The Case for a Permanent Hybrid Tribunal for Mass Atrocities

Justice in Conflict

Muslim civilians in Bangui take cover to avoid heavy gunfire directed towards the Baya Dombia school where voters were gathering for the Constitutional Referendum on December 13, 2015. (Photo: Marco Longari / AFP) Muslim civilians in Bangui take cover to avoid heavy gunfire directed towards the Baya Dombia school where voters were gathering for the Constitutional Referendum on December 13, 2015.
(Photo: Marco Longari / AFP)

There is no point denying it. The current global production of mass atrocities far outweighs the tools and institutions that exist to respond to them. There is a far greater demand for, than supply of, international justice. We often hear about the development, growth, and entrenchment of a “system” of international justice. But, Stephen Rapp, the former U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues, recently remarked: “there isn’t a global system of justice, just some cases in The Hague and a few other places”.

Despite lofty rhetoric, the International Criminal Court (ICC) was never going to be a silver-bullet solution to creating a system of international justice. That’s not the institution’s fault, but it is high time…

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