Daily Archives: Monday, October 26, 2015

Event: JCWI’s Annual Seminar 2015: Crisis or Turning Point? The Shifting Sands of British Politics & the Migration Crisis

JCWI AGM & Seminar: Crisis or Turning Point? The Shifting Sands of British Politics & the Migration Crisis

Thursday, October 29, 2015 from 6:00 PM – 8:30 PM

JCWI’s formal business of the AGM is for members only and will be followed by a seminar entitled, “Crisis or Turning Point? – The Shifting Sands of British Politics and the Migration Crisis”. The Seminar starts at 7pm.

This year’s refugee ‘crisis’ has resulted in an outpouring of compassion and a ‘call to action’ from a wide section of the British and European public. However, this was coupled with some of Europe’s governments building higher fences and closing borders as they perceive their sovereignty to be under threat.

Domestically immigration is once again dominant in terms of policy and our response is divided. Public opinion has changed Government policy but will this last? While the UK has agreed to resettle some Syrian refugees directly from the camps on the Syrian border, we have opted out of resettling any of have already made the treacherous journey to Europe. Will this stance have a knock-on effect on our already fraught relationship with Europe and will it hasten our departure from Europe? Additionally, with Labour electing an unequivocally left-wing leader, how will this affect the migration debate?

In light of these issues, the seminar will focus on pastures new and how we as a country go forward amidst the current migration crisis. These vital issues will be discussed with a panel of distinguished speakers, including Stuart McDonald MP, Shadow Scottish National Party Spokesperson on Immigration, Asylum and Border Control who will be the keynote speaker at the Seminar. The full list of speakers are:

– Stuart McDonald MP, SNP
– Dipti Pardeshi, Chief of Mission at IOM UK
– S Chelvan, Barrister, No5 Chambers

Attendees will be eligible for 1.5 CPD hours. This seminar is free to attend. Anyone who wishes to find out about our work or indeed participate in it is welcome to attend the Seminar. It will be preceded by Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants’ Annual General Meeting which is for members only and starts at 6pm.

This is also a turning point for JCWI with our Chief Executive, Habib Rahman, retiring. The Seminar will be followed by a party in the Rocket Venue at the Club Quarter’s Hotel, next door to the Seminar venue, which you are cordially invited to.

Events: ‘Witnessing: Working with Testimonies for Refugee Advocacy’

‘Witnessing: Working with Testimonies for Refugee Advocacy’ is a workshop on refugee and forced migration narratives geared towards professionals and academics who work with refugees and other displaced people. The workshop, which will be held in New York City from January 6 – 10, 2016, is sponsored by PROOF: Media for Social Justice, and is co-facilitated by Dr. Anita Fabos, Associate Professor of International Development and Social Change, Clark University, and Leora Kahn, Executive Director of PROOF: Media for Social Justice.

Inquiries welcome; full applications are due November 15.

Two full-tuition scholarships for U.S.-based refugees are available. For more information and to apply, please visit http://proof.org/witnessing/

Call for papers, Final: Children and War: Past and Present – Deadline 31 Oct

Children and War: Past and Present

Third international multidisciplinary conference to be held at the University of Salzburg, Austria, on 13-15 July 2016

Organized by the University of Salzburg and the University of Wolverhampton, in association with the UN Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict.

This conference is planned as a follow-up to the two successful conferences, which took place at the University of Salzburg in 2010 and 2013. It will continue to build on areas previously investigated, and also open up new fields of academic enquiry.

All research proposals which focus on a topic and theme related to ‘Children and War’ are welcome, ranging from the experience of war, flight, displacement and resettlement, to relief, rehabilitation and reintegration work, gender issues, persecution, trafficking, sexual violence, trauma and amnesia, the trans-generational impact of persecution, individual and collective memory, educational issues, films and documentaries, artistic and literary approaches, remembrance and memorials, and questions of theory and methodology. Specific conference themes anticipated are:

– Children as victims, witnesses and participants in armed conflicts.
– Holocaust, genocide and forced labour.
– Deportation and displacement, refugees and asylum seekers.
– War crimes, trials and human rights.
– Reflexions on research in politically and culturally diverse contexts.
– Sources produced by NGOs and their public and academic use.

Please send an abstract of 200-250 words, together with biographical background information of 50-100 words by 31 October 2015 to: J.D.Steinert@wlv.ac.uk. Panel proposals are welcome.

All proposals are subject to a review process. Successful candidates will be informed at the end of 2015 and will be asked to send in their papers by the end of May 2016 for distribution among conference participants on a CD. Further information will be made available in due time.

Fee for speakers: EUR 160. The fee includes admission to all panels, lunches, coffees, teas, and evening events.
Participants need to secure their own funding to participate in this conference.

Conference language: English.

The organising team:
Wolfgang Aschauer (Salzburg)
John Buckley (Wolverhampton)
Helga Embacher (Salzburg)
Albert Lichtblau (Salzburg)
Grazia Prontera (Salzburg)
Johannes-Dieter Steinert (Wolverhampton)

Events: RLI Seminar Series 2015-16 – Asylum in Europe – Starting Friday, 23 October 2015 (IALS, 6 pm)

RLI Seminar Series 2015-16 – Asylum in Europe – Starting Friday, 23 October 2015 (IALS, 6 pm)

This is to announce the forthcoming Seminar Series on Asylum in Europe hosted by the Refugee Law Initiative of the University of London during the current academic year 2015/16.

The first session on access to international protection will take place on Friday, 23 October 2015, from 6 pm at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (London).

All details are below, attached and also available at: http://www.sas.ac.uk/rli/whats-on

Attendance is free, but registration recommended: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/refugee-law-initiative-university-of-london-3554876155

Thank you for spreading the word!

Looking forward to seeing you there,

Violeta Moreno-Lax

PROGRAMME

Access to Protection in Europe: Pre-emptive Humanitarianism and the “Rescue without Protection” Paradigm
Dr Violeta Moreno-Lax, Queen Mary University of London
23 October 2014, 6.00pm | L103/104, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Safety Zones in Countries of Origin: A Violation of International Law?
Dr Bríd Ní Ghráinne, University of Sheffield
06 November 2014, 6.00 pm | L103/104, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Running Sideways – Has Europe Overdone Distancing Itself from the Geneva Refugee Convention?
Julian Lehmann, Global Public Policy Institute (GPPi)
2 December 2015, 6.00 pm | L103/104, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Human Trafficking and Slavery Reconsidered
Dr Vladislava Stoyanova, Faculty of Law, Lund University, Sweden
19 January 2016, 6.00 pm | Council Chamber, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Terrorism and Exclusion from Refugee Status in the UK: Asylum Seekers Suspected of Serious Criminality
Dr Sarah Singer, Refugee Law Initiative, School of Advanced Study
29 February 2016, 6.00pm | Conference Room, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

If the stars align: EU law, policy and practice on solidarity and responsibility-sharing for asylum and refugee protection
Madeline Garlick, Radboud University, The Netherlands
4 February 2016, 6.00 pm | Council Chamber, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

EU asylum law and disabled refugees – is the UK reservation to the CRPD in the context of asylum law redundant?
Stephanie Motz, University of Lucerne
16 March 2016, 6.00pm | Council Chamber, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

“Bottom-up” harmonization in the EU asylum policy: the case of EASO
Lilian Tsourdi, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Law and Institute for European Studies
4 May 2016, 6.00pm | L103/104, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Refugee Studies Centre: Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture taking place on 4 November 2015

‘We do not want to become refugees’: Human mobility in the age of climate change  

Professor Walter Kälin (Envoy of the Chairmanship of the Nansen Initiative, and Professor of Constitutional and International Law, University of Bern)

Time and date: 5pm, 4 November 2015

Location: Oxford University Museum of Natural History, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PW

Registration: The lecture is free to attend and open to all but registration is required.

Disaster displacement is one of the big humanitarian challenges of our times and is likely to significantly increase in the context of climate change. Building on the work of the Nansen Initiative on disaster-induced cross-border displacement, the lecture will explore different tools available to address displacement and other forms of disaster related human mobility.

About the speaker 

Professor Walter Kälin is a Swiss international human rights lawyer, legal scholar, and advocate. Currently, he is Professor of Constitutional and International Law at the Faculty of Law of the University of Bern (Switzerland), and Envoy of the Chairmanship of the Nansen Initiative. He served as a member of the UN Human Rights Committee until the end of 2014. From 2004 until 2010, he was the Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General on Internally Displaced Persons. Professor Kälin is the author of numerous works including The Face of Human Rights (2004) and The Law of International Human Rights Protection (2009). He received his doctor of law from the University of Bern and his LL.M. from Harvard University.

The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception

 

Courses: CMRS Winter Short Courses (January 24th – February 11th, 2016)

Center for Migration and Refugee Studies

Winter Short Courses January 24th  – February 11th, 2016

The Center for Migration and Refugee Studies (CMRS) at The American University in Cairo (AUC) is offering the following three short courses during the month of January and February 2016:

1.      Designing research with urban displaced populations in MENA region (Jan 24 – 28, 2016)

2.      International Refugee Law (Jan 31 – Feb 4  , 2016)

3.      Euro -Mediterranean Refugee and Migration Crisis: Origins, Effects, Responses (Feb 7 – 11, 2016)

1. Eligibility for all courses:
Requirements: These courses are offered for undergraduate and postgraduate students, and researchers as well as practitioners working with migrants and refugees. A minimum knowledge of displacement and migration terminologies and context is a requirement for participation in any of the three courses.

All courses are conducted in English and no translation facilities are provided.  Participants should have a sufficient command of the English language. Each course will run from 9 am till 5pm for five days.

Interested applicants can apply for one course or for all the three courses.
Number of Participants: minimum of 12 in each course
NB: Non- Egyptian applicants are strongly encouraged to apply early in order to have enough time to obtain their visa.

2. Dates and Location: CMRS courses will take place between Sunday 24th of January and 11th of February at the AUC Tahrir Campus in Downtown Cairo. The exact location and room numbers will be forwarded to accepted participants before the start of the courses.

3. Courses’ Descriptions

3.1 Designing research with urban displaced populations in MENA region   (Jan 24 – 28, 2016)

This course is intended for practitioners from national governments, international inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), and national and inter-national non-governmental organizations (NGOs), working with migrants and refugees in urban settings. It is also for junior researchers, undergraduates and post-graduates in social sciences working on topics related to migrants and refugees.

The course will provide essential tools and techniques needed to conduct research and needs-assessments with displaced populations. It will help participants:

·   Identify the appropriate research methods for their target groups and subject matter.

·   Select the appropriate sample frame/s and sampling techniques.

·   Create research tools to reflect the aims and objectives of the research.

·   Consider the contextual limitations and challenges in conducting research with migrants and refugees.

·   Understand the ethical considerations vis-à-vis interaction with respondents.

The course will cover mixed research methods with an emphasis on qualitative techniques namely: Focus Group Discussions, Semi-Structured Interviews, in-depth interviews and ethnographies. It will lay out the pros and cons of the different methods and sampling techniques.   It will discuss in-depth the implications of reflexivity on the data collection, analysis and outcomes. It will also look at ethical considerations and challenges in conducting research with beneficiaries.

The course includes lectures and application of methods. Participants will be expected through a group project to apply one of the research methods through a practical exercise with refugee and migrant respondents in Egypt on a topic of interest.

Requirements: A minimum knowledge of displacement and migration terminologies is a requirement for the course participation. Knowledge of research is not required.

About the Instructor: Sara Sadek is a PhD Candidate at the Center for Applied Human Rights at the Politics Department at the University of York, UK. She obtained her B.A in Political Science at the American University in Cairo (AUC) in 2003 and her M.A in Refugee Studies at the University of East London (UEL) in UK in 2007. She is currently a consultant and trainer in the field of migration and protection in Egypt and MENA region. She has lead and participated in a series of medium to large-scale needs assessments and research projects using quantitative and qualitative methods including:  large-scale surveys, focus group discussions, interviews and ethnographies.  She worked as a researcher and consultant for international organizations and academic institutions. To name a few: Center for Migration and Refugee Studies (CMRS) at the American University in Cairo (AUC), the International Organization for Migration (IOM), United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Save the Children International (SC), Swiss Development Cooperation, the University of East London, the French Institute for the Near East (IFPO), Duke University, and Center for Applied Human Rights at the University of York, UK. Research topics covered:  Libyan migrants, civil society-state relations, trafficking and smuggling, mixed migratory flows, domestic labor, unaccompanied minors, survivors of Sexual and Gender-based Violence, Diaspora and transnational communities, child protection, livelihoods and socio-economic rights, citizenship, narratives of displacements and transitional justice.

3.2 International Refugee Law (Jan 31 – Feb 4, 2016)

The course will provide post-graduate students, international agency staff, NGO workers, lawyers and others working with refugees or interested in refugee issues with an introduction to the international legal framework which governs the protection of refugees.  Through lectures, case studies and  small group discussions, course participants will learn about the basic features of international refugee law through the lens of the 1951 Refugee Convention, looking at the elements of the definition(s) of “refugee,” who is excluded from the definition, the role of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, the process by which refugee status is determined, the rights of refugees under international law, the ethical and professional obligations of those representing refugees, and other issues of refugee policy.  A background in law is useful but not required.

About the Instructor: Parastou Hassouri has previously taught international refugee law at the American University of Cairo and has extensive experience in the field of international refugee law and refugee and immigrant rights and migration policy. Most recently, She has been serving as a consultant with the Refugee Status Determination (RSD) Unit at the UNHCR office in Ankara, Turkey.  Her previous consultancies with the UNHCR have been at the Zaatari Refugee Camp in Jordan and the UNHCR office in Moscow.  Parastou has also done extensive research in the field of refugee and migration law.  As a researcher/consultant for the Geneva-based NGO Global Detention Project, she conducted research on the issue of the migration-related detention in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries.  She also conducted research on the resettlement of Iraqi refugees out of the Middle East to third countries for the New York City-based NGO,  Human Rights First.  Her previous experience includes working as a Legal Advisor and Sexual and Gender-Based Violence Focal Point at Africa and Middle East Refugee Assistance (AMERA) in Cairo.  Her experience in the United States includes serving as an Attorney Advisor at the Immigration Courts of New York City and Los Angeles and working as an immigration attorney in private practice in New York City.  In addition, she designed and directed the Immigrant Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey, where she focused on responding to ethnic profiling and other forms of anti-immigrant backlash in the United States in the aftermath of the attacks of September 11.

3.3 Euro -Mediterranean Refugee and Migration Crisis: Origins, Effects, Responses (Feb 7 – 11, 2016)

This short course analyzes the causes of the current refugee and migration crisis in the Euro-Mediterranean region, the manifestation and expression of the experience across the region, the ensuing consequences, and the range and effectiveness of law and policy responses. The course is useful for those working in international, national, and non-governmental organizations that engage with migration and asylum issues, particularly those working in the Euro-Mediterranean region, and to post-graduate students in migration and refugee studies, Middle East and Euro-Mediterranean studies, as well as in related fields. Through lectures, case studies, and discussions, this one-week intensive course provides a rigorous critical overview of the current migration and refugee crisis and its short and long-term regional implications. Questions explored include: What are the political, economic, environmental, social, and cultural drivers of the current migration? Issues considered include conflict, governance, human rights, underdevelopment, inequality, demography, labor markets, climate change, desertification, drought, religious and ethnic discrimination, and xenophobia. What are the projected trends in these areas? How effective are international and regional laws and policies in ensuring that migration and asylum processes are orderly and humane? Do laws and policies logically flow from what we know of the origins of this migration, the present reality, and projections for coming migrations? If not, what measures could move us towards greater effectiveness? These questions are explored through regional case studies, including migration from Syria, Iraq, Libya, and Yemen; migration from the Horn of Africa and the Sahel transiting through North Africa and the Middle East towards Europe; intersection with ongoing migration from the Balkans and Eastern Europe; and responses in transit and destination states in North Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. A background in international relations, political science, or international law is useful but not required for participation.

About the Instructors:

Ibrahim Awad is Professor of Global Affairs and Director of the Center for Migration and Refugee Studies at the American University in Cairo. He has worked for the League of Arab States, the United Nations, and the International Labour Organization, holding positions of Secretary of the Commission, UN-ESCWA; Director, ILO Sub-regional Office for North Africa; and Director, ILO International Migration Programme. Dr Awad is a political scientist and political economist and his research interests and publications encompass international migration, employment, human and labour rights, development, politics and political transitions in the Middle East and North Africa, international relations, global governance and European integration.

Usha Natarajan is Assistant Professor of Law and Associate Director of the Center for Migration and Refugee Studies at the American University in Cairo. Her research and publications are multidisciplinary, utilizing third world and postcolonial approaches to international law to provide an interrelated understanding of the relationship between international law and issues of development, migration, environment and conflict. Dr Natarajan explores the interplay of these issues globally and in the Arab region. Prior to joining AUC in 2010, she worked with various international organizations including UNDP, UNESCO and the World Bank on law reform initiatives in Asia.

Deadlines for submitting application for all courses are:

·         15th of December, 2015

·         Deadline for paying course deposit (30% of the course’s fee- 150$) is 31st of December, 2015

Application Information:

To apply for the courses:

1. Fill out the application form. The form is available on CMRS website:  http://www.aucegypt.edu/GAPP/cmrs/outreach/Pages/ShortCourses.aspx

2. Send the application form to cmrscourses@aucegypt.edu with your most recent C.V; Att. Ms. Naseem Hashim

Applicants may apply to and be accepted in more than one course. Please do not hesitate to contact cmrscourses@aucegypt.edu if you have any difficulty with the application process.
Applicants accepted for the course will be notified by email within a week after the deadline for submitting the application.

Fees and Scholarship:

The fee for each course is $ 500. Participants are expected to pay a 30% of the total fees ($150) as a deposit. Please pay attention to the deposit deadline and kindly note that the deposit is non-refundable.  More information on payment method will be provided to accepted participants.

Tuition fees will cover course material and two coffee breaks per course day. All participants are kindly requested to secure their visa and organise and cover expenses for their travel to and from Egypt, as well as their accommodation and local transportation in Egypt.

Independent researchers and students can apply for the limited number of scholarships. Scholarships are not intended for participants who can be funded by their own institutions.

Sweden: Doubling the number of refugees as centres burn

Conference: ‘Protection elsewhere, but where? National, regional and global perspectives on refugee law’ – Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law

PROTECTION ELSEWHERE, BUT WHERE?
National, Regional and Global Perspectives on Refugee Law

20 November 2015, 9.00am-5.00pm

The Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law at the University of New South Wales in Sydney will hold its annual conference on 20 November 2015, on the theme ‘Protection elsewhere, but where? National, regional and global perspectives on refugee law’.

The keynote address will be given by Erika Feller, Former Assistant High Commissioner for Protection, UNHCR and Vice-Chancellor’s Fellow, University of Melbourne.

The conference sessions will include:

–   Reflection on key developments in Australian refugee law and policy in a global perspective.
–   Analysis of the prospects and possibilities for regional cooperation on refugee protection in the Asia-Pacific region.
–   Discussion of the operation and implications of Australia’s policies of turning back boats and offshore processing in Nauru and Papua New Guinea.
–   An examination of Australian law and practice compared to approaches elsewhere.
–   A Q&A discussion with panellists from Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand, providing local perspectives on refugee protection in the region.

Program and speaker biographies now available

Early bird registration closes 19 October. Register here:
http://www.kaldorcentre.unsw.edu.au/event/kaldor-centre-annual-conference.

This is an approved OMARA CPD Activity (CN50) and 3 CPD points can be awarded for attendance.

Date:  20 November 2015, 9-5pm
Location:  Law Theatre G04, Ground Floor, Law Building, UNSW Kensington Campus
(F8 on Campus Map)

Conference Fees:

‘Early bird’ fee (by 19 October 2015)
Standard Registration      $120
Student Registration        $80

Regular Fee (after 19 October 2015)
Standard Registration     $150
Student Registration       $100

For more information, contact kaldorcentre@unsw.edu.au

 

Stranded in Cold Rain, a Logjam of Migrants in the Balkans

Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 10/26/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily News and Updates from ReliefWeb 10/26/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Journal Research Articles for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 10/26/2015

  • This practice-based research study examines a US-based preventive services program tailored to immigrant and refugee families that have been subject to a Child Protective Services report. The model is the result of a collaboration between an immigrant serving community-based agency and a county department of child welfare services in a medium-sized city that has become a hub for refugee resettlement. A clinical data mining approach was used in an intensive examination of 15 families’ case records. This paper identifies family characteristics, service needs, and strength-based practices that emerged, offering recommendations for child welfare agencies and practitioners in other jurisdictions seeking to design strategies to strengthen their services for immigrant and refugee communities.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Given the steady rise in the number of Hazara seeking asylum in Australia, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of media in their acculturation and to explore whether their level of English language proficiency played a mediating role in selecting certain media platforms over others. Data were collected through 29 participants completing a survey, followed by in-depth interviews with ten Hazara male youths (age ≤18 years) in Brisbane, Australia. The findings suggested that young Hazara men were very selective in their media choice. While some used media to improve their integration into Australia, others consciously chose to separate and be more “Afghan” than “Australian”. In this selection process, their self-awareness with regard to English language proficiency, coupled with how motivated they were to learn English, played a critical mediating role; certain participants who had limited English proficiency and wanted to improve it watched English language media to improve their proficiency. These media were avoided by participants with a similar proficiency who had no interest in improving it; participants representing this group resorted to Hazaragi/Dari media for information and news, instead of the local media. In this study, the latter group also displayed a separation approach of acculturation.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • The city of Oslo has established a council of immigrant organisations (CIO). The city has designed CIO to have a double mandate: one from the city of Oslo and one from the immigrant organisations. The question raised in this article is how the city of Oslo’s design of CIO has an impact on its form of representation, its activities and its political position within local government. The article finds that CIO can legitimately claim to be a local council as the local authorities decide its main tasks and appoint the leader. CIO can also claim to be democratically representative as it is elected by the immigrant organisations. This gives CIO a choice of action, which it has used to develop its own activities independently of the city of Oslo and the organisations it represents. CIO’s activities are mainly to change the underlying majority way of thinking in the established state and municipal institutions, with the aim of adapting them to the minorities’ lives and cultures. Moreover, the article finds that the local authorities cannot implement a redesign without approval from CIO members. The authorities may decide to close CIO down by arguing that it does not produce the expected results, but this is problematic as long as CIO also is a descriptive representative council. The article concludes that CIO’s design gives it an ambiguous form of representation and choice of action, and that the political attempts to steer CIO confirms its ambiguous position within the local government.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • While in contemporary usage the term ‘diaspora’ is often construed to denote any deterritorialised or transnational population, it most meaningfully refers to dispersal and resettlement of a population elsewhere. Jews are a prime example of such a diaspora. While in the Australian context, Jewish immigrants have many of the middle class and disproportionately professional occupational backgrounds of transnationals, most Australian Jewish immigrants seek permanent resettlement. The surge of Jewish migrants in the past half century has produced a people less assimilated than integrated, part of Australia’s economic, political and social life while conscious of themselves as a community bound together by a common religious tradition, with Zionism — support for Israel — an important element of their lived experience and of the diasporic tradition.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Third-country immigrants are over-represented among lower status workers in all EU countries and rarely achieve upward mobility. The present paper aims to analyse the migration trajectories of foreign-born women who entered the Italian labour market as domestic workers, in order to assess the role of personal and group characteristics in determining the chances of leaving this sector. The data were collected as part of a project studying the working trajectories of migrants in Italy. The survey was conducted during 2009 on 13,000 migrants aged 18 and over, living in Italy at the time of the interview and born in high emigration countries. We used a piecewise exponential model with random intercept for citizenship with time measured from the beginning of the person’s first domestic work in Italy. Our results show low exit rates from the domestic sector but we identify personal and group characteristics which facilitate exit from this segment of the labour market. Employment experience, including unskilled, has a positive effect on the transition in the host country, as do education achieved in the country of origin and higher levels of tasks and duties in the last job held in the country of origin, whereas ethnic networks limit access to other occupations. The aims of the women’s migration project include a strong emphasis on occupational mobility, whether they migrate for work or for family reasons. Finally, we find evidence of the existence of a “U-shaped” pattern in occupational mobility for this particular subpopulation of workers.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This article examines the characteristics of social ties that shape the migration experiences of Zimbabwean social workers in Britain. While contributing to the elaboration of the social capital concept, the article seeks to answer the following question: To what extent do Zimbabwean social workers generate, destroy or re-constitute social capital in trying to adapt to and progress with life in a foreign country? Conceptualizing social capital as a process rather than a state helps in understanding the extent to which Zimbabwean social workers have utilized three types of social capital namely bonding, bridging and linking social capital and how these have influenced their migration trajectories. The article contributes to the growing literature on the Zimbabwean diaspora while paying attention to the ‘invisible’ immigrant professionals. Research findings reveal how the Zimbabwean social workers have relied on more distant ties, linking social capital, to migrate instead of the commonly used bonding social capital. The agency of the social workers also shows in the way they abandon social capital that has become less beneficial in pursuit of more beneficial forms.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This evaluation considers 434 households that participated in an Extended Case Management program from March 2009 through July 2011 in Salt Lake City, Utah, in the United States. Substantial improvements in wellbeing and reductions in needs in relation to health, employment, finances, housing, education, and family/community circumstances were observed over the course of 2 years. Variations in wellbeing and integration over time were related primarily to English ability at arrival, household type, country of origin, and employment status. Education, employment experience prior to arrival, and literacy were also associated with some outcomes. Employment increased dramatically over time, with at least one person employed in over 75 % of households that had reached 24 months of extended case management support.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This article focuses on the perceptions of Muslim immigrants regarding what might constitute ‘successful integration’ into two Western European countries: Germany and the Netherlands. I conducted qualitative interviews with representatives from Muslim umbrella organisations and reviewed their publications to analyse their definitions of ‘integration’. The results support the assumption that differences in political opportunity structures derived from specific integration policies, as well as national regimes of religious governance, affect the views of Muslim organisations acting in these contexts. In the Netherlands, the Muslim representatives still support a policy of multicultural integration and, first and foremost, the right to preserve their original identities. In contrast, their counterparts in Germany occasionally consider moderate forms of acculturation, including the creation of ‘hybrid’ identities, within the country that receives them. Understanding areas of concordance between immigrant and state representatives within the same national context could pave the way for more constructive and less polarised dialogue between the two groups and might serve as a model for facilitating other types of integration.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This study examines the relationship between the context of reception toward immigrants, as defined by the state-level political climate related to immigrants, and homeownership for foreign-born Latinos and Asians in the USA. We hypothesize that the passage of legislation that restricts individual rights or access to opportunities for immigrants sends an unwelcoming signal to immigrants, decreasing their level of comfort in the state and discouraging homeownership. Using data from the 2007 American Community Survey and data on immigrant legislation at the state-level from the National Conference of State Legislatures, we estimate probit models that predict the likelihood of homeownership for Latino and Asian immigrants living in unwelcoming or welcoming/neutral states. Research results suggest that residing in a state with an unwelcoming political climate toward immigrants is associated with lower likelihood of homeownership for Latino immigrants, but has no relationship with homeownership for Asian immigrants.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This article examines the characteristics of social ties that shape the migration experiences of Zimbabwean social workers in Britain. While contributing to the elaboration of the social capital concept, the article seeks to answer the following question: To what extent do Zimbabwean social workers generate, destroy or re-constitute social capital in trying to adapt to and progress with life in a foreign country? Conceptualizing social capital as a process rather than a state helps in understanding the extent to which Zimbabwean social workers have utilized three types of social capital namely bonding, bridging and linking social capital and how these have influenced their migration trajectories. The article contributes to the growing literature on the Zimbabwean diaspora while paying attention to the ‘invisible’ immigrant professionals. Research findings reveal how the Zimbabwean social workers have relied on more distant ties, linking social capital, to migrate instead of the commonly used bonding social capital. The agency of the social workers also shows in the way they abandon social capital that has become less beneficial in pursuit of more beneficial forms.
    Keywords
    Zimbabwean social workers Social capital Migrant networks Overseas workers in the UK Immigrant professionals
    Journal of International Migration and Integration Journal of International Migration and Integration Look
    Inside
    Other actions

    Export citation
    Register for Journal Updates
    About This Journal
    Reprints and Permissions
    Add to Papers

    Share
    Share this content on Facebook Share this content on Twitter Share this content on LinkedIn

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This practice-based research study examines a US-based preventive services program tailored to immigrant and refugee families that have been subject to a Child Protective Services report. The model is the result of a collaboration between an immigrant serving community-based agency and a county department of child welfare services in a medium-sized city that has become a hub for refugee resettlement. A clinical data mining approach was used in an intensive examination of 15 families’ case records. This paper identifies family characteristics, service needs, and strength-based practices that emerged, offering recommendations for child welfare agencies and practitioners in other jurisdictions seeking to design strategies to strengthen their services for immigrant and refugee communities.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • The study seeks to determine the extent to which economic integration factors, social integration factors, human capital and area-level factors are associated with immigrants’ satisfaction with their settlement experience in Canada. The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada (Wave 1) and the 2001 Census Profiles are used for multilevel modelling. The study confirmed that factors from all broad groupings are associated with immigrants’ satisfaction with their settlement. Skilled class and highly educated migrants report lower levels of satisfaction, highlighting the contradiction in the Canadian immigration system which targets these migrants at the selection stage but lacks mechanisms that could help unlock their potential at the settlement stage. The study also demonstrates that migrants who have an ethnically diverse circle of friends are more satisfied with their settlement. At the contextual level, immigrant concentration was negatively associated with satisfaction. These findings speak in favour of settlement policies encouraging integration of newcomers into the receiving society.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • While in contemporary usage the term ‘diaspora’ is often construed to denote any deterritorialised or transnational population, it most meaningfully refers to dispersal and resettlement of a population elsewhere. Jews are a prime example of such a diaspora. While in the Australian context, Jewish immigrants have many of the middle class and disproportionately professional occupational backgrounds of transnationals, most Australian Jewish immigrants seek permanent resettlement. The surge of Jewish migrants in the past half century has produced a people less assimilated than integrated, part of Australia’s economic, political and social life while conscious of themselves as a community bound together by a common religious tradition, with Zionism — support for Israel — an important element of their lived experience and of the diasporic tradition.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Accessibility to maternal health care by marginalised groups, such as poor migrant women, has remained an issue of concern in Ghana. While a number of studies have been conducted on the livelihoods of migrant female head porters (Kayayei) in cities in Southern Ghana, there is little understanding of their accessibility and utilisation of maternal health services. This paper examines the challenges that the migrant female head porters encounter in the process of seeking maternal health care in Accra. The data were collected through a questionnaire survey on a sample of 70 female head porters and in-depth interviews with key informants and some of the Kayayei. The findings indicate that the factors affecting accessibility to maternal health services by the Kayayei are unavailability of health facilities in the slums where Kayayei live, low-income levels, high cost of maternal health care, long queues and waiting times at modern health facilities, and the perception that traditional medicines are adequate for protecting pregnant women and their babies. It was therefore suggested that government should increase the number of health facilities and strengthen the National Health Insurance Scheme to enhance access to health care by this vulnerable and poor group of people as well as increase health educational campaigns.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This study investigates how discourses of multiculturalism shape public debates surrounding new migration in Singapore. Singapore’s immigration policies led to the influx of Chinese and Indian professionals, many of whom share race and class identities with local Singaporeans. However, Singaporeans of Chinese and Indian backgrounds rejected these presumed similarities, using discourses of multiculturalism to differentiate themselves from co-ethnic migrants. Based on a content analysis of news reports and online forums, this study shows how local actors portrayed new migrants as too prejudiced or bigoted to adapt to Singapore’s multiracial society, thereby creating a paradoxical application of multicultural ideals. This example highlights how contemporary immigration is creating diverse forms of inclusion and exclusion within migrant-receiving nations, challenging models, and policies of multiculturalism based solely on ethnicity and race. This paper also demonstrates how individuals can utilize the discourse of multiculturalism in forwarding their own interests and concerns. Scholarly debates have often portrayed multiculturalism as an ideology or policy imposed by state institutions, where local actors are left to either resist or accommodate such ideas. In the Singapore context, individual Singaporeans transform discourses of multiculturalism, creating a counter-discourse that challenges state immigration policies.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This article considers the dual role of immigrants’ social networks in occupational attainment in the Finnish labour market. Drawing on the empirical observations gained from investigating the entire occupational careers of 40 immigrants, it argues that while ethnically dominated networks act as a crucial resource-opportunity structure to help get immigrants a foothold in the local economy and society, at the same time, they can also operate as constraining factors by confining them to low-prestige occupations in which the chances for occupational mobility are rather restricted. Overall, the article aims to suggest that although deficiency in locally gained human capital creates obstacles to better labour-market integration, the kinds of social networks in which immigrants are embedded can also significantly contribute to their low occupational attainment in their new country.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Does regulation impede or facilitate immigrant participation in the labor market? To answer this question, we focus on the growing and increasingly regulated Canadian health-care sector. On the one hand, occupational regulation may facilitate immigrant entry into the labor market as it imposes standards based on credentials, and recent immigrants tend to be highly skilled. On the other hand, regulatory standards are often enforced by provincially designated authorities whose selection criterion may unwittingly penalize those with foreign credentials or experience. Using a longitudinal data set combining information on the regulation of nine Canadian health-care occupations and the Canadian Census from 1991 to 2006, we test whether the introduction of regulation places a greater burden on the immigrant population relative to the native-born. Specifically, we employ a difference in methodology, exploiting variation across provinces and over time in whether an occupation is regulated to identify its effect on the ratio of immigrants-to-native-born workers employed in that occupation. The results indicate that, on average, a province’s introduction of occupational regulation increases the participation of immigrants relative to the native-born by 20 %.

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.