Category Archives: Events

TV Documentary on ITV (UK) Tonight: “Exposure: Islam’s Non-Believers”

TV Documentary Tonight: Exposure: Islam’s Non-Believers
Today 10:40pm – 11:40pm ITV, (United Kingdom)

Details of a documentary scheduled to air on the ITV Channel in the UK by the award-winning film-maker Deeyah Khan.  The documentary, entitled “Exposure: Islam’s Non-Believers” investigates the experiences of ex-Muslims, some of who have faced extreme discrimination, ostracism, psychological abuse and even violence as a result of renouncing their faith. In Britain, many are forced to lead double lives to hide their true beliefs, while others have been attacked by their families, resorted to self-harm or even taken their own lives.

Details from ITV:

Current affairs series. In this documentary, award-winning filmmaker Deeyah Khan investigates the lives of people who have left Islam as they face discrimination, ostracism, psychological abuse and even violence in the UK and around the world. In Britain, many ex-Muslims are forced to lead double lives and hide their true beliefs because of the stigma they face in their own communities. Deeyah speaks to former Muslims at risk of suicide, self-harm and abuse from their closest family members and reveals how some senior Bangladeshi British imams – mainstream figures in society – have called for the execution of atheist bloggers in Bangladesh.

 

Call for Papers: “External and Internal Displacement: Impacts and Lessons Learned from Resettlement Processes”

Special Sessions – Winter 2016

New Pressures on Cities and Regions

Managing change in your local economy: have your views heard

Session organiser(s)

Andrew Beer, University of South Australia Business School

This meeting is part of an international research study looking at the ways in which key individuals and businesses at the local or regional level are involved in managing the processes of change in the economy.   Regions such as northern Adelaide are undergoing a substantial shift, with more change expected as production at Holden ends in 2017. This change will have knock on effects for other businesses, the community sector, the labour market and probably consumer confidence.  So what do business and community leaders do in response to these challenges?  How involved are you in driving this process of change, and what would you do if you had the capacity to reshape the economy?

This meeting covers these sorts of questions and looks at two scenarios: what happens when a large new business announces that it wants to enter your region, and what happens when they announce their closure.   We will discuss both possibilities, with the results written down and then included in the research.

The other nations participating in this study are Finland, the United Kingdom, Italy, Germany and the USA.  Our results will be compared with the outcomes from these places.  Once the project is finished, the results will be available on the web, or we can send them to you in hard copy or via email.

Submission guidelines

For more information: call Andrew Beer on 0409 696 485 or contact him on email on andrew.beer@unisa.edu.au

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Interpreting long-term urban economic transformation in cities

Session organiser(s)

Ron Martin, University of Cambridge

More information to follow.

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The Political Economy of Brexit

Session organiser(s)

David Bailey, Aston Business School and Leslie Budd, The Open University Business School

More information to follow.

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External and Internal Displacement: Impacts and Lessons Learned from Resettlement Processes

Session organiser(s)

Dr. Yehya Serag, associate professor of urban and regional planning (Ain Shams University- Cairo) and Dr. Abeer Elshater, associate professor of urban design (Ain Shams University – Cairo)

This spatial session aims to provide a review of the resettlement processes and programs on the mass displacement of people throughout the contemporary era. Worldwide, this review can give a solid ground for further innovations for this kind of crises in terms of a better life for all; the hosted and comer. The primary focus is on both displaced people whether they are internally displaced persons (IDPs) or externally displaced persons (refugees) and their impacts on the host territory of displacement. The internally displaced persons, on one hand, have not crossed an international boundary, but have, for whatever reason, fled their homes, causing internal demographic flows. On the other hand, different nations witnessed (and are witnessing) several flows of refugees. Both types of flows have their impacts on the host communities that they end up settling, affecting, for example, their socio-economic aspects, their built environment and reshaping of Human settlements, to mention a few.

Most refugees (58%) now live in cities, not in refugee camps. In cities, refugees face hard conditions and often have their basic rights denied. It is extremely challenging to support refugees in urban settings. As such, one of the aims of this session is to attempt to give a precise morphological analysis and define the process and scenarios of settled accommodation in the host communities. In most resettlement cases, several interventions are made by the host countries as well as International organizations, to provide direct aid for the displaced persons, but of course, such interventions might have their positive and negative impacts of the host communities.

This session aims to start a process of knowledge sharing on how the crises of displacement was and is dealt with, by the host communities and what are the impacts, benefits, and disadvantages of the resettlement processes. Our aim is to invite speakers from Europe and the Middle East to share their experiences and studies on the resettlement process, from its different aspects. This should be done while, taking into consideration that Europe is currently witnessing a flux of refugees as a result of the Syrian unrest. Simultaneously, some Middle Eastern countries (mainly Egypt, Jordan and Lebanon) witnessed and are witnessing several flows of both types of displaced people as a result of regional wars, domestic unrest, and large-scale development projects. Meeting resettlement demands have been dealt with previously in several cases in these countries, thus having a proper experience for dealing with such demands.

The intended outcomes of this session are to collect contributions in various fields such as urban planning and housing approaches and practice, heterodox concepts highlighting local and social economies indicators, strategies of displacement, and others to enhance our knowledge in the following topical areas (and possibly others):

The socio-economic pressures that face the host countries to participate in the resettlements of refugees, and IDPs in their territories.
The socio-economic impacts of the displaced people in the host communities and human settlements.
The physical impact of the resettlement on the built environment and housing sector.
The impact of resettlement on the services sector in the host communities.
The assessment of what the gender-related impacts of resettlement have been.
The role of international aid organizations in the resettlement initiatives
Types of internal displacement, their causes, and their impacts.

Submission guidelines

We welcome both theoretical and empirical papers to this theme. If you are interested in participating in this special session, please send a title and abstract (between 400 and 500 words) to:

Dr. Yehya Serag, associate professor of urban and regional planning (Ain Shams University- Cairo): yehya_serag@eng.asu.edu.eg

Dr. Abeer Elshater, associate professor of urban design  (Ain Shams University-Cairo): abeer.elshater@eng.asu.edu.eg

http://www.regionalstudies.org/conferences/special-sessions/special-sessions-winter-2016#246

 

Event listing Film Screening: A Syrian Love Story

Event:

A Syrian Love Story

16 June 2016  | 6:00pm–8:00pm | Click here to book your free ticket
Londonewcastle Project Space | 28 Redchurch St, London E2 7DP

Comrades and lovers Amer and Raghda met in a Syrian prison cell 15 years ago. When McAllister first meets their family in 2009, Raghda is back in prison leaving Amer to look after their 4 boys alone; but as the ‘Arab Spring’ sweeps the region, the family’s fate shifts irrevocably. Filmed over 5 years, the film charts their incredible odyssey to political freedom. For Raghda and Amer, it is a journey of hope, dreams and despair: for the revolution, their homeland and each other.

Known for his unique and intimate portraits, maverick director Sean McAllister (Liberace of Baghdad) received the Grand Jury prize at this year’s Sheffield Documentary Festival for this “Bergmanesque portrait of a relationship and love”.

Please note this is event is free, but pre-booking is essential due to limited capacity.

This event is part of our exhibition, Call me by my name: Stories from Calais and beyond, exploring the complexity and human stories behind the current refugee crisis, with a particular focus on the Calais camp.

 

Event: We are all migrants: an interactive workshop

Event:

We are all migrants: an interactive workshop

Facilitated by NOMAD (Nation of Migration Awakening the Diaspora) and performance artist Denys Blacker
18 June 2016  | 3-6pm | Free, no advanced registration required
Londonewcastle Project Space | 28 Redchurch St, London E2 7DP

Nomad (Nation of Migration Awakening the Diaspora) is an organisation working with young refugees in North London.

They will be presenting two interactive workshops that are open to public participation, in collaboration with the performance artist Denys Blacker

“We are all Migrants” is a workshop exploring the different topics and statements around migration and refugee and migrant issues. This activity will invite us to engage in a debate and meaningful discussions. We will take you on journey to explore and challenge the stigmas, taboos and labels attached to “refugee.”

“Call Me By My Name” is a performance workshop during which we will explore the many names we have been called by others. the labels that we ourselves and others use to describe how we look and who we are; the insulting and the complimentary, the affectionate and the funny. The performance is open to audience participation and discussion.

The workshops are free.
No previous experience is necessary.

Link from Migration Museum website:  migrationmuseum.org/event/interactive-workshop-we-are-all-migrants/

 

Refugee Council Archive at UEL Event: “Different Pasts: Shared Futures”: Showcasing UEL Initiatives Supporting Refugees

UEL and the Refugee Council Archive for Refugee Week Event:

“Different Pasts: Shared Futures”: Showcasing UEL Initiatives Supporting Refugees

Wednesday, 22nd June: 10.30am – 7pm
University of East London, Docklands Campus.
Refugee Council Archive (Ground Floor, Library) and Room DL.3.04

RWlogo ColourWe warmly welcome you to attend our UEL “Different Pasts: Shared Futures” event for Refugee Week 2016. We have organised a mix of sessions to help showcase the initiatives currently being undertaken by staff and students here at the University of East London to help support migrants and refugees and to showcase new projects and research to help promote and celebrate the contribution of refugees to the UK, and encourages a better understanding between communities.

Our Timetable of Events for the day will include:
10.30am – 11am:  Registration and Networking

11am-12.30pm: Living Narratives in the Calais Jungle. 
With confirmed Speakers: Dr. Aura Lounasmaa (UEL), Dr. Cigdem Esin (UEL) ,Dr Tahir Zaman, (SOAS/UEL) and Marie Godin, (International Migration Institute, University of Oxford).

1pm Onwards: Refugee Council Archive Open Afternoon and Exhibition. Location: Archive

1pm – 2pm: Film Screening: Performing the Archive: Living Narratives and the Politics of Performance.
A showcase of a recent civic engagement project with our second-year theatre studies students.

2pm-3pm: Archiving Living Histories of the Migration Experience: Living Refugee Archive (JPG) RedOral History, Archives and the Hidden Narratives of Migration.
Dr. Rumana Hashem and Paul Dudman, Archivist at UEL.

3pm – 4.30pm: Workshop: How can we engage with refugee communities and help document and preserve their life histories and enable their stories to be told?

Showcasing our latest civic engagement projects including the Living Refugee Archive and the Mental Health and Wellbeing Online Portal and introducing the IASFM Working Group and Oral History Society Migration SIG and the Migration and Asylum Network.  Led by Dr. Rumana Hashem and Paul Dudman.

4.30pm – 4.45pm: Break

4.45pm – 6pm: Brexit and the Migration Crisis: Redefining refugee, migration and conflict studies in a fragmented Europe?”

Roundtable discussion including past and present UEL Staff and Students on people-centred understandings of conflict and refugee movements and responses to global and refugee inactivates in light of current events. Chair: Professor Giorgia Dona.

6pm: Refreshments and Networking. Location: Ground Floor Library Foyer and Refugee Council Archive.

Organised in Conjunction with the Refugee Council Archive at UEL; the Centre for Narrative Research, Centres for Migration, Refugees and Belonging and Centres for Social Justice and Change at UEL.

Programme Information:

UEL is at the forefront of research and teaching within the fields of refugee, forced migration and conflict studies. Specialist postgraduate masters courses exist in Refugee Studies and Conflict Displacement and Human Security. If you would like to explore the issues discussed during today in further depth, we welcome enquiries in relation to the courses that we have on offer.
MA in Refugee Studies

A distinctive feature of this course is that it considers the perspective and experiences of the people forced to flee conflict, generalised violence, and human rights violations. It highlights social, cultural and community responses to people in search of sanctuary in the contexts of restrictive border practices. It encourages informed understanding about contemporary conflicts, forced displacement and human security.
Link: https://www.uel.ac.uk/Postgraduate/Courses/MA-Refugee-Studies
MA in Conflict Displacement and Human Security

The key aspects of your learning will be the focus on conflict and displacement. We value a people-centred approach and an emphasis on human security which combines both human rights and human development.

The course approaches development as an important security strategy and considers displacement a measure of human security. We will encourage you to adopt an independent critical approach to contemporary theories of conflict, human rights and human security.

Both of these courses are situated within the field of Global Studies at UEL and work in close contact with our research centres including the Centre for Migration Refugees and Belonging; the Centre for Narrative Research; and the Centre for Social Change and Justice. UEL is also the home of the Refugee Council Archive, hosted within the Docklands Library as part of a wider Archives provision, the Archive represents one of the largest collections of material documenting the history and development of refugee and forced migration issues with the UK.

Migration Museum: Call me by my name: stories from Calais and beyond

Call me by my name: stories from Calais and beyond

2 June – 22 June 2016  | 12pm–8pm (open every day) | Free admission
Londonewcastle Project Space, 28 Redchurch St, London E2 7DP
Transport: Overground (Shoreditch High Street – 2 min walk), Tube (Old Street/Liverpool Street – 10 min walk), Bus (8, 23, 26, 35, 47, 48, 67, 149, 242, 388)

The Calais camp has become a potent symbol of Europe’s migration crisis. Public opinion on this ever- evolving shantytown and its inhabitants is polarised: to some a threatening swarm seeking entry to our already overstretched island-nation, to others a shameful symbol of our failed foreign policy. Amid such debate, it is easy to lose sight of the thousands of individuals who have found themselves in limbo in Calais, each with their own story and reasons for wanting to reach Britain.

Call me by my name: stories from Calais and beyond is a multimedia exhibition, taking place in a momentous month that sees both the EU referendum and Refugee Week. It explores the complexity and human stories behind the current migration crisis, with a particular focus on the Calais camp.

The exhibition features compelling works by established and emerging artists, refugees, camp residents and volunteers. These include a powerful new installation by award-winning artist Nikolaj Bendix Skyum Larsen, art by ALPHA using materials from the camp, drawings of Calais by illustrator Nick Ellwood, art and photography by camp residents, and an installation of lifejackets embedded with the stories of their wearers. It will serve as a forum for a range of discussions, film screenings and performances, including a poetry evening hosted by Michael Rosen. There will also be an opportunity for visitors to leave their responses, which will become part of an art piece by artist-in-residence, Cedoux Kadima.

The Migration Museum Project would like to thank the following donors for their generous grants and support, without which we would not have been able to stage this exhibition: Londonewcastle, Arts Council England, ESRC, Citizenship and Governance Research at The Open University, The University of Oxford’s Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS) and all of the generous contributors to our crowdfunding campaign, including Michael and Em O’Kane, David Warren, Richard Buccleuch and Tom Jupp. We would also like to thank Counterpoints Arts for their advice and support during the planning of this exhibition.

View and download the press release here.

Events associated with this exhibition:

Birds Crossing Borders drop in art workshop, 4 June 2016, 2 -4 pm

Poetry of Migration, 6 June 2016, 5:30 – 8:30 pm

What is Britishness? 14 June 2016, 7 – 9 pm

Join the conversation on Twitter using #CalaisStories. You can find us at @MigrationUK.
Share our Facebook event page and let us know if you’re coming to the exhibition!

Event: Liverpool ARK: The health and wellbeing of refugees

Liverpool ARK: The health and wellbeing of refugees

Join us at the first event organised by Liverpool ARK – Liverpool Asylum and Refugee Knowledge, the University of Liverpool interdisciplinary network on refugee studies.

This event will address the health and well-being of refugees, and aims to share current research in the field, link researchers and local experts, and develop an agenda to meet local challenges.

A team from the University of Liverpool’s Institute of Psychology Health and Society will present findings from several refugee health projects they have been involved with.

Booking Via Eventbrite:  www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/liverpool-ark-the-health-and-wellbeing-of-refugees-tickets-25315755105

Lunch and refreshments provided. [Foyer for refreshments]

Objectives

  1. Share current research in the field
  2. Link researchers and local experts
  3. Develop agenda to meet local challenges

Agenda

1.00 – 1.45:      Lunch

1.45 – 2.00:      Welcome and programme outline                 Chris Dowrick

2.00 – 3.00:      Sharing current research in the field

  • Responding to the health needs of asylum seekers and refugees: findings from the EUR-HUMAN project. Nadja van Ginneken
  • Building mental health research capacity of frontline workers in low resource settings: ethical and educational dimensions. Anna Chiumento
  • Evidence-based psychological interventions for asylum seekers and refugees: international perspectives. Atif Rahman
  • Improving access to high quality primary care: key results of the AMP and RESTORE programmes. Chris Dowrick

3.00 – 3.10:     Liverpool ARK – broad objectives                   Nuno Ferreira

3.10 – 3.15:      Refreshments

3.15 – 4.00:      Linking researchers and local experts

  • Workshops to consider the following topics: needs assessment; methods and evaluation of training; effective interventions; access to healthcare;

4.00 – 4.30:      Feedback and agenda setting:

  • What are our key research and implementation activities?
  • What are our key partnerships?

When Wednesday, 22 June 2016 from 13:00 to 16:30 (BST) – Add to Calendar Where University of Liverpool – Rendall Building, Seminar Room 11 – 74 Bedford St S, Liverpool, L69 7ZT – View Map