Tag Archives: statistics

Publication of UK Government Immigration Statistics for January to March 2016

Publication of UK Government Immigration Statistics for January to March 2016 and Office for National Statistics Reports

EU migration agenda as a cloud, Nando Sigona, 2015Thank you to the The International Migration team at the Migration Statistics Unit, ONS for circulating the details of these on the day of release via the Migration Stats Jiscmail list.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has today, Thursday 26th May 2016, published the Migration Statistics Quarterly Report (MSQR). The report can be accessed from the following link:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/releases/migrationintheukmay2016

The MSQR series brings together statistics on migration that are published by the ONS, Home Office, and the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP).

ONS have also released the Short-Term International Migration Annual Report (STIMAR). The report can be accessed from the following link:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/releases/shorttermmigrationestimatesforenglandandwalesmid2014estimates

ONS have also released a ‘UK Perspectives’ article on international migration, which can be accessed from the following link:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/releases/ukperspectivespart22016

A press release has been published covering the above publications and providing more detail about the main messages. This can be accessed from the following link:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/news/news/migrationstatisticsquarterlyreport

Yesterday, ONS also published the 2014-based Subnational Population Projections for England:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/releases/subnationalpopulationprojections2014basedprojections

The Home Office’s Immigration Statistics January – March 2016 release is published today. It provides the latest figures on those subject to immigration control. The release is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-january-to-march-2016

Listing of the data tables included in ‘Immigration statistics, January to March 2016’.
Immigration statistics, January to March 2016
Cross cutting staffing data for UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) and Immigration Enforcement (IE).

Estimates of Short-Term International Migration (1 -12 months, 3 – 12 months and 3 – 12 months UN definition) to and from the UK for England and Wales.

A user guide to Home Office immigration statistics.

User Guide to Home Office Immigration Statistics

New Survey by Amnesty International: Refugees Welcome Survey 2016

Refugees Welcome Survey 2016: Views of Citizens Across 27 Countries
by Amnesty International

The vast majority of people (80%) would welcome refugees with open arms, with many even prepared to take them into their own homes, according to a global survey commissioned by Amnesty International.

The new Refugees Welcome Index, based on a global survey of more than 27,000 people carried out by the internationally renowned strategy consultancy GlobeScan, ranks 27 countries across all continents based on people’s willingness to let refugees live in their countries, towns, neighbourhoods and homes.

The survey shows people say they are willing to go to astonishing lengths to make refugees welcome. It also shows how anti-refugee political rhetoric is out of kilter with public opinion.

Download: Global Refugees Survey 2016

Further news: Refugees Welcome Index shows government refugee policies out of touch with public opinion.

 

New UNHCR report: 2014 Global Trends: World at War

New Publication from UNHCR:

UNHCR are pleased to announce that the following report has been published and is available for download via the UNHCR statistics website at:  www.unhcr.org/statisics

2014 Global Trends – World at War

UNHCRThe report provides an overview of the statistical trends and changes in global populations of concern to UNHC, i.e. refugees, returnees, stateless persons, and certain groups of internally displaced persons (IDPs), place din the context of major humanitarian developments and displacement during the year.

Some of the key findings of the report:

  • Global forced displacement has seen accelerated growth in 2014, once again reaching unprecedented levels. The year saw the highest displacement on record. By end-2014, 59.5 million individuals were forcibly displaced worldwide as a result of persecution, conflict, generalized violence, or human rights violations. This is 8.3 million persons more than the year before (51.2 million) and the highest annual increase in a single year.
  • Some 19.5 million persons were refugees, 14.4 million under UNHCR’s mandate and 5.1 million Palestinian refugees registered by UNRWA. The global figure included 38.2 million internally displaced persons and nearly 1.8 million asylum-seekers. If these 59.5 million persons were a nation, they would make up the 24th largest in the world.
  • An estimated 13.9 million individuals were newly displaced due to conflict or persecution in 2014. This includes 11.0 million persons newly displaced within the borders of their own country, the highest figure on record. The other 2.9 million individuals were new refugees.
  • For the first time, Turkey became the largest refugee-hosting country worldwide, with 1.59 million refugees. Turkey was followed by Pakistan (1.51 million), Lebanon (1.15 million), the Islamic Republic of Iran (982,000), Ethiopia (659,500), and Jordan (654,100).
  • More than half (53%) of all refugees worldwide came from just three countries: the Syrian Arab Republic (3.88 million), Afghanistan (2.59 million), and Somalia (1.11 million).
  • Over the course of 2014,some 126,800 refugees returned to their countries of origin. This figure was the lowest level of refugee returns since 1983.
  • A record high of nearly 1.7 million individuals submitted applications for asylum or refugee status in 2014. UNHCR offices registered 245,700 or 15 per cent of these claims. With 274,700 asylum claims, the Russian Federation was the world’s largest recipient of new individual applications, followed by Germany (173,100), the United States of America (121,200), and Turkey (87,800).
  • Children below 18 years of age constituted 51 per cent of the refugee population in 2014, up from 41 per cent in 2009 and the highest figure in more than a decade.

 

New Publication: UNHCR report: 2014 Mid-Year Trends

UNHCR are pleased to announce the release of the 2014 Mid-Year Trends report, which is now available and may be downloaded from the UNHCR statistics website at: www.unhcr.org/statistics.

The report provides a statistical overview of refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced persons (IDPs), returnees, stateless persons and other persons of concern to UNHCR for the period of 1 January to 30 June 2014. It is the second time only UNHCR is able to provide a global update at mid-year thanks to increased efforts put in place by both Headquarters and field colleagues.

The purpose of the report is to provide a snapshot of main trends in the number of persons of concern to UNHCR over this period, rather than providing a comprehensive overview of global trends in forced displacement. The report’s key findings show a dramatic deterioration in forced displacement during the first half of the year:

–       The total population of concern to UNHCR stood at 46.3 million at mid-2014, the highest level on record;

–       The global number of refugees at mid-2014 was estimated at 13.0 million, 1.3 million more than at the end of 2013;

–       The number of IDPs protected/assisted by UNHCR stood at 26 million, the highest on record;

–       The total number of persons of concern to UNHCR seeking protection within or outside the borders of their countries during the first half of 2014 exceeded 5.5 million individuals; and

–       Syrians have become the largest refugee population under UNHCR’s mandate, overtaking Afghans, who had held that position for more than three decades. At more than 3 million as of June 2014, Syrian refugees account for 23 per cent of all refugees under the organization’s mandate.

I hope that you will find the 2014 Mid-Year Trends report useful and interesting.

 

UK Government: Borders and immigration transparency data

The UK Government has published Data on UK Visas and Immigration, Immigration Enforcement and Border Force activities (including performance against targets).

The publication can be downloaded from the website at:  www.gov.uk/government/publications/borders-and-immigration-transparency-data

This document contains data on:

Border Force

  • clearance of passengers at the border
  • drug seizure volumes
  • drug seizures
  • convention on international trade in endangered species
  • seizures and volumes

UK Visas and Immigration

  • migration data
  • settlement applications from non-EEA partners on hold pending judicial review
  • older live cases unit
  • asylum applications concluded in 12 months
  • asylum 6 month decisions
  • life in the UK test data
  • MP’s correspondence within service standard
  • MP’s correspondence outstanding
  • MP’s complaints

Immigration Enforcement

  • foreign national offenders
  • family returns
  • cedars returns

Publication: UNHCR Report: Asylum Trends 2013

UNHCR Report: Asylum Trends 2013

This is to inform you that the following report has been published today and can be downloaded from the UNHCR website at http://www.unhcr.org/532afe986.html.

– Asylum Trends 2013 (Levels and Trends in Industrialized Countries)

Key findings:

Copyright: UNHCR

A.  An estimated 612,700 asylum applications were registered in 2013 in the 44 industrialized countries covered by the report, some 133,000 claims more than the year before (+28%). This is the third consecutive annual increase and the second highest annual level of the past 20 years.

B.  With 109,600 new asylum applications registered during 2013, Germany was for the first time since 1999 the largest single recipient of new asylum claims among the group of industrialized countries. The United States of America was second with an estimated 88,400 asylum applications, followed by France (60,100), Sweden (54,300), and Turkey (44,800). The top five receiving countries together accounted for six out of ten new asylum claims submitted in the 44 industrialized countries.

C.  The Syrian Arab Republic, the Russian Federation, Afghanistan, Iraq, and Serbia (and Kosovo: Security Council resolution 1244 (1999))  were the five top source countries of asylum-seekers in the 44 industrialized countries in 2013. Among the top-10 countries of origin six are currently experiencing violence or conflict – Syria, Afghanistan, Eritrea, Somalia, Iraq and Pakistan.

D.  The Syrian Arab Republic became for the first time the main country of origin of asylum-seekers in the 44 industrialized countries. Provisional data indicate that some 56,400 Syrians requested refugee status in 2013, more than double the number of 2012 (25,200 claims) and six times more than in 2011 (8,500 claims). The 2013 level is the highest number recorded by a single group among the industrialized countries since 1999.

UK Government Publishes Latest Migration Data

UK Government Publishes Latest Migration Data

Full details can be found as follows:

Home Office immigration statistics: user guide:
User Guide to Home Office Immigration Statistics – [Download PDF]
“This user guide to Home Office immigration statistics is designed to be a useful reference guide with explanatory notes on the Home Office’s quarterly immigration statistics releases.”

Immigration Statistics, October to December 2013:
[Link]
“This release presents immigration statistics from Home Office administrative sources, covering the period up to the end of December 2013.”

Monthly asylum application tables – [Link]

Children entering detention under Immigration Act powers – [Link]
“The figures maybe revised in subsequent quarterly immigration publications and should be seen as provisional.”

Tables for ‘Immigration statistics, October to December 2013’ – [Link]
“Listing of the data tables included in ‘Immigration statistics, October to December 2013’.”

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has today, Thursday 27th February 2014, published the Migration Statistics Quarterly Report (MSQR). The report can be accessed from the following link:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/migration1/migration-statistics-quarterly-report/february-2014/index.html

The MSQR series brings together statistics on migration that are published by the Home Office, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), ONS, and the National Records of Scotland (NRS).

See Also:

Migrants’ Rights Network – Migration statistics are difficult reading for Cameron but prove critics right

Migrants’ Rights Network – Asylum applications up by 21% across Europe in 2013

Resource: UNHCR: 2012 Statistical Yearbook

UNHCR: 2012 Statistical Yearbook

UNHCR are pleased to announce that the 2012 Statistical Yearbook has been published and is available for download at the UNHCR statistics website: http://www.unhcr.org/52a7213b9.html.

The 12th edition of UNHCR’s Statistical Yearbook contains six chapters dealing with (a) methodological issues; (b) global levels and trends in the population of concern to UNHCR; (c) durable solutions; (d) asylum and refugee status determination; (e) demographic characteristics and location; and (f) from emergency response to protection: the statistical perspective.

New to this Yearbook, UNHCR has opened up space to outside perspectives on the information reflected by the data. The Yearbook contains an article by a journalist and an entire section by an external statistical expert, taking a deeper look into the demographic data available to UNHCR. In future, the Statistical Yearbook will expand the space for

UNHCR: 2013 Mid-Year Trends report

I am pleased to announce the release of the 2013 Mid-Year Trends report, which is now available and may be downloaded from the UNHCR statistics website at: www.unhcr.org/statistics<http://www.unhcr.org/statistics>.

The report provides a statistical overview of refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced persons (IDPs), returnees, stateless persons and other persons of concern to UNHCR for the period of 1 January to 30 June 2013. It is the first time ever UNHCR is able to provide a global update at mid-year thanks to increased efforts put in place by both Headquarters and field colleagues.

The purpose of the report is to provide a snapshot of main trends in the number of persons of concern to UNHCR over this period, rather than providing a comprehensive overview of global trends in forced displacement. The report’s key findings show a dramatic deterioration in forced displacement during the first half of the year:

–       The total population of concern to UNHCR stood at 38.7 million at mid-2013, the highest level on record;

–       The global number of refugees at mid-2013 was estimated at 11.1 million, 600,000 more than at end-2012;

–       The number of IDPs protected/assisted by UNHCR exceeded the 20 million mark for the first time ever;

–       The total number of persons of concern to UNHCR seeking protection within or outside the borders of their countries during the first half of 2013 exceeded the 5.9 million mark;

–       In light of ongoing crises, 2013 may see the highest number of refugee outflows for any year since the Rwandan crisis in 1994, when 2.8 million people became refugees worldwide; and

–       An estimated 1.9 million Syrians were refugees at mid-2013. At the current pace of the conflict and outflow, Syria may well replace Afghanistan as the top refugee-producing country during the course of 2014, which would constitute the first change in ranking since 1981.

I hope that you will find the 2013 Mid-Year Trends report useful and interesting.

 

UK Migration Statistics Quarterly Report

From the Migration Statistics User Forum [MIGRATION-STATS@JISCMAIL.AC.UK]

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has today, Thursday 29th August 2013, published the Migration Statistics Quarterly Report (MSQR). The report can be accessed from the following link:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/migration1/migration-statistics-quarterly-report/august-2013/index.html

The MSQR series brings together statistics on migration that are published by the Home Office, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), ONS, and the National Records of Scotland (NRS).

ONS have also published today estimates of the UK population by country of birth and nationality. This release includes a statistical report, to be read alongside the associated reference tables. It can be accessed from the following link:

http://ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/migration1/population-by-country-of-birth-and-nationality/2012/index.html

ONS have also published the Local Area Migration Indicators Suite. This is an interactive product bringing together different migration related data sources to allow users to compare indicators of migration at local authority level. It can be accessed from the following link:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/migration1/migration-indicators-suite/august-2013/index.html

We would welcome any comments on any of our products. Please contact migstatsunit@ons.gov.uk with any comments.

 

New Resource: UNHCR: 2012 Global Trends report

UNHCR are  pleased to announce that the following report has been published today and is available for download on the UNHCR statistics website www.unhcr.org/statistics.

2012 Global Trends – Displacement: the new 21st century challenge

The 48-page report reflects many of the major humanitarian developments between January and December 2012. It analyses the statistical trends and changes in the global populations of concern to UNHCR, i.e. refugees, asylum-seekers, returnees, stateless persons and certain groups of internally displaced persons (IDPs).

Some of the key findings of the report:

– By end 2012, 45.2 million people were forcibly displaced worldwide as a result of persecution, conflict, generalized violence and human rights violations. Some 15.4 million people were refugees: 10.5 million under UNHCR’s mandate and 4.9 million Palestinian refugees registered by UNRWA. The global figure included 28.8 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) and nearly one million (937,000) asylum-seekers. The 2012 level was the highest since 1994, when an estimated 47 million people were forcibly displaced worldwide.

– During the year, conflict and persecution forced an average of 23,000 persons per day to leave their homes and seek protection elsewhere, either within the borders of their countries or in other countries.

– An estimated 7.6 million people were newly displaced due to conflict or persecution, including 1.1 million new refugees – the highest number of new arrivals in one year since 1999. Another 6.5 million people were newly displaced within the borders of their countries – the second highest figure of the past ten years.

– Pakistan was host to the largest number of refugees worldwide (1.6 million), followed by the Islamic Republic of Iran (868,200), Germany (589,700), and Kenya (565,000).

– More than half (55%) of all refugees worldwide came from five countries: Afghanistan, Somalia, Iraq, the Syrian Arab Republic, and Sudan.

– Some 21,300 asylum applications were lodged by unaccompanied or separated children in 72 countries in 2012, mostly by Afghan and Somali children. It was the highest number on record since UNHCR started collecting such data in 2006.

 

Statistics: Evidence presented on Migration Statistics to the Public Administration Select Committee

The following information has recently been circulated via the Migration Statistics User Forum Jiscmail discussion list*.

The Public Administration Select Committee (PASC) is examining the topic of migration statistics, as part of a programme of work on statistics and their use in government.  The written and oral evidence which was  presented to the committee has now been made available for download from the Migration Statistics section of the PASC website, available here.

Details include both written and oral evidence as outlined below:

The Committee is undertaking a programme of work on statistics and their use in government by means of a series of ten studies. One of these studies looks at migration statistics.

Written Evidence

Issues and questions paper

Written evidence (PDF PDF 796 KB)Opens in a new window

Oral Evidence

24 April 2013

Witnesses: Dr Scott Blinder, Director, The Migration Observatory, Councillor Philippa Roe, Leader, Westminster City Council, and Professor John Salt, Co-Director, Migration Research Unit, University College London

Jon Simmons and Chris Kershaw, Home Office, Guy Goodwin and Ben Humberstone, Office for National Statistics.

Further background information can be found here:-  PASC to take evidence on Migration statistics.  On this page, the purpose of the inquiry is outlined as being:

The purpose of the inquiry: to assess the quality of migration statistics produced by the Office for National Statistics and the Home Office. Are they sufficiently accurate, detailed, meaningful and timely for the purposes to which they are put? The Committee will take evidence from three users of official migration statistics, who can describe the statistics’ current strengths and weaknesses as well as those aspects of the statistics they would like to see improve. The second part of the session will give Committee the opportunity to question the producers of migration statistics, who can talk about recent developments in the production of migration statistics and options for their improvement in future.

* The Migration Statistics User Forum Jiscmail discussion list is available to join here and aims to:

This is a forum for discussion of migration statistics that allows users to discuss their need for and use of the data and for producers to consult on presentation and changes. The main focus will be on figures for the United Kingdom, but this would not exclude discussion of migration statistics for other countries. In order to meet these objectives, members are encouraged to post discussions, respond to other users as appropriate and post their own proposals and publications.

 

BSPS Event: Emigration – Don’t leave me this way?

BSPS circulation. Please help BSPS to publicise this forthcoming day meeting to non-members. A PDF flyer is attached for convenience.

This day meeting is free and open to all (members and non-members), but pre-registration is requested by emailing the BSPS Secretariat at pic@lse.ac.uk. Places are limited and early registration is recommended. Full directions will be sent to those registered in advance of the meeting.

A PDF flyer is also available – [BSPS-Emigration-Day-Meeting_16 May2013_ Programme].

Emigration – Don’t leave me this way?

A BSPS day meeting: Thursday 16 May 2013

Graham Wallas Room, London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE

Chair –Professor Tony Champion, Vice-President, British Society for Population Studies,

10:30 – 11:00 – Registration

11:00 – 11: 40 – Trends in emigration: what do the official data show?

Joanna Wroe, Office for National Statistics

11:40 – 12:20 – Brits into Frenchmen? British emigration to France since the late 1980s

Dr Susan Collard, Senior Lecturer in French Politics and Contemporary European Studies, University of Sussex and Helen Drake, Professor of French and European Studies, Loughborough University.

12:20 – 13:00 – Understanding British emigrants: the view from ethnography

Dr Michaela Benson, Lecturer in Sociology, University of York and Karen O’Reilly Professor of Sociology, Department of Social Sciences, Loughborough University.

13:00 – 14:00 – Lunch (not provided)

14:00 – 14:40 – Returning from Spain?

Dr Kelly Hall, Senior Lecturer in Sociology, School of Social Sciences, University of Northampton

14:40 – 15:20 – A model-based approach for estimating international emigration for Local Authorities

Brian Foley, Office for National Statistics

15:20 – 15:50 – Break (tea & coffee provided for all)

15:50 – 16:30 – The policy implications of emigration from the UK: target and uncertainty

Carlos Vargas-Silva, Senior Researcher, Migration Observatory, University of Oxford.

16:30 – 17:00 – Panel Discussion & Close

 

BSPS Secretariat
POR.2.01
London School of Economics
Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE
www.bsps.org.uk
020 7955 7666

 

Latest Migration Statistics Published and Associated Media Links

Both the UK Home Office and the UK Office for National Statistics have published new statistical publications today.

Home Office Publications
(Source: Home Office Science and the Migration Statistics listserv).

The following have been posted by Home Office Science:

For enquiries about the contents of publications or the research and statistics produced by HOS, please contact public.enquiries@homeoffice.gsi.gov.uk

Home Office’s Immigration Statistics October – December 2012 release, has been published today, it provides the latest figures on those subject to immigration control.  A notable change introduced with this release is that our entry clearance visa applications, resolutions, issues and refusals back to 2005 have been provided on a quarterly, rather than annual, basis in new tables be.01.q (by category) and be.02.q (by nationality) as well as new quarterly data by category by nationality in tables be.06.q.w to be.06.q.o.

This edition also contains a short article about ‘Foreign National Offenders in detention and leaving detention’ (see http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/immigration-asylum-research/foreign-national-offenders-13), this article sets out differences in detention periods between offenders and other detainees held in UKBA detention. This ‘short article’ is intended as additional analysis of our data to assist users in understanding the figures. We plan in future to publish further articles on a range of topics to assist users to better interpret immigration statistics.

ONS Publications

(Source:  Office for National Statistics and the Migration Statistics listserv).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has today, Thursday 28th February 2013, published the Migration Statistics Quarterly Report (MSQR). The report can be accessed from the following link:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/migration1/migration-statistics-quarterly-report/february-2013/index.html

The MSQR series brings together statistics on migration that are published quarterly by the Home Office, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), ONS, and the National Records of Scotland (NRS).

ONS have also released a report looking at the quality and reliability of the International Passenger Survey (IPS) in relation to producing estimates of long-term migration flows. The report was originally released in November 2012, but now contains some updated information. It can be accessed from the following link:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/method-quality/specific/population-and-migration/international-migration-methodology/international-passenger-survey-quality-information-in-relation-to-migration-flows.pdf

We would welcome any comments on any of our products. Please contact migstatsunit@ons.gov.uk with any comments.

Associated Media Links

UK Home Office – Net migration continues to fall

The Guardian – Net migration to UK drops to 163,000

The Independent – Net immigration into Britain falls ‘significantly’

The Daily Telegraph – Net migration falls by a third

The Daily Telegraph – Fall in overseas students driving down net migration

BBC News – UK net migration falls by a third

The Huffington Post – Net Migration

The Daily Express – Winning the battle on immigration: Number of migrants staying in UK falls by a third

The Mail Online – The broken pledges of immigration: Coalition promised to cut net migration to under 100,000. Yesterday, it hit 252,000

New Publications on Dungavel House; Remittances; Statelessness; and UK Migration Statistics

Report on an unannounced short follow-up inspection of Dungavel House
Immigration Removal Centre, 31 July – 2 August 2012.
Report by the HM Chief Inspector of Prisons.
[Download Full Report](Source: HM Chief Inspector of Prisons)

Remittances and Portfolio Values: An Inquiry Using Spanish Immigrants from Africa, Europe and the Americas
by Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes, Susan Pozo, (June 2012).

Using a recent Spanish database, we show that remittances respond to cross country differences in portfolio values. This behavior suggests that immigrants are sophisticated economic optimizers who take advantage of opportunities to invest trans-nationally given the networks that immigrants are likely to have developed both in their host and home communities. The responsiveness to portfolio variables persists whether immigrants are highly or less highly educated. However, there are differences in the individual portfolio variables to which immigrants from various regions of the world respond to, as we would expect given migrants’ diverse backgrounds and motives for emigrating. Additionally, remitting patterns change over time with the length of the migration spell, suggesting that remittances sent for portfolio motives become more likely as the immediate needs of family left back home are addressed and immigrants settle down in their host communities.

[Download Discussion Paper No. 6622]
(Source:  IZA – Shaping the Future of Labor).

On 1 October 2012, UNHCR launched its first E-Learning Course on Statelessness.  One component of the E-Learning Course is a Self-Study Module on Statelessness which is available at: http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/docid/50b899602.html  The Self-Study Module on Statelessness can also be accessed at under the Tools  heading on the Statelessness Special Features page, which can be located on the Refworld landing page.
(Source: UNHCR)

UK Home Office Immigration Statistics July – September 2012.
Produced by the UK Home Office.
From the Summary Points Quarter 3 2012, selected points include:

  • Work: There were fewer work-related visas issued (-4% to 145,604, the lowest recorded using comparable data) and fewer grants of work-related permissions to stay permanently (-5% to 65,310). However there was an increase in work-related grants to extend stay in the UK (10% to 142,443).
  • Study: There were 29% fewer sponsored student visa applications and similarly there were 26% fewer study visas issued. There was a 1% increase in sponsored student visa applications for the university sector, contrasting with falls for the further education sector (- 67%), English language schools (-76%), and independent schools (-17%).
  • Asylum: There were 20,838 asylum applications, 8% higher than the previous 12 months. This remains well below the peak number of asylum applications received in the year ending December 2002 (84,132).
  • Detention: During the third quarter of 2012 (July to September), 48 children entered detention, lower than for the second quarter of 2012 (60). The number of children in detention for the third quarter of 2012 remains well below the peak in these figures for the third quarter of 2009 (322) using comparable data available from 2009.

Downloads Available Include:

(Source: UK Home Office)

Migration Statistics Quarterly Report November 2012.
Produced by the UK Office for National Statistics, (ONS).
[Download Full Report]
(Source: Migration Statistics Jiscmail List).

International Passenger Survey: Quality Information in Relation to Migration Flows.
Produced by the UK Office for National Statistics, (ONS).
[Download Full Report]
(Source: Migration Statistics Jiscmail List).