Category Archives: Refugee Archives at UEL

Reminder: UEL Archives and Special Collections Open Day: Wednesday 18th November

As part of the Explore Your Archive Campaign 2015, we are pleased to announce:

explore-campaign_identityUEL Archives and Special Collections Open Day

When: Wednesday, 18th November 2015.
11am – 6pm

Where: University of East London Docklands Campus
Library Archive: Room DL.G.02

Are you interested in archives, history or maybe looking for an idea for a research project? Are you auel-logo student or member of staff at UEL and curious to see what the UEL Archives contain? If you fall into any of these categories, you might be interested in attending our Archives Open Day.

As part of the Explore Your Archive 2015, a joint campaign by The National Archives and the Archives and Records Association, the UEL Archives will be running a free Archives Open day on Wednesday 18th 2015 between 11am and 6pm. This will be an informal event with no formal programme where you are welcome to drop-in at any time during the day to explore our Archives and talk to meexplore-primary-messagembers of staff.

We would very much like the opportunity to welcome you to a showcase of material from our unique and diverse archival collections and we are also very keen to use this day to discuss how our archival collections can be best utilised to encourage greater usage and accessibility beyond the confirms of academia and out into the wider world.   We are very keen to make the Archives more interactive and engaging and we are hoping to make a start on this through civic engagement and outreach projects.

The Open Day will:

  • Showcase material from the Archive Collections at UEL, including the British Olympic Association Archive; Refugee Council Archive, the Hackney Empire Theatre Archive and the East London People’s Archive developed by Eastside Community Heritage.
  • Encourage both staff and students at UEL and external researchers to come drop-in anytime during the day to have a look at our archives and chat to members of staff.
  • To promote the UEL Archive collections to a wider audience beyond academia and to try and encourage new outreach and partnership opportunities.
  • Include a small display on the 1948 London Olympic Games.
  • Provide an opportunity to discuss current civic engagement projects and plans for the future.

This is a free event and there are no charges associated with attending. Due to the limited size of the Archive Room, places are limited for the afternoon sessions, so if you are interested, please make a booking here: http://DSC_0003uelarchivesopenday.eventbrite.co.uk

Details of how to find the UEL Docklands Campus can be found here: http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/finding-us

Background Information on the UEL Archives

The University of East London is currently the home of several important archival collections including the British Olympic Association Archive and Library; the Hackney Empire Theatre Archive; the Eastside Community Heritage oral history collection and the Refugee Council Archive.

Further details on all of these collections can be found on our website at: https://uelarchivesportal.wordpress.com/our-archives/

Please do contact us with any questions or feedback that you may have, and we look forward to hearing from you.

Organised By:

Paul Dudman, Archivist, in conjunction with the Library and Learning Services at the University of East London.

Contact E-mail: library-archives@uel.ac.uk / Contact Telephone: +44 (0) 20 8223 7676 / Twitter: @ArchivesUEL

Refugee Week at UEL: Refugee Archives and Special Collections Open Day, Tuesday 16 July

As part of Refugee Week 2015, we are pleased to announce a:

UEL Archives and Special Collections Open Day

When: Tuesday, 16 June 2015
11am – 6pm.

Where: University of East London, Docklands Campus Library Archive: Room DL.G.02

FB-example-8Are you interested in archives, history or refugee and migration issues? Are you a student undertaking research for a dissertation, an NGO-worker focusing on policy; an archivist interested in learning about “refuge archives”; a historian of population movements; an activist or community-group member actively working in the field to support your local community group or organisation? If so, then you may be interested in attending our Archives Open Day?

We would very much like the opportunity to welcome you to a showcase of material from our unique and diverse archival collections and we are also very keen to use this day to discuss hoe are archival collections can be best utilised to encourage greater usage and accessibility beyond the confines of academia. We are very keen to make our Archives more interactive and engaging and we are hoping to take a step towards achieving this through a civic engagement and outreach project that we are currently running.

The aim of this day will be to:

  • Showcase materials for the Archive Collections at UEL, especially FB-We're-Partthe Refugee Council Archive and associated collections.
  • To encourage new groups and communities to attend this open day to discuss our latest civic engagement project which hopes to pilot a new Living Refugee Archive website developed through external engagement beyond the Archive and the collection of oral histories.
  • To promote the UEL Archives to a wider audience beyond academia and to try and encourage new outreach and partnership opportunities.
  • To consider the relevance of “Refugee Archives” in the 21st Century and to reflect on the collection development and management of such collections.

FB-ContributeThe Archivist, Paul Dudman, will be on hand all day to provide advice on how to care for your personal archive collection including photographs and documents. You can also discover how to access the Archives at UEL for your own research projects and further study. If you are interested in using the archives for your research; to Improve your research quality and potential; or if you would like to discuss ways we can utilise the archives for your teaching; or even if you would like to discuss the possibility of forming a new partnership or helping with outreach or civic engagement activities? Or maybe you are just curious about UEL’s fascinating collection of archives and special collections? Please do get in touch and try to come to our Open Day!

This is a free event and there are no charges associated with attending. If you require a car parking space, please do let us know and we can make the arrangements accordingly.

If you are interested in attending, please sign up for a free ticket via our Eventbrite page in order that we can get an idea of the number of people who are interested in attending. Please sign-up here: http://uelarchivesopnday.eventbrite.co.uk

Further details are also available on the Refugee Archives Facbook page at: https://www.facebook.com/RefugeeCouncilArchive

Details of how to find the UEL Docklands Campus can be found here: http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

Background Information on the UEL Archives

The University of East London is currently the home of several high profile archival collections including the British Olympic Association Archive and Library; the Hackney Empire Theatre Archive; the Eastside Community Heritage oral history collection and the Refugee Council Archive and associated collections.

Further details of these collections can be found on our website at: https://uelarchivesportal.wordpress.com/

Organised By

Paul Dudman, Archivist, in conjunction with the Library and Learning Services at the University of East London.

Contact Details:

Contact E-mail: p.v.dudman@uel.ac.uk
Contact Telephone: +44 (0) 20 8223 7676
Twitter: @refugeearchives
Refugee Archives Blog: https://refugeearchives.wordpress.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/679985885480139/

Reminder: Event: Refugee Council Archive at UEL – Archives Open Day, Tuesday 16 June 2015

As part of Refugee Week 2015, we are pleased to announce a:

UEL Archives and Special Collections Open Day

When: Tuesday, 16 June 2015
11am – 6pm.

Where: University of East London, Docklands Campus Library Archive: Room DL.G.02

FB-JoinAre you interested in archives, history or refugee and migration issues? Are you a student undertaking research for a dissertation, an NGO-worker focusing on policy; an archivist interested in learning about “refuge archives”; a historian of population movements; an activist or community-group member actively working in the field to support your local community group or organisation? If so, then you may be interested in attending our Archives Open Day?

We would very much like the opportunity to welcome you to a showcase of material from our unique and diverse archival collections and we are also very keen to use this day to discuss hoe are archival collections can be best utilised to encourage greater usage and accessibility beyond the confines of academia. We are very keen to make our Archives more interactive and engaging and we are hoping to take a step towards achieving this through a civic engagement and outreach project that we are currently running.

The aim of this day will be to:

  • Showcase materials for the Archive Collections at UEL, especially FB-example-6the Refugee Council Archive and associated collections.
  • To encourage new groups and communities to attend this open day to discuss our latest civic engagement project which hopes to pilot a new Living Refugee Archive website developed through external engagement beyond the Archive and the collection of oral histories.
  • To promote the UEL Archives to a wider audience beyond academia and to try and encourage new outreach and partnership opportunities.
  • To consider the relevance of “Refugee Archives” in the 21st Century and to reflect on the collection development and management of such collections.

The Archivist, Paul Dudman, will be on hand all day to provide advice on how to care for your personal archive collection including photographs and documents. You can also discover how to access the Archives at UEL for your own research projects and further study. If you are interested in using the archives for your research; to Improve your research quality and potential; or if you would like to discuss ways we can utilise the archives for your teaching; or even if you would like to discuss the possibility of forming a new partnership or helping with outreach or civic engagement activities? Or maybe you are just curious about UEL’s fascinating collection of archives and special collections? Please do get in touch and try to come to our Open Day!

FB-example-4This is a free event and there are no charges associated with attending. If you require a car parking space, please do let us know and we can make the arrangements accordingly.

If you are interested in attending, please sign up for a free ticket via our Eventbrite page in order that we can get an idea of the number of people who are interested in attending. Please sign-up here: http://uelarchivesopnday.eventbrite.co.uk

Further details are also available on the Refugee Archives Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/RefugeeCouncilArchive

Details of how to find the UEL Docklands Campus can be found here: http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

Background Information on the UEL Archives

The University of East London is currently the home of several high profile archival collections including the British Olympic Association Archive and Library; the Hackney Empire Theatre Archive; the Eastside Community Heritage oral history collection and the Refugee Council Archive and associated collections.

Further details of these collections can be found on our website at: https://uelarchivesportal.wordpress.com/

Organised By

Paul Dudman, Archivist, in conjunction with the Library and Learning Services at the University of East London.

Contact Details:

Contact E-mail: p.v.dudman@uel.ac.uk
Contact Telephone: +44 (0) 20 8223 7676
Twitter: @refugeearchives
Refugee Archives Blog: https://refugeearchives.wordpress.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/679985885480139/

New Book in the Refugee Council Archive: Women Against Fundamentalism : stories of dissent and solidarity

As part of the Refugee Council Archive here at the University of East London, we are pleased to highlight the following new addition to the Archive collection:

Women Against Fundamentalism : stories of dissent and solidarity.
Edited by Sukhwant Dhaliwal and Nira Yuval-Davis.  Archive reference: QU85.2 DHA.

Full details of this new publication can be found on the Women Against Fundamentalism website and the book is available from the publishers website and as a kindle edition.

This book maps the development of the organisation over the past 25 years, through the life stories and political reflections of some of its members, focusing on the ways in which lived contradictions have been reflected in their politics. Their stories describe the pathways that led them to WAF, and the role WAF has played in their lives and in the forms of politicial activism in which they have engaged. Discussing feminist activism from different ethnic and religious back-grounds, contributors highlight the complex relationships of belonging that are at the heart of contemporary social life – including the problems of exclusionary political projects of belonging. They explore the ways in which anti-fundamentalism relates to broader feminist, anti-racist and other emancipatory political ideologies and movements.

Sukhwant Dhaliwal joined WAF in 1995. She has worked with Asian women’s organisations challenging domestic violence in both Newham and Manchester and has worked with Southall Black Sisters. For the last ten years, she has completed research projects encompassing a number of equality strands including: racism and racist violence; disability; age; religion and belief; and gender.

Nira Yuval-Davis is a founding member of WAF. She is the Director of the Centre on Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB) at the University of East London

Refugee Counci Archive at UEL: Recently Received Books

On behalf of the Refugee Council Archive here at the University of East London, we have recently received the following reference books to add to the collection:

The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies. Edited by Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyehm Gil Loescher, Katy Long, and Nando Sigona.  Archive Reference: QU5 OXF.

Further details taken from the abstract available on the Oxford University Press website:

This authoritative Handbook critically evaluates the birth and development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, and analyses the key contemporary and future challenges faced by academics and practitioners working with and for forcibly displaced populations around the world. The 52 state-of-the-art chapters, written by leading academics, practitioners, and policymakers working in universities, research centres, think tanks, NGOs and international organizations, provide a comprehensive and cutting-edge overview of the key intellectual, political, social and institutional challenges arising from mass displacement in the world today. The chapters vividly illustrate the vibrant and engaging debates that characterize this rapidly expanding field of research and practice.

Further details on the Handbook can also be found on the pages of the Refugee Studies Centre.

Child and Youth Migration : mobility-in-migration in an era of globalization. Edited by Angela Veale, University College Cork, Ireland and Giorgia Dona, University of East London, UK. Archive Reference: QU86.22 VEA.

Further details taken from the abstract available on the Palgrave website:

Migration across multiple borders is a defining feature of the time in which we live, and children are central to this contemporary migration phenomenon. A core aim of this volume is to contribute at an empirical level to knowledge about the intersection between children, migration, and mobilities by highlighting underresearched child and youth short-term and micro movements within major migration fluxes that occur in response to migration and global change. This collection positions this complex mobility-in-migration within individual, intergenerational, and collective migratory lifespan trajectories. Drawing together empirical research from around the globe, we see how in the lives of children and young people, migration and mobility intersect so that migration is not an end state but rather is one form of movement in lives characterized by multiple journeys, short, circular or seasonal migrations, and holiday and pleasure mobilities that are dynamic and often ongoing into the future.

The Battle of Britishness : migrant journeys, 1685 to the present by Tony Kushner. Archive Reference: QU60.574 KUS.

Further details taken from the abstract available on the Manchester University Press website:

This pioneering study of migrant journeys to Britain begins with Huguenot refugees in the 1680s and continues to asylum seekers and east European workers today. Analyzing the history and memory of migrant journeys, covering not only the response of politicians and the public but also literary and artistic representations, then and now, Kushner’s volume sheds new light on the nature and construction of Britishness from the early modern era onwards. It is an essential tool for those wanting to understand why people come to Britain (or are denied entry) and how migrants have been viewed by state and society alike.

Refugee Archives at UEL In The News Bulletin Issue 6: Friday 9th January, 2015.

 uel-logo

Refugee Archives at UEL

In The News Bulletin

Issue 6: Friday 9th January, 2015.

Introduction

Welcome to the latest issue of the In The News Bulletin produced by Archive staff at the Refugee Council Archive at the University of East London. Can we take this opportunity to wish everybody a very happy New Year and every success for the year ahead.

This bulletin has the aim of providing both the latest news and developments on the Refugee Council Archive at the University of East London whilst also providing additional information on issues of concern to refugee and forced migration studies more generally. This bulletin will be circulated via our Refugee Archive WordPress blog and also via our Refugee-Research Jiscmail email list. We would welcome any feedback that you may have on this bulletin and we would also welcome any input that you may have in terms of current and future content for both this bulletin and also our WordPress blog more generally. Please Contact Paul Dudman via email (library-archvies@uel.ac.uk) or Twitter (@PaulDudman) with any feedback or thoughts that you may have.

There are also some general Archive details included at the end of this and every bulletin posting for your reference.

This Week’s Interesting News

Psychology and Torture – a literature review. Ian Clark, Subject Librarian for Psychology at the University of East London, has published a very interesting blog posting on his UEL Psychology Library Blog which provides a very interesting literature review on the subject of Psychology and Torture. Access to the blog posting is here: http://uellibrarypsyc.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/psychology-and-torture-a-literature-overview/

Out of the ‘darkness’: UN War Crimes Commission records hailed as vital international justice tool. A news story from the United Nations detailing how the United Nations War Crimes Commission records have now been opened for the first time in 70 years. Highlighting the importance of these records for the history of the World War II and its aftermath, the article highlights “The records of the UN War Crimes Commission, which was operational between 1943 and 1948 and played a vital role in preparation for the war crimes trials that followed the Second World War, were made open to the public this past July at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.”

The full story is available at: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=49313#.VG5CSblAQdW.
(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, November 2014).

At an event to mark the World Day for Audiovisual Heritage, the Minister for Sports and Culture in Rwanda lamented the loss of historical archives, but then commented, “Even today we are seeing a deliberate effort to destroy the records of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi which now gives us the challenge on how to properly archive our audiovisual history. For instance today we have Gacaca documents which we need to store property.” If any reader has additional information on the “deliberate effort to destroy,” please forward it to the ICA. http://allafrica.com/stories/201410300469.html

(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, October 2014).

A Guatemala court ruled that there was sufficient cause to try two Army officers for sexual slavery and domestic slavery against Quiche women at the military outpost at the community of Sepu Zarco in the 1980s.” Link:

http://www.breakingthesilenceblog.com/general/trial-for-sexual-slavery-during-armed-conflict-opens-in-guatemala/

(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, October 2014).

The Iran–Iraq war lasted from 1980 until 1988, but even 34 years later it is “rarely . . examined with the nuance it deserves,” Al-Monitor reported. A Tehran-based researcher said, “There is a red line preventing neutral historians and independent analysts from conducting research on this subject or commenting on it,” adding, “The narrative of this war has to be reclaimed from the government-sanctioned historians, former commanders and members of one political faction. People need to know what happened. Why did the war last as long as it did? Why so many casualties? What was happening on the front during the last months of the war?” Opening the archives of the war in both countries would be an important start.  http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2014/10/iran-iraq-war-saddam-hussein-irgc.html?utm_source=Al-Monitor+Newsletter+%5BEnglish%5D&utm_campaign=61068533d7-October_7_2014&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_28264b27a0-61068533d7-93088897#

(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, October 2014).

The Guardian reports on how Police investigating the abduction of Libyan seuspects and their forced return to Libya have passed documentation to the UK Crown Prosecution Service. Link http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2014/oct/31/met-libya-abduction-rendition-cps

(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, November 2014).

The United Kingdom Court of Appeal ruled that the claim by a Libyan husband and wife against “various branches of the UK government, a former UK foreign secretary, and a senior intelligence officer over their alleged involvement in the couple’s 2004 rendition to Libya, where they were imprisoned and tortured,” could be tried. A lower court had refused to hear the claim, on the grounds that the case would damage the UK’s relationship with the United States. Human Rights Watch found documents in 2011 in Tripoli that described “US offers to transfer, or render, at least four detainees from US to Libyan custody, one with the active participation of the UK.” http://www.hrw.org/new/2014/10/31/dispatches-rare-victory-justice; http://www.hrw.org/news/2011/09/08/usuk-documents-reveal-libya-rendition-details

(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, October 2014).

Another story highlighting the importance of archives in relation to issues pertaining to human rights is highlighted by issues surrounding the ongoing disagreement between Armenia and Turkey in relation to the 1915 massacre of Armenians, known as the Armenian Genocide. In a recent article, highlighted in the October 2014 HRWG Newsletter, the director of Armenia’s national archives told Mediamax that “there are enough necessary documents on the Armenian Genocide in the archive to initiate an international court trial against Turkey.” A few days later, the Turkish Minister for European Union Affairs told TRT Haber television channel that “Armenia is not ready to open its archives for investigation of the 1915 events,” and added that “Turkey has repeatedly proposed to create an independent commission to investigate the events of 1915.” http://asbarez.com/128170/national-archive-chief-says-enough-documents-to-bring-turkey-to-court/; http://en.trend.az/world/turkey/2327556.html In addition,

the head of the Armenian church in Lebanon announced plans to sue Turkey for property lost and “the restitution of its historical centre, the Catholicate of Sis.” Link: https://iwpr.net/global-voices/armenian-church-seeks-restitution-from-turkey

(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, October 2014).

Events and Call for Papers

Forthcoming events organised by the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB) at the university of East London:

‘Beyond the Beast of Austerity: Inequality and the lives we hope to lead’, Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL).
This seminar will take place 4-6pm, Monday 12th January 2014 in EB G.06, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD (http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/)

‘Hierarchy, Inequality and Stratification: classing intersectionality and intersectionalising class’, Prof. Floya Anthias (UEL).
This seminar will take place 4-6pm, Monday 26th January 2014 in EB G.06, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD (http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/)

Conference: Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel

Monday 9th February 2015, 09.00–18.30, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG

Further details can be found on the CMRB website at: www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/events.htm or alternative please email Jamie Hakim at: j.hakim@uel.ac.uk

Online Resources

Rule of Terror: Living under ISIS in Syria. Report of the Independent International Commission on the Syrian Arab Republic. A new report by the Commission which is based upon “over 300 interviews with men, women and children who fled or are living in ISIS-controlled areas” within Syria. Both the testimonies collected as the basis for this report and the ongoing collection of records by the Commission will be important for documenting and preserving any human rights violations within Syria during this period. (Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, November 2014).

A new website opened on forced labor, trafficking and slavery: “Over the next 12 months you’ll see dozens of pieces from academics and practitioners on a range of debates. Starting in January, each month will focus on a distinct theme. We’ll begin by examining the common misconceptions of slavery, trafficking, and forced labor as promoted by politicians and across the mainstream media. We’ll follow this by looking at how political structures, economic systems, and legal frameworks sustain and entrench human vulnerability in a way that allows such exploitation and domination to flourish in plain sight.” https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery

(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, October 2014).

Other News

“Camps of Death,’ a documentary directed by film-maker Avdo Huseinovic for the Association of Concentration-Camp Detainees in Bosnia and Herzegovina, was shown for the first time at the Bosnian Culture Centre in Sarajevo. For information about the documentary, contact the Association of Concentration-Camp Detainees. www.logorasibih.ba#sthash.4HZn3DPm.dpuf (Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, November 2014).

New Additions to the Archive

Britain’s forgotten prisoners : $$b meeting the needs of Immigration Act detainees / Kathy Lowe.

HM Chief Inspector of Prisons for England and Wales : annual report 2008-09 / HM Chief Inspector of Prisons for England and Wales.

A report on alternatives to the detention of families : for the All Party Parliamentary Groups for Refugees and Children / No Place for a Child Campaign.

A hidden trade : child trafficking research in Scotland, 2005/6 / [written by Sheila Arthur and Richard Morran ; edited by Susan Fisher, Douglas Hamilton and Stefanie Keir].

The small hands of slavery : modern day child slavery / a report by Save the Children UK

Impact from the trafficking prevention project : stories from the beneficiaries / a report by Save the Children UK.

Counter trafficking directory / National Missing Persons Helpline

Dispatches: How to break into Britain. (off air recording)

Starting over : young refugees talk about life in Britain / The Prince’s Trust with The Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund.

Where are the children? : A mapping exercise on numbers of unaccompanied asylum-seeking children in the UK : September 2000 – March 2001 / carried by the Refugee Council and British Agencies for Adoption and Fostering, (BAAF).

The deportation machine : Europe, asylum and human rights / $$c Liz Fekete.

Making separated children visible : the need for a child-centred approach : executive summary / Dr. Nalinie Mooten for the Irish Refugee Council.

I did not choose to come here : listening to refugee children / Selam Kidane.

Out of exile : developing youth work with young refugees / Ros Norton and Brian Cohen.

Home truths : adult refugees and asylum seekers : a guide for donors and funders / Sarah Sandford, Tris Lumley.

A long way from home : young refugees in Manchester write about their lives / [edited by Jackie Ould ; illustrations by Ahmed El Hassan].

Mono-cultural communities and their effect on asylum/immigration seekers in Humberside / Andrew Dawson.

A long way to go : young refugees and asylum seekers in the UK : a guide for donors and funding / Eleanor Stringer and Tris Lumley.

Local impacts of international migration : the information base / Gary Craig, Andy Dawson, Sandra Hutton, Nerys Roberts, and Mick Wilkinson

Welcome to Britain : voices from the front line of the refugee crisis / The Medical Foundation.

Incoming assets : why Tories should change policy on immigration and asylum / by John Bercow.

An examination of UK asylum policy : how successive UK Governments have tried, failed, and are still trying / Rt. Hon. Ann Widdecombe MP.

Making separated children visible : the need for a child-centred approach / Nalinie Mooten for the Irish Refugee Council.

The end of the road : the impact on families of section 9 of the Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants) Act 2004 / Nancy Kelley and Lise Meldgaard.

Caring for unaccompanied asylum-seeking children and young people / written by Eileen Fursland.

Caring for unaccompanied asylum-seeking children and young people from Afghanistan / written by Eileen Fursland.

Caring for unaccompanied asylum-seeking children and young people from Iran / written by Eileen Fursland.

Caring for unaccompanied asylum-seeking children and young people from Eritrea / written by Eileen Fursland.

Child and family social work with asylum seekers and refugees / guest editor, Ravi Kohli.

Refugees : |b perspectives on the experience of forced migration / edited by Alastair Ager.

Ensuring quality education for young refugees from Syria (12-25 years) : a mapping exercise / Sarah Wahby, Hashem Ahmadzadeh, Metin Corabatir, Leen Hashem, Jalal Al Husseini with contributions from Farah Akel, Maha Alasil, Zeina Bali and Hoshang Waziri. (Arabic Version).

Repatriation through a trust-based lens : refugee-state trust relations on the Thai-Burma border and beyond / Karen Hargrave.

Assessing the burden of key infectious diseases affecting migrant populations in the EU/EEA : executive summary / European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

Fundamental rights at airports : border checks at five international airports in the European Union : summary / by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights.

Schengen : your gateway to free movement in Europe / Consilium.

The EU in the world 2014 : a statistical portrait Eurostat.

Education : the situation of Roma in 11 EU member states / by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights.

EASO country of origin information report : South and Central Somalia country overview / by the European Asylum Support Office.

Migrant health : sexual transmission of HIV within migrant groups in EU/EEA and implications for effective interventions / European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

Mapping youth transitions in Europe / European Foundation for the improvement of Living and Working Conditions.

Fundamental rights : key legal and policy developments in 2013 / by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights.

Handbook on European law relating to asylum, borders and immigration / by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights.

Medical assistance to self-settled refugees : Guinea, 1990-96 / Wim Van Damme.

Education in the developing world : conflict and crisis / Sarah Graham-Brown on behalf of World University Service.

Exclusion and inclusion of refugees in contemporary Europe / edited by Philip Muus.

Multicultural policies and the state : a comparison of two European societies / edited by Marco Martiniello.

Further Archive Information

The current Opening Hours for our Archival collections are detailed as follows. The Refugee Council Archive and the British Olympic Association Archive are currently located on our Docklands Campus Library whilst the Hackney Empire Archive is currently located in our Stratford Campus Library.

The opening hours for both Docklands and Stratford Archives are as follows:

Docklands Archive

Mondays:  1pm – 6pm*

Tuesdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Wednesdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Thursdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Fridays: 1pm – 5pm*

Sat/Sun:  Both Archives Closed

Access to the Stratford Archive for the Hackney Empire Archive is by prior appointment only.

* Morning appointments between 10am and 12pm are available by prior appointment.  The Archive will be closed between 12pm and 1pm for lunch.

We would recommend that, especially for external users, that you contact us in advance of your trip in order to make an appointment to use the Archives.  This enables us to ensure that a member of staff will be on hand to assist you.

To make an appointment, please click on the link to our Make an Appointment page.

Archive Web Resources and Email List

Please find details below of our various online and social media resources which are currently available online and please do take a look. We would also welcome any feedback that you may have on how these can be improved:

Blogs

We have created several blogs to help support the archival work that we undertake and these are highlighted as follows:

Facebook

Please join and Like Us on Facebook, links are as follows:

Twitter

Please follow us on Twitter by selecting one of the options below:

Refugee-Research Email Mailing List

Please also consider joining our Refugee Research Jiscmail e-mail list which is managed in conjunction with this blog.  To subscribe to the mail group
www.jiscmail.ac.uk, type REFUGEE‐RESEARCH into the ‘find lists’ box, or use the alphabetical index to scroll down to R. and then follow the instructions on our REFUGEERESEARCH homepage to ‘join or leave the list’. Most users need only enter their email address and name. Alternatively, email the Archivist, Paul Dudman on p.v.dudman@uel.ac.uk, requesting to join the mail group.

Please let us know of any further links that you would like to see added.

 

Contact Details

Paul Dudman is currently the Archivist responsible for all of the physical Archives located here at the University of East London Library and Learning Services: Archives. Paul is happy to receive and respond to any questions or queries that you may have in response to both our Archival collections and also our social media presence.

If you wish to contact the Archive, please contact Paul Dudman via one of the contact methods detailed below:

By email at: library-archives@uel.ac.uk

By telephone at: +44 (0) 20 8223 7676

Online at: uelarchivesportal.wordpress.com/contact-us/

On Twitter at: @refugee_archive

By post to:

Paul V. Dudman
Archivist
Library and Learning Services
University of East London
Docklands Campus
4-6 University Way
London, E16 2RD
United Kingdom.