Daily Archives: Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Updated News Stories on the Mediterranean

UNHCR –Latest deaths on Mediterranean highlight urgent need for increased rescue capacity

GENEVA, April 15 (UNHCR) UN High Commissioner for Refugees António Guterres on Wednesday expressed shock at news from the Mediterranean that hundreds of people were missing after their boat sank and called anew for urgent action to prevent such tragedies in the future.

Link: http://www.unhcr.org/552e603f9.html

UNHCE – UNHCR shock at latest deaths on Mediterranean, rescue capacity needed more urgently than ever

UN – After migrant catastrophe in Mediterranean, UN urges ‘robust’ rescue operations

UNHCR – Italian coastguard rescues thousands of migrants and refugees in Mediterranean

 

News: The Guardian – World’s largest refugee camp scapegoated in wake of Garissa attack

The Kenyan government has called Dadaab ‘a nursery for al-Shabaab’ and is demanding its closure. But dismantling the home of 350,000 people will not happen quickly or make the country safer, says Simon Allison

After the terrorist attack on Garissa University in which 147 students were killed Kenya’s government has found a scapegoat. Three hundred and fifty thousand scapegoats, in fact.

On Saturday, the country’s deputy president William Ruto issued an ultimatum to the UN. He told the High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to shut down Dadaab refugee camp near the border with Somalia within three months, or else Kenya would shut it down itself.

Officials have claimed that Dadaab is where al-Shabaab plans its acts of terror, such as Garissa and the 2013 Westgate Mall attack, and must be shut down.

For full details, please visit: www.theguardian.com/world/2015/apr/14/kenya-garissa-dadaab-scapegoat-al-shabaab

 

News: UNHCR statement on the future of Kenya’s Dadaab Refugee Camps

This is a summary of what was said by UNHCR spokesperson Karin de Gruijl to whom quoted text may be attributed at the press briefing, on 14 April 2015, at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.

The Government of Kenya has announced that the Dadaab refugee camps should be closed within three months and the 350,000 Somali refugees living there returned to their country. The Government’s decision was announced this past weekend following the horrific attack at Garissa University earlier this month.

UNHCR too has been shocked and appalled by the Garissa attack. High Commissioner António Guterres and his staff stand in solidarity with the people of Kenya. We reiterate our condolences to the families of all the victims.

Kenya has been generously hosting and protecting refugees from violence and persecution in neighbouring Somalia for more than two decades. UNHCR works closely with the Government of Kenya and we understand well the current regional security situation and the seriousness of the threats Kenya is facing. We also recognize the obligation of the Government to ensure the security of its citizens and other people living in Kenya, including refugees.

For full article, please visit:  www.unhcr.org/552d0a8a9.html

 

Course: Applied Research Methods with Hidden, Marginal and Excluded Populations

Source: Forced Migration List – List Archives: http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/lists/forced-migration.html

Applied Research Methods with Hidden, Marginal and Excluded Populations (2Q)
School in Social Science Data Analysis, University of Essex (UK)
27-31 July 2015 (full time)

Detailed program: HERE
http://www.essex.ac.uk/summerschool/media/pdf/Outlines/2Q.pdf

The course (11th Edition) provides an introduction to research methods in conducting research, both qualitative and quantitative, with marginal, hidden and excluded populations, with a specific focus on equity related research. The course introduces the main theories and research approaches on hard-to-reach populations (such as migrants, displaced population, victims of human rights violations, LGBT, drug addicted, child soldiers, victims of violence) , using different frameworks and techniques.

This intensive course will provide tools to address key quantitative and qualitative issues such as the lack of known sampling frame; the difficulties in reaching the target group; the concepts of impact, attribution and contribution; and the political dimension of research findings. The course explores topics such as: estimation and sampling techniques; participatory research; evidence-based policy versus policy-based evidence; innovation, crowdsourcing , innovation and the use of technology; the art of combining qualitative and quantitative methods; and ethical considerations arising when conducting research with hidden and marginalized populations.

Topics :

1) Quantitative methods:
– Cluster sampling
– Adaptive cluster sampling
– Time location sampling
– Small area estimation
– Capture and Recapture
– Respondent Driven Sampling RDS (intro)
– Social network analysis applied to hard-to-reach populations (introduction)

2) Qualitative methods
– Participatory research methods
– Rapid assessment
– Positive deviance

3) Ethics and Research

4) Innovation and the use of technology: SMS, crowd sourcing and mapping
– Using SMS and mobile phones for research and data collection, online survey,
– Crowdsourcing and mapping: Ushahidi (introduction)

Course description, contact and registration  HERE
https://www.essex.ac.uk/summerschool/pages/courses/session2/2q.html

Contacts :
www.essex.ac.uk/summerschool
Select Course 2Q

CMRB Film Screenings of `Everyday Borders’

University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging, Southall Black Sisters, Migrant Rights Network and the Refugee and Migrant Forum of Essex and London present the following film screening hosted by Northumbria University’s Migration and Diaspora Network and Department of Geography:

Everyday Borders

(dir. Orson Nava)

This event will take place in room 0.8, Broadacre House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE43 7PZ

Location details are here

Thursday 30th April 2015, 18.45–20.30

Please reserve a space at:

https://everydaybordersncl.eventbrite.co.uk

Increasing numbers of people are becoming border-guards as employers, landlords, health workers and educators are legally required to administer the UK border as part of their everyday lives. As the 2014 Immigration Act pulls more people into border-guard roles, those who are their subjects experience being denied jobs, accommodation, healthcare and education because these border administrators may not be able or willing to understand the complexities of immigration law, may act on racist stereotypes or, threatened by fines and raids, exclude racialised minorities in order to minimize risk to themselves.

What are the implications of these developments to all of us in our daily lives?

The film screening will be followed by a panel discussion including:

Kathryn Cassidy (Northumbria University/UEL), Tom Vickers (Northumbria University) & community partners

*Apologies for cross-posting*

The University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB), Southall Black Sisters (SBS), Migrant Rights Network (MRN) and the Refugee and Migrant Forum of Essex and London (RAMFEL) present the following film screening hosted by the SOAS Student Union:

‘Everyday Borders’ (dir. Orson Nava)

The film screening will be followed by a panel discussion with: Meena Patel (SBS), Rita Chadha (Ramfel), Don Flynn (MRN), Georgie Wemyss (CMRB) and Orson Nava. Chair: Nira Yuval-Davis (CMRB)

This event will take place on Thursday 30th April 2015, 19.00–21.00 in G3, SOAS, London, WC1H 0XG

Please reserve a space at: everydayborders.eventbrite.co.uk

Full details can be found on the attached flyer. Please circulate widely.

 

Event: “Go Home”: Mapping Immigration Controversy – End of Project Conference 10 June 2015

“Go Home”: Mapping Immigration Controversy
End of Project Conference

June 10th, 9.30am – 6.30pm, University of Warwick, Social Sciences Building

Register here: http://mic-conference.eventbrite.com

This one day conference is aimed at academics and activists interested in discussing the findings of the Mapping Immigration Controversy project. We want to bring together learning and research within and outside universities, to discuss how government rhetoric and practice on immigration is affecting our everyday lives, and the new forms of resistance that are emerging.

Keynote speakers:
Bridget Anderson, University of Oxford
Rita Chadha, Refugee and Migrant Forum of Essex and London
Suresh Grover,  The Monitoring Group
Georgie Wemyss, University of East London

Panel discussions on:
Activist Research Methodology
State Communications on Immigration
Resistance

The conference will also include performance and interactive sessions

Free attendance, including lunch, but you need to register at http://mic-conference.eventbrite.com

The Mapping Immigration Controversy project is an 18 month research project that has been exploring the impacts on local communities and national debate of current publicity campaigns about migration by the UK Home Office. Discussions at the conference will build on our interim findings and will include other researchers and activists.

GETTING TO THE EVENT
The nearest mainline station to the University of Warwick is Coventry station. Buses and taxis to campus are available at the station. There is pay and display car parking on campus but spaces are often very limited. You can find out more about transport options here: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/directions/

TRAVEL BURSARIES
We have travel bursaries for travel within the UK, to enable participation from people who would not otherwise be able to come, and to encourage attendance from community organisations, activists, migrants, people directly affected by Home Office immigration campaigns, young people, students and early career researchers.

If you are applying for a travel bursary, please be prepared to write a sentence about why, and give an estimate of how much your transport costs are likely to be on the registration page. Please note that we will ordinarily expect you to pay for your travel in advance, and will reimburse you by BACS transfer to your bank account after the conference (you will need to complete a form and provide receipts). If you foresee a problem with this – for example if you are not able to pay the cost of your travel up-front, or if you do not have a UK bank account which can receive BACS transfers – please get in touch and we will try to make arrangements to book your travel for you.

Wreck of Migrant Vessel Headed to Italy Leaves Up to 400 Dead

clandestina

Source: http://www.wsj.com

ROME—Survivors of the wreck of a migrant boat headed to Italy from Libya said that as many as 400 people had died in the wreck, according to Save the Children and the International Organization for Migration.

According to some among the 150 survivors from that boat, who were interviewed by migrant assistance groups including the IOM and Save the Children, the wreck happened in the past few days, 24 hours after the boat left the Libyan coast, and involved migrants coming from sub-Saharan Africa. “Many young men, probably minor,” were among the victims, Save the Children said, citing the refugees.

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Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistanc

Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance: Local and Global Conceptions and Struggles Conference

Friday 1 May 2015, University of East London (Docklands).

This conference launches the ESRC-Funded seminar series ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: Learning from History and Thinking Internationally’ organised by Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL). We are grateful to the ESRC, UEL and the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, the University of Glasgow and the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group for their support.

Full programme attached and registration and further details can be found at:
http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/evolving-understandings-of-racism-and-resistance-tickets-16258660090

Evolving understandings of racism and resistance – local and global conceptions and struggles

Friday 1st May 2015

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: JOHN SOLOMOS, STEPHEN SMALL

One-day conference at the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, University of East London in conjunction with the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group.

Launching the ESRC-funded seminar series, ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: learning from history and thinking internationally’, organised by Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL).

This conference responds to the urgent need to understand how and why people have mobilised around ethnicity – to challenge racism or to fight for social justice – despite other exclusionary forms of ethnic politics, including campaigns of racism. Whereas we have learned to argue against social policy that divides the population by ethnicity (Commission for Integration and Cohesion, 2007), there is little contemporary debate about the socially beneficial potential of calls to ethnic identity in enabling political mobilisation. At

a time when there is widespread disillusionment with mainstream politics and unexpected and relatively unknown political groupings can emerge to prominence with little warning, it is essential that we understand the range of forms of ethnic mobilisation and the implications of these diverse forms of political engagement.

These questions become urgent in a context of the resurgence of racist movements across Europe and the continuation and intensification of communal divisions in many regions. In many urban spaces, the impacts of economic crises and war have remade the terrain of racism and inequality, hardening some divisions and giving rise to new kinds of ethnic mobilisation that reference religious, national, regional and ethnic identity in ways that reflect the transnational connectedness of these mobile populations.

Papers and discussions will address the following questions and debates, and more:

Contemporary and historical examples of movements against racism and the role of ethnic mobilisation within such movements; the role played by ethnic mobilisations in wider movements for social justice;         changing terrains of racism and new articulations of anti-racist resistance.

Programme:

Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance: Local and Global Conceptions and Struggles

Conference

Friday 1 May 2015

University of East London, East Building, Docklands Campus, E16 2RD

9.30am: Registration, tea and coffee

10am: Welcome and introduction to the ESRC seminar series ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: Learning from History and Thinking Internationally’: Gargi Bhattacharrya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL)

10.15am: Plenary 1: Professor Stephen Small (University of California, Berkeley), Decolonizing the mind for knowledge production and dissemination

11.15am: Tea and coffee break

11.30am: Parallel sessions

Anti-racism in historical perspective

Doron Avraham (Bar Ilan), Contested Concepts of Race and Ethnicity: A Response of German Jews to Nazi Racial Policy

Brendan McGeever (Birkbeck), Racism and Resistance in the Russian Revolution: the political mobilisation of ethnicity in socialist campaigns against antisemitism in revolutionary Russia, 1917-1922.

Lindy Moore (Independent), Networks of anti-racism 1890-1914: the mobilisation of evangelical Christian Socialists

Stephen Ashe (CoDE, Manchester) and Laurence Brown (CoDE, Manchester), Evolving understandings of racism and resistance – local and global conceptions and struggles

Racism and anti-racism in France

Joseph Downing (LSE), Ethnic Mobilisation in the Republic: The Quest to Challenge Exclusionary Narratives of Migration in France

Selim Nadi (Lyon), Organizing anti-racism in France: from the Arab Workers Movement to the Party of the Indigenous of the Republic (1972 – 2010

Pauline Picot (Université Paris), Ethnic categories and ethnic segmentation within the antiracist activist field in contemporary France

1pm: Lunch break

2pm: Parallel sessions

Migrants and anti-racist organising

Federico Olivieri (Pisa), Migrant struggles as acts against racism Italian contemporary cases in comparative perspective

Alice Mukaka (UEL), Resistance and mobilization around migrant women’s rights: a feminist issue

Sukhwant Dhaliwal, (Bedfordshire) and Kirsten Forkert (BCU), Resisting the Go Home van and other Home Office immigration campaigns

Marella Hoffman, (Cambridge), Belonging and resistance in ethnic communities in Cambridge

Black Politics: then and now

Kehinde Andrews (BCU), Back to Black: Black radical activism in twenty first century Britain

John Narayan (Warwick), The Coloured Cosmopolitanism of Black Power: From The Black Panther Party to #Blacklivesmatter

Fatima Rajina (SOAS), Racism and Resistance: the story of British Bangladeshis

3.30pm: Plenary 2: Professor John Solomos (University of Warwick), Race, Racism and Social Research: between social science and policy

4.30pm: Tea and coffee break

4.45pm: Parallel sessions

Anti-racist practice in institutional settings

Alessio D’Angelo (Middlesex), BME organisations in the UK: communities of resistance or sub-contractors?

Bethan Harries (CoDE, Manchester), “Divide and conquer?” The effects of public sector retrenchment on anti-racist and marginalised community organising

Omar Khan (Runnymede), ‘Ending Racism this Generation’: learning from a UK campaign

Islamophobia

Hilary Aked (Bath), The gender segregation on campus furore as a racialised moral panic

Shamira Megnani (Leeds), Alliances across Historical Exclusions: Evoking ‘Guilt by Association’ in the anti-Islamophobia Novel

Aurelien Mondon (Bath), The mainstreaming of racism in France: the resurgence of reactionary propagandists

6.15pm: Closing remarks and Conference closes

This conference launches the ESRC-Funded seminar series ‘Racism and Political Mobilisation: Learning from History and Thinking Internationally’ organised by Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL), Satnam Virdee (Glasgow) and Aaron Winter (UEL).  We are grateful to the ESRC, UEL and the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, the University of Glasgow and the BSA Race and Ethnicity Study Group for their support.

Please note that lunch will not be provided at this free event, but facilities to purchase meals, snacks, coffee and tea are available throughout the Docklands site (Menus and information: http://www.dineoncampus.co.uk/uel/places-to-eat.aspx – Map: http://www.dineoncampus.co.uk/doc-assets/docs/UEL_Docklands_Campus_Map.pdf.

Travel and Accommodation:

Directions to Conference Site at UEL, Docklands Campus – which is located at Cyprus Station on the DLR (easily accessible fromn Stratford Station, but please remember to purchase tickets in advance and/or tap your card before entering and after exiting the train): http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

The closest airport is City: http://www.londoncityairport.com/

Accommodation is available in Stratford near and around Westfield Mall, the Olympic Stadium and UEL’s Stratford Campuses (but please note that the conference is not located at the UEL Stratford sites): http://www.visitlondon.com/discover-london/london-areas/east/stratford

Accommodation is also available closer near the Excel Centre:  http://www.excel-london.co.uk/visiting-excel/visitors-guide/hotels/

Do you have questions about Evolving Understandings of Racism and Resistance? Contact CMRB. UEL

New Articles on Refugee and Migration History 04/15/2015

  • “Transitional justice discursively occupies a two-dimensional space mapped by understandings of ‘transition’ and ‘justice.’ Transition is defined very broadly, understood as any regime change, however achieved, because transition is defined contingently, as something that is normatively presumed to have the goal of liberal democracy. The edited volumes under review, particularly that discussing the Arab Spring, thus include in their remit states where a regime has fallen but liberal democracy is far from being consolidated, where vicious civil wars are underway (as in Syria or Libya) or authoritarianism has been reasserted (as in Egypt). Justice, in contrast, is defined narrowly. While the idea of justice is presumed to be represented by a situation where the entirety of human rights law is respected, in both theory and practice transitional justice focuses largely on truth and accountability for past violations, prioritizing civil and political rights over other rights, rather than explicitly building justice for the future. The books reviewed here represent an extensive survey of the practice of transitional justice in recent decades and an articulation of global discourses of transition and justice. This review seeks to use the three volumes and the dozens of contexts they address to investigate this discursive space, to interrogate how in practice transitional justice is understood and articulated, and to suggest what a future practice could look like. “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

  • “This article examines the underlying intentions that guided the authors of Article 33, better known as the non-refoulement principle, of the 1951 Refugee Convention, from February 1950 until the signing of the Final Act in July 1951. I begin by explaining the diplomatic context within which the non-refoulement principle was inscribed into the text of the Convention, following the schism between the two opposing groups of member states present at the drafting table. Based on unpublished material from Israeli and UK archives, I then study four specific aspects of the drafting of the non-refoulement article. The first issue concerns the geographical scope of non-refoulement regarding refugees on the high seas. The second concerns the addition to non-refoulement in the first paragraph of Article 33 of the category of ‘a particular social group or political opinion’, in direct contemporary reference to political refugees from the Soviet bloc. The third issue studied here is the development of the text of paragraph 2 of Article 33, one of the major conditions restricting protective measures for refugees. This study uncovers how this paragraph was drafted, where it was initially intended to fit within the Convention text, and how it eventually became a qualifying condition for Article 33. Fourthly, this article considers the embedded meaning of the term ‘national security’ as it was inserted into Article 33 by the UK representatives who drafted it. “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

  • “The Making of the Modern Refugee is an important history of forced displacement in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. This study by Peter Gatrell makes several new contributions to the literature on refugee policy. Many previous contemporary histories of refugee movements mainly cover events and policies in Europe or the global North and largely exclude consideration of refugee movements in the global South. In contrast, this study encompasses a wide spectrum of forced displacements across the globe including in the Middle East and North Africa, Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. Nonetheless, the scope of this book could have been even broader had refugee movements in the Western hemisphere been covered and other significant … “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

  • “This work aims to reframe a discussion of refugees and migration in the late-Ottoman and interwar periods. To understand the emergence of an ‘Ottoman refugee’, Isa Blumi explores the destructive power of global capitalism, a theme often downplayed in historical analyses of violence and displacement in the Middle East.

    By the mid-nineteenth century, external players—foreign states and trans-Atlantic bankers whom Blumi collectively calls the ‘Euro-American Empire’—competed in the Ottoman markets, often through local agents (p. 16). They encouraged the commercialization of agriculture, the reduction of trade tariffs, and a transition towards private property, and also provided the Ottoman government with significant loans to finance its internal reforms; repaying the debt further subjected the Ottoman economy to external demands. These processes coincided with the arrival of millions of refugees from the Caucasus and the Balkans in the Ottoman domains. A source of cheap labour, they were put to work in the production of cash crops and the … ”

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Daily International News Stories Round-up 04/15/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Refugee Council Archive: Daily News Stories On Refugee and Forced Migration 04/15/2015

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Articles on Refugee and Forced Migration Issues 04/15/2015

  • “Transitional justice discursively occupies a two-dimensional space mapped by understandings of ‘transition’ and ‘justice.’ Transition is defined very broadly, understood as any regime change, however achieved, because transition is defined contingently, as something that is normatively presumed to have the goal of liberal democracy. The edited volumes under review, particularly that discussing the Arab Spring, thus include in their remit states where a regime has fallen but liberal democracy is far from being consolidated, where vicious civil wars are underway (as in Syria or Libya) or authoritarianism has been reasserted (as in Egypt). Justice, in contrast, is defined narrowly. While the idea of justice is presumed to be represented by a situation where the entirety of human rights law is respected, in both theory and practice transitional justice focuses largely on truth and accountability for past violations, prioritizing civil and political rights over other rights, rather than explicitly building justice for the future. The books reviewed here represent an extensive survey of the practice of transitional justice in recent decades and an articulation of global discourses of transition and justice. This review seeks to use the three volumes and the dozens of contexts they address to investigate this discursive space, to interrogate how in practice transitional justice is understood and articulated, and to suggest what a future practice could look like. “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

  • “This article examines the underlying intentions that guided the authors of Article 33, better known as the non-refoulement principle, of the 1951 Refugee Convention, from February 1950 until the signing of the Final Act in July 1951. I begin by explaining the diplomatic context within which the non-refoulement principle was inscribed into the text of the Convention, following the schism between the two opposing groups of member states present at the drafting table. Based on unpublished material from Israeli and UK archives, I then study four specific aspects of the drafting of the non-refoulement article. The first issue concerns the geographical scope of non-refoulement regarding refugees on the high seas. The second concerns the addition to non-refoulement in the first paragraph of Article 33 of the category of ‘a particular social group or political opinion’, in direct contemporary reference to political refugees from the Soviet bloc. The third issue studied here is the development of the text of paragraph 2 of Article 33, one of the major conditions restricting protective measures for refugees. This study uncovers how this paragraph was drafted, where it was initially intended to fit within the Convention text, and how it eventually became a qualifying condition for Article 33. Fourthly, this article considers the embedded meaning of the term ‘national security’ as it was inserted into Article 33 by the UK representatives who drafted it. “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

  • “The Making of the Modern Refugee is an important history of forced displacement in the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. This study by Peter Gatrell makes several new contributions to the literature on refugee policy. Many previous contemporary histories of refugee movements mainly cover events and policies in Europe or the global North and largely exclude consideration of refugee movements in the global South. In contrast, this study encompasses a wide spectrum of forced displacements across the globe including in the Middle East and North Africa, Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. Nonetheless, the scope of this book could have been even broader had refugee movements in the Western hemisphere been covered and other significant … “

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

  • “This work aims to reframe a discussion of refugees and migration in the late-Ottoman and interwar periods. To understand the emergence of an ‘Ottoman refugee’, Isa Blumi explores the destructive power of global capitalism, a theme often downplayed in historical analyses of violence and displacement in the Middle East.

    By the mid-nineteenth century, external players—foreign states and trans-Atlantic bankers whom Blumi collectively calls the ‘Euro-American Empire’—competed in the Ottoman markets, often through local agents (p. 16). They encouraged the commercialization of agriculture, the reduction of trade tariffs, and a transition towards private property, and also provided the Ottoman government with significant loans to finance its internal reforms; repaying the debt further subjected the Ottoman economy to external demands. These processes coincided with the arrival of millions of refugees from the Caucasus and the Balkans in the Ottoman domains. A source of cheap labour, they were put to work in the production of cash crops and the … ”

    tags:newjournalarticleshistory

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.