Tag Archives: CMRB

CMRB Event Today: Challenges in conducting research with Roma women offenders in prison Can Yildiz

No need to reserve a plce – just turn up at 4 pm today. Best, Nira Y-D

CMRB (The Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging)

at the University of East London is pleased to announce as part of its

Borders and Bordering Seminar Series:

Challenges in conducting research with Roma women offenders in prison
Can Yildiz
(King’s College London)

This seminar will take place in

EB.G.06, Docklands Campus, University of East London, E16 2RD,

nearest tube: Cyprus DLR

(http://www.uel.ac.uk/campuses/docklands/)

4-6pm, Monday 11th May 2015

The event is free but spaces are limited so please reserve a place by following the below link

canyildiz.eventbrite.co.uk

Abstract: Can Yildiz’s doctoral study focuses on the experiences of Romanian and Bulgarian Roma women offenders as it aims to investigate the crucial social processes which produce extremely disproportionately high numbers of them in a London prison. She is about to start doing with her fieldwork in May 2015.  Drawing on her experiences obtaining ethical approval and to formulate her research framework, this paper will discuss some of the bureaucratic, theoretical and practical challenges in conducting research in this field.

Can Yildiz is a PhD student in Urban Geography at King’s College London. Her doctoral research is based on the experiences of Eastern European Roma women offenders in London. She holds MA on migration, mental health and social care. She is a qualified social worker.

See www.euborderscapes.eu for more information on the EU Borderscapes project, www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/borderscapes for details of the UEL Borderscapes team and www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb for information on CMRB

Film: Everyday Borders

University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging, Southall Black Sisters, Migrant Rights Network and the Refugee and Migrant Forum of Essex and London present the following film screening hosted by Northumbria University’s Migration and Diaspora Network and Department of Geography:

Everyday Borders
(dir. Orson Nava)

Increasing numbers of people are becoming border-guards as employers, landlords, health workers and educators are legally required to administer the UK border as part of their everyday lives. As the 2014 Immigration Act pulls more people into border-guard roles, those who are their subjects experience being denied jobs, accommodation, healthcare and education because these border administrators may not be able or willing to understand the complexities of immigration law, may act on racist stereotypes or, threatened by fines and raids, exclude racialised minorities in order to minimize risk to themselves.

What are the implications of these developments to all of us in our daily lives?

Postponed CMRB Event: Sovereignty and Agency in the Post-Ottoman Middle East, Dr. James Renton, Edge Hill University

Please Note:

Dear All,

The seminar, ‘Sovereignty and Agency in the Post-Ottoman Middle East’ by Dr. James Renton, Edge Hill University (details attached) has been postponed. The new time and date will be announced soon.

Best regards,

Jamie Hakim, CMRB

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) is pleased to announce the following seminar:

Sovereignty and Agency in the Post-Ottoman Middle East

Dr. James Renton, Edge Hill University

This seminar will take place in EB G.06, Docklands Campus,

UEL, E16 2RD

http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

Monday 27th April 2015, 4–6pm

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at

                                  jamesrenton.eventbrite.co.uk                      

Dr James Renton is a Reader in History at Edge Hill University, and Senior Honorary Research Associate in the Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies at University College London. He is the author of The Zionist Masquerade: The Birth of the Anglo-Zionist Alliance, 1914-1918 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), and is currently writing a history of the idea of the Middle East.

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb

CMRB Film Screenings of `Everyday Borders’

University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging, Southall Black Sisters, Migrant Rights Network and the Refugee and Migrant Forum of Essex and London present the following film screening hosted by Northumbria University’s Migration and Diaspora Network and Department of Geography:

Everyday Borders

(dir. Orson Nava)

This event will take place in room 0.8, Broadacre House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE43 7PZ

Location details are here

Thursday 30th April 2015, 18.45–20.30

Please reserve a space at:

https://everydaybordersncl.eventbrite.co.uk

Increasing numbers of people are becoming border-guards as employers, landlords, health workers and educators are legally required to administer the UK border as part of their everyday lives. As the 2014 Immigration Act pulls more people into border-guard roles, those who are their subjects experience being denied jobs, accommodation, healthcare and education because these border administrators may not be able or willing to understand the complexities of immigration law, may act on racist stereotypes or, threatened by fines and raids, exclude racialised minorities in order to minimize risk to themselves.

What are the implications of these developments to all of us in our daily lives?

The film screening will be followed by a panel discussion including:

Kathryn Cassidy (Northumbria University/UEL), Tom Vickers (Northumbria University) & community partners

*Apologies for cross-posting*

The University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB), Southall Black Sisters (SBS), Migrant Rights Network (MRN) and the Refugee and Migrant Forum of Essex and London (RAMFEL) present the following film screening hosted by the SOAS Student Union:

‘Everyday Borders’ (dir. Orson Nava)

The film screening will be followed by a panel discussion with: Meena Patel (SBS), Rita Chadha (Ramfel), Don Flynn (MRN), Georgie Wemyss (CMRB) and Orson Nava. Chair: Nira Yuval-Davis (CMRB)

This event will take place on Thursday 30th April 2015, 19.00–21.00 in G3, SOAS, London, WC1H 0XG

Please reserve a space at: everydayborders.eventbrite.co.uk

Full details can be found on the attached flyer. Please circulate widely.

 

Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistanc

Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance: Local and Global Conceptions and Struggles Conference

Friday 1 May 2015, University of East London (Docklands).

This conference launches the ESRC-Funded seminar series ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: Learning from History and Thinking Internationally’ organised by Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL). We are grateful to the ESRC, UEL and the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, the University of Glasgow and the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group for their support.

Full programme attached and registration and further details can be found at:
http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/evolving-understandings-of-racism-and-resistance-tickets-16258660090

Evolving understandings of racism and resistance – local and global conceptions and struggles

Friday 1st May 2015

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: JOHN SOLOMOS, STEPHEN SMALL

One-day conference at the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, University of East London in conjunction with the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group.

Launching the ESRC-funded seminar series, ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: learning from history and thinking internationally’, organised by Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL).

This conference responds to the urgent need to understand how and why people have mobilised around ethnicity – to challenge racism or to fight for social justice – despite other exclusionary forms of ethnic politics, including campaigns of racism. Whereas we have learned to argue against social policy that divides the population by ethnicity (Commission for Integration and Cohesion, 2007), there is little contemporary debate about the socially beneficial potential of calls to ethnic identity in enabling political mobilisation. At

a time when there is widespread disillusionment with mainstream politics and unexpected and relatively unknown political groupings can emerge to prominence with little warning, it is essential that we understand the range of forms of ethnic mobilisation and the implications of these diverse forms of political engagement.

These questions become urgent in a context of the resurgence of racist movements across Europe and the continuation and intensification of communal divisions in many regions. In many urban spaces, the impacts of economic crises and war have remade the terrain of racism and inequality, hardening some divisions and giving rise to new kinds of ethnic mobilisation that reference religious, national, regional and ethnic identity in ways that reflect the transnational connectedness of these mobile populations.

Papers and discussions will address the following questions and debates, and more:

Contemporary and historical examples of movements against racism and the role of ethnic mobilisation within such movements; the role played by ethnic mobilisations in wider movements for social justice;         changing terrains of racism and new articulations of anti-racist resistance.

Programme:

Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance: Local and Global Conceptions and Struggles

Conference

Friday 1 May 2015

University of East London, East Building, Docklands Campus, E16 2RD

9.30am: Registration, tea and coffee

10am: Welcome and introduction to the ESRC seminar series ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: Learning from History and Thinking Internationally’: Gargi Bhattacharrya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL)

10.15am: Plenary 1: Professor Stephen Small (University of California, Berkeley), Decolonizing the mind for knowledge production and dissemination

11.15am: Tea and coffee break

11.30am: Parallel sessions

Anti-racism in historical perspective

Doron Avraham (Bar Ilan), Contested Concepts of Race and Ethnicity: A Response of German Jews to Nazi Racial Policy

Brendan McGeever (Birkbeck), Racism and Resistance in the Russian Revolution: the political mobilisation of ethnicity in socialist campaigns against antisemitism in revolutionary Russia, 1917-1922.

Lindy Moore (Independent), Networks of anti-racism 1890-1914: the mobilisation of evangelical Christian Socialists

Stephen Ashe (CoDE, Manchester) and Laurence Brown (CoDE, Manchester), Evolving understandings of racism and resistance – local and global conceptions and struggles

Racism and anti-racism in France

Joseph Downing (LSE), Ethnic Mobilisation in the Republic: The Quest to Challenge Exclusionary Narratives of Migration in France

Selim Nadi (Lyon), Organizing anti-racism in France: from the Arab Workers Movement to the Party of the Indigenous of the Republic (1972 – 2010

Pauline Picot (Université Paris), Ethnic categories and ethnic segmentation within the antiracist activist field in contemporary France

1pm: Lunch break

2pm: Parallel sessions

Migrants and anti-racist organising

Federico Olivieri (Pisa), Migrant struggles as acts against racism Italian contemporary cases in comparative perspective

Alice Mukaka (UEL), Resistance and mobilization around migrant women’s rights: a feminist issue

Sukhwant Dhaliwal, (Bedfordshire) and Kirsten Forkert (BCU), Resisting the Go Home van and other Home Office immigration campaigns

Marella Hoffman, (Cambridge), Belonging and resistance in ethnic communities in Cambridge

Black Politics: then and now

Kehinde Andrews (BCU), Back to Black: Black radical activism in twenty first century Britain

John Narayan (Warwick), The Coloured Cosmopolitanism of Black Power: From The Black Panther Party to #Blacklivesmatter

Fatima Rajina (SOAS), Racism and Resistance: the story of British Bangladeshis

3.30pm: Plenary 2: Professor John Solomos (University of Warwick), Race, Racism and Social Research: between social science and policy

4.30pm: Tea and coffee break

4.45pm: Parallel sessions

Anti-racist practice in institutional settings

Alessio D’Angelo (Middlesex), BME organisations in the UK: communities of resistance or sub-contractors?

Bethan Harries (CoDE, Manchester), “Divide and conquer?” The effects of public sector retrenchment on anti-racist and marginalised community organising

Omar Khan (Runnymede), ‘Ending Racism this Generation’: learning from a UK campaign

Islamophobia

Hilary Aked (Bath), The gender segregation on campus furore as a racialised moral panic

Shamira Megnani (Leeds), Alliances across Historical Exclusions: Evoking ‘Guilt by Association’ in the anti-Islamophobia Novel

Aurelien Mondon (Bath), The mainstreaming of racism in France: the resurgence of reactionary propagandists

6.15pm: Closing remarks and Conference closes

This conference launches the ESRC-Funded seminar series ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: Learning from History and Thinking Internationally’ organised by Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL).  We are grateful to the ESRC, UEL and the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, the University of Glasgow and the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group for their support.

Please note that lunch will not be provided at this free event, but facilities to purchase meals, snacks, coffee and tea are available throughout the Docklands site (Menus and information: http://www.dineoncampus.co.uk/uel/places-to-eat.aspx – Map: http://www.dineoncampus.co.uk/doc-assets/docs/UEL_Docklands_Campus_Map.pdf.

Travel and Accommodation:

Directions to Conference Site at UEL, Docklands Campus – which is located at Cyprus Station on the DLR (easily accessible fromn Stratford Station, but please remember to purchase tickets in advance and/or tap your card before entering and after exiting the train): http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

The closest airport is City: http://www.londoncityairport.com/

Accommodation is available in Stratford near and around Westfield Mall, the Olympic Stadium and UEL’s Stratford Campuses (but please note that the conference is not located at the UEL Stratford sites): http://www.visitlondon.com/discover-london/london-areas/east/stratford

Accommodation is also available closer near the Excel Centre:  http://www.excel-london.co.uk/visiting-excel/visitors-guide/hotels/

Do you have questions about Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance? Contact CMRB. UEL

CMRB Event: Sovereignty and Agency in the Post-Ottoman Middle East, Dr. James Renton, Edge Hill University

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) is pleased to announce the following seminar:

Sovereignty and Agency in the Post-Ottoman Middle East

Dr. James Renton, Edge Hill University

This seminar will take place in EB G.06, Docklands Campus,

UEL, E16 2RD

http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

Monday 27th April 2015, 4–6pm

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at

                                  jamesrenton.eventbrite.co.uk                      

Dr James Renton is a Reader in History at Edge Hill University, and Senior Honorary Research Associate in the Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies at University College London. He is the author of The Zionist Masquerade: The Birth of the Anglo-Zionist Alliance, 1914-1918 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), and is currently writing a history of the idea of the Middle East.

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb

 

Conference: Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance: Local and Global Conceptions and Struggles

Conference:

Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance: Local and Global Conceptions and Struggles Conference

Friday 1 May 2015, University of East London (Docklands).

This conference launches the ESRC-Funded seminar series ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: Learning from History and Thinking Internationally’ organised by Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL). We are grateful to the ESRC, UEL and the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, the University of Glasgow and the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group for their support.

Full programme attached and registration and further details can be found at:
http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/evolving-understandings-of-racism-and-resistance-tickets-16258660090

Evolving understandings of racism and resistance – local and global conceptions and struggles

Friday 1st May 2015

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: JOHN SOLOMOS, STEPHEN SMALL

One-day conference at the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, University of East London in conjunction with the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group

Launching the ESRC-funded seminar series, ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: learning from history and thinking internationally’, organised by Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL).

This conference responds to the urgent need to understand how and why people have mobilised around ethnicity – to challenge racism or to fight for social justice – despite other exclusionary forms of ethnic politics, including campaigns of racism. Whereas we have learned to argue against social policy that divides the population by ethnicity (Commission for Integration and Cohesion, 2007), there is little contemporary debate about the socially beneficial potential of calls to ethnic identity in enabling political mobilisation. At

a time when there is widespread disillusionment with mainstream politics and unexpected and relatively unknown political groupings can emerge to prominence with little warning, it is essential that we understand the range of forms of ethnic mobilisation and the implications of these diverse forms of political engagement.

These questions become urgent in a context of the resurgence of racist movements across Europe and the continuation and intensification of communal divisions in many regions. In many urban spaces, the impacts of economic crises and war have remade the terrain of racism and inequality, hardening some divisions and giving rise to new kinds of ethnic mobilisation that reference religious, national, regional and ethnic identity in ways that reflect the transnational connectedness of these mobile populations.

Papers and discussions will address the following questions and debates, and more:

Contemporary and historical examples of movements against racism and the role of ethnic mobilisation within such movements; the role played by ethnic mobilisations in wider movements for social justice;         changing terrains of racism and new articulations of anti-racist resistance.

Programme:

Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance: Local and Global Conceptions and Struggles

Conference

Friday 1 May 2015

University of East London, East Building, Docklands Campus, E16 2RD

9.30am: Registration, tea and coffee

10am: Welcome and introduction to the ESRC seminar series ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: Learning from History and Thinking Internationally’: Gargi Bhattacharrya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL)

10.15am: Plenary 1: Professor Stephen Small (University of California, Berkeley), Decolonizing the mind for knowledge production and dissemination

11.15am: Tea and coffee break

11.30am: Parallel sessions

Anti-racism in historical perspective

Doron Avraham (Bar Ilan), Contested Concepts of Race and Ethnicity: A Response of German Jews to Nazi Racial Policy

Brendan McGeever (Birkbeck), Racism and Resistance in the Russian Revolution: the political mobilisation of ethnicity in socialist campaigns against antisemitism in revolutionary Russia, 1917-1922.

Lindy Moore (Independent), Networks of anti-racism 1890-1914: the mobilisation of evangelical Christian Socialists

Stephen Ashe (CoDE, Manchester) and Laurence Brown (CoDE, Manchester), Evolving understandings of racism and resistance – local and global conceptions and struggles

Racism and anti-racism in France

Joseph Downing (LSE), Ethnic Mobilisation in the Republic: The Quest to Challenge Exclusionary Narratives of Migration in France

Selim Nadi (Lyon), Organizing anti-racism in France: from the Arab Workers Movement to the Party of the Indigenous of the Republic (1972 – 2010)

Pauline Picot (Université Paris), Ethnic categories and ethnic segmentation within the antiracist activist field in contemporary France

1pm: Lunch break

2pm: Parallel sessions

Migrants and anti-racist organising

Federico Olivieri (Pisa), Migrant struggles as acts against racism Italian contemporary cases in comparative perspective

Alice Mukaka (UEL), Resistance and mobilization around migrant women’s rights: a feminist issue

Sukhwant Dhaliwal, (Bedfordshire) and Kirsten Forkert (BCU), Resisting the Go Home van and other Home Office immigration campaigns

Marella Hoffman, (Cambridge), Belonging and resistance in ethnic communities in Cambridge

Black Politics: then and now

Kehinde Andrews (BCU), Back to Black: Black radical activism in twenty first century Britain

John Narayan (Warwick), The Coloured Cosmopolitanism of Black Power: From The Black Panther Party to #Blacklivesmatter

Fatima Rajina (SOAS), Racism and Resistance: the story of British Bangladeshis

3.30pm: Plenary 2: Professor John Solomos (University of Warwick), Race, Racism and Social Research: between social science and policy

4.30pm: Tea and coffee break

4.45pm: Parallel sessions

Anti-racist practice in institutional settings

Alessio D’Angelo (Middlesex), BME organisations in the UK: communities of resistance or sub-contractors?

Bethan Harries (CoDE, Manchester), “Divide and conquer?” The effects of public sector retrenchment on anti-racist and marginalised community organising

Omar Khan (Runnymede), ‘Ending Racism this Generation’: learning from a UK campaign

Islamophobia

Hilary Aked (Bath), The gender segregation on campus furore as a racialised moral panic

Shamira Megnani (Leeds), Alliances across Historical Exclusions: Evoking ‘Guilt by Association’ in the anti-Islamophobia Novel

Aurelien Mondon (Bath), The mainstreaming of racism in France: the resurgence of reactionary propagandists

6.15pm: Closing remarks and Conference closes

This conference launches the ESRC-Funded seminar series ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: Learning from History and Thinking Internationally’ organised by Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL).  We are grateful to the ESRC, UEL and the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, the University of Glasgow and the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group for their support.

Please note that lunch will not be provided at this free event, but facilities to purchase meals, snacks, coffee and tea are available throughout the Docklands site (Menus and information: http://www.dineoncampus.co.uk/uel/places-to-eat.aspx – Map: http://www.dineoncampus.co.uk/doc-assets/docs/UEL_Docklands_Campus_Map.pdf.

Travel and Accommodation:

Directions to Conference Site at UEL, Docklands Campus – which is located at Cyprus Station on the DLR (easily accessible fromn Stratford Station, but please remember to purchase tickets in advance and/or tap your card before entering and after exiting the train): http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

The closest airport is City: http://www.londoncityairport.com/

Accommodation is available in Stratford near and around Westfield Mall, the Olympic Stadium and UEL’s Stratford Campuses (but please note that the conference is not located at the UEL Stratford sites): http://www.visitlondon.com/discover-london/london-areas/east/stratford

Accommodation is also available closer near the Excel Centre:  http://www.excel-london.co.uk/visiting-excel/visitors-guide/hotels/

Do you have questions about Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance? Contact CMRB. UEL