Tag Archives: Greece

News: Greece on brink of chaos as refugees riot over forced return to Turkey

News from The Guardian (UK):

Greece on brink of chaos as refugees riot over forced return to Turkey

A woman feeds pigeons at the port of Piraeus near Athens where migrants are camped out. Photograph: Yorgos Karahalis/AP Image Copyright: Guardian and Associated Press.

The Greek government is bracing itself for violence ahead of the European Union implementing a landmark deal that, from Monday, will see Syrian refugees and migrants being deported back to Turkey en masse.

Rioting and rebellion by thousands of entrapped refugees across Greece has triggered mounting fears in Athens over the practicality of enforcing an agreement already marred by growing concerns over its legality. Islands have become flashpoints, with as many as 800 people breaking out of a detention centre on Chios on Friday.

Some 750 migrants are set to be sent back between Monday and Wednesday from the island of Lesbos to the Turkish port of Dikili.

“We are expecting violence. People in despair tend to be violent,” the leftist-led government’s migration spokesman, Giorgos Kyritsis, told the Observer. “The whole philosophy of the deal is to deter human trafficking [into Europe] from the Turkish coast, but it is going to be difficult and we are trying to use a soft approach. These are people have fled war. They are not criminals.”

Barely 24 hours ahead of the pact coming into force, it emerged that Frontex, the EU border agency, had not dispatched the appropriate personnel to oversee the operation. Eight Frontex boats will transport men, women and children, who are detained on Greek islands and have been selected for deportation, back across the Aegean following fast-track asylum hearings. But of the 2,300 officials the EU has promised to send Greece only 200 have so far arrived, Kyritsis admitted.

Read Full Article: Greece on brink of chaos as refugees riot over forced return to Turkey.

News: Conditions Rapidly Deteriorating for Children Detained in Moria Camp on Lesvos

News from ReliefWeb:

Conditions Rapidly Deteriorating for Children Detained in Moria Camp on Lesvos

Media Contact: Media@savechildren.org

FAIRFIELD, CT (April 3, 2016) — Save the Children expressed deep concern today over the deplorable conditions in Moria detention center on the Greek island of Lesvos, where more than 1,000 children, many traveling alone, are detained as part of the EU-Turkey deal.

In addition to concerns around the detention of asylum seekers, the agency is also shocked by the lack of safeguards in place for those likely to be returned to Turkey in less than 24 hours. It calls on European leaders to urgently rethink their proposal and suspend all transfers to Turkey until there is a guarantee that those in need of international protection will receive it.

“The situation inside Moria detention center is deteriorating rapidly,” said Simona Mortolini, Save the Children Team Leader in Greece. “We have spoken to families and children who are sleeping outside on the cold ground on thin blankets because there is nowhere else for them to sleep in the overcrowded accommodation facilities. The camp was initially designed to host a few hundred people transiting through within a day. It now hosts 3,300 people, many have been trapped there for more than a week.”

“People continue to arrive to the island and the number of families detained in the center continues to increase by the day. It is extremely dangerous for children and we are worried about their physical and mental well-being, especially those children travelling alone.”

“There are reports of protests and people have told us they will commit suicide if they are sent back to Turkey. Some said they will jump off the boats. People are absolutely desperate. They have sold all their worldly possessions to pay for the journey from Turkey to Greece, they already risked their lives at sea to make the crossing. There is nothing left for them to return to – in Turkey or in their countries of origin that are marred by wars and widespread violence and insecurity.”

As part of the new EU-Turkey deal, which came into effect on 20 March, newly-arrived vulnerable children and their families, regardless of their status, have been detained in closed facilities on the Greek islands until their individual interview and assessment take place – which could take weeks or months.

Read Full Article – Conditions Rapidly Deteriorating for Children Detained in Moria Camp on Lesvos

 

News – Migrant crisis: Greece starts deportations to Turkey

From the BBC News Service:

Migrant crisis: Greece starts deportations to Turkey

First group of returned migrants were welcomed by Turkish officials in Diki. Image Copyright: BBC.

The first boat carrying migrants being deported from Greece has arrived in Turkey as part of an EU plan aimed at easing mass migration to Europe.

Scores of migrants boarded ferries on the Greek island of Lesbos and arrived in Dikili, western Turkey.

Frontex, the EU’s border agency, told the BBC that most of the 136 people who left Lesbos on Monday were Pakistanis.

Meanwhile, the first group of 16 Syrian migrants has arrived in Germany from Turkey, officials say.

Under the deal, for each Syrian migrant returned to Turkey, the EU is due to take in another Syrian who has made a legitimate request.

However, Greek authorities said the first deportees were those who had not applied for asylum, and included citizens from Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Morocco.

And Turkey’s EU Affairs Minister Volkan Bozkir said there were no Syrians among the first group of migrants sent from Greece.

Another ferry carrying migrants to Turkey is also due to leave the Greek island of Chios on Monday.

The returns were carried out calmly, despite a small protest at the gate of Lesbos port, where activists shouted ‘No to deportations’ and ‘EU shame on you’, the BBC’s Sarah Rainsford at the scene said.

Read Full Article – Migrant crisis: Greece starts deportations to Turkey.

See Also – ReliefWeb: Turkey prepares for up to 500 migrants from Greece on Monday

Re-blog: Into The Fire – refugees and migrants in Greece

JCWI are working alongside video activists from Reel News to help gain the widest audience possible for their new film Into The Fire. The film is thoughtfully made and brilliantly put together but makes, in places, for somewhat uncomfortable viewing.
Things are bleak in Greece at the moment. The vicious austerity measures are ripping up people’s lives, denying people a pension, heating, food and security. The reaction seems to be going in two directions, there is a strong feeling of solidarity with communal kitchens and medical care provided by those who can and there is the growth of progressive parties such as Syriza. But there is also a nasty backlash against the more vulnerable people there – refugees and immigrants.
Into The Fire tells the story of those immigrants, the attacks from police and organised fascists, the appalling treatment of their asylum claims or their attempts to get documentation and the right to work, the homelessness and the lack of healthcare. Add to all that, the impossibility of moving to another country – even the one they came from – and you have the desperate situation these people face.
A huge percentage of refugees making it to the EU in search of sanctuary arrive in Greece – entirely for geographical reasons. They arrive to find the system for documenting and processing asylum seekers in meltdown.  It’s bad enough for the UNHCR, in September 2010, to call the asylum situation in Greece a ‘humanitarian crisis’. Unquestionably things have deteriorated since then. In January this year, Human Rights Watch reported:

“Violence against people from Afghanistan and North and sub-Saharan Africa is alarmingly commonplace, much of it going unrecorded.”

Into the Fire reports on some of the victims of this violence, and looks at the living conditions, prospects and reality faced by them.

– See more at: http://www.jcwi.org.uk/blog/2013/04/11/fire-refugees-and-migrants-greece#sthash.8RlbpTe4.dpuf

Into The Fire – refugees and migrants in Greece
JCWI are working alongside video activists from Reel News to help gain the widest audience possible for their new film Into The Fire. The film is thoughtfully made and brilliantly put together but makes, in places, for somewhat uncomfortable viewing.
Things are bleak in Greece at the moment. The vicious austerity measures are ripping up people’s lives, denying people a pension, heating, food and security. The reaction seems to be going in two directions, there is a strong feeling of solidarity with communal kitchens and medical care provided by those who can and there is the growth of progressive parties such as Syriza. But there is also a nasty backlash against the more vulnerable people there – refugees and immigrants.

Into The Fire tells the story of those immigrants, the attacks from police and organised fascists, the appalling treatment of their asylum claims or their attempts to get documentation and the right to work, the homelessness and the lack of healthcare. Add to all that, the impossibility of moving to another country – even the one they came from – and you have the desperate situation these people face.

A huge percentage of refugees making it to the EU in search of sanctuary arrive in Greece – entirely for geographical reasons. They arrive to find the system for documenting and processing asylum seekers in meltdown.  It’s bad enough for the UNHCR, in September 2010, to call the asylum situation in Greece a ‘humanitarian crisis’. Unquestionably things have deteriorated since then. In January this year, Human Rights Watch reported:

“Violence against people from Afghanistan and North and sub-Saharan Africa is alarmingly commonplace, much of it going unrecorded.”

Into the Fire reports on some of the victims of this violence, and looks at the living conditions, prospects and reality faced by them.

– See more at: www.jcwi.org.uk/blog/2013/04/11/fire-refugees-and-migrants-greece#sthash.8RlbpTe4.dpuf

View the video below:

 

ToC: International Migration February 2013, Volume 51, Issue 1 Pages 1–212

International MigrationThe latest Table of Contents for the journal International Migration has just been published.  Further details for this issue, namely Volume 51, Issue 1 Pages 1–212 (February 2013) can be found by following the link below and details of some of the articles available are also included.

Link – http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/imig.2013.51.issue-1/issuetoc

Rationalities and Images Underlying Labour Migration from Bangladesh to Malaysia (pages 40–60)
By Petra Dannecker

Foreigners and Outsiders: Exclusionist Attitudes towards Labour Migrants in Israel (pages 136–151)

By Rebeca Raijman.

An Estimation of the Economic Impact of Migrant Access on GDP: the Case of the Madrid Region (pages 169–185)

By Rafael de Arce and Ramon Mahia.

New Publications on Rethinking Integration; Greece; Food Insecurity; Human Trafficking; Halifax Public Libraries; Children; Asylum

Rethinking integration

Rethinking integration

Rethinking integration.
A new report written by Myriam Cherti and Clare McNeil for the IPPR.

IPPR has published a report setting out what they call an ‘everyday integration’ approach to bringing cultural minorities into the mainstream.

The report argues that this contrasts with the ‘group multiculturalism’ which has been advocated by academic researchers in the past, and the more recent assimulationist approaches which have been advocated in recent years by government.

[Access Full Report].
(Source: Migrants’ Rights Network).

Update report Greece/ June 2012.
Report written by Thanos Maroukis for the CLANDESTINO Project.

In a new report posted on the project’s website they have set out an alternative assessment for 2011 which suggests figure of 390,000 as representing the upper range of credible estimates. This figure is calculated on the basis of CLANDESTINO’s baseline estimate for 2007 updated to take into account apprehension data provided by the Greek authorities and other factors used by researchers to interpret data.

[Download Full Report].
(Source: Migrants’ Rights Network).

The State of Food Insecurity in the World (SOFI).
Produced by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.
[Download Full Report]
(Source: IDS – World Food Day: What hope for a new era of global action on food security?).

First Annual Report of the Inter-Departmental Ministerial Group on Human Trafficking

First Annual Report of the Inter-Departmental Ministerial Group on Human Trafficking

First Annual Report of the Inter-Departmental Ministerial Group on Human Trafficking – Cm. 8421.
Produced by the Inter-Departmental Ministerial Group (IDMG) on Human Trafficking.

Fuelled primarily by those who seek to make a profit from the misery of others, human trafficking is the vilest of crimes and equates to modern day slavery.

Men, women and children from across the world are exploited and forced into performing services or other work against their will. In some instances the exploitation can be experienced over a prolonged period of time. Those who are exploited may face years of sexual abuse, forced labour, or domestic servitude and, in many instances never fully recover from their traumatic experience.

[Access the Report]
(Source: The Metro – Trafficking misery: illegal trade of humans into Britain ‘rising every year’).

Asset Mapping at Halifax Public Libraries: A Tool for Beginning to Discover the Library’s Role with the Immigrant Community in Halifax.
Article written by Kenneth Williment and Tracey Jones-Grant and published in Partnership: the Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research, vol. 7, no. 1 (2012).
[Download Article]
(Source: The Network E-bulletin).

Into the unknown: Children’s journeys through the asylum
process.
A new report by the Children’s Association.
[Download Full Report]
(Source: The Network E-bulletin).

Tell it like it is: the truth about asylum.
A new report by The Refugee Council.
[Access the Report]
(Source: The Network E-bulletin).