Tag Archives: Arab Spring

Event: MENA Solidarity Network – “Teachers and the Arab Spring: Eyewitness reports from Tunisia, Egypt and Bahrain”

*** Apologies for Cross Posting ***

MENA Solidarity Network

*Teachers and the Arab Spring*

*Eyewitness reports from Tunisia, Egypt and Bahrain*

Monday 12 November, 7.30pm

Committee Room 8, House of Commons, SW1A 2TT

Speakers:

*Mohamed Sghaier Saihi: UGTT union federation, teachers’ spokesman in the Kasserine region*

*Mary Compton: NUT activist and editor of Teachersolidarity website, recently returned from a delegation to Egypt*

*Ali Alaswad: Resigned MP from al Wefaq Party, Bahrain*

*Anne Alexander: MENA Solidarity Network*

Chairs:

Katy Clark, MP and Nick Grant, National Executive member, NUT*

Teachers are playing a key role in the revolutionary struggles across the Arab world. Strikes by teachers in Tunisia paved the way for the January 2011 uprising, they were among the founders of the first independent unions in Egypt, while teachers were at the forefront of the movement for democracy in Bahrain which has faced brutal repression. On 21 October, Mahdi Abu Deeb and Jalila al-Salma, leaders of the Bahraini Teachers’ Association were jailed for five years and six months respectively for the “crime” of peaceful protest.

Come and hear at first hand about how teachers in Tunisia, Egypt and Bahrain are still fighting for social justice and freedom, and about what we can do here to build solidarity with their struggles.

All welcome – please leave enough time to pass through security checks on entering the building

Facebook event here:  http://www.facebook.com/events/456728077710774/

About the speakers:

*Mohamed Sghaier Saihi* is a/UGTT union federation executive member, Kasserine province, and regional spokesman for the teachers’ union.  He will speak about the role of teachers in the Tunisian revolution and the waves of strike and protests which are continuing against the neo-liberal Islamist Ennahda party which leads the current government.

Read more here:  http://menasolidaritynetwork.com/2012/10/21/tunisia-revolutions-heartland-in-revolt-again

*Mary Compton* is a leading activist in the National Union of Teachers and editor of the Teachersolidarity.com website. She visited Egypt earlier this month as part of a delegation organised by MENA Solidarity Network and will be reporting on her meetings with the independent teachers’ unions. http://www.teachersolidarity.com/

*Ali Alaswad* is a resigned Bahraini MP from the largest opposition party Al Wefaq. He was elected in October 2010 and resigned in February 2011, alongside 17 other opposition MP’s, in protest at the violent crackdown against pro-democracy demonstrators. During the period of martial law he left Bahrain after he was targeted by the regime and now lives in London where he continues his work for democracy in Bahrain. He will give an update on the case of Mahdi Abu Deeb and Jalila al-Salman after their recent sentencing, and the situation more generally for teachers in Bahrain.

*Anne Alexander* is convenor of the Middle East North Africa Solidarity Network and a member of UCU. MENA Solidarity is a network of activists from different UK trade unions engaged in building solidarity links with workers in the Middle East and North Africa in support of their struggle for social justice and workers’ rights.  Our steering group includes activists from the PCS, RMT, UNITE, UCU, NUJ and MPs John McDonnell and Katy Clark.

We are supported by NUT, UCU, PCS, Barnet TUC, Brent TUC, Cambridge TUC, Chesterfield TUC, Manchester TUC, Haldane Society, Haringey TUC, London Transport Region RMT, London Region UCU, Unison London Fire Authority.

Further information: www.menasolidaritynetwork.com; and www.facebook.com/mena.solidarity
Follow on Twitter: – @menasolidarity

 

New Publications on Asylum and Population Control; Global Refugee Policy; Mining-Induced Displacement; Refugee Resettlement in America; Refugees of the Arab Spring `Living Under Drones’;

Asylum and population control

Asylum and population control

Asylum and population control: assessing UNHCR’s sexual and reproductive health programme in Guatemalan refugee settlements
Refugee Studies Centre (Oxford) Working Paper Series Number 83.
By Dr Oscar Gil-Garcia.

From the Abstract:

The UN and other multilateral agencies in the fields of relief and development, under the premise of promoting gender equality, increasingly identify reproductive health care to displaced people as a ‘durable solution’ to prevent maternal mortality, complications following abortion, sex gender-based violence (SGBV), and sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

The UNHCR response to displaced Guatemalan’s seeking asylum in Mexico is the first case where gender equality discourse was used to justify the inclusion of health interventions to respond to SGBV in its humanitarian projects. Questions remain on how gender equality discourse became institutionalised within UNHCR and its impact in shaping health interventions.What role does gender play in shaping health provision, specifically reproductive health, to refugee communities? What lessons can be gained from displaced communities in their provision of health services? To answer these questions, this paper presents findings from ethnographic research among forced migrants living in La Gloria, the largest of the 36 original refugee camps, located in the southern state of Chiapas, Mexico.

[Download Full Working Paper]
(Source: Refugee Studies Centre)

Background paper: Global Refugee Policy: varying perspectives, unanswered

Background paper: Global Refugee Policy

Background paper: Global Refugee Policy

questions
By Sarah Deardorff Miller.

Global Refugee Policy (GRP) is a phrase often used by scholars, practitioners and policymakers, but one that is seldom conceptualised, defined or unpacked. Indeed, understanding of GRP is highly contingent on the ontological assumptions and disciplinary lenses applied from the beginning. And yet despite its hazy nature, scholars of all persuasions generally agree that policies have the potential to deeply affect the lives of refugees and other forced migrants in significant ways, from constraining their access to basic human rights, to influencing how, when and where refugees may choose to move.
This paper has been prepared for the RSC 30th Anniversary Conference, 6-7 December 2012.

[Download Full Report]
(Source: Refugee Studies Centre)

Living Under Drones: Death, Injury ,and Trauma to Civilians From US Drones.
A researched and documented study by the New York University Law School Global Justice Clinic and Stanford Law School’s International Human Rights Clinic.
[Download Full Report]
(Source: Librarians and Human Rights)

Mining-Induced Displacement and Resettlement: Social Problem and Human Rights Issue (a Global Perspective).
By Bogumil Terminski.
[Access Full Report]
(Source: Social Science Research Network)

Refugee Resettlement in America: The Iraqi Refugee Experience in Upstate, New York.
Cairo Papers on Migration and Refugees Paper No. 1/ July 2012
By Christine M. Fandrich.
[Download Working Paper]
(Source: The American University in Egypt)

Refugees of the Arab Spring: The Syrian Refugees in Lebanon April 2011-April 2012
Cairo Papers on Migration and Refugees Paper No. 2/ August 2012
By Sam Van Vliet and Guita Hourani.
[Download Working Paper]
(Source: The American University in Egypt)

 

New Publications on Civil-Military Coordination; Country Reports on Terrorism; Syria and the Arab Spring

Country-specific civil–military coordination guidelines

Country-specific civil–military coordination guidelines

Country-specific civil–military coordination guidelines.
By Victoria Metcalfe and Michelle Berg.
HPG Working Papers, August 2012.

Effective civil–military coordination is essential in achieving the over-arching humanitarian goal of saving lives and alleviating suffering. However, in practice it is often difficult to strike the correct balance between a necessary and appropriate level of interaction with the military, including the use of military assets to support humanitarian operations, and maintaining the distinction between the civil and the military spheres.

[Download Full Working Paper]
(Source: Humanitarian Practice Group)

Protecting civilians? The interaction between international military and

Protecting civilians? The interaction between international military and humanitarian actors

Protecting civilians? The interaction between international military and humanitarian actors

humanitarian actors.
By Victoria Metcalfe.
HPG Working Papers, August 2012.

This HPG Working Paper explores the rationale for interaction between humanitarian organisations and international military and peacekeeping forces on the protection of civilians. It considers the risks and challenges of interaction with such forces, and highlights practical experience from the field.
Published by ODI as part of the HPG Working Papers series.

[Download Full Working Paper]
(Source: Humanitarian Practice Group)

Continuity, change and contest: meanings of ‘humanitarian’ from the ‘Religion of Humanity’ to the Kosovo war

Continuity, change and contest: meanings of ‘humanitarian’ from the ‘Religion of Humanity’ to the Kosovo war

Continuity, change and contest: meanings of ‘humanitarian’ from the ‘Religion of Humanity’ to the Kosovo war.
By Katherine Davies.
HPG Working Papers, August 2012.

This study examines the evolving meaning of the term ‘humanitarian’, from its emergence in the mid-nineteenth century through to the end of the twentieth century.

As part of the Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG)’s project on the ‘Global History of Modern Humanitarian Action’, its primary objective is to trace the development of the concepts and ideas that the word denotes and connotes, the ways in which the word has been used (and ‘misused’) and its discursive operations.

[Download Full Working Paper]
(Source: Humanitarian Practice Group)

Country Reports on Terrorism 2011
United States Department of States Bureau of Counterterrorism Publication.
Released April 2012.
[Download Full Report]
(Source: DocuBase)

Syria: Prospects for Intervention.
Middle East and North Africa Programme; International Law Programme; International Security Research Department.
Chatham House Meeting Summary.
[Download Full Report]
(Source: DocuBase)

Unpacking the GCC’s Response to the Arab Spring.
By Silvia Colombo for Sharaka.
[Download Full Report]
(Source: DocuBase)

After the Arab Spring : New Paths for Human Rights and the Internet in European Foreign Policy.
Directorate-General for External Policies (EU).
[Download Full Report]
(Source: DocuBase)

 

New Publications on Egypt; the Arab Spring; Irregular Migrants in Cyprus; UNHCR Asylum Levels and Trends; Sudanese Refugee Womenv

Marginality and Exclusion in EgyptMarginality and Exclusion in Egypt.
A new book by Ray Bush and Habib Ayeb and published by Zed Books.
[Further Details]
(Source: Zed Books).

The Arab Spring: The End of Postcolonialism
A new book by Hamid Dabashi and published by Zed Books.
[Further Information]
(Source: Zed Books).

Cyprus: Punishment without a crime: Detention of migrants and asylum seekers in Cyprus.
By Amnesty International.

‘’Detention should not be a tool for regulating migration. Cypriot authorities are wilfully violating International and European Union law when they detain irregular migrants without examining alternative measures and demonstrating that their detention is indeed necessary,” said Jezerca Tigani, Europe and Central Asia Deputy Programme Director at Amnesty International.

[Download Full Report]
(Source: Amnesty International)

UNHCR Asylum Levels and Trends in Industrialized Countries: Statistical overview of asylum applications lodged in Europe and selected non-European countries.
Produced by the UNHCR.
[Download Full Report]
(Source: UNHCR).

Frozen words: memory and sexual violence amongst Sudanese refugee women in Cairo.
New Issues  in Refugee Research – Research Paper No. 240.
By  Ginger A. Johnson.
[Download Working Paper]
(Source: UNHCR)

Improvements in Estimating Migration: Intelligence Update 12-2012.
Produced by the Greater London Authority Intelligence Unit.
[Download Report]
(Source: The Daily Telegraph –Migrant population in some parts of England double previous estimate).

 

New Publications on the Arab Spring; Research on Policy; Afghanistan; Bangladeshi Workers; World Disasters Report; Women Human Rights Defenders

Afghanistan: A Case Study

Afghanistan: A Case Study

Migration, Displacement and the Arab Spring: Lessons to Learn (Brookings-LSE Project on Internal Displacement, March 2012) [text]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog).

The New Amendment to the ‘Prevention of Infiltration’ Act: Defining Asylum-Seekers as Criminals (Israel Democracy Institute, Feb. 2012) [text]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog).

Linking Research and Policy in the Field of Migration, Asylum and Integration, Vienna, 12 Dec. 2011 [info]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog).

Making Systematic Reviews Work for International Development Research (ODI, Jan. 2012) [text]
– See also related blog post.
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog).

Afghanistan: a case study – strengthening principled humanitarian response capacities.
A new report written by Andy Featherstone and published by the Overseas Development Institute,  Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection and the Norwegian Refugee Council.

This study seeks to examine the challenges to adhering to these principles in practice and how donor funding restrictions can hamper the ability to provide principled humanitarian assistance. The case study in Afghanistan is the second of four case studies (Democratic Republic of Congo, Pakistan and South Sudan are the other three).

[Download Full Report]
(Source:  Overseas Development Institute).

Race to the Bottom: Olympic sportswear companies’ exploitation of Bangladeshi workers.
By Adrian Janes.  A new publication by War on Want.

Adidas, Nike and Puma have all invested heavily in their associations with the London 2012 Olympic Games, either through official partnerships with London 2012 or sponsoring national teams and high profile athletes. As well as gaining access to worldwide audiences to promote their products they also aim to associate themselves with the Olympic values of fair play and respect. Our research finds that for the workers making goods for Adidas, Nike and Puma in Bangladesh, there is little sign of fair play or respect. Five of the six factories covered by our research did not even pay their workers the Bangladeshi minimum wage, let alone a living wage that allow them to meet their basic needs. On average workers were paid just 16p an hour, with two thirds of the workers work over 60 hours a week, in clear breach of Bangladeshi law.

[Download Full Report]
(Source: Docubase)

World Disasters Report 2010: Focus on urban risk.
International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies.
[Download Full Report]
(Source: ALNAP)

Global Report on the Situation of Women Human Rights Defenders

Global Report on the Situation of Women Human Rights Defenders

The Global Report on the Situation of Women Human Rights Defenders has been produced by the Women Human Rights Defenders International Coalition (WHRD IC).

The report analyses the challenges faced by women human rights defenders in different contexts. Through the prism of over 40 case studies, the connections between the context in which a woman human rights defenders works and the nature of the violations she experiences are explored.

[Download Full Report]
(Source:  International Service for Human Rights).

Event: International Symposium “The Arab Spring and Beyond: Human Mobility, Forced Migration and Institutional Responses”

The Arab Spring and Beyond: Human Mobility, Forced Migration and Institutional Responses

The Arab Spring and Beyond: Human Mobility, Forced Migration and Institutional Responses

Apologies for Cross-Posting

You are cordially invited to attend the forthcoming International Symposium “The Arab Spring and Beyond: Human Mobility, Forced Migration and Institutional Responses”

Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford, 20 March 2012

Migration in its various forms has been a key part of the popular uprisings that spread across North Africa and the Levant in 2011. The columns of vehicles escaping from cities and villages under siege in Libya, the boats crammed with Tunisians crossing the Mediterranean Sea and landing on the island of Lampedusa, and the numerous Egyptian émigrés and university students returning to Cairo to join the protests in Tahrir Square are a few examples of the ways in which human mobility intersects current events in North Africa and the Levant.

The North Africa in Transition: Mobility, Forced Migration and Humanitarian Crises? workshop organised by the Refugee Studies Centre (RSC) and the International Migration Institute (IMI) at the University of Oxford on 6 May 2011 offered a platform to begin exploring how these events have impacted existing patterns of mobility in the region and generated new ?mixed? migration flows. Panelists observed that the regional crises had prompted some economic migrants to become forced migrants; pushed forced migrants into irregular migration channels; and made multiple migrant groups, including seasonal and long established migrants, ?involuntarily immobile?. Panelists also observed that apart from large-scale displacement within and from Libya, migration patterns from most other countries, such as Tunisia and Egypt, seemed to have remained remarkably unaffected by the political turmoil, in stark contrast with predictions made by some politicians, journalists and researchers about mass displacement.

To build on this event and take stock of further political and economic developments in the region, the RSC, IMI and the Oxford Diasporas Programme are organising a second international symposium on migration and forced migration in North Africa and the Levant on 20 March 2012 with the participation of international scholars, practitioners and policy makers. This second workshop will examine the extent to which the Arab Spring has shifted migration dynamics and migration and refugee governance.

For the full conference programme – [The Arab Spring and Beyond Final programme]

The workshop will address the following questions: How have varying processes

The Arab Spring and Beyond: Human Mobility, Forced Migration and Institutional Responses

The Arab Spring and Beyond: Human Mobility, Forced Migration and Institutional Responses

of political, economic, and social contestation in North Africa and the Levant affected human mobility? To what extent have events transformed or impacted the institutional behaviour and responses of international organisations and civil society groups working in the field of migration and refugee protection? How have publics and governments in North Africa and the Levant positioned or repositioned themselves in relation to issues of asylum and migration?

For further information, please contact Heidi El-Megrisi: rsc-outreach@qeh.ox.ac.uk

New Publications on Arab Spring, Humanitarian Emergencies, Children and Minors

Year of Rebellion

Year of Rebellion

The Arab Spring and the Death Toll in the Mediterranean: The True Face of Fortress Europe (StateWatch, Jan. 2012) [text]
See Also : Migrants At Sea blog posting – Statewatch Analysis: The Arab Spring and the death toll in the Mediterranean: the true face of Fortress Europe.
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog)

The EU’s Self-interested Response to Unrest in North Africa: The Meaning of Treaties and Readmission Agreements between Italy and North African States (StateWatch, Jan. 2012) [text]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog)

Disaster Relief 2.0: The Future of Information Sharing in Humanitarian Emergencies.
A new report published by the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.
[Download Full Report]
(Source:   ALNAP).

Real Time Evaluation of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies’ Response to the MENA Civil Unrest (IFRC, Aug. 2011) [text via ReliefWeb]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog)

Year of Rebellion: The State of Human Rights in the Middle East and North Africa (Amnesty International, Jan. 2012) [text]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog)

Landing in Dover

Landing in Dover

 

Comparative Study on Practices in the Field of Return of Minors (ECRE & Save the Children, Dec. 2011) [text via Refworld]
– See also related checklist. For more information about this project, visit ECRE’s web page.
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog)

Higher Education for Refugees. Special issue of Refuge: Canada’s Periodical on Refugees, vol. 27, no. 2 (2010) [full-text]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog)

Landing in Dover: The Immigration Process Undergone by Unaccompanied Children Arriving in Kent (Children’s Commissioner of England, Jan. 2012) [text]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog)

“Supporting Refugee Students in Schools: What Constitutes Inclusive Education?,” International Journal of Inclusive Education, vol. 16, no. 1 (2012) [preprint]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog)

Voice of Unaccompanied Minor Asylum Seekers on Guardianship: A Study on Guardians of Unaccompanied Minor Asylum Seekers in Cyprus (Hope for Children, 2011) [text via Terre des Hommes]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog)

Winding Pathways: Supporting Refugee Students in High School – A Narrative Inquiry into the Experiences of One EAL Teacher in Manitoba, Thesis submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies (University of Manitoba, Dec. 2011) [text]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog)

Forthcoming publication:

 “I just want to study”: Access to Higher Education for Young Refugees and Asylum Seekers (Refugee Support Network, Jan. 2012) [info]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog)

New Publications on Ethiopia, Arab Spring, FRONTEX, Racial Justice, Systematic Reviews

“Waiting Here for Death”

“Waiting Here for Death”

“Waiting Here for Death”: Forced Displacement and “Villagization” in Ethiopia’s Gambella Region (Human Rights Watch, Jan. 2012) [text]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog).

Ending the Displacement Cycle: Finding Durable Solutions through Return and Resettlement (Regional Centre for Strategic Studies, June 2011) [text]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog).

Arab Spring, Tunisia and Turkey
A Policy Debate publication produced by the SETA Foundation.

Tunisia triggered a wave of protests that has been sweeping all over the North Africa and the Middle East since the early 2011. It set the motion in the so-called Arab Spring and successfully demonstrated that social and political transformation is possible without resorting to violence. Through fair and transparent elections that was held on October 23, 2011, Tunisians elected a Constituent Assembly that is mandated to draft the new Constitution of Tunisia. The new political actors in Tunisia has shown great interest in increasing the level of cooperation with Turkey, a country whose experience in political transformation and economic development has become a source of inspiration for the people in the region.

[Download Report]
(Source: DocuBase).

FRAN Quarterly Q3 2011

FRAN Quarterly Q3 2011

The Frontex Risk Analysis Unit (RAU) released its 3rd Quarter Report (July-September) for 2011 on 18 January.  (See also  2nd Quarter Report (April-June 2011) and 1st Quarter Report (Jan-March 2011).)

The reports contain a significant amount of information, graphs, and statistical tables regarding detections of illegal border crossings, irregular migration routes, detections of facilitators, detections of illegal stays, refusals of entry, asylum claims, and more.  The Report is based on data provided by Member States.  The Report states that “Frontex and the Member States are currently harmonising their illegal-migration data, a process that is not yet finalised. Therefore more detailed data and trends in this report should be interpreted with caution and, where possible, cross-referenced with information from other sources.”

[Download Report]
See Also – Frontex:  FRAN Quarterly | Q03 2011.
Click here for previous post on Q1 and Q2 Reports.
(Source: Migrants At Sea blog).

Criminal Justice v Racial Justice: Minority ethnic overrepresentation in the criminal justice system.
Edited by Kjartan Páll Sveinsson.
A new report published by The Runnymede Trust.
[Access to the Report]
See Also – Runnymede Trust Press Release.
(Source: Runnymede Trust)

Making systematic reviews work for international development research

Making systematic reviews work for international development research

Making systematic reviews work for international development research
Discussion papers
, January 2012.
Authors: Jessica Hagen-Zanker, Maren Duvendack, Richard Mallett and Rachel Slater with Samuel Carpenter and Mathieu Tromme.
[Download Full Summary and the Full Report]
(Source: Overseas Development Institute).

 

Publications on the Arab Spring, Egypt, Balkans, Internal Dispalcement in Serbia

Turkey and the Arab Spring: Implications for Turkish Foreign Policy from a Transatlantic Perspective. A new report by Istituto Affari Internazionali.
[Download Report]
(Source: DocuTicker – Turkey and the Arab Spring: Implications for Turkish Foreign Policy from a Transatlantic Perspective).

Broken Promises: Egypt’s Military Rulers Erode Human Rights.  A new report published by Amnesty International.
[Access Report]
(Source: Amnesty International – New Amnesty International report on abuses under Military Council in Egypt).

Access to Free Legal Aid for Displaced Persons in the Western Balkans Countries: Overview of the Situation in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia and Montenegro (Group 484, Nov. 2011) [text via ReliefWeb]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog – http://fm-cab.blogspot.com/)

Access to Rights and Integration of Returnees on the Basis of the Readmission Agreements: Analysis of the Main Problems and Obstacles (Praxis, Aug. 2011) [text]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog – http://fm-cab.blogspot.com/)

Assessment of the Needs of Internally Displaced Persons in Serbia (UNHCR et al., Feb. 2011) [text]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog – http://fm-cab.blogspot.com/)

Legally Invisible Persons in Serbia: Still without a Solution (Praxis, June 2011) [text]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog – http://fm-cab.blogspot.com/)

Only Genuine Justice Can Ensure Durable Peace in the Balkans (Human Rights Comment, Nov. 2011) [text]

Serbia as a Safe Third County: A Wrong Presumption (Hungarian Helsinki Committee, Sept. 2011) [text]
(Source: Forced Migration Current Awareness Blog – http://fm-cab.blogspot.com/)