Daily Archives: Sunday, May 17, 2015

Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 05/17/2015 (p.m.)

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Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 05/17/2015 (a.m.)

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Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/17/2015

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Archives in the News: Updates from the UEL Archives (weekly)

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Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/17/2015

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New Articles on Refugee and Forced Migration Issues (weekly)

  • “For two decades now, the countries of Central and Eastern Europe, as well as Russia, have been transitioning from authoritarian pasts to somewhat more liberal forms of social and political organization. The development of human rights consciousness confronts three core challenges posed by the legacy of twentieth century communism: associational life reduced to niche or clique; lack of trust; and discouragement of individual personhood. Practitioners can meet these challenges through a new approach to civic education. I show how, in four steps: (1) I propose human rights advocacy by means of a ‘cognitive style’, (2) deployed within civic education, (3) in ways that encourage civic participation. (4) I conclude by sketching three forms of a human rights cognitive style to spur civic education and participation: for professional activists; for non-professional community activists; and for educational deployment. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Stigma and discrimination against men who have sex with men (MSM) and transsexual-transgender-transvestite (trans) people in Latin America increase their vulnerability to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Discrimination in hospitals, schools and workplaces drives them away from HIV information, prevention and treatment services that can save their lives. This increased vulnerability is reflected in pockets of HIV prevalence within these populations, higher than the national averages for the general population. This article postulates that prejudice against MSM and trans persons is not only life-threatening for them, but can also increase the HIV vulnerability of heterosexual males. This study explores how negative attitudes towards lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) persons among a population of male heterosexual long-distance truck drivers in South America may affect their knowledge about HIV and AIDS; this, consequently, may affect their HIV vulnerability. Employing an independent analysis of an International Labour Organization (ILO) survey of 353 long-distance truck drivers from Bolivia and Chile, we develop measures of vulnerability to HIV transmission and prejudice against LGBT persons. We find that vulnerability is strongly associated with prejudice. We conclude that a culture of prejudice against LGBT persons in the workplace has a detrimental impact on heterosexual men’s knowledge and attitudes, increasing their HIV vulnerability. One implication is that promoting the human rights of the LGBT community must be mainstreamed into HIV prevention efforts. Another is that work should be done on emphasizing the interconnectedness of human rights. This could make an impact in halting the AIDS epidemic across the board. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is the site of one of the most egregious conflicts in modern times. Fuelled by a violent political economy of mineral and natural resource extraction, the lengthy cycle of violence and intimidation has resulted in the highest death toll in any war since World War II. The shortcomings of internationally sponsored peacebuilding efforts in the region have led to a local turn in the peacebuilding literature where a key role for community groups in local conflict resolution and development is being promoted. Drawing on fieldwork conducted by the author with community groups in Ituri District in north-eastern DRC, this article highlights the failure of international and national initiatives to address the underlying causes of the Iturian conflict and goes on to argue that there are limits to what local communities can achieve in this context. The findings demonstrate that the greatest impact of community groups’ activities is at individual rather than structural levels and three inter-related reasons are given for this. The article concludes by highlighting four issues for community groups interested in challenging the status quo and effecting long-lasting transformative change, moving from conflict containment to conflict transformation. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “International refugee law, in particular the 1951 Convention on the Status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol, has been accorded an exceptionally strong role in the framework for EU asylum policies. By virtue of EU primary law, it was established as a yardstick for secondary EU refugee law and its application by EU member states. As a consequence of this, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) has the power to interpret provisions of international refugee law. In fact, it has become the first international court actually interpreting the 1951 Convention and the 1967 Protocol. Expectations that this institutional setting would boost international refugee law through the strong framework of the EU were rising high after the establishment of the legal framework for EU refugee policies. More than twelve years after the adoption of the first asylum law instruments under EU law, and more than seven years after the first judgments were handed down, it is time for an assessment of how the Court has been dealing with the potential of applying and possibly shaping international refugee law. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Environmental migration is often presented as one of the gravest consequences of environmental disruptions – climate change in particular, and is already a reality in many parts of the world. Yet the protection of these migrants is not adequately addressed in the international normative frameworks on migration. As a result, a growing number of scholars and advocacy groups have sought to create a special convention and/or an ad hoc status for these migrants, while others have contended that such a legal status is not the answer. As a result, the protection of environmental migrants is currently the subject of vigorous debates amongst scholars and policy-makers, and no clear solution is yet in sight.

    Research however has little considered the debates that surrounded the protection of those displaced within their countries (IDPs) in the 1990s. Both phenomena have sometimes overlapped, especially as environmental displacement is often internal. Yet, the debate on IDPs has had some significant success, in particular, the adoption of the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement in 1998, and the signature of the Organization for African Unity’s Kampala Convention in 2009.

    This article argues that important lessons can be drawn from the protection of IDPs in order to inform the current debates on the protection of environmental migrants, as the political contexts and policy challenges associated with both crises of the migration regime are often similar. The article identifies such lessons and assesses the opportunities and caveats of applying a similar approach of soft law to environmental migration – and what would be needed to achieve it. ”

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.