Monthly Archives: November 2015

Book Launch – Racism: A Critical Analysis

Barring Syrian Refugees From The West Would Be Bad For The Middle East

Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 11/30/2015

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Daily News and Updates from ReliefWeb 11/30/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 11/29/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily News and Updates from ReliefWeb 11/29/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Journal Research Articles for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (weekly) (weekly)

  • tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The arrival of new media and communications technology has given rise to a protection paradox for refugees. In principle, it should enhance protection for asylum seekers by developing a more informed RSD process. Instead, it can be argued to have decreased protection for some, as the omnipresence of electronic information is accompanied by a demand in domestic asylum systems for increasingly detailed corroborative evidence to support the particulars of individual claims which many asylum seekers are ill equipped to provide, and that decision makers are disinclined, or insufficiently trained, to assess. In exploring the underlying dynamics of this paradox, this article examines the intersection between new media and the evidentiary regime for refugee protection that is gradually developing in lieu of a dramatic transformation of RSD. It argues that the democratization of human rights documentation and the arrival of new technologies and actors gives rise to novel forms of evidence and a different type of asylum seeker, introducing electronic evidence (e evidence) and the electronic dissident (e dissident) into RSD. The implications of e evidence and e dissidence for RSD include: an emerging duty to corroborate e documentation in protection cases; a need to consider the effect of the cyberactivity by decision makers (the ‘googling judge’) and asylum claimants outside of the RSD process, on disclosure and the admission of evidence within the assessment process; and, the knowledge to evaluate the risk of e dissidence and the changing features of sur place claims in the era of instant on-line dissent. The protection paradox could be diminished when the potential of new media to transform RSD is realized by realigning the approach to e evidence in the asylum process with the advanced practices developed across human rights sectors in the creation, filtering, assessment, and preservation of e evidence. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Cessation is a process that removes refugee status. If cessation occurs too soon, it risks the lives of individuals sent back to their countries of origin. If cessation happens too slowly or not at all, states may become more reluctant to accept refugees in the first place. The most recent experiment in cessation is underway – and well behind schedule. Two deadlines recommended by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees for the cessation of refugee status of Rwandans have come and gone, yet some 100,000 Rwandan refugees remain in countries of asylum. This article hypothesizes that the delay to implementation of Rwandan cessation by many African states is driven by regional political concerns with irregular migration. Unilateral cessation may cause undesirable irregular migration, which poses a challenge for a region composed of states with varying levels of support for cessation and at various stages of implementation. Cessation is a state prerogative but may only work effectively as an act of regional consensus. Meanwhile, Rwandan refugees are faced with indefinite uncertainty about their legal status. Most Rwandan refugees have not experienced premature cessation, but delayed cessation. If coordinated implementation of cessation does not occur, the outstanding Rwandan refugee population will dwindle slowly over time, primarily because individuals opt for voluntary return or host states increase local integration. As delays mount in implementation and enforcement of the ceased circumstances clauses, one must conclude that the UNHCR advisory deadlines for cessation were premature, or that cessation has not proved as effective as the 1951 Refugee Convention intended – or both.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “By way of side-effect, and to an extent that had not been foreseen, the Netherlands is confronted with asylum applications from persons involved in proceedings before the International Criminal Court (ICC), which it hosts in The Hague. These applications have led to an unprecedented body of case law from both the ICC and the Netherlands judiciary regarding the protection of the applicants. Central to this case law is the question of allocation of responsibility for the protection of the persons involved, particularly with respect to the prohibition of refoulement. This article provides an analysis of the relevant cases regarding asylum applications from persons involved in ICC proceedings, namely, detained defence witnesses, voluntary witnesses for the prosecution, and acquitted suspects. It particularly examines and evaluates the jurisdictional delimitations made by the ICC and the Dutch courts, and the fundamental questions of refugee and human rights protection that are addressed in these cases. With regard to domestic case law, the focus will be on the way in which key provisions of international refugee law – such as the application of articles 1A, 1D and 1F of the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees – and the safe third country concept are applied. The article concludes that the basic rights of former ICC witnesses and suspects are not always addressed adequately and appear to be lost in the divide created by the jurisdictional battles between the ICC and its host state. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “At the end of 2013, the Australian Government reintroduced a policy to turn around or tow back vessels carrying irregular migrants, many of them asylum seekers. This policy is designed to prevent their arrival in Australia and return them to the place from where the vessels departed. A similar policy was in operation in late 2001 when, in the aftermath of the so-called ‘Tampa Affair’, four vessels were returned to Indonesia. This article examines the context, objectives, and controversies of this policy and explores the known successful and attempted ‘turn-backs’. The article critically evaluates the rationale and operation of the past and present policies and reflects on the question of whether to retain or repeal this approach. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This study, informed from data collected through semi-structured interviews and participant observation, focuses on the perceived negative aspects of Information and Communication Technology use on the part of Eritrean refugees in a refugee shelter in Rome, Italy. Unable to return to their homeland for economic, political, and legal reasons, using the telephone and Internet have become the only ways for these refugees to maintain contact with their loved ones. And yet that very usage puts those loved ones in harm’s way because the regime in Eritrea is suspected of using the same Information Communication Technology to keep the diaspora communities under surveillance. We argue that Eritrean refugees’ apprehension with using the technology is well founded and leads to self-censorship regarding certain subject matter and, at times, complete avoidance of communicating through the technology. Furthermore, those that choose to communicate despite the perceived risks still do not have complete freedom of expression and, therefore, continue to be oppressed by the regime in Eritrea. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “During the past years, scholars have studied sexual and gender-based violence during conflict and in refugee situations worldwide and produced a significant body of literature. However, little attention has been paid to connecting this type of violence during different phases, instead presenting it as different sets of cases. This article challenges this prevailing notion that violence during conflict, flight, and displacement are separate cases but suggests that it forms a continuum of violence. Based on a case study in Uganda, the article provides in-depth insights of scope, forms, and conditions of violence, and informs about factors impacting the violence. It is eventually argued, that the linearity of the prevalence of sexual and gender-based violence during conflict, flight, and encampment reveals a continuum with widening patterns since especially the forms, perpetrator structures, and conditions show a diachronic increase of complexity. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “How and why might time matter in the politics of refugee assistance and global governance more broadly? Although core historical institutionalist concepts such as path dependence and critical junctures represent vital foundational constructs, they tend to overlook the social influence of time. By integrating social constructivist insights, this article examines the constitutive effects that time can have on the creation and subsequent development of governance arrangements through a political developmental analysis of one of the world’s most protracted refugee crises. For almost three decades, thousands of refugees fleeing from political persecution or development displacement in Burma (Myanmar) have resided in neighbouring Thailand. Throughout this period, multiple actors have struggled to collaborate in a shifting political environment in order to provide refugee assistance and protection, all the while attempting to find what much of the humanitarian community terms “durable solutions.” Drawing on interviews of a variety of stakeholders conducted amid a period of rapid change between 2010 and 2013, the article highlights how temporality conditions the social interaction between agents and structures in ways that affect change. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article examines the role of discourse in Australia’s current border control policy, “Operation Sovereign Borders”. From a crimmigration perspective, it examines how discourse contributes to the dichotomous understanding of crimmigration as combining “loud panicking” and “quiet manoeuvring”. A Critical Discourse Analysis is applied, thereby examining not only the discourse at a textual level, but also how the discursive setting and the socio–political context influence the effects of discourse. The results show that Operation Sovereign Borders focuses on border protection and securitization through a “strong and consistent” deterrence policy. It creates “loud panic” vis-à-vis crimmigrant others and draws border securitization into the field of administrative immigration control. Immigrants are distinguished on the basis of their mode of transportation, creating an image of a homogeneous crimmigrant group of illegal and non-deserving boat migrants buying places from human traffickers. Through offshore processing and a dominant discourse, the Australian Government is simultaneously able to “quietly manoeuvre”, thereby leaving little room for alternative discourses or critiques. Discourse thus plays a pivotal role in creating “loud panic” and in enabling “quiet manoeuvring”, which are much more interwoven and mutually reinforcing than sometimes suggested. This fosters the Government’s ability to effectively implement restrictive immigration measures. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article aims to re-evaluate and clarify the significance of the contribution of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights to the protection of irregular immigrants’ rights. It argues that this Court has placed itself at the forefront of a renewed approach to immigration, confirming its potential to promote an extended form of protection of irregular immigrants’ rights in Latin America. However, the actual protection of irregular immigrants’ rights promoted by the Court depends on Latin American countries’ capability to overcome several important challenges, in particular with respect to the compliance with judicial decisions and the effectiveness of the protection of rights. These challenges, which are not purely legal or institutional, are strongly dependent on the Latin American cultural, political, and societal context. They may, therefore, hinder the impact of a stronger human rights-based approach to the protection of irregular immigrants’ rights in Latin America. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In August 1947, the euphoria generated by the creation of newly independent India and Pakistan was celebrated by peoples far removed from the Subcontinent, including among the descendants of Indian indentured laborers in the British island colony of Trinidad. Trinidad’s East Indians reveled in the newfound freedom of their now-divided, overseas, ethnic compatriots. The masses of East Indians felt a surge of pride in the overthrow of colonial rule, evidenced by their attendance at parades, talks, and celebrations. In the months and weeks leading up to independence, East Indians debated the merits and disadvantages of partition. Some advocated firmly the idea of a unified ethnic “Indian” community in Trinidad, whereas others constructed clear boundaries between proponents of Pakistan versus India, thus fortifying tenuous and contingent divisions between Trinidad’s Hindus and Muslims.

    This essay demonstrates that the culmination of Indian independence and partition exacerbated the diverging identities of Hindu and Muslim Trinidadians. I argue that Indian independence and the creation of Pakistan had global ramifications for the meaning of “Indian-ness” in the British colonies including Trinidad and elsewhere. East Indians’ appeal to nationalism interrogates the construction of national and cultural identity spatially and temporally distant from the source, ultimately affirming the salience of a religio-national identity. Furthermore, the networks of communication established between Indians in places such as Trinidad, England, and the United States produced “diffracted” diasporic identities that were mediated through these interactions. ”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Earlier research has used 1980 and 1990 U.S. census data to examine the effectiveness of disproportionate stratification to oversample areas with greater concentrations of a minority population in order to achieve a specified effective sample size for a national survey of that minority. The areas considered were census block and block groups. The effectiveness of this oversampling depends on the degree of the minority’s geographical concentration and on the relative cost of the full data collection to the screening cost. This paper updates the earlier findings using 2010 U.S. census data and compares these findings with those based on data from the 1990 U.S. census. The paper extends the application to subnational surveys that are concerned with a single census region or with core-based statistical areas (CBSAs) or non-CBSAs. It also examines the effect of using different cutpoints for defining the density strata. Oversampling two minority populations in a survey and oversampling a minority as part of a survey of the overall population are also discussed. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Passing through the Gevgelija refugee transit camp

Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 11/28/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily News and Updates from ReliefWeb 11/28/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Chaos on Greek islands as refugee registration system favours Syrians

Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 11/27/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily News and Updates from ReliefWeb 11/27/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

How does the refugee vetting process work?

This Isn’t The First Time Americans Have Shown Fear Of Refugees