Tag Archives: FRONTEX

News: Border force warns terrorists could enter EU by abusing asylum checks

News:

Border force warns terrorists could enter EU by abusing asylum checks
By Migration correspondent at The Guardian

Frontex police escort migrants, who are being deported from Lesbos, on to a ferry before it returns to Turkey. Photograph: Milos Bicanski/Getty Images

Frontex border agency’s annual risk analysis echoes previous warnings that irregular migratory flows could be used by terrorists to enter the EU.

The EU’s border force has warned that terrorists may have infiltrated Europe by hiding among asylum seekers, noting that two of the bombers in last November’s Paris attacks arrived on the continent in a smuggling boat from Turkey.

Frontex’s annual risk analysis, released on Tuesday, said: “The Paris attacks in November 2015 clearly demonstrated that irregular migratory flows could be used by terrorists to enter the EU.”

Echoing observations made five months ago, the report added: “Two of the terrorists involved in the attacks had previously irregularly entered through Leros and had been registered by the Greek authorities. They presented fraudulent Syrian documents to speed up their registration process.

“As the vast majority of migrants arrive undocumented, screening activities are essential to properly verify their declaration of nationality.”

Frontex’s suggestions come weeks after European politicians introduced a stringent new border policy that will see almost all asylum seekers landing on islands such as Leros returned to Turkey.

Read Full Article – Border force warns terrorists could enter EU by abusing asylum checks.

 

News Article: Migrant crisis confusion: how many are entering the EU?

News Story:

Migrant crisis confusion: how many are entering the EU?

Europe’s border agency is facing criticism, after admitting that it has doubled-counted migrants entering the EU this year.

It released data claiming 710,000 migrants had entered the bloc from January-September this year.

But it later admitted some migrants would have been counted coming in twice, at the Greek border and then again as they travelled north into Hungary or Croatia.

Nando Sigona, a researcher on migration at the University of Birmingham in England, said: “I’m still amazed how Frontex could release such sensitive figures so light-heartedly, considering the impact that numbers have on the moral panic regarding migration and the political debate.”

A spokeswoman for Frontex told euronews that the agency had admitted that it had double-counted a few hours after releasing the information on Tuesday (October 13).

“We did issue a clarification,” she said. “We just use the data provided to us by the member states.”

The spokeswoman added that the agency had published the number of migrants entering Hungary because it was the only way of capturing people from the Balkans, such as Kosovo, who were moving northwards to enter the EU.

Asked about whether the agency should have published an article with a headline claiming 710,000 had entered the EU, the spokeswoman said Frontex would continue to publish the data in the same way, alongside a clarification about the double-counting.

Read Full Article here:  www.euronews.com/2015/10/14/migrant-crisis-confusion-how-many-are-entering-the-eu/#.Vh5qYndMvsI.facebook

 

News: ECRE and UNHCR Concerned over the ending of Mare Nostrum without European rescue initiative to replace it.

Extract:

ECRE and UNHCR have warned that ending Italy’s rescue operation Mare Nostrum without replacing it by a well-resourced European search and rescue initiative would mean more deaths at sea.

One year ago, just a few days after more than 300 people drowned off the coast of Lampedusa, Italy launched the Mare Nostrum operation to ensure search and rescue of migrants in the Mediterranean. Since then, Mare Nostrum has saved around 150,000 people.

“Everyone was horrified at the loss of lives off Lampedusa one year ago. Italy did something about it. Now this life-saving Mare Nostrum operation is at stake. Refugees, many fleeing war in Syria and oppression in Eritrea, cannot stay in lawless Libya and it is not possible for them to reach a safe place legally and safely. If Mare Nostrum ends without being replaced by a well-resourced operation whose priority is to save lives, more people will die in their attempt to reach our shores. A European effort is urgently needed, if the EU is really serious about putting an end to the deaths in the Mediterranean,” said ECRE’s Secretary General Michael Diedring.

Read the full article online via the ECRE website here: ECRE and UNHCR Concerned over the ending of Mare Nostrum without European rescue initiative to replace it.

Further news and social media coverage of this story are available via the following links:

BBC News – UK opposes future migrant rescues in Mediterranean

The Independent – UK axes support for Mediterranean migrant rescue operation

The Independent – Italy’s decision to end Mare Nostrum will put the lives of thousands of migrants and refugees at risk

Amnesty International – Is there ever a justification for leaving people to drown in the Med?

The Telegraph – Drown an immigrant to save an immigrant: why is the Government borrowing policy from the BNP?

The Guardian – Italian navy says it will continue refugee rescue mission despite plan to scrap it

The Guardian – Migrants’ tales: ‘I feel for those who were with me. They got asylum in the sea’

The Independent – European governments must come to the rescue of asylum-seekers

ECRE – Mare Nostrum to end – New Frontex operation will not ensure rescue of migrants in international waters

UNHCR – UNHCR concerned over ending of rescue operation in the Mediterranean

 

New Publications on Syria; Yemen; Bahrain; Frontex and Internal Displacement

Syrian Refugees: Reliance on Camps Creates Few Good Options.
A new report by Refugees International.

The civil war in Syria has forced large numbers of Syrians from their homes, and in many cases from the country entirely. Refugees continue to flee in record numbers, and there are currently almost 400,000 registered or waiting for registration in Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, and Turkey combined. The United Nations has said it expects this number could reach 700,000 by December 31, 2012. About half of all the registered Syrians are living in camps, but the other half remain in local host communities trying to get by on their own.

[Download a PDF of this report].
(Source: Refugees International – refugeesinternational.org.)

Conflict in Yemen: Abyan’s darkest hour.
A new report by Amnesty International.

For around 10 months leading up to mid-2012, Abyan governorate in southern Yemen was racked by armed conflict between government forces and Ansar al-Shari’a, an Islamist armed group affiliated to al-Qa’ida. This report documents violations committed by Ansar al-Shari’a when cities and towns in Abyan were under their control and during the subsequent armed conflict. These violations included recklessly exposing civilians to harm during attacks; killing captured soldiers; abducting civilians; and obstructing medical treatment for wounded people. It also shows how government forces used disproportionate force during the conflict.

[Download Full Report]
(Source: Amnesty International press release – Yemen: Abyan conflict a human rights ‘catastrophe’).

Bahrain: Reform shelved, repression unleashed.
A new report by Amnesty International.

On the first anniversary of the BICI report, Amnesty International continues to call for true justice and accountability in Bahrain. The Bahraini government must immediately release all prisoners of conscience; conduct independent, effective and transparent investigations into allegations of torture; bring to justice anyone at any level of the chain of command who committed or gave the orders to commit abuses; and refrain from further use of unnecessary or excessive force against protesters. The international community should immediately condemn human rights violations and match their condemnation with action.

[Download Full Report]
(Source: Amnesty International Press Release – Bahrain: Promises of reform broken, repression unleashed).

FRAN (Frontex Risk Assessment Network) Quarterly Report for the Second Quarter of 2012 (April-June).
Quarterly report produced by Frontex.

On 10 October Frontex released its FRAN (Frontex Risk Assessment Network) Quarterly Report for the Second Quarter of 2012 (April-June). As is always the case, the 70 page report contains a significant amount of information, graphs, and statistical tables regarding detections of illegal border crossings (land, air, and sea), irregular migration routes, detections of facilitators, detections of illegal stays, refusals of entry, asylum claims, returns, information regarding other illegal border activities, and more.  Here are some highlights (focusing on the sea borders)

[Download Full Report]
(Source: Migrants at Sea blog – Frontex FRAN Report for Q2 2012).

UNHCR Handbook for the Protection of Internally Displaced Persons.
Produced by UNHCR.
[Download Full Report]
(Source: UNHCR)

Challenges of IDP Protection: Research study on the protection of internally displaced persons in Afghanistan.
A new report by the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, (IDMC).

A new report, published today by IDMC and NRC presents new evidence highlighting the worrying conditions faced by the growing number of internally displaced persons (IDPs) across Afghanistan. More than 166,000 internally displaced Afghans have been recorded in 2012 alone, bringing the total number of internally displaced due to conflict to at least 460,000.

[Download full report here] and [Download executive study here].
(Source: IDMC).

Côte d’Ivoire: IDPs rebuilding lives amid a delicate peace.
A new report by the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, (IDMC).

Côte d’Ivoire witnessed the world’s largest new internal displacement event of 2011 after contested presidential election results in 2010 sparked a violent conflict for political control. Serious rights abuses by supporters of both sides and armed clashes between them resulted in the internal displacement of up to a million people. Two years later, most of these internally displaced people (IDPs) have returned home to rebuild their lives. However, tens of thousands have still not found durable solutions to their displacement.

[Download the Report]
(Source: IDMC).

 

New Publications on Ethiopia, Arab Spring, FRONTEX, Racial Justice, Systematic Reviews

“Waiting Here for Death”

“Waiting Here for Death”

“Waiting Here for Death”: Forced Displacement and “Villagization” in Ethiopia’s Gambella Region (Human Rights Watch, Jan. 2012) [text]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog).

Ending the Displacement Cycle: Finding Durable Solutions through Return and Resettlement (Regional Centre for Strategic Studies, June 2011) [text]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog).

Arab Spring, Tunisia and Turkey
A Policy Debate publication produced by the SETA Foundation.

Tunisia triggered a wave of protests that has been sweeping all over the North Africa and the Middle East since the early 2011. It set the motion in the so-called Arab Spring and successfully demonstrated that social and political transformation is possible without resorting to violence. Through fair and transparent elections that was held on October 23, 2011, Tunisians elected a Constituent Assembly that is mandated to draft the new Constitution of Tunisia. The new political actors in Tunisia has shown great interest in increasing the level of cooperation with Turkey, a country whose experience in political transformation and economic development has become a source of inspiration for the people in the region.

[Download Report]
(Source: DocuBase).

FRAN Quarterly Q3 2011

FRAN Quarterly Q3 2011

The Frontex Risk Analysis Unit (RAU) released its 3rd Quarter Report (July-September) for 2011 on 18 January.  (See also  2nd Quarter Report (April-June 2011) and 1st Quarter Report (Jan-March 2011).)

The reports contain a significant amount of information, graphs, and statistical tables regarding detections of illegal border crossings, irregular migration routes, detections of facilitators, detections of illegal stays, refusals of entry, asylum claims, and more.  The Report is based on data provided by Member States.  The Report states that “Frontex and the Member States are currently harmonising their illegal-migration data, a process that is not yet finalised. Therefore more detailed data and trends in this report should be interpreted with caution and, where possible, cross-referenced with information from other sources.”

[Download Report]
See Also – Frontex:  FRAN Quarterly | Q03 2011.
Click here for previous post on Q1 and Q2 Reports.
(Source: Migrants At Sea blog).

Criminal Justice v Racial Justice: Minority ethnic overrepresentation in the criminal justice system.
Edited by Kjartan Páll Sveinsson.
A new report published by The Runnymede Trust.
[Access to the Report]
See Also – Runnymede Trust Press Release.
(Source: Runnymede Trust)

Making systematic reviews work for international development research

Making systematic reviews work for international development research

Making systematic reviews work for international development research
Discussion papers
, January 2012.
Authors: Jessica Hagen-Zanker, Maren Duvendack, Richard Mallett and Rachel Slater with Samuel Carpenter and Mathieu Tromme.
[Download Full Summary and the Full Report]
(Source: Overseas Development Institute).