Daily Archives: Saturday, October 3, 2015

Call for papers : The Social Reproductive Worlds of Migrants Joint RC06 Family Research (Host) and RC31 Sociology of Migration session

Call for papers : The Social Reproductive Worlds of Migrants
Joint RC06 Family Research (Host) and RC31 Sociology of Migration session

Session organizers :
Majella Kilkey (UoS), Laura Merla (UCL & UWA) & Loretta Baldassar (UWA)

While research highlights the role inward migration plays in meeting the social reproductive needs of migrant-receiving societies, less attention is paid to the social reproductive aspects of migrants’ lives. In the context of the increasing volume in international migration and its feminisation, and the increasingly instrumentalist and economistic approach to migration-entry regimes, it is critical that migration and family policies begin to acknowledge that a production system cannot operate without a reproduction system (Truong, 1996).

This joint (RC06 and RC31) paper presentation session, invites papers that contribute to developing a research agenda on the social reproductive worlds of migrants. Social reproduction incorporates family building through relationship formation and procreation, and the ongoing care required in the maintenance of people on a daily basis across the life-course. Thus, we seek contributions that examine how during processes of migration, families are formed, procreate and care.

Possible areas include:
1) spatial and temporal configurations of how migrants organise their social reproductive worlds, and how these relate to the patterning of opportunities and constraints rendered by public policies in both countries of origin and of destination;
2) the role of managed migration strategies in the development of patterns of ‘stratified social reproduction’ (Kraler, 2010) among migrants;
3) how, to what extent and under which conditions transnational family dynamics and solidarities provide kin members with a safety net and greater opportunities to access and claim rights to social protection;
4) the gendered nature of migrants’ social reproductive worlds, including male as well as female migrants.

Submission deadline : 30 September 2015. Abstracts of max 300 words should be submitted online through this link :http://www.isa-sociology.org/forum-2016/

Selected papers will be considered for publication in a Special issue of Social Sciences (http://www.mdpi.com/journal/socsci)

Call for Papers: ECPR/SGEU ‘Understanding EU responses towards crises and conflicts’

ECPR/SGEU Conference in Trento, 16-18 June 2016 – Call for Papers

please find attached a call for papers for the next Pan-European Conference on the European Union (ECPR/SGEU) taking place in Trento, Italy in 2016 (http://ecpr.eu/Events/EventDetails.aspx?EventID=105) on ‘Understanding EU responses towards crises and conflicts’.  The panel aims to investigate how the EU responds to crisis events and conflict situations and to explore which factors shape these responses.

We are looking forward to receiving abstracts by 10th of October 2015.  Please send your proposals l.hadj-abdou@sheffield.ac.uk and benedetta.voltolini@sciencespo.fr Thanks also for distributing widely

ECPR/SGEU Conference in Trento, 16-18 June 2016 – Call for Papers

Title: Understanding EU responses towards crises and conflicts

The EU’s neighborhood is fraught with crises and conflicts, which range from the violent civil wars in Syria, Libya, and Ukraine, the rise of the Islamic State and the more entrenched situations of Israel-Palestine, Morocco-Western Sahara, Nagorno-Karabakh just to mention a few. Migration flows, including the recent refugee crisis, are also issues that the EU has to face on the international stage. And if we move beyond the neighborhood, conflicts in Africa, the instability in Afghanistan and Iraq and environmental disasters around the world force the EU to act.

While a lot has been said about the divergent interests of EU member states, the lack of instruments or of political willingness as well as solidarity, less is known about the ways in which the EU constructs its understanding of crises and conflicts, which actors participate in these processes of framing and knowledge construction and how these factors shape EU actions. Instead of moving backwards from outcomes towards assuming the motives and logics driving EU responses, it is thus important to investigate the processes that shape these responses.

Against this backdrop, the panel aims to investigate how the EU responds to crisis events and conflict situations and what factors shape these (policy) responses. In particular, some of the possible questions that can be addressed by contributors are:

  • How does the EU make sense of and frames crises and conflicts?
  • What actors contribute to the processes of framing and knowledge construction?
  • What different types of knowledge emerge through these processes?
  • Under what conditions does policy learning take place?
  • Under what conditions does knowledge travel across cases?
  • When do crises lead to policy change and when does continuity persist? And what factors explain this (lack of) change?

The panel(s) is strongly committed to theoretical, epistemological and methodological pluralism. Paper abstracts of maximum 300 words should be submitted to Leila Hadj Abdou  (l.hadj-abdou@sheffield.ac.uk) and Benedetta Voltolini (benedetta.voltolini@sciencespo.fr) by the 10th October 2015. Please feel free to contact us if you require any further information.

Daily News and Updates on Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 10/03/2015

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Daily News and Updates from ReliefWeb 10/03/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Journal Research Articles for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies 10/03/2015

  • “Governments and Media often don’t get along very well, particularly when the press challenges core political positions. This is certainly the case in Rwanda, where information and communication management is an important political weapon used by the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) to protect its hold on power. The RPF has developed a coherent and comprehensive narrative on the past, present, and future of the country and its citizens, and tightly policing this ‘truth’ is an essential ingredient of its political strategy. Domestically, this control is achieved through legislation on ‘divisionism’ and ‘genocide ideology’, as well as through repression that relegates alternative views to the ‘hidden transcript’.1 Independent media and critical civil society organizations have been eliminated. Internationally, the narrative is protected by the genocide credit the regime exploits and by systematically and at times aggressively countering challenges to the ‘truth’, directly through government statements or by using foreign lobbyists.2 It also benefits from Rwanda’s adherence to neo-liberal economic policies and its contribution to international peacekeeping operations. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In 2012 Mali faced a crisis disrupting nearly twenty years of democratization – a coup and rebel insurgency. This article investigates policy priorities amongst rural Malians living on the border of state and rebel-controlled territory during the crisis. While academic and policy-making communities have focused largely on Mali’s recent and sudden regime and territorial breakdown, the villagers defined the crisis in terms of their unmet needs for public services and infrastructure amidst high food and water insecurity. Concern for the sudden ‘juridical state’ breakdown – the collapse of the democratic regime – was trumped by the focus on long-term ‘empirical state’ breakdown. Using recent Afrobarometer data on diverse dimensions of empirical statehood, we show that the problem of rural neglect emphasized by seminal scholars is persistent not only across Mali, but also across many African countries. The tendency of academics and policy makers to focus on the immediate or more volatile political problems of the coup and rebel insurgency facing the Malian state, while important, risks understating and underestimating the power of slow-moving crises of daily life that are more important to rural citizens. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In contrast to similar organizations in its neighbouring countries, Niger’s domestic Salafi associations have remained peaceful and apolitical. Drawing on historical institutionalist scholarship and on recent conceptualizations of the state as a religious actor, this article examines how the Nigerien state has tried to regulate religious practices since Seyni Kountché’s military coup in 1974. It argues that the institutional regulation of religious practices is one important variable that accounts for Niger’s deviant trajectory. During Niger’s autocratic period (1974–91), the government established the Association islamique du Niger (AIN) as the sole legal authority regulating access to Niger’s Friday prayer mosques. Committed to peaceful and apolitical interpretations of the Koran, the AIN confined access to Niger’s religious sphere to local clerics and Sufi brotherhoods. After the breakdown of autocratic rule in 1991, the AIN served as a religious advisory body. Salafi associations could assemble freely but had to abide by certain criteria. Confronted with the prospect of Islamic violence in 2000, the Nigerien state intervened in Niger’s religious sphere in several ways. Among other initiatives, the government began to resurrect a more rigorous system of religious supervision in order to monitor religious practices on an ongoing basis. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Recent trends towards community-based and participatory approaches to peacebuilding and acknowledgment of the greater need to incorporate women’s voices have resulted in experiments devolving responsibilities for building peace to women’s organizations at the grassroots level in post-conflict situations. This article discusses one such experiment that women’s savings and credit cooperatives in Nepal have undertaken to mediate conflict and build peace at the local levels. Using women’s narratives emerging from interviews and focus group discussions, the gendered assumptions behind women’s community-based peacebuilding activities, and implications for women’s sustained participation in peace work, are examined. The findings reveal that this model of peacebuilding relied on educating and training women but neglected to explore the structural inequalities that cause violence. Indeed, the expectation placed on women’s savings and credit co-operative members to perform unremunerated and sustained peace work in their communities may itself reflect inequalities of power that community-based peace models need to address. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Worldwide, societies are experiencing unprecedented shifts in their age compositions. For the first time in human history, the number of older people will surpass the number of children that are under the age of fourteen representing one of the ‘biggest social transformations’ societies will experience. The great shift in demographics demand that sustainable development efforts are age-inclusive and support the well-being of people throughout their life course – including the later life years. The purpose of this article is 2-fold. First, we delineate the linkages between the proposed sustainable development goals (SDGs) and development issues related to older persons and an ageing population, arguing that the success of the SDGs also rests on the ability to address such issues. Second, we explore community development’s role in the implementation of the SDGs and addressing age-related development issues, proposing that community development’s unique perspectives, values and approaches contribute to innovative development pathways conducive to age-inclusive sustainable development. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In September 2015, the sustainable development goals (SDGs) replaced the millennium development goals. The ambitions of the SDGs are to transform the current aid architecture and promote environmental, economic and social well-being on a global scale. The process of how this new global framework for sustainable development has been designed is unique in terms of the extent of opportunities for people’s participation. This article considers what lessons the debate on community development can offer the new global development framework. First, we analyse existing attempts to include ‘voices’ from the local level in the process of formulating the SDGs, drawing on existing literature on critical community development and citizen participation. We find that the inclusion of citizen perspectives in the SDG process was largely tokenistic. Building on this critique, we go on to explore the propositions within the critical community development literature about an approach to implementing the SDGs that could be truly transformative. Finally, we consider the insights from the critical community development literature in relation to the findings of a global network of participatory research that aimed to influence the SDG design and implementation. We explore how citizen’s participation in the new global framework could become more significant through deeper and more strategic forms of representation and engagement. In conclusion, we return to examine the prospects and practical requirements for a more bottom-up and transformative approach to implementing the new global framework. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “At the end of 2013, the Australian Government reintroduced a policy to turn around or tow back vessels carrying irregular migrants, many of them asylum seekers. This policy is designed to prevent their arrival in Australia and return them to the place from where the vessels departed. A similar policy was in operation in late 2001 when, in the aftermath of the so-called ‘Tampa Affair’, four vessels were returned to Indonesia. This article examines the context, objectives, and controversies of this policy and explores the known successful and attempted ‘turn-backs’. The article critically evaluates the rationale and operation of the past and present policies and reflects on the question of whether to retain or repeal this approach. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “By way of side-effect, and to an extent that had not been foreseen, the Netherlands is confronted with asylum applications from persons involved in proceedings before the International Criminal Court (ICC), which it hosts in The Hague. These applications have led to an unprecedented body of case law from both the ICC and the Netherlands judiciary regarding the protection of the applicants. Central to this case law is the question of allocation of responsibility for the protection of the persons involved, particularly with respect to the prohibition of refoulement. This article provides an analysis of the relevant cases regarding asylum applications from persons involved in ICC proceedings, namely, detained defence witnesses, voluntary witnesses for the prosecution, and acquitted suspects. It particularly examines and evaluates the jurisdictional delimitations made by the ICC and the Dutch courts, and the fundamental questions of refugee and human rights protection that are addressed in these cases. With regard to domestic case law, the focus will be on the way in which key provisions of international refugee law – such as the application of articles 1A, 1D and 1F of the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees – and the safe third country concept are applied. The article concludes that the basic rights of former ICC witnesses and suspects are not always addressed adequately and appear to be lost in the divide created by the jurisdictional battles between the ICC and its host state. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article investigates how involvement by the International Criminal Court (ICC) in situations of ongoing conflict affects peace processes. It argues that the level of ICC involvement is crucial for the Court’s impact on peace settlements and that this impact takes the form of delegating politico-legal and discursive authority away from peace process actors. To make this argument, the article disaggregates the processes of ICC involvement and peacemaking into component parts and conceptualizes a broad notion of judicialization. This analytical framework is applied to two cases with different negotiation outcomes: the Juba talks between the Ugandan government and the Lord’s Resistance Army and the Kenya National Dialogue and Reconciliation between the Party of National Unity and the Orange Democratic Movement. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.