Tag Archives: Archives

Archives: New Home for LGBT Archive

New Home for LGBT Archive

An interesting article appeared in the November edition of CILIP Update, the magazine of the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP). The magazine has reported on how the recently refurbished Manchester Central Library and Archive will become the new home for the Lesbian and Gay Foundation (LGF) Archive.

The LGF Archive represents one of the most significant archival collections on gay and lesbian issues and the LGF has joined forces with the Archives+ Centre located within the Manchester Central Library to help preserve and make accessible this important collection. The LGH recognised the importance of this Archive in terms of preserving the records of the development of lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT) rights and the changing societal attitudes and the link with the Archives+ Centre will hopefully enable much of this material to become accessible.

The Archive itself contains a broad range of materials. In addition to a large collection of local and national magazines, focused towards the LGBT audience, the collection contains a range of historical materials including a number of reports and documents on issues including culture, health and events.

Further information is available as follows:

Manchester City Council – The Lesbian & Gay Foundation’s archives to go on show at Manchester Central Library

Manchester Archives – LGBT Source Guide

The Lesbian and Gay Foundation – http://www.lgf.org.uk/

The United Nations History Project website

Online Resource:

The United Nations History Project
unhistoryproject.org/

We would like to take this opportunity to highlight the work of the United Nations History Project in facilitating access to a broad range of information broadly relating to the history of the United Nations.  Coordinated by Dr Heidi J. S. Tworek, in conjunction with Harvard Asia Center and the Joint Center for History and Economics and Harvard and Cambridge, and supported by the United Nations Foundation, the United Nations History Project,

The project aims to illustrate the scholarly importance of studying the history of the United Nations and international organizations in general.

It is a starting point for scholars who wish to research in UN archives or find online materials related to the UN. The website provides comprehensive guides to physical and online sources on the United Nations. It also collates many of the research guides on the United Nations that already exist. In addition, leading scholars on the UN have written about their experiences working in UN archives and discuss further research possibilities.

(Link:- unhistoryproject.org/index.html).

The United Nations History Project website offers a range of teaching materials to help support the study of UN history. The website is divided into four main sections, incorporating:
  • Researching the UN.  Provides details on how to research the history of the United Nations, encompassing online and physical archive collections; research guides; statistics and researcher experiences.
  • Teaching UN History.  This section highlights Syllabi in relation to the teaching of UN history.
  • Major Themes on UN History.  Highlights thirteen major themes of UN History and their relevant sources of information, encompassing the likes of Environment; Governance; Health; Human Rights; and Peace and Security.
  • Scholarly Networks.  Encompassing further details in relation to scholarly networks supporting the study of the United Nations and its history.
The United Nations History Project therefore represents a very important resources for the history and development of the United Nations, whilst also providing an opportunity to help connect both archivists, scholars and researchers.
We are also very pleased to announce that a couple of our own archival collections based here at the University of east London  are now listed on the UN History Project website.  Further details can be highlighted as follows:
The website offers a set of teaching materials for UN history. There are annotated bibliographies, timelines, and featured sources on thirteen major themes of UN history. There are resources from a course taught on the global history of the UN at Harvard in spring 2011 as well as a compilation of other syllabi on UN topics. – See more at: http://unhistoryproject.org/index.html#sthash.fFQJ2OUZ.dpuf
It is a starting point for scholars who wish to research in UN archives or find online materials related to the UN. The website provides comprehensive guides to physical and online sources on the United Nations. It also collates many of the research guides on the United Nations that already exist. In addition, leading scholars on the UN have written about their experiences working in UN archives and discuss further research possibilities. – See more at: http://unhistoryproject.org/index.html#sthash.fFQJ2OUZ.dpufIt is a starting point for scholars who wish to research in UN archives or find online materials related to the UN. The website provides comprehensive guides to physical and online sources on the United Nations. It also collates many of the research guides on the United Nations that already exist. In addition, leading scholars on the UN have written about their experiences working in UN archives and discuss further research possibilities.(See more at: unhistoryproject.org/index.html#sthash.hBqbQ7Aa.dpuf)
The project aims to illustrate the scholarly importance of studying the history of the United Nations and international organizations in general. – See more at: http://unhistoryproject.org/index.html#sthash.hBqbQ7Aa.dpuf

Please do take time to investigate and explore this fabulous resource.  Further information on the United Nations History Project can be found as follows:

The United Nations History project can be contacted at:  unitednationshistory@gmail.com

 

Re-blog: El Salvador: Activists Struggle to Recover Human Rights Archives

(IPS) – Some 50,000 files on crimes against humanity are languishing in an undisclosed location in El Salvador, prey to damp and the ravages of time, while activists and lawyers frantically try to regain control over them.

Without prior warning, on Sept. 30 the Catholic Church suddenly closed the office that had spent decades painstakingly collecting the documents: the Tutela Legal del Arzobispado – the legal aid office of the archbishop of San Salvador.

But the former employees of the office, who learned that day that it was being closed, are working to reopen it elsewhere and are laying claim to the files.

Full article – El Salvador: Activists Struggle to Recover Human Rights Archives

 

Refugee Council Archive: Off Air Recording Requests: WB 13/07/2013

The following off-air recordings have been made for the Refugee Council Archive for the week beginning the 13/07/2013:

Saturday 13 July

0530-0600: BBC News: Our World:  In Sickness and in Debt Series Recording.

Monday 15 July

1955-2000: Channel 4: (7/32) Ramadan Diaries Series Recording.

2000-2030: Channel 4: Dispatches South Africas Dirty Cops

2100-2200: BBC1: Panorama Broken by Battle.

Tuesday 16 July

1955-2000: Channel 4: (8/32) Ramadan Diaries Series Recording.

1900-2000: BBC2: Indian Ocean with Simon Reeve.  Part 1: South Africa to Zanzibar). Whole Series Please. (previously recorded, but only have Parts 1&2).

Wednesday 17 July

1100-1130: BBC Radio 4: (1/2) The Story of the Talmud Whole Series Please.

1900-2000: BBC2: Indian Ocean with Simon Reeve.  Part 2: Madagascar to the Seychelles). Series Recording.

1955-2000: Channel 4: (9/32) Ramadan Diaries Series Recording.

Thursday 18 July

1955-2000: Channel 4: (10/32) Ramadan Diaries Series Recording.

2000-2100: BBC2: Indian Ocean with Simon Reeve.  Part 3: Kenya to Somaliland). Series Recording.

2235-2325: BBC1: Meet the Landlords.

Friday 19 July

1955-2000: Channel 4: (11/32) Ramadan Diaries Series Recording.

 

Refugees in our history & heritage

For Refugee Week UK 2013 (17th-23rd June 2013) we looked at the contributions of refugees to our history and heritage. We decided to create a time-line and ‘living archive’ which acknowledges these contributions.

The time-line is at its early stages and we hope that, with your involvement, it will grow, develop and celebrate all our similarities and difference. It is a participatory ‘living archive’, which means that with your perspectives and input it will keep changing and improving, ensuring that we acknowledge and record our full and diverse history and heritage. We also hope that you will find it useful and as fascinating as we do!

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Did you know, for example, that the UK has been offering protection to refugees for hundreds of years? That refugees and their descendants have had significant contributions to our arts, science, sports and literature? That refugees co-designed Hampton Court Palace, helped establish the Bank of England and brought us the Paralympics?

This online time-line holds many answers and surprises about our history and heritage. And in a poll that we conducted in May, 94% of the people we talked to agreed that it is vital that we are aware of how refugees and their descendants have helped shape our nation and how refugees and migrants have influenced our history, heritage and culture.

http://www.refugeeweektimeline.org.uk

You can upload your personal experiences and insights on the site. For any further queries or to upload large documents and images please contact Refugee Week UK Co-ordinator Jess Linton: jess@counterpointsarts.org.uk; 0207 012 1761.

Further information can also be found at:

 

Re-blog: Charity, Racism and War | Voluntary Action History Society

Since the Woolwich murder, there have been worrying scenes and disturbances as the English Defence League has sought to become associated with Help the Heroes. Such political difficulties and controversies are nothing new to the voluntary sector. Offering some historical perspective, Peter Grant takes a look back to the activities of the Anti-German League during the First World War.

The horrific death of Drummer Lee Rigby has triggered a particularly unfortunate backlash from certain elements in British Society.  Predictably the English Defence League have attempted to exploit the situation but their attempt to ally themselves to the Help for Heroes charity has been firmly rejected.

The circumstances have reminded me of the responses 100 years ago to German ‘atrocities’ during the First World War. The execution of Edith Cavell and, especially, the sinking of the Lusitania, 98 years ago this week, led to some violent anti-German demonstrations, notably in Liverpool, Manchester and the East End of London. German-owned or even German-sounding shops were attacked and looted. Though lasting several days and leading to further government restrictions on ‘aliens’ including increased internment the Lusitania riots were perhaps untypical. Nevertheless a number of more right-wing elements attempted to further exploit this anti-German feeling. Two ‘Anti-German Leagues’ were established in order to combat what one of them described as ‘Teutonic leprosy.’

The more ‘respectable’ version was the British Anti-German League based in Birmingham. A number of their supporters including Admiral Charles Beresford, Dr Ellis Powell (editor of the Financial News), Joseph Havelock Wilson (sometime Liberal MP and founder of the National Amalgamated Sailors’ and Firemen’s Union) and the future Conservative Home Secretary, William Joynson-Hicks later began the British Empire Union, which was one of the bodies that later metamorphosed into the British Union of Fascists so it would be interesting to see how its supporters later reconciled support for Hitler with their earlier anti-Germanic pronouncements.

Full article via Charity, Racism and War | Voluntary Action History Society.

Re-blog: Feature: New Research on Save the Children | Voluntary Action History Society

After winning the Economic History Society Bursary to attend our summer conference, Emily Baughan writes for our June feature on The Save the Children Fund, the Geneva Declaration of the Rights of the Child and a Charter for Stateless Children, 1919-1940.

I am very grateful to the Voluntary Action History Society and the Economic History Society for a bursary which enables me to present my research at their upcoming conference in Huddersfield. My PhD. project, which draws on archives in Britain, Geneva, the U.S., Canada, and South Africa, examines the principles and practices of the international ‘child saving’ movement in the interwar period. It charts the growth of the movement from its inception as an act of protest against the ‘unfair peace’ of the Versailles Treaty, through famine and refugee relief in 1920s Europe, to early development projects in Africa in the 1930s, and finally to controversial relief efforts for Spanish and German children in the turbulent period prior to the Second World War. I focus in particular on the largest ‘child saving’ organizations of the era, the British Save the Children Fund and its Geneva-based partner, the Union Internationale de Secours aux Enfants.

The 1924 Geneva Declaration of the Rights of the Child is the best-remembered aspect of the interwar work of the Save the Children Fund (SCF) and the Union Internationale. Proclaiming the right of children to education, welfare and ‘moral and spiritual’ development irrespective of their race, nationality and creed, it has been typically been viewed as an early manifestation of the universalist sentiment that later underpinned the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights. My paper at the VAHS conference will offer a reinterpretation of the Declaration of the Rights of the Child by reading it alongside a proposed charter for child refugees also promoted by the SCF. In doing so, my paper will place international and national voluntary action within the same analytical frame, revealing how fund members’ prior work in British domestic and imperial philanthropy shaped their international humanitarianism.

The SCF had been working with Russian refugees in Eastern Europe since 1920, but had a difficult time raising funds for them: “they all look too cheerful” complained one relief worker. In 1921, they received a novel offer from the Czech foreign minister, who asked the Fund to remove two thousand Russian refugee children from their parents in Constantinople, and send them to Czechoslovakia where they would be housed, fed and educated at the expense of the state. This proposal was undergirded both by fears about the ‘weakness’ of the Czech population, and the strength of the Communist threat from the east. It was believed that these children would grow up to be strong Czech citizens, helping the young nation ward off the external Bolshevik threat.

Full article via Feature: New Research on Save the Children | Voluntary Action History Society.