection” Paradigm
Dr Violeta Moreno-Lax, Queen Mary University of London
23 October 2014, 6.00pm | L103/104, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Safety Zones in Countries of Origin: A Violation of International Law?
Dr Bríd Ní Ghráinne, University of Sheffield
06 November 2014, 6.00 pm | L103/104, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Running Sideways – Has Europe Overdone Distancing Itself from the Geneva Refugee Convention?
Julian Lehmann, Global Public Policy Institute (GPPi)
2 December 2015, 6.00 pm | L103/104, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Human Trafficking and Slavery Reconsidered
Dr Vladislava Stoyanova, Faculty of Law, Lund University, Sweden
19 January 2016, 6.00 pm | Council Chamber, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Terrorism and Exclusion from Refugee Status in the UK: Asylum Seekers Suspected of Serious Criminality
Dr Sarah Singer, Refugee Law Initiative, School of Advanced Study
29 February 2016, 6.00pm | Conference Room, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

If the stars align: EU law, policy and practice on solidarity and responsibility-sharing for asylum and refugee protection
Madeline Garlick, Radboud University, The Netherlands
4 February 2016, 6.00 pm | Council Chamber, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

EU asylum law and disabled refugees – is the UK reservation to the CRPD in the context of asylum law redundant?
Stephanie Motz, University of Lucerne
16 March 2016, 6.00pm | Council Chamber, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

“Bottom-up” harmonization in the EU asylum policy: the case of EASO
Lilian Tsourdi, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Law and Institute for European Studies
4 May 2016, 6.00pm | L103/104, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

RLI Seminar Series 2015-16 – Asylum in Europe – Starting Friday, 23 October 2015 (IALS, 6 pm)

RLI Seminar Series 2015-16 – Asylum in Europe – Starting Friday, 23 October 2015 (IALS, 6 pm)

RLI

Download Flyer

This is to announce the forthcoming Seminar Series on Asylum in Europe hosted by the Refugee Law Initiative of the University of London during the current academic year 2015/16.

The first session on access to international protection will take place on Friday, 23 October 2015, from 6 pm at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (London).

All details are below, attached and also available at: http://www.sas.ac.uk/rli/whats-on

Attendance is free, but registration recommended: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/refugee-law-initiative-university-of-london-3554876155

PROGRAMME

Access to Protection in Europe: Pre-emptive Humanitarianism and the “Rescue without Protection” Paradigm
Dr Violeta Moreno-Lax, Queen Mary University of London
23 October 2014, 6.00pm | L103/104, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies
Safety Zones in Countries of Origin: A Violation of International Law?
Dr Bríd Ní Ghráinne, University of Sheffield
06 November 2014, 6.00 pm | L103/104, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies
Running Sideways – Has Europe Overdone Distancing Itself from the Geneva Refugee Convention?
Julian Lehmann, Global Public Policy Institute (GPPi)
2 December 2015, 6.00 pm | L103/104, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies
Human Trafficking and Slavery Reconsidered
Dr Vladislava Stoyanova, Faculty of Law, Lund University, Sweden
19 January 2016, 6.00 pm | Council Chamber, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

 

Terrorism and Exclusion from Refugee Status in the UK: Asylum Seekers Suspected of Serious Criminality
Dr Sarah Singer, Refugee Law Initiative, School of Advanced Study
29 February 2016, 6.00pm | Conference Room, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies
If the stars align: EU law, policy and practice on solidarity and responsibility-sharing for asylum and refugee protection
Madeline Garlick, Radboud University, The Netherlands
4 February 2016, 6.00 pm | Council Chamber, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies
EU asylum law and disabled refugees – is the UK reservation to the CRPD in the context of asylum law redundant?
Stephanie Motz, University of Lucerne
16 March 2016, 6.00pm | Council Chamber, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies
“Bottom-up” harmonization in the EU asylum policy: the case of EASO
Lilian Tsourdi, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Law and Institute for European Studies
4 May 2016, 6.00pm | L103/104, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies