Category Archives: Publications

New Report: Measuring well-governed migration – The 2016 Migration Governance Index

New Report:

Measuring well-governed migration – The 2016 Migration Governance Index

Poorly managed migration can lead to harm, danger and insecurity, says a report from the Economist Intelligence Unit. It can encourage migrant smuggling and human trafficking, as well as social unrest, xenophobia and discrimination—as observed amid Europe’s ongoing “migration crisis”. It can also create missed opportunities when receiving and sending countries are blocked from harnessing the development gains available through mobility.

Well-governed migration brings profound benefits to both “receiving” and “sending” countries. Receiving countries get productive workers who fill key gaps in the labour market and help their demographic profiles. Sending countries receive billions of dollars in remittances from their overseas workers, attract investment from affluent members of their diaspora, and leverage the benefits of “circular migration” when returning emigrants bring back their skills, expertise, contacts and personal wealth.

Text courtesy of Migrants’ Rights Network – Poorly managed migration harmful says report.

 

New Report: Shifting Ground: Views on immigration during the long term and during election campaigns

A new study by Ipsos MORI looking at how British attitudes towards immigration have changed over the long term and during election campaigns is published today. The report, “Shifting Ground”, combines existing data with new findings from a longitudinal study which followed voters during, throughout, and after the 2015 General Election campaign in order to track changes in individuals’ attitudes.

The study finds concerns about immigration have indisputably risen over the long term. The importance of immigration as an issue facing Britain on the Economist/Ipsos MORI Issues Index reached record levels in 2015, with 56% of the public mentioning it in September; the highest level ever recorded since the series started in the 1970s.

As well as growing concern overall, there were changes in the profile of people who are concerned about the issue. In particular, in the early 2000s there was relatively little difference between the oldest and youngest generations on concern about immigration, but in the last few years there is a growing generational divide with older generations having become much more concerned than younger generations.

Download PDF

Read Full Article: Shifting Ground: Views on immigration during the long term and during election campaigns.

 

 

New Report: OU research highlights benefits and risks of smartphones for refugees

New Report:

OU research highlights benefits and risks of smartphones for refugees

Today (16 May) marks the launch of a new academic report by the Open University, Mapping Refugee Media Journeys: Smart Phones and Social Media Networks. The research identified a huge gap in the provision of relevant, reliable and timely news and information for and with refugees that is endangering their lives.

“Our research suggests that the information and news needs of refugees are not sufficiently taken into account by governments and news organisation as they make perilous journeys from war-torn parts of the world to Europe and when they arrive. EU member states have failed to develop a coherent policy strategy to deal with refugees entering Europe,” said Marie Gillespie, OU Professor of Sociology and a member of the OU’s Citizenship and Governance priority research area.

“News and government agencies are effectively reneging on their responsibility under the UN Refugee Charter to provide information and news that can assist their search for protection and safety because they fear that they might be accused of facilitating and encouraging refugees to come to Europe. It’s now such a politicised issue.”

“Quick tech fixes don’t work.”

The research uses an innovative mix of methods: serial interviews with Syrian and Iraqi refugees as they make their journeys, an analysis of news media coverage of refugees and a ‘big data’ analysis of refugee social networks on Facebook and Twitter by computer scientists. It involves interviews with staff at the European Commission, among international broadcasters and non-governmental organisations (NGOs). It provides a best practice guide for those providing digital resources for refugees.

The report reveals that refugees access the news and information they need through their mobile phones mainly via links sent by trusted friends and family, as well as by smugglers. The smartphone is both a resource and a threat on their journeys. It is an essential navigation, translation and networking tool but it is also a threat as the digital traces refugees leave behind make them vulnerable to surveillance by extremists and smugglers. The smartphones also contain an ever-expanding photo album of violence and abuse that they may have witnessed.

The need for security forces refugees to go underground digitally where they use avatars and encrypted services to get vital information from smugglers and handlers whom they have to rely on and sometimes trust more than government sources and mainstream media.

Read full press release – OU research highlights benefits and risks of smartphones for refugees.

Mapping Refugee Media Journeys: Smart Phones and Social Media Networks was produced by The Open University and France Mèdias Monde.

Read more about OU research in Citizenship and Governance.

 

New Publication: Entitlement and belonging: social restructuring and multicultural Britain

New Publication:

Entitlement and belonging: social restructuring and multicultural Britain

An IRR discussion paper on the Housing and Planning and Immigration Bills 2015-16.

Entitlement_and_Belonging_coverThe Housing and Planning and Immigration Bills, currently going through parliament, contain measures which are central to the Conservatives’ stated belief in cohesive ‘One Nation’ government. In a discussion paper published by the IRR today, criminologist Dr Jon Burnett argues that the rapid social transformation that will inevitably take place through these mutually-reinforcing housing and immigration measures will be destructive for social cohesion. In fact, the break-up and displacement of multicultural neighbourhoods, coupled with the extended reach of immigration policing, will accentuate extremes of inequality in the inner city and lead to a marked deterioration in the quality of life for BAME communities.

Focusing largely on London, Entitlement and belonging suggests that a ‘SUS culture’ is developing in the UK as the ‘hostile environment principle’, long- established in immigration policy, is extended into housing. The government argues that nationally-implemented ‘right to rent’ checks, imposing a duty on landlords to carry out immigration profiling and allowing summary eviction of  tenants, are ‘justifiable’ measures aimed at forcing out those who have no legal right to stay in the country. Yet even its own evaluation provided compelling evidence of discrimination against BAME citizens.

According to Dr Burnett, author of the research: ‘In rolling out the measures, the government risks rolling out discrimination. Equally concerning though is the ideological assumptions underpinning the legislation about “who” belongs in particular localities. The poor in multicultural neighbourhoods are being dispossessed of their rights and uprooted from where they live. They have been deemed eminently disposable.’

The IRR hopes that this publication can encourage as wide a discussion as possible about the legislation as well as the wider goals of ‘One Nation’ government. IRR Director, Liz Fekete, asks: ‘Given that the cosmopolitan and multicultural nature of London was our brand in the  Olympic bid,  shouldn’t we be concerned when multicultural London is abandoned in favour of  a more elitist and monocultural urban future?’

Entitlement and belonging: social restructuring and multicultural Britain can be downloaded here (pdf file, 401kb)

Article reblogged from the Institute of Race Relations – www.irr.org.uk/news/entitlement-and-belonging-social-restructuring-and-multicultural-britain/

 

CMRB: Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel online paper series

CMRB, the Runnymede Trust and the Centre for Palestine Studies, London Middle East Institute, SOAS are delighted to announce the publication of:

“Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel” online paper series, edited by Nira Yuval-Davis and Jamie Hakim.

The series aims to to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel from within an anti-racist normative framework

The first tranche of articles can be found at http://www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/publications.htm, and includes:

Nira Yuval-Davis and Jamie Hakim, ‘Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel Series Introduction’

Antony Lerman, ‘The “New Anti-Semitism”’

Hilary Aked, ‘The Undeniable Overlap: Right-wing Zionism and Islamophobia’

Helga Embacher and Jan Ryback, ‘Anti-Semitism in Muslim Communities and Islamophobia in the Context of the Gaza War 2014: The Example of Austria and Germany’

Anabelle Sreberny, ‘The Idea of Jewish Anti-Semitism and Recuperating the “Semites”’

Keith Kahn-Harris, ‘The Interplay between Internal and External Factors in the Stimulation of Intra-Jewish conflict over Israel and Antisemitism’

Stefano Bellin, ‘How Should We Speak About the Jews and the Palestinians? Constructing a Non-Racist Space for Criticism’

The series has been constructed as an open-ended forum for dialogue between academics, activists and interested parties differently situated across the globe. We will consider all submissions that explore any aspect of how anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms and the question of Palestine/Israel intersect, from within an anti-racist normative framework. Please e-mail your submission to j.hakim@uel.ac.uk.

This series has been given the front page of openDemocracy the week commencing Wednesday 28th September. Each day of that week one of five of the articles will be published at www.opendemocracy.net.

Best,
Nira Yuval-Davis and Jamie Hakim
CMRB

Border Criminologies: An Assessment of the Report of the Inquiry into the Use of Immigration Detention in the United Kingdom

osworth, Centre for Criminology, University of Oxford

ExtractPage1Today, the All Party Parliamentary Group on Refugees & the All Party Parliamentary Group on Migration published their Report of the Inquiry into the Use of Immigration Detention in the United Kingdom. Along with last night’s Channel 4 broadcast about staff in Yarl’s Wood IRC, this publication adds to the growing critique of the current system. Although not an official publication of the House of Commons or the House of Lords, the Report represents the views of a range of politicians and suggests that there may be appetite for change, at least after the national election in May.

The report has taken six months to produce. Coming in at just under 80 pages, it synthesises testimonies from three public hearings and a selection of written submissions. It also draws on committee members’ visits to some detention sites in the UK and a trip to Sweden. Expert advice at the hearings was provided by a selection of NGOs, medics, civil servants, current and former detainees, although not, inexplicably, by academic researchers. So, what does the report actually say?

Full article available on the Border Criminologies website at:  http://bordercriminologies.law.ox.ac.uk/immigration-detention-inquiry-report/

 

Novel: The Blue Between Sky and Water by Susan Abulhawa

It was interesting to read the recent newspaper review article of the author and human rights activist Susan Abulhawa’s latest novel entitled, “”The Blue Between Sky and Water.”  The article in the London Metro `In defiance of disaster’ reflects on the author’s work in attempting to document the lives of women in Gaza.

As Abulhawa outlines:

At the centre of thee it all are the women. The matriarchs, the gossips, the healers, the lost, the dreamers, the artists and the sandcastle makers … They are the women I met in my imagination, in documentaries, in person, in news clips .. They all carried Palestine wherever exile took them and I inherited from them the wound of an unredeemed history.”

The official pres release provides further details of the novel and is available to download as a PDF file here – Media Pack.

The official website for Susan Abulhawa, entitled Morning in Jenin, is located here:  http://morningsinjenin.com/

 

New Research Paper: The true human rights situation in Eritrea: the new UK Home Office Guidance as a political instrument for the prevention of migration

Please, find in following link this paper:

‘The true human rights situation in Eritrea: the new UK Home Office Guidance as a political instrument for the prevention of migration’
by Sara Palacios Arapiles.

Link to Paper:  http://sas-space.sas.ac.uk/6097/

This research paper aims at documenting the true situation in Eritrea,
in order to refute the credibility of the content and of some of the
sources of the new Guidance on Eritrea issued by the UK Home Office
(HO); and of the related policies that are being implemented in some
other countries, such as Israel. The HO country of origin Guidance
surprisingly claims that there are alleged signs of improvement inside
Eritrea for potential returnees. It is argued in this paper that the
reasons for this are entirely politically influenced, with the purpose
of preventing migration. The paper then brings to light the current
circumstances in the country – supported inter alia by the testimonies
gathered by the author, and the new findings of the UN Commission of
Inquiry on Human Rights in Eritrea- that would make the forcible return
of the Eritrean asylum-seekers and refugees unlawful.

 

New UNHCR report: 2014 Global Trends: World at War

New Publication from UNHCR:

UNHCR are pleased to announce that the following report has been published and is available for download via the UNHCR statistics website at:  www.unhcr.org/statisics

2014 Global Trends – World at War

UNHCRThe report provides an overview of the statistical trends and changes in global populations of concern to UNHC, i.e. refugees, returnees, stateless persons, and certain groups of internally displaced persons (IDPs), place din the context of major humanitarian developments and displacement during the year.

Some of the key findings of the report:

  • Global forced displacement has seen accelerated growth in 2014, once again reaching unprecedented levels. The year saw the highest displacement on record. By end-2014, 59.5 million individuals were forcibly displaced worldwide as a result of persecution, conflict, generalized violence, or human rights violations. This is 8.3 million persons more than the year before (51.2 million) and the highest annual increase in a single year.
  • Some 19.5 million persons were refugees, 14.4 million under UNHCR’s mandate and 5.1 million Palestinian refugees registered by UNRWA. The global figure included 38.2 million internally displaced persons and nearly 1.8 million asylum-seekers. If these 59.5 million persons were a nation, they would make up the 24th largest in the world.
  • An estimated 13.9 million individuals were newly displaced due to conflict or persecution in 2014. This includes 11.0 million persons newly displaced within the borders of their own country, the highest figure on record. The other 2.9 million individuals were new refugees.
  • For the first time, Turkey became the largest refugee-hosting country worldwide, with 1.59 million refugees. Turkey was followed by Pakistan (1.51 million), Lebanon (1.15 million), the Islamic Republic of Iran (982,000), Ethiopia (659,500), and Jordan (654,100).
  • More than half (53%) of all refugees worldwide came from just three countries: the Syrian Arab Republic (3.88 million), Afghanistan (2.59 million), and Somalia (1.11 million).
  • Over the course of 2014,some 126,800 refugees returned to their countries of origin. This figure was the lowest level of refugee returns since 1983.
  • A record high of nearly 1.7 million individuals submitted applications for asylum or refugee status in 2014. UNHCR offices registered 245,700 or 15 per cent of these claims. With 274,700 asylum claims, the Russian Federation was the world’s largest recipient of new individual applications, followed by Germany (173,100), the United States of America (121,200), and Turkey (87,800).
  • Children below 18 years of age constituted 51 per cent of the refugee population in 2014, up from 41 per cent in 2009 and the highest figure in more than a decade.

 

Publications: FMR 49 now online – Disasters and displacement in a changing climate

Forced Migration Review issue 49, entitled ‘Disasters and displacement in a changing climate’, is now online at www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters

In light of the projected increase in the frequency and intensity of disasters associated with climate change, the number of people displaced in the context of disasters will inevitably rise. Existing national, regional and international legal regimes, however, currently respond to only some of the protection concerns arising from such displacement. Crafting an appropriate response will demand a cross-sectoral approach that addresses different forms of human mobility and which also recognises the local knowledge, values and beliefs of affected communities.

This issue of FMR includes 36 articles on ‘Disasters and displacement in a changing climate’, five articles on ‘Female genital mutilation (FGM) and asylum in Europe‘, and five ‘general’ articles on: Cartagena +30, trafficking for human organs, animals and forced migration, refugee-state distrust on the Thai-Burma border, and sweet tea and cigarettes in Jordan.

The full list of contents, with web links, is given at the end of this email.

FMR 49 will be available online and in print in English, Arabic, French and Spanish.

The FGM mini-feature is also available as a separate pdf at www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/FGM.pdf.

If you do not regularly receive a print copy of FMR and would like to receive a print copy for your organisation, or multiple copies for onward distribution or for use in training or at conferences, please contact us at fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk.

This publication has been produced with the assistance of the European Union.

Details of our forthcoming issues – on ‘The Balkans 20 years on from the Dayton Agreement’ and ‘Thinking ahead: displacement, transition and solutions’ – can be found at www.fmreview.org/forthcoming.

Apologies for any cross-posting.

Best wishes,

Marion Couldrey & Maurice Herson
Editors, Forced Migration Review
fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk   www.fmreview.org
+44 (0)1865 281700 skype: fmreview
Follow FMR on Facebook and Twitter

FMR 49 Disasters and displacement in a changing climate – contents with web links

THEME ARTICLES

Foreword

Børge Brende (Government of Norway) and Didier Burkhalter (Government of Switzerland) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/brende-burkhalter

The Nansen Initiative: building consensus on displacement in disaster contexts Walter Kälin (The Nansen Initiative) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/kaelin

National Adaptation Plans and human mobility Koko Warner (UNU-EHS), Walter Kälin (Nansen Initiative), Susan Martin (Georgetown University) and Youssef Nassef (UNFCC) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/warner-kaelin-martin-nassef

Modelling displacement
Justin Ginnetti (Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/ginnetti

The state of the evidence
Susan Martin (Georgetown University)
www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/martin

The necessity for an ethnographic approach in Peru Geremia Cometti (Laboratoire d’Anthropologie Sociale, Paris) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/cometti

An integrated focus
William Lacy Swing (International Organization for Migration) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/swing

West Africa: a testing ground for regional solutions Julia Blocher, Dalila Gharbaoui and Sara Vigil (University of Liège) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/blocher-gharbaoui-vigil

Development and displacement risks
Glaucia Boyer and Matthew McKinnon (UNDP) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/boyer-mckinnon

Developing temporary protection in Africa Tamara Wood (University of New South Wales) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/wood

Climate effects on nomadic pastoralist societies Dawn Chatty and Troy Sternberg (University of Oxford) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/chatty-sternberg

Guidance for ‘managed’ relocation
Brent Doberstein and Anne Tadgell (University of Waterloo) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/doberstein-tadgell

Preparing for planned relocation
www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/planned-relocation

Lessons from planned relocation and resettlement in the past Jane McAdam (University of New South Wales) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/mcadam

Post-disaster resettlement in urban Bolivia Gemma Sou (University of Manchester) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/sou

Focusing on climate-related internal displacement Scott Leckie and Ezekiel Simperingham (Displacement Solutions) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/leckie-simperingham

Brazil’s draft migration law
Isabela Piacentini de Andrade (Universidade Positivo) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/piacentini

Disasters, displacement and a new framework in the Americas David James Cantor (Refugee Law Initiative) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/cantor

Temporary protection arrangements to fill a gap in the protection regime Volker Türk (UNHCR) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/tuerk

Refugees, climate change and international law María José Fernández (Universidad Católica de Salta, Argentina) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/fernandez

Displacement as a consequence of climate change mitigation policies Sara Vigil (University of Liège) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/vigil

Statelessness and environmental displacement Jessie Connell (Australian National University) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/connell

A role for strategic litigation
Matthew Scott (Lund University, Sweden)
www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/scott

Floods and migration in the Czech Republic Robert Stojanov (University of Prague), Ilan Kelman (University College London) and Barbora Duží (Czech Academy of Sciences) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/stojanov-kelman-duzi

‘One Safe Future’ in the Philippines
Lloyd Ranque and Melissa Quetulio-Navarra (Philippines government agency) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/ranque-quetulionavarra

Post-disaster resettlement in the Philippines: a risky strategy Alice R Thomas (Refugees International) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/thomas

Cross-border migration with dignity in Kiribati Karen E McNamara (University of Queensland) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/mcnamara

Land, disasters and mobility in the South Pacific Daniel Fitzpatrick (Australian National University) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/mcnamara

Not drowning but fighting: Pacific Islands activists Hannah Fair (University College London) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/fair

Samoa: local knowledge, climate change and population movements Ximena Flores-Palacios (Auckland University of Technology) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/florespalacios

Facilitating voluntary adaptive migration in the Pacific Bruce Burson (New Zealand Immigration and Protection Tribunal) and Richard Bedford (University of Waikato) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/burson-bedford

Integrating resilience in South Asia
Mi Zhou and Dorien Braam (Praxis Labs)
www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/zhou-braam

“Everyone likes it here”
Himani Upadhyay, Divya Mohan (TERI, India) and Ilan Kelman (University College London) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/upadhyay-mohan-kelman

Building adaptive capacity in Assam
Soumyadeep Banerjee, Suman Bisht and Bidhubhusan Mahapatra (International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, Nepal) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/banerjee-bisht-mahapatra

Mixed motivations and complex causality in the Mekong Jessica Marsh (Mekong Migration Network) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/marsh

One good reason to speak of ‘climate refugees’
François Gemenne (University of Liège and Sciences Po, Paris) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/gemenne

Governance questions for the international community Alexander Betts (Refugee Studies Centre) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/betts

Building respectful solutions

Colleen Swan (Kivalina City Council), Chief Albert P Naquin (Isle de Jean Charles Tribal Council) and Stanley Tom (Newtok Traditional Council) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/swan-naquin-tom

FGM ARTICLES

Female genital mutilation: a case for asylum in Europe Fadela Novak-Irons (UNHCR) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/novakirons

FGM: challenges for asylum applicants and officials Christine Flamand (INTACT) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/flamand

The medicalisation of female genital mutilation Pierre Foldes and Frédérique Martz (Institut en Santé Génésique) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/foldes-martz

The Istanbul Convention: new treaty, new tool Elise Petitpas (End FGM European Network) and Johanna Nelles (Council of Europe) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/pettipas-nelles

Changing attitudes in Finland towards FGM Saido Mohamed and Solomie Teshome (Finnish League for Human Rights) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/mohamed-teshome

GENERAL ARTICLES

The Cartagena process: 30 years of innovation and solidarity Carlos Maldonado Castillo (UNHCR) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/castillo

Trafficking for human organs
Vladimir Makei (Government of Belarus)
www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/makei

Sweet tea and cigarettes: a taste of refugee life in Jordan Rana B Khoury (Northwestern University) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/khoury

Refugee-state distrust on the Thai-Burma border Karen Hargrave (independent) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/hargrave

Animals and forced migration
Piers Beirne and Caitlin Kelty-Huber (University of Southern Maine) www.fmreview.org/climatechange-disasters/beirne-keltyhuber

 

Publication: Migrant Voice Newspaper

Further details on the latest issue of the Migrant Voice Newspaper.  The following text is taken from the Migrant Voice website:

The Migrant Voice newspaper will be distributed on Monday April 20th in Birmingham from 3-6pm at Moor Street station; in London on Tuesday the 21st from 4-7pm at Waterloo, Victoria and London Bridge stations and on April 28th from 4-7pm at Kings Cross, Euston, Oxford Circus and Paddington stations.

_____

Immigration is high on the news agenda and is being presented by some politicians as a burden on the country, feeding fears and fuelling prejudice. There are 7.8 million foreignborn nationals in the UK but they are largely underrepresented in mainstream British media.

Our research reveals that migrants’ voices are heard in only one in eight media stories on migration. Many of these articles reflect critical, sometimes explicitly negative, attitudes – not only towards migration policies but also migrants themselves.

Far from the idea that debating migration is off-limits, it turns out that the only people ‘banned’ from discussing it are migrants themselves.

Here, we place migrants at the centre of the debate and let them tell their stories.

We found that over 90 per cent of migrants feel at least partially integrated into British society yet feel totally excluded from the political conversation about migration. When politicians make ill-informed comments it creates distrust on both sides. Yet – thankfully – the vast majority of Britons feel positive about the migrants they encounter in their daily lives, and the feeling is mutual.

Migrant Voice aims to address the lack of balanced and accurate representation in the media and celebrate the contribution migrants make to the UK. Our paper includes vibrant, engaging and moving stories, created and distributed by migrants.

This year’s issue is particularly important as it coincides with Migrant Voice celebrating five years of movement building, mobilisation and engagement with the public debate.

In this issue we unveil a new ‘I am an Immigrant’ poster campaign which celebrates the immense contribution that immigrants make.

The posters, which go on display at hundreds of London tube stations and national railway stations this month, show immigrants are part of the fabric of British society.

We are also the first to report on the launch of the ‘Bloody Foreigners’ campaign mobilising migrant communities to give more blood, turning an old phrase on its head. It’s just one of the many ways today’s migrants are contributing to the health and wealth of our nation.

We give you a glimpse into the strong North Korean community in the UK, the largest defector community from that country in Europe.

We also take you on two long, horrifying journeys from Syria and Eritrea in search of safety in the UK.

And we share the inspirational story of Agnes, an orphan of the Rwandan genocide and a former child soldier, who is now settled in the UK and is campaigning to improve the lives of other children orphaned by war.

There are also stories about the everyday lives of migrants in Britain – in restaurants, on the sports field, in the arts, in business.

Many more stories are featured on our website www.migrantvoice.org.

We also want to hear your thoughts – write to us at [email protected]

We hope you enjoy reading our paper.

Nazek Ramadan Founder, Migrant Voice

To read the full paper: http://bit.ly/1GYTI9M

To request printed copies of the paper, please email [email protected]

New Book in the Refugee Council Archive: Women Against Fundamentalism : stories of dissent and solidarity

As part of the Refugee Council Archive here at the University of East London, we are pleased to highlight the following new addition to the Archive collection:

Women Against Fundamentalism : stories of dissent and solidarity.
Edited by Sukhwant Dhaliwal and Nira Yuval-Davis.  Archive reference: QU85.2 DHA.

Full details of this new publication can be found on the Women Against Fundamentalism website and the book is available from the publishers website and as a kindle edition.

This book maps the development of the organisation over the past 25 years, through the life stories and political reflections of some of its members, focusing on the ways in which lived contradictions have been reflected in their politics. Their stories describe the pathways that led them to WAF, and the role WAF has played in their lives and in the forms of politicial activism in which they have engaged. Discussing feminist activism from different ethnic and religious back-grounds, contributors highlight the complex relationships of belonging that are at the heart of contemporary social life – including the problems of exclusionary political projects of belonging. They explore the ways in which anti-fundamentalism relates to broader feminist, anti-racist and other emancipatory political ideologies and movements.

Sukhwant Dhaliwal joined WAF in 1995. She has worked with Asian women’s organisations challenging domestic violence in both Newham and Manchester and has worked with Southall Black Sisters. For the last ten years, she has completed research projects encompassing a number of equality strands including: racism and racist violence; disability; age; religion and belief; and gender.

Nira Yuval-Davis is a founding member of WAF. She is the Director of the Centre on Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB) at the University of East London

Refugee Counci Archive at UEL: Recently Received Books

On behalf of the Refugee Council Archive here at the University of East London, we have recently received the following reference books to add to the collection:

The Oxford Handbook of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies. Edited by Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyehm Gil Loescher, Katy Long, and Nando Sigona.  Archive Reference: QU5 OXF.

Further details taken from the abstract available on the Oxford University Press website:

This authoritative Handbook critically evaluates the birth and development of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies, and analyses the key contemporary and future challenges faced by academics and practitioners working with and for forcibly displaced populations around the world. The 52 state-of-the-art chapters, written by leading academics, practitioners, and policymakers working in universities, research centres, think tanks, NGOs and international organizations, provide a comprehensive and cutting-edge overview of the key intellectual, political, social and institutional challenges arising from mass displacement in the world today. The chapters vividly illustrate the vibrant and engaging debates that characterize this rapidly expanding field of research and practice.

Further details on the Handbook can also be found on the pages of the Refugee Studies Centre.

Child and Youth Migration : mobility-in-migration in an era of globalization. Edited by Angela Veale, University College Cork, Ireland and Giorgia Dona, University of East London, UK. Archive Reference: QU86.22 VEA.

Further details taken from the abstract available on the Palgrave website:

Migration across multiple borders is a defining feature of the time in which we live, and children are central to this contemporary migration phenomenon. A core aim of this volume is to contribute at an empirical level to knowledge about the intersection between children, migration, and mobilities by highlighting underresearched child and youth short-term and micro movements within major migration fluxes that occur in response to migration and global change. This collection positions this complex mobility-in-migration within individual, intergenerational, and collective migratory lifespan trajectories. Drawing together empirical research from around the globe, we see how in the lives of children and young people, migration and mobility intersect so that migration is not an end state but rather is one form of movement in lives characterized by multiple journeys, short, circular or seasonal migrations, and holiday and pleasure mobilities that are dynamic and often ongoing into the future.

The Battle of Britishness : migrant journeys, 1685 to the present by Tony Kushner. Archive Reference: QU60.574 KUS.

Further details taken from the abstract available on the Manchester University Press website:

This pioneering study of migrant journeys to Britain begins with Huguenot refugees in the 1680s and continues to asylum seekers and east European workers today. Analyzing the history and memory of migrant journeys, covering not only the response of politicians and the public but also literary and artistic representations, then and now, Kushner’s volume sheds new light on the nature and construction of Britishness from the early modern era onwards. It is an essential tool for those wanting to understand why people come to Britain (or are denied entry) and how migrants have been viewed by state and society alike.

New Publication: UNHCR report: 2014 Mid-Year Trends

UNHCR are pleased to announce the release of the 2014 Mid-Year Trends report, which is now available and may be downloaded from the UNHCR statistics website at: www.unhcr.org/statistics.

The report provides a statistical overview of refugees, asylum-seekers, internally displaced persons (IDPs), returnees, stateless persons and other persons of concern to UNHCR for the period of 1 January to 30 June 2014. It is the second time only UNHCR is able to provide a global update at mid-year thanks to increased efforts put in place by both Headquarters and field colleagues.

The purpose of the report is to provide a snapshot of main trends in the number of persons of concern to UNHCR over this period, rather than providing a comprehensive overview of global trends in forced displacement. The report’s key findings show a dramatic deterioration in forced displacement during the first half of the year:

–       The total population of concern to UNHCR stood at 46.3 million at mid-2014, the highest level on record;

–       The global number of refugees at mid-2014 was estimated at 13.0 million, 1.3 million more than at the end of 2013;

–       The number of IDPs protected/assisted by UNHCR stood at 26 million, the highest on record;

–       The total number of persons of concern to UNHCR seeking protection within or outside the borders of their countries during the first half of 2014 exceeded 5.5 million individuals; and

–       Syrians have become the largest refugee population under UNHCR’s mandate, overtaking Afghans, who had held that position for more than three decades. At more than 3 million as of June 2014, Syrian refugees account for 23 per cent of all refugees under the organization’s mandate.

I hope that you will find the 2014 Mid-Year Trends report useful and interesting.

 

Forced Migration Review issue 47, entitled ‘The Syria crisis, displacement and protection’, is now online

Forced Migration Review issue 47, entitled ‘The Syria crisis, displacement and protection’, is now online at www.fmreview.org/syria

The 6.45 million displaced people inside Syria make this the largest IDP crisis in the world, with possibly also the largest number of people who are ‘trapped’. In addition, the number of refugees from Syria continues to increase. The international community has an opportunity to set up, from now, an effective response to what will clearly become protracted displacement. The authors of the 20 articles in this latest issue of FMR offer observations that could be of value in increasing the level of protection for the displaced and in shaping assistance to both the displaced and the countries and communities that are ‘hosting’ them.

The full list of contents, with web links, is given at the end of this page.

________________________________________

FMR 47 will be available online and in print in English, Arabic, French and Spanish.

An expanded contents Listing for this issue is also available, at www.fmreview.org/syria/FMR47listing.pdf

Requesting copies: If you do not regularly receive a print copy of FMR and would like to receive a print copy of FMR 47 or the Listing for your organisation, or multiple copies for onward distribution or for use in training or at conferences, please contact us as soon as possible at fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk. Please state how many copies you need (of full issue and/or Listing) in which languages, and provide a full postal address.

Please help disseminate this issue as widely as possible by circulating to networks, posting links, blogging, mentioning it on Twitter and Facebook and adding it to resources lists.

This issue has been published with the assistance of the Regional Development and Protection Programme, a three-year regional initiative for Lebanon, Jordan and Iraq, led by Denmark and with contributions from the EU, Denmark, Ireland, the Netherlands, UK and the Czech Republic.

See www.fmreview.org/forthcoming for details of forthcoming FMR issues.

If you no longer wish to continue receiving our occasional email alerts, please let us know.

With thanks and best wishes
Marion Couldrey & Maurice Herson
FMR Editors
fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk

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FMR 47 The Syria crisis, displacement and protection – contents with web links

The inheritance of loss
Nigel Fisher (United Nations)
www.fmreview.org/syria/fisher

Development and protection challenges of the Syrian refugee crisis
Roger Zetter (Refugee Studies Centre) and Héloïse Ruaudel (independent)
www.fmreview.org/syria/zetter-ruaudel

The refugee crisis in Lebanon and Jordan: the need for economic development spending
Omar Dahi (Hampshire College/Carnegie Middle East Center, Beirut)
www.fmreview.org/syria/dahi

Syrians contributing to Kurdish economic growth
Anubha Sood and Louisa Seferis (Danish Refugee Council)
www.fmreview.org/syria/sood-seferis

The role of host communities in north Lebanon
Helen Mackreath (American University of Beirut)
www.fmreview.org/syria/mackreath

Refugee activists’ involvement in relief effort in Lebanon
Frances Topham Smallwood (University of Amsterdam)
www.fmreview.org/syria/smallwood

Limited legal status for refugees from Syria in Lebanon
Dalia Aranki and Olivia Kalis (Norwegian Refugee Council)
www.fmreview.org/syria/aranki-kalis

Coping strategies among self-settled Syrians in Lebanon
Cathrine Thorleifsson (University of Oslo)
www.fmreview.org/syria/thorleifsson

Refugee by association
Blanche Tax (UNHCR)
www.fmreview.org/syria/tax

Protection challenges of mobility
Melissa Phillips and Kathrine Starup (Regional Mixed Migration Secretariat/Danish Refugee Council)
www.fmreview.org/syria/phillips-starup

A duty and a burden on Jordan
Saleh Al-Kilani (Jordanian Ministry of Interior)
www.fmreview.org/syria/alkilani

For beneficiary-led protection programming in Jordan
Sinead McGrath (International Catholic Migration Commission in Jordan)
www.fmreview.org/syria/mcgrath

If Israel accepted Syrian refugees and IDPs in the Golan Heights
Crystal Plotner (Al-Marsad, Arab Human Rights Centre in Golan Heights)
www.fmreview.org/syria/plotner

Gender, conscription and protection,and the war in Syria
Rochelle Davis, Abbie Taylor and Emma Murphy (Georgetown University)
www.fmreview.org/syria/davis-taylor-murphy

The vulnerability of Palestinian refugees from Syria
Leah Morrison (Oxford Brookes University)
www.fmreview.org/syria/morrison

The impact of displacement on disabled, injured and older Syrian refugees
Marcus Skinner (HelpAge International)
www.fmreview.org/syria/skinner

The mental health of Syrian refugee children and adolescents
Leah James, Annie Sovcik, Ferdinand Garoff and Reem Abbasi (Center for Victims of Torture)
www.fmreview.org/syria/james-sovcik-garoff-abbasi

The inside story: internal displacement in Syria
Erin Mooney (ProCap)
www.fmreview.org/syria/mooney

How the crisis is altering women’s roles in Syria
Zerene Haddad (Jesuit Refugee Service, Middle East and North Africa)
www.fmreview.org/syria/haddad

Mobility as a solution
Lucas Oesch (Groupe de recherches et d’études sur la Méditerranée et le Moyen Orient)
www.fmreview.org/syria/oesch