Daily Archives: Sunday, December 27, 2015

Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 12/27/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily News and Updates from ReliefWeb 12/27/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Journal Research Articles for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (weekly) (weekly)

  • Recent years have seen increasing participation in short-term international volunteering. These volunteer teams usually engage individuals from high-income countries to travel and provide charitable services for host communities in low- and middle-income countries for a period of 3 months or less. The economic impacts arising from this phenomenon often vary; while volunteers introduce a new revenue that may support local job creation, they may also inadvertently disrupt the local workforce with their contributions, and thereby drive up unemployment. In addition, there may be a shift of economic focus towards attracting and supporting volunteers, rather than developing meaningful capacity in needed developmental areas. There also exist expected tensions with the direct and indirect goals and impacts of visiting volunteer teams, such as intended evangelism, unintended cultural colonialism, or education over service. Weighed against the desirability of additional community revenue, these tensions raise numerous ethical concerns. This paper examines a medium-sized city in Latin America, which receives many well-meaning international volunteers annually, who serve disadvantaged local populations. Specifically, this paper examines a faith-based volunteer team that was primarily composed of non-skilled youth. Using participant observation and interviews with relevant stakeholders, we identified an unsustainable growth model in place at the local hospital, which directs resources to support and promote the flow of foreign volunteers despite ethical concerns around perpetuating poverty, skills mismatch, and limited beneficial impacts on the target population. We highlight future concerns for this community associated with a financial dependence on international volunteers, and present solutions to potentially mitigate this issue.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This article studies the outcomes of the 2008 labour-migration policy change in Sweden, when most state control was abolished and an employer-led selection was introduced. The main goal was to increase labour migration from third countries to occupational sectors experiencing labour shortages. The article compares the volume, composition and labour-market status of labour migrants who arrived before the change in the law with those who arrived after. Labour migrants from EU countries are used as a control group to assess any eventual influence from non-migration policy determinants. The main outcome of the policy change is that non-EU labour migration increased – an effect entirely due to the rise in labour migration to surplus occupations. Changes in the composition of the labour migrants explains why those who came after the law change have, on average, a worse labour market position.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This article analyses whether the human capital gained abroad helps returning migrants to integrate into the Lithuanian labour market. The analysis focuses on highly qualified migrants, defined narrowly as people with higher education who held qualified jobs when working abroad. The article found that for this group of returnees professional aims were important when taking a decision to return, together with other motives such as family reasons and home-sickness. Most of the returnees were able to find employment and pursue their careers without major difficulties, although a significant minority signalled an intention to emigrate again. The article examines the key factors that sometimes helped and sometimes hindered integration of the returnees and discusses the role of the public policy.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Domestic welfare reform and the management of international migration in Britain have been described by David Cameron as ‘two sides of the same coin’. Heightened conditions and sanctions for the benefit-dependent domestic population, both in and out of work, are being harnessed as a means of promoting labour market change and reducing demand for low-skilled migrants – often EU workers, whose own access to benefit is being curtailed. Arguments about the post-national expansion of rights and associated cosmopolitan debate implicitly measure migrants rights against a normative model of citizenship as the yardstick of full social inclusion, but with little attention to how far citizenship itself falls short of this promise. Taking Britain as a case study, this paper considers how the concept of civic stratification can further advance analysis of the link between domestic welfare, migration and human rights in a context of intensifying controls for both migrants and citizens.

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.