Daily Archives: Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Canada’s refugees: Where they come from by the numbers

CMRB Event: MORE TICKETS – Gender, Fundamentalism and the ‘Prevent Agenda’

The Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB) at UEL are pleased to confirm that more tickets have just been made available for:

GENDER, FUNDAMENTALISM AND THE ‘PREVENT AGENDA’

Organised by University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) and SOAS’ Centre for Gender Studies.

This seminar will take place on Saturday 17th October 2015, 2–5pm, in B102, Brunei Gallery,  SOAS, London, WC1H 0XG
www.soas.ac.uk/gallery/visit/

Speakers:

Tehmina Kazi, British Muslims for Secular Democracy
Irene Zempi, Nottingham Trent University
Aisha Phoenix, Goldsmiths
Rahila Gupta, Southall Black Sisters

The event is free but space is limited so please register at genderfundamentalismprevent.eventbrite.co.uk

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) and SOAS’ Centre for Gender Studies are pleased to announce the following seminar:

GENDER, FUNDAMENTALISM ANDTHE ‘PREVENT AGENDA’

This seminar will take place in B102, Brunei Gallery,

SOAS, London, WC1H 0XG

www.soas.ac.uk/gallery/visit/

Saturday 17th October 2015, 2–5pm

Speakers:

Tehmina Kazi, British Muslims for Secular Democracy

Irene Zempi, Nottingham Trent University

Aisha Phoenix, Goldsmiths

Rahila Gupta, Southall Black Sisters

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at genderfundamentalismprevent.eventbrite.co.uk

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb and facebook.com/CMRBuel

For more info on Centre for Gender Studies: http://www.soas.ac.uk/genderstudies/

Speakers Biographies

Tehmina Kazi, British Muslims for Secular Democracy

Tehmina is the Director of British Muslims for Secular Democracy (www.bmsd.org.uk), a group of Muslim democrats working to raise awareness about democracy, particularly secular democracy, within British Muslim communities and the wider public. Tehmina is executive producer of the documentary film Hidden Heart (hiddenheartfilm.com) and was also a freelance consultant for English PEN’s Faith and Free Speech in Schools project. Tehmina is a trustee of Hope Not Hate (www.hopenothate.org.uk), an advisory board member of the Measuring Anti-Muslim Attacks (tellmamauk.org) project, an Inclusive Mosque Initiative (inclusivemosqueinitiative.org/about/) committee member, and was a judge for the Accord Coalition’s (accordcoalition.org.uk) Inclusive Schools Award, 2014. Tehmina was named one of the BBC’s 100 Women (www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-29758792) in October 2013 and 2014, and held the Eric Lane Fellowship at Clare College, Cambridge from January to March 2014. She is a Centenary Young Fellow of the RSA.

 

Irene Zempi, Nottingham Trent University

Irene is currently working as a Lecturer in Criminology at Nottingham Trent University. Prior to this position Irene was a Teaching Fellow in Criminology at the University of Leicester. She has a PhD in Criminology and an MSc in Criminology from the University of Leicester, and a BSc in Sociology from Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences in Athens, Greece. As a practitioner, Irene has extensive experience working with victims of volume crime, domestic violence, hate crime and anti-social behaviour at Victim Support. For her doctoral research, Irene examined the topic of Islamophobia and the targeted victimisation of Muslim women who wear the niqab (face veil). The study included individual and focus group interviews with niqab-wearing women at mosques, Muslim schools and Islamic centres, as well as an ethnographic approach whereby Irene wore the full veil in public in Leicester. This study was the first ever one to examine the experiences of women wearing the niqab as victims of anti-Muslim hate crime in the UK and therefore is an important piece of work in the field of hate crime studies. Irene has published widely on issues of Islamophobia and anti-Muslim hate crime. Her most recent project involves the first ever study to examine both online and offline experiences of anti-Muslim hate crime of ‘visible’ Muslim men and women in the UK, with Dr Imran Awan from Birmingham City University. This study was commissioned and funded by the Measuring Anti-Muslim Attacks (Tell MAMA) Project.

 

Aisha Phoenix, Goldsmiths

Aisha Phoenix is completing an ESRC-funded PhD in Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London on how Palestinian university students narrate their lives under occupation. Her research is based on interviews she conducted with Muslim young men and women in the West Bank. She has also conducted research on Somali young women sixth form students in the UK and hierarchies of belonging. Her research interests also include colourism; prejudice on the basis of skin shade. She has a Masters in Social Research from Goldsmiths and one in Social Anthropology of Development from SOAS. Aisha has worked as a journalist and writes freelance articles. She has a Postgraduate Diploma in Newspaper Journalism from City University and a BA in Arabic and Modern Middle Eastern Studies from Oxford University. Her publications include: ‘Colourism and the Politics of Beauty’ (2014), Feminist Review, 108, 97-105; ‘Racialisation, relationality and riots: intersections and interpellations’ (2012), Feminist Review, 100, 52-72 (with Ann Phoenix) and ‘Somali Young Women and Hierarchies of Belonging’ (2011), YOUNG: Nordic Journal of Youth Research. Vol. 19, 3: 313-331.

 

Rahila Gupta, Southall Black Sisters

Rahila Gupta is a freelance journalist, writer and activist. In 1989, she joined the management committee of Southall Black Sisters, an advocacy and campaigning women’s group set up in 1979 for women escaping domestic violence and, in 2004, she founded the Nihal Armstrong Trust which funds families of children with cerebral palsy to buy cutting-edge equipment and services. With Kiranjit Ahluwalia she wrote Provoked, the story of a battered woman who killed her violent husband and co-wrote the screenplay based on the book and released as a film in 2007. Her last book, Enslaved, on immigration controls, published in 2007, was said to be ‘one of the most vital books of the new century’. Her verse play Don’t Wake Me: The Ballad of Nihal Armstrong was nominated for three awards and was selected by the British Council as part of their showcase in Edinburgh 2013 and went on tour to USA and India in 2014. Her articles are published in the Guardian, New Humanist, New Internationalist and openDemocracy among other magazines, journals and websites. She is currently working on a radio play inspired by Jimmy Mubenga. Additionally, she and Bea Campbell are hoping to collaborate on a book, Why Doesn’t Patriarchy Die? which will investigate how patriarchy fits with diverse political systems.


More details can be found on the attached flyer. Please circulate widely.

CMRB Event: Black Lives Matter: the implications for the UK context

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) is pleased to announce the following seminar:

Black Lives Matter: the implications for the UK context

This seminar will take place from 4-6pm on Monday 12th October 2015, in EBG. 06, East Building, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD

Speakers:

Cherrell Brown, community organiser and US activist BlackLivesMatter

Adam Elliott-Cooper, Department of Geography, University of Oxford
‘How #BlackLivesMatter changed resistance’

Stephanie Lightfoot-Bennett, United Family and Friends campaign

The event is free but space is limited so please register at http://blacklivesmatteruk.eventbrite.co.uk
Please circulate widely.

International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy: Special Issue on Islamophobia and Crime

Please find details of the the new edited volume of the International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy which is a special issue on the subject of “Islamophobia and Crime.” The journal is available today and it is free to access at: https://www.crimejusticejournal.com/

A table of contents for the journal is reproduced below:

Vol 4, No 3 (2015): International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy

Table of Contents

Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 10/06/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily News and Updates from ReliefWeb 10/06/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Journal Research Articles for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 10/06/2015

  • This book substantiates the maxim that fact is often stranger than fiction. It builds on scholarly literature that has emphasized the many injustices and misrepresentations associated with migration in multiple settings, in particular literature that critiques the attachment of the notion of ‘illegality’ not only to the process of migration, but also to the migrants themselves. Its contribution lies in its relentless investigation into the workings of what the author refers to as the ‘illegal migration industry’ or ‘illegality industry’ in the emerging Euro-African borderlands (p. 3), which surrounds the migrant. It explores this facet of migration by analysing how migrants themselves see this industry: what it is, and who has benefited from its actions. Although the findings might not come as a great surprise to most within the academic community, its rich empirical data and the thoroughness with which the author tackles the ‘illegality industry’ provide for a strong contribution to a wider body of literature that is concerned with narratives that lie behind popular images of the migrant.

    tags: newjournalarticles

  • Recently, the Somali diaspora has found itself at the centre of heightened security concerns surrounding the proliferation of international terrorist networks and their recruitment strategies. These concerns have reached new levels since the absorption of al-Shabaab into al-Qaeda in 2012. Based on a qualitative analysis of interviews with 118 members of Canada’s largest Somali community, this article draws upon narrative criminology to reverse the ‘why they joined’ question that serves as the predicate for much recent radicalization scholarship, and instead explores, ‘why they would never join’. We encounter Somali-Canadians equipping themselves with sophisticated counternarratives that vitiate the enticements of al-Shabaab. Particularly, notions of ‘coolness’, ‘trickery’ and ‘religious perversion’ mediate participants’ perceptions of al-Shabaab and enable a self-empowering rejection of its recruitment narratives. In particular, we find resonances between the narratives of non-recruits and ‘bogeyman’ narratives that exist commonly in many cultures. The efficacy of these narratives for resilience is three-fold, positioning the recruiters as odious agents, recruits as weak-minded dupes and our participants as knowledgeable storytellers who can forewarn others against recruitment to al-Shabaab.

    tags: newjournalarticles

  • Most people are unable to accurately estimate the number of immigrants in their country. Nonetheless, it has been argued that the size of the immigrant population would affect people’s immigration attitudes. Part of the effect of immigration on attitudes occurs not so much because of real immigration figures, but rather because of media reporting about immigration. In this study, negative attitudes towards immigration are explained by investigating the impact of the salience and the tone of immigration topics in the news media vis-à-vis the impact of immigration statistics. The cases of Denmark and the Netherlands are analysed for a period from 2003 to 2010, using a multilevel design. Overall, real-world immigration numbers have little impact. The tone of news coverage has an effect in the Netherlands: a positive tone reduces negativity towards immigration, while a negative tone does not increase negativity. We cautiously conclude that the longevity of the issue’s salience has a moderating effect.

    tags: newjournalarticles

  • As United Nations (UN) peacekeeping evolved from interposition forces to multidimensional missions, the UN adjusted its peacekeeping principles and allowed a wider use of force. As the latest, the Security Council adopted a new mandate for UN Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo creating the ‘Force Intervention Brigade’, described as the first contingent of troops to conduct targeted offensive operations against armed groups. However, this role of the UN as an enforcement actor within a non-international armed conflict was not prepared by an assessment of the rules applicable to UN missions. These rules provide the Force Intervention Brigade with an ambiguous double status being at the same time a specially protected peacekeeping force and a party directly engaged in hostilities. As a consequence, peacekeeping missions as a whole are put at a higher risk of failing to perform their assigned mediation between the conflict parties and of themselves becoming the target of attacks. As a preliminary policy advice, I propose a clear distinction between peacekeeping and peace enforcement troops with a view to protect the peacekeeper’s perceived legitimacy and to reconcile the status of peace enforcement troops with the law applicable to the conflicts they, in fact, became a party to.

    tags: newjournalarticles

  • This article discusses the largely under-researched anti-poverty work of Migrant and Refugee Community Organizations (MRCOs) in Glasgow. The role of MRCOs as a source of social capital and critical coping and survival mechanism in exile has received notable attention since the introduction of dispersal policy in 1999. The practices outlined in this article contribute to this growing body of research by presenting examples of collective action developed from within migrant community organizations. The discussion is contextualized by broader ideological and political debates on entitlement and deservedness as they relate to migrants generally and asylum seekers specifically. Whilst offering tangible acts of financial support, MRCO strategies are also driven by social, cultural and political objectives which challenge structural constraints on self-determination. Varied in terms of risk and formality, their collective action is woven through with discourses of solidarity, belonging, resistance and empowerment. The informal nature of much of this work means that it is often missing from the broader picture of anti-poverty action and scholarship. The article concludes with a number of recommendations that suggest ways forward for bringing this action to the attention of academic researchers, practitioners and policy makers with an aim for developing better community-focused research.

    tags: newjournalarticles

  • In independent India, national development has been largely equated with economic growth and surplus. Most tribal people in India lead a hard, materially poor life. Multiple natural sources along with strong community ties make their life possible, even under difficult circumstances. Adivasis are by far the most vulnerable and marginalized socio-economic group in India; gaps in poverty, literacy and mortality between tribal and non-tribal groups are widening, despite the economic changes sweeping India. These challenges have been compounded in recent years by the arrival of global mining giants, for whom governments have used the colonial Land Acquisition Act of 1894 to forcibly displace millions from their ancestral lands. India today has over 4000 dams; more than 3000 of them built after independence in 1947. At least 500 more dams are under construction. Adivasis constitute 8.08 percent of India’s population as per 1991 census figures. According to an Indian government working group, fifty percent of those displaced by development projects are adivasis. It clearly shows that the adivasis have faced a disproportionate share of displacement. The women folk of their community suffer the most. The resource rich areas are consequently most likely to be dammed or mined. Many tribal belts have now been identified as ‘development sites’ ideally suited for building large multi-purpose river valley projects such as mines, thermal power stations or paper factories. The article will critically analyse the impacts of the destructive development on adivasi peoples of India today.

    tags: newjournalarticles

  • A quick review of feminist scholarship in the field of legal studies shows that a tension between equality and complementarity underlies many debates on the issue of women’s rights. In this article we use the work of a Guatemalan indigenous women’s organization, Kaqla, to revisit this alleged dichotomy. By adopting an actor-centred perspective, we propose a more integrated understanding of several key debates in the field of human rights. In addition, we explore how likely it is that local efforts to reconceptualize women’s rights are upstreamed to transnational normsetters, and what barriers or facilitating factors exist in this regard. The article has both a descriptive and an explanatory component. The former is based on anthropological fieldwork and describes how Kaqla mainstreams a rights discourse in its workshops on personal healing, how women come to understand the notion of women’s rights on the basis of it, and what efforts Kaqla undertakes to share this new understanding with actors in its network. The explanatory component links these findings to theory by exploring a) why Kaqla’s mainstreaming of a rights discourse is particularly successful, b) how its emphasis on the notion of complementarity and its effort to reconcile this with the notion of equality speak to several classic debates in the field of human rights, and c) why caution is needed when assuming that new content will automatically travel up- and downstream once it is developed. Despite the fact that new ways to operationalize rights discourses are developed, that new content is arising on the basis of that, and that formal communication mechanisms exist, we found that upstreaming of conceptual information is limited due to the local actors’ perceptions that there is no interest in this on the side of the transnational actor.

    tags: newjournalarticles

  • The current economic crisis is worsening migrants’ living conditions and thus their social and economic integration into EU countries. However, recent literature has not sufficiently considered the strategies that unemployed migrants adopt to cope with this transformation. This article explores the economic and social impact of the recession on migrant workers. In particular, it analyses the coping strategies of unemployed Moroccan and Romanian migrants in Italy, who are the biggest national groups of foreigners. Drawing on 170 in-depth interviews carried out in one of the most dynamic areas of northeast Italy, we find that Moroccan and Romanian migrants adopt different strategies in order to cope with unemployment: the first suffer more from discrimination than the latter in the labour market but can enjoy the economic and social support of extended family and religious community, while for Romanians, it is easier to find a new job, because they can rely on a more diversified social network. Furthermore, migrants of both national groups rarely return to their country of origin, but Moroccans (non-EU nationals) seem to be geographically more mobile than Romanians (EU nationals), who show a resolve to remain in Italy. Finally, unemployed migrants are minimizing their living costs in a very similar way. This paper also studies other differences among interviewees that arise from their gender, age and family model.

    tags: newjournalarticles

  • This research was supported by funding from the European University Institute Max Weber Programme and the Duke University Research Network on Racial and Ethnic Inequality. A very early version of this manuscript was presented at the Research and Analysis in the Sociology of Religion workshop at the University of Notre Dame. I thank participants for their feedback. For their helpful comments and suggestions, I especially thank Japonica Brown-Saracino, Marcus Anthony Hunter, and Lyn Spillman. I also sincerely thank my respondents for their generosity and participation. All errors are my own.

    tags: newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.