CMRB Event: MORE TICKETS – Gender, Fundamentalism and the ‘Prevent Agenda’

The Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB) at UEL are pleased to confirm that more tickets have just been made available for:

GENDER, FUNDAMENTALISM AND THE ‘PREVENT AGENDA’

Organised by University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) and SOAS’ Centre for Gender Studies.

This seminar will take place on Saturday 17th October 2015, 2–5pm, in B102, Brunei Gallery,  SOAS, London, WC1H 0XG
www.soas.ac.uk/gallery/visit/

Speakers:

Tehmina Kazi, British Muslims for Secular Democracy
Irene Zempi, Nottingham Trent University
Aisha Phoenix, Goldsmiths
Rahila Gupta, Southall Black Sisters

The event is free but space is limited so please register at genderfundamentalismprevent.eventbrite.co.uk

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) and SOAS’ Centre for Gender Studies are pleased to announce the following seminar:

GENDER, FUNDAMENTALISM ANDTHE ‘PREVENT AGENDA’

This seminar will take place in B102, Brunei Gallery,

SOAS, London, WC1H 0XG

www.soas.ac.uk/gallery/visit/

Saturday 17th October 2015, 2–5pm

Speakers:

Tehmina Kazi, British Muslims for Secular Democracy

Irene Zempi, Nottingham Trent University

Aisha Phoenix, Goldsmiths

Rahila Gupta, Southall Black Sisters

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at genderfundamentalismprevent.eventbrite.co.uk

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb and facebook.com/CMRBuel

For more info on Centre for Gender Studies: http://www.soas.ac.uk/genderstudies/

Speakers Biographies

Tehmina Kazi, British Muslims for Secular Democracy

Tehmina is the Director of British Muslims for Secular Democracy (www.bmsd.org.uk), a group of Muslim democrats working to raise awareness about democracy, particularly secular democracy, within British Muslim communities and the wider public. Tehmina is executive producer of the documentary film Hidden Heart (hiddenheartfilm.com) and was also a freelance consultant for English PEN’s Faith and Free Speech in Schools project. Tehmina is a trustee of Hope Not Hate (www.hopenothate.org.uk), an advisory board member of the Measuring Anti-Muslim Attacks (tellmamauk.org) project, an Inclusive Mosque Initiative (inclusivemosqueinitiative.org/about/) committee member, and was a judge for the Accord Coalition’s (accordcoalition.org.uk) Inclusive Schools Award, 2014. Tehmina was named one of the BBC’s 100 Women (www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-29758792) in October 2013 and 2014, and held the Eric Lane Fellowship at Clare College, Cambridge from January to March 2014. She is a Centenary Young Fellow of the RSA.

 

Irene Zempi, Nottingham Trent University

Irene is currently working as a Lecturer in Criminology at Nottingham Trent University. Prior to this position Irene was a Teaching Fellow in Criminology at the University of Leicester. She has a PhD in Criminology and an MSc in Criminology from the University of Leicester, and a BSc in Sociology from Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences in Athens, Greece. As a practitioner, Irene has extensive experience working with victims of volume crime, domestic violence, hate crime and anti-social behaviour at Victim Support. For her doctoral research, Irene examined the topic of Islamophobia and the targeted victimisation of Muslim women who wear the niqab (face veil). The study included individual and focus group interviews with niqab-wearing women at mosques, Muslim schools and Islamic centres, as well as an ethnographic approach whereby Irene wore the full veil in public in Leicester. This study was the first ever one to examine the experiences of women wearing the niqab as victims of anti-Muslim hate crime in the UK and therefore is an important piece of work in the field of hate crime studies. Irene has published widely on issues of Islamophobia and anti-Muslim hate crime. Her most recent project involves the first ever study to examine both online and offline experiences of anti-Muslim hate crime of ‘visible’ Muslim men and women in the UK, with Dr Imran Awan from Birmingham City University. This study was commissioned and funded by the Measuring Anti-Muslim Attacks (Tell MAMA) Project.

 

Aisha Phoenix, Goldsmiths

Aisha Phoenix is completing an ESRC-funded PhD in Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London on how Palestinian university students narrate their lives under occupation. Her research is based on interviews she conducted with Muslim young men and women in the West Bank. She has also conducted research on Somali young women sixth form students in the UK and hierarchies of belonging. Her research interests also include colourism; prejudice on the basis of skin shade. She has a Masters in Social Research from Goldsmiths and one in Social Anthropology of Development from SOAS. Aisha has worked as a journalist and writes freelance articles. She has a Postgraduate Diploma in Newspaper Journalism from City University and a BA in Arabic and Modern Middle Eastern Studies from Oxford University. Her publications include: ‘Colourism and the Politics of Beauty’ (2014), Feminist Review, 108, 97-105; ‘Racialisation, relationality and riots: intersections and interpellations’ (2012), Feminist Review, 100, 52-72 (with Ann Phoenix) and ‘Somali Young Women and Hierarchies of Belonging’ (2011), YOUNG: Nordic Journal of Youth Research. Vol. 19, 3: 313-331.

 

Rahila Gupta, Southall Black Sisters

Rahila Gupta is a freelance journalist, writer and activist. In 1989, she joined the management committee of Southall Black Sisters, an advocacy and campaigning women’s group set up in 1979 for women escaping domestic violence and, in 2004, she founded the Nihal Armstrong Trust which funds families of children with cerebral palsy to buy cutting-edge equipment and services. With Kiranjit Ahluwalia she wrote Provoked, the story of a battered woman who killed her violent husband and co-wrote the screenplay based on the book and released as a film in 2007. Her last book, Enslaved, on immigration controls, published in 2007, was said to be ‘one of the most vital books of the new century’. Her verse play Don’t Wake Me: The Ballad of Nihal Armstrong was nominated for three awards and was selected by the British Council as part of their showcase in Edinburgh 2013 and went on tour to USA and India in 2014. Her articles are published in the Guardian, New Humanist, New Internationalist and openDemocracy among other magazines, journals and websites. She is currently working on a radio play inspired by Jimmy Mubenga. Additionally, she and Bea Campbell are hoping to collaborate on a book, Why Doesn’t Patriarchy Die? which will investigate how patriarchy fits with diverse political systems.


More details can be found on the attached flyer. Please circulate widely.

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