Monthly Archives: May 2015

A workshop: Aid in Time – Histories of Humanitarianism, June 3rd at the University of Bristol

Aid in Time

The Humanitarian Histories Group at the University of Bristol are pleased to announce their first workshop, on Wednesday June 3rd 2015. To book a space, please email emily.baughan@bristol.ac.uk

Programme:

2:00-3:00 – Humanitarianism and the Humanities: framing the debate – Juliano Fiori, Save the Children UK

3:15-4:30- Where’s my House?: Histories of Shelter and Changing Channels of Information (Chair, Su Lin Lewis)

 Tom Scott-Smith (University of Bristol): From Aalto to IKEA: What is really new about innovation in the shelter sector?

Ben White (University of Glasgow): Care and Control: the refugee camp in history

Imogen Wall (Independent consultant/ former UN): – Where’s my house? Information and community empowerment in humanitarian emergencies

4:45 – 5:30 Looking Back, Facing Forward: Histories of humanitarianism (Chair: Rob Skinner)

Eleanor Davey (University of Manchester): Writing history for a humanitarian audience: HPG’s ‘modern’ and ‘global’ project

Andrew Jones (University of Birmingham): Band Aid in Time: from…

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Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 05/31/2015 (p.m.)

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Migrant Crisis in the Mediterranean: Daily News Stories 05/31/2015 (a.m.)

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Daily International News Stories Round-up 05/31/2015

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Archives in the News: Updates from the UEL Archives (weekly)

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Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 05/31/2015

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New Articles on Refugee and Forced Migration Issues (weekly)

  • “By conducting a textual analysis of the National Human Rights Action Plans of 39 countries, this study revealed that these plans are faced with at least 14 significant problems in the ‘pre-phase’ and the four phases of planning—these are preparatory phase; development phase; implementation phase; and assessment phase. The problems include: non-compliance; tardiness; lack of a baseline study; ideological orientation; non-correspondence; lack of comprehensiveness; lack of coordination; supporting the status quo; lack of time frame; lack of transparency; lack of accountability; lack of resources; lack of monitoring mechanism; and lack of evaluation mechanism. These problems are best addressed by attempting to remove or mitigate their root causes. In this regard, this study explored three important root causes of the problems: the lack of political will; the lack of stakeholder awareness; and the traditional concept of planning. This suggested building three response strategies including: a shift from unitary systems of government to more horizontally-organized system of networked governance; raising awareness of such plans; and a strategic move towards the modern concept of planning. By directing corrective measures at root causes, it is hoped that the likelihood of recurrence of problems will be minimized. “

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