Daily Archives: Sunday, October 25, 2015

“The vote was clear. The [Swiss] people are worried about mass migration to Europe.”

Greece: Attacks on Boats Risk Migrant Lives (Human Rights Watch)

clandestina

Source: https://www.hrw.org/news/2015/10/22/greece-attacks-boats-risk-migrant-lives

(Athens) – Armed masked men have been disabling boats carrying migrants and asylum seekers in the Aegean Sea and pushing them back to Turkish waters, Human Rights Watch said today.

Human Rights Watch spoke to nine witnesses who described eight incidents in which masked assailants – often armed – intercepted and disabled the boats carrying asylum seekers and migrants from Turkey toward the Greek islands, most recently on October 7 and 9, 2015. The witnesses said that the assailants deliberately disabled their boats by damaging or removing the engines or their fuel, or puncturing the hulls of inflatable boats. In some cases, the boats were towed to Turkish waters.

View original post 4,026 more words

Gallery

Protests against “hot-spots”, detention centers and border fences

This gallery contains 3 photos.

Originally posted on clandestina:
Thessaloniki: Thursday October 29 Evros fence: Saturday October 31

Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 10/25/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily News and Updates from ReliefWeb 10/25/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Journal Research Articles for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (weekly) (weekly)

  • This paper analyses the impact of European mobility in the field of the political nomination of intra-EU migrants in local elections. The study contributes to the debates in the literature related to immigrant nomination and representation by showing how group resources and political opportunities in the country of residence interact with the political opportunities of the European citizenship regime. It argues that the symbolic and legal status of European identity, representation in the European Parliament and strong links between political institutions in the countries of destination and origin play a positive role in boosting immigrant political entrepreneurs’ visibility vis-à-vis host country political actors. In order to illustrate these findings, the paper provides a qualitative comparison of British and Romanian residents in Spain.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Building on insights from recent research on ‘return mobilities’ among the second generation, this paper addresses the trans-national practices of young British- and American-born people of Egyptian ancestry and, in particular, their experiences in Egypt during a time of great social and political upheaval. In observing the ways in which many of these individuals effectively operate in their parent’s homelands by drawing on Western credentials or established social networks, we also note how intersections of gender, religion, class and nationality sometimes constrain these activities. In the process, attention is drawn to the hierarchies of belonging that structure trans-national fields and the degree to which struggles for recognition and status are shaped by the demands of host populations, notably during periods when social identities come under sustained scrutiny.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This article addresses how the processes of national parliaments feature in the ECtHR’s practice of affording states a margin of appreciation. The analysis is centred on a collection of recent case law, including prominent cases such as Animal Defenders International v United Kingdom and S.A.S. v France, which have been associated with a deepening of the Court’s concept of subsidiarity. Questions addressed include the following. How does the Court’s attention to the quality of parliamentary process relate to a theory of deepened subsidiarity? Which cases support the thesis of deepened subsidiarity in the context of parliamentary process? What is the scope of the Court’s concept of parliamentary process? What criteria have the Court used for assessing the quality of parliamentary process? And to what level of scrutiny have parliamentary processes been examined? A key argument is that although there is considerable ambiguity in how the Court depicts its engagement with the quality of parliamentary processes, the extent to which certain considerations and approaches are repeated across the case law makes it possible for a start to be made at outlining the subsidiarity-based framework that structures the Court’s assessment of national parliamentary processes.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • Focusing on the embodiment of violence against pregnant women, this paper borrows from Palestinian women’s own words and descriptions to reveal intimate aspects of aggression against and surveillance over their bodies and lives. The paper examines both the effects of violence on young mothers and their community and the denial of violence by the settler colonial state. I emphasize the structural regime that exacerbates such aggression, as well as women’s agency in subverting the system of oppression. The paper concludes by stressing that surveillance embedded in Israeli biopolitical measures and geopolitical constraints inscribe severe violence over birthing Palestinian women. Such violence invades the public and intimate spaces of women’s homes, bodies and minds, leaving them trapped in a vicious maze.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • This paper presents research that analysed data regarding offenders convicted for trafficking offences in the United Kingdom. The paper identifies three themes relating to women’s involvement in trafficking activity. First, women perform lower level roles in trafficking that render them more susceptible to detection. Second, previous experiences of victimization have often provided pathways into offending for these women. Third, convicted female traffickers are frequently involved in intimate relationships with male traffickers. A more responsive approach to female traffickers, it is argued, would acknowledge the role of previous victimization, show greater understanding of the power dynamics between co-defendants and would need to be supported by policy conversant of the intersections between economic and sexual exploitation, gender inequality and global inequalities.

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “For social workers striving for cultural competency and strength-based approaches with refugees resettled in the West, attention to the role of religion and faith as potential resources is particularly vital. With rising numbers of refugees fleeing from Islamic societies to Western host countries over the past two decades, social work research has articulated Islam as a source of strength and group solidarity, as well as the trigger for anti-Islam bias and discrimination. However, Muslims are not a monolithic group. This article reports on a qualitative study with fourteen Muslims seeking US asylum due to persecution based upon their gender role non-conforming behaviours. Findings suggest that, for persons in this category, relationships to religion and faith may be complex, and potentially traumatic. Creating opportunities for gender role non-conforming refugees from Islamic societies to discuss religion and spirituality, with appropriate psychological support and without judgements from co-ethnic others or service providers, is an important clinical intervention for social workers to consider. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The idea of social relations shaping business and production relations between economic agents is not new. Production relations may become socially embedded and may exhibit homophily. We work towards understanding an embeddedness–homophily connection with the support of a case study of the decline of a formerly dominant handloom weavers’ community in Kerala, the Saliyars. We demonstrate that there is a spectrum of cohesion along which network links can be categorised, and that it is homophilous-embeddedness that truly defines cohesion. We build the evidence that the Saliyars’ networks were characterised by ‘homophilous-embeddedness’, which, we show, has been relayed across generations. Due to this attribute, the Saliyars are placed as an example that counters the standard line in the literature that community cohesion has been historically congruent to technological progress and knowledge diffusion in handloom in India. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

%d bloggers like this: