Daily Archives: Sunday, May 10, 2015

UN Security Council Draft Resolution on Use of Force in Libya to Call for “Use of All Means to Destroy the Business Model of the Traffickers”

MIGRANTS AT SEA

The Guardian reports that the UK has prepared a draft UN Security Council resolution on behalf of the EU “that is believed to call for the ‘use of all means to destroy the business model of the traffickers’.” According to the Guardian the resolution would authorise the use of military force in Libyan territorial waters; the military force “would come under Italian command, have the participation of around 10 EU countries, including Britain, France, Spain, and Italy…” EU naval vessels would be authorised to enter into Libyan territorial waters and helicopter gunships would be used “to ‘neutralise’ identified traffickers’ ships.”

The Security Council meets tomorrow, Monday, 11 May, to consider the situation in the Mediterranean and will receive a briefing from HRVP Federica Mogherini. The Libyan government in Tobruk has said it opposes any such resolution.

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Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 05/10/2015 (p.m.)

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Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 05/10/2015 (a.m.)

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Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/10/2015

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Archives in the News: Updates from the UEL Archives (weekly)

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Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/10/2015

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New Articles on Refugee and Forced Migration Issues (weekly)

  • “Motivations for migrants to return clearly change with integration, but the time-changing aspect of return migration has received little attention in the literature. This paper studies how migrants’ preferences for the home country change with intermarriage, i.e., marriage to a spouse from the host country. Specifically, I analyse the association between intermarriage and three outcomes related to migrants’ home country preference – intentions to return, remittances sent and actual return – using German panel data (SOEP) for the period 1984–2012. The results reveal a negative association between intermarriage and home country preference that is moreover stronger for female than for male migrants. However, some of the effect seems driven by selection since the relationship gets weaker once I control for person fixed effects. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Citizenship scholars in Europe often focus on the institutional factors that influence naturalisation, but a less explored topic in the literature is the role of politics and group belonging in naturalisation behaviour—factors that have been proven to influence immigrants’ behaviour in the North American context. Through analysis of the extensive Trajectories and Origins (2008) data-set, I find that interest in politics shapes naturalisation behaviour and outcomes, and living in an anti-immigrant climate, identifying as Muslim and feeling otherised is negatively correlated with naturalisation behaviour. Lastly, Arab immigrants are more likely to seek French naturalisation and have this status than White, non-EU immigrants. This paper sets a quantitative foundation for the role of political orientation and context, and ethnic group belonging in shaping immigrants’ naturalisation behaviour in France. It ends with proposals for a future research agenda on studying the political integration of different ethnic groups in France, and Europe generally.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “We examine differences in the intensity of employer stereotypes of men and women with Arabic names in Sweden by testing how much work experience is needed to eliminate the disadvantage of having an Arabic name on job applications. Employers are first sent curriculum vitaes (CVs) of equal merit in a field experiment setup. Arabic-named CVs are thereafter enhanced with more relevant work experience than Swedish-named CVs. The results indicate a reverse gender gap in employer stereotypes because initial differences in the number of callbacks disappear for female applicants when Arabic-named CVs are enhanced but remain strong and significant for male applicants. Thus, contrary to what is often assumed about the interaction of gender and ethnicity, we find that Arabic men face stronger discrimination in the labor-market than Arabic women.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article aims to advance the discussion on the relationship between people and places in the context of protracted exile. It analyses narratives of home and belonging of protracted Congolese refugees in Kampala and argues for a dynamic and changing notion of home that takes place in protracted exile. Conditions in exile lead to a profound feeling of being out of place and fuel an antagonistic sense of home. This does not mean, however, that all refugees share a strong attachment to their homeland, or that their desire to return is a natural given. Indeed, this article argues that the home of Congolese refugees is not only left behind in another place, it has also been left behind in another time and is therefore experienced as a previous and irretrievable home. Triggered by remittances and information, refugees’ search for home is translated into a desire to be resettled, and thus the idea of home becomes stronger. This is also reflected in refugees’ notion of home as a spiritual place, transcending both time and space. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “For several months in 2013 and 2014, a group of failed Afghan asylum seekers in Brussels became a constant focus of Belgian media and public attention. Through a combination of factors, they succeeded in highlighting the precarious situation of their group in a manner that garnered unprecedented levels of public support, although they ultimately failed to deliver their primary political goal—a moratorium on deportations to Afghanistan. This article analyses the specific combination of factors underlying the short-lived success of this social protest movement and the group dynamics that propelled it to national prominence. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Election-related violence, because it is meant to coerce voters, may have an adverse effect on individual attitudes towards elections—and towards democracy in general. Victims of election violence may come to associate voting with conflict, which may in turn translate into lower levels of support for democratic processes and an unwillingness to participate in future elections. This may be especially true when repeated instances of electoral violence take place, as has been the case in Kenya. To explore the possible relationship between electoral violence and democratic alienation, interviews were conducted in two internally displaced person (IDP) camps in Kenya: one which housed primarily government supporters and one which housed primarily opposition supporters. Among interviewees—all of whom were victims of past electoral violence—there were pronounced differences in stated willingness to vote in future elections. These differences depended on the individual’s perception of freeness and fairness of elections and whether the individual’s candidate or party of choice won or lost. Additionally, as ethnicity is an important factor in vote choice and partisan support, this translates into stark differences between ethnic groups. These findings suggest that electoral violence may have an uneven effect on democratic attitudes and participation. “

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article investigates the ways in which a shift from post-colonial nation building to neoliberal state restructuring has shaped church and Irish state relations regarding migrant welfare. It develops the extensive work of Bäckström and Davie (Welfare and Religion in 21st Century Europe: Configuring the Connections, Vol. 1. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate 2010) and Bäckström et al. (Welfare and Religion in 21st Century Europe: Gendered, Religious and Social Change, Vol. 2. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate 2011) on how majority churches in European countries are reclaiming a social welfare role as the state relinquishes this responsibility: first, by examining the domain of migrant welfare which is not developed in their work; and second, by arguing that majority church pro-migrant service provision, as it has evolved in recent decades, can be understood in relation to an emergent neoliberal mode of collective responsibility for migrant welfare. It suggests that in spite of other factors and forces that undermine Irish Catholic church authority, the marketization of more domains of life in the first decades of the 21st century has given new significance to Catholic Social Teaching and pro-migrant church initiatives.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Immigration has become systematically politicized and opposed by many individuals. We examine individual attitudes toward equal opportunities for foreigners and Swiss citizens, using cross-sectional data from the Swiss Household Panel. Individuals with low levels of education tend to oppose foreigners, while the opposition by individuals with high levels of education increases with the risk of unemployment. Values and beliefs explain the negative attitudes of individuals with low levels of education, but not the association with the risk of unemployment for individuals with high levels of education. Clearly, both values and economic factors are important for explaining attitudes toward foreigners.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.