Daily Archives: Friday, January 9, 2015

Reminder – CfP: Towards a ‘mobile’ solution to forced migration? (IMISCOE, Geneva, 25-27 June 2015)

Call for papers:  Towards a “mobile” solution to forced migration?

for panel at IMISCOE 12th Annual Conference / nccr – on the move 1st Annual Conference “Rights, Democracy and Migration – Challenges and Opportunities” on 25-27 June 2015 in Geneva

Convenors: Lucas Oesch (University of Manchester) and Marion Fresia (University of Neuchâtel)

Deadline for application: January 11, 2015

Since the 1990s, studies on migration have operated a “transnational turn” (Monsutti 2010; Vertovec 1999, 2004). This framework has not been limited to “voluntary” migration but was also extended to the study of “forced” migration. Thanks to its dynamic dimension, the transnational perspective has mainly contributed to avoid considering displaced persons or “refugees” as mere victims, but as individuals implementing strategies in their mobility (Chatelard and Doraï 2009; Monsutti 2008). In this context, the concept of “forced migrant” was coined. It takes into account the structural dimension of displacement that is generated by a large-scale violent situation (Bakewell 2011). But it also recognizes the agency of the individual (Turton 2003). In this perspective, migration patterns are composed of complex and often circular paths between several countries (Schiller et al. 1992, 1995). However, the conventional “durable solutions” (Repatriation, Resettlement, Integration) on offer for forced migrants scarcely fit the mobility strategies that some individuals use which require them to be able to continue circulating between several locations, including sometimes their country of origin, and therefore to live a “mobile and multi-located life” (Long 2010; Van Hear 2006). In some cases, responses to forced migration have tried to include the human mobility dimension (Adepoju et al. 2010). Yet, the inclusion of mobility in responses to force migration, and the study of such initiatives, remain relatively under-developed (Zetter 2014). This session aims to open such questions to critical scrutiny by promoting conversations with academics or professionals.

We invite contributions discussing the human mobility of forced migration and/or its inclusion within solutions on offer for forced migrants in theoretical, methodological or empirical ways. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

– The human mobility dimension of forced migration
– The refugee regime and the sociological reality of forced migration
– Solutions on offer for forced migrants which include mobility, or fail to include it
– The impact of the (non-)inclusion of mobility on the strategies of forced migrants

Abstracts of 250 words, in English, as well as applicant’s name, affiliation and contact details should be sent to both lucas.oesch@manchester.ac.uk and marion.fresia@unine.ch by January 11, 2015.

The panel will be proposed to IMISCOE on 15 January, and the convenors will let you know about the preliminary acceptance of your paper by that date. The final acceptance of submissions by IMISCOE will be announced on February 15.

Please note that neither the conference organisers nor IMISCOE have funds available for panel presenters. Panel organisers are not responsible for securing funding for their presenters. All conference delegates, including the panel presenters, must register for the conference. Please note that the conference fee is €200 (€150 for PhD students). Relevant details can be found at www.imiscoe.org.

Refugee Archives at UEL In The News Bulletin Issue 6: Friday 9th January, 2015.

 uel-logo

Refugee Archives at UEL

In The News Bulletin

Issue 6: Friday 9th January, 2015.

Introduction

Welcome to the latest issue of the In The News Bulletin produced by Archive staff at the Refugee Council Archive at the University of East London. Can we take this opportunity to wish everybody a very happy New Year and every success for the year ahead.

This bulletin has the aim of providing both the latest news and developments on the Refugee Council Archive at the University of East London whilst also providing additional information on issues of concern to refugee and forced migration studies more generally. This bulletin will be circulated via our Refugee Archive WordPress blog and also via our Refugee-Research Jiscmail email list. We would welcome any feedback that you may have on this bulletin and we would also welcome any input that you may have in terms of current and future content for both this bulletin and also our WordPress blog more generally. Please Contact Paul Dudman via email (library-archvies@uel.ac.uk) or Twitter (@PaulDudman) with any feedback or thoughts that you may have.

There are also some general Archive details included at the end of this and every bulletin posting for your reference.

This Week’s Interesting News

Psychology and Torture – a literature review. Ian Clark, Subject Librarian for Psychology at the University of East London, has published a very interesting blog posting on his UEL Psychology Library Blog which provides a very interesting literature review on the subject of Psychology and Torture. Access to the blog posting is here: http://uellibrarypsyc.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/psychology-and-torture-a-literature-overview/

Out of the ‘darkness’: UN War Crimes Commission records hailed as vital international justice tool. A news story from the United Nations detailing how the United Nations War Crimes Commission records have now been opened for the first time in 70 years. Highlighting the importance of these records for the history of the World War II and its aftermath, the article highlights “The records of the UN War Crimes Commission, which was operational between 1943 and 1948 and played a vital role in preparation for the war crimes trials that followed the Second World War, were made open to the public this past July at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.”

The full story is available at: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=49313#.VG5CSblAQdW.
(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, November 2014).

At an event to mark the World Day for Audiovisual Heritage, the Minister for Sports and Culture in Rwanda lamented the loss of historical archives, but then commented, “Even today we are seeing a deliberate effort to destroy the records of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi which now gives us the challenge on how to properly archive our audiovisual history. For instance today we have Gacaca documents which we need to store property.” If any reader has additional information on the “deliberate effort to destroy,” please forward it to the ICA. http://allafrica.com/stories/201410300469.html

(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, October 2014).

A Guatemala court ruled that there was sufficient cause to try two Army officers for sexual slavery and domestic slavery against Quiche women at the military outpost at the community of Sepu Zarco in the 1980s.” Link:

http://www.breakingthesilenceblog.com/general/trial-for-sexual-slavery-during-armed-conflict-opens-in-guatemala/

(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, October 2014).

The Iran–Iraq war lasted from 1980 until 1988, but even 34 years later it is “rarely . . examined with the nuance it deserves,” Al-Monitor reported. A Tehran-based researcher said, “There is a red line preventing neutral historians and independent analysts from conducting research on this subject or commenting on it,” adding, “The narrative of this war has to be reclaimed from the government-sanctioned historians, former commanders and members of one political faction. People need to know what happened. Why did the war last as long as it did? Why so many casualties? What was happening on the front during the last months of the war?” Opening the archives of the war in both countries would be an important start.  http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2014/10/iran-iraq-war-saddam-hussein-irgc.html?utm_source=Al-Monitor+Newsletter+%5BEnglish%5D&utm_campaign=61068533d7-October_7_2014&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_28264b27a0-61068533d7-93088897#

(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, October 2014).

The Guardian reports on how Police investigating the abduction of Libyan seuspects and their forced return to Libya have passed documentation to the UK Crown Prosecution Service. Link http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2014/oct/31/met-libya-abduction-rendition-cps

(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, November 2014).

The United Kingdom Court of Appeal ruled that the claim by a Libyan husband and wife against “various branches of the UK government, a former UK foreign secretary, and a senior intelligence officer over their alleged involvement in the couple’s 2004 rendition to Libya, where they were imprisoned and tortured,” could be tried. A lower court had refused to hear the claim, on the grounds that the case would damage the UK’s relationship with the United States. Human Rights Watch found documents in 2011 in Tripoli that described “US offers to transfer, or render, at least four detainees from US to Libyan custody, one with the active participation of the UK.” http://www.hrw.org/new/2014/10/31/dispatches-rare-victory-justice; http://www.hrw.org/news/2011/09/08/usuk-documents-reveal-libya-rendition-details

(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, October 2014).

Another story highlighting the importance of archives in relation to issues pertaining to human rights is highlighted by issues surrounding the ongoing disagreement between Armenia and Turkey in relation to the 1915 massacre of Armenians, known as the Armenian Genocide. In a recent article, highlighted in the October 2014 HRWG Newsletter, the director of Armenia’s national archives told Mediamax that “there are enough necessary documents on the Armenian Genocide in the archive to initiate an international court trial against Turkey.” A few days later, the Turkish Minister for European Union Affairs told TRT Haber television channel that “Armenia is not ready to open its archives for investigation of the 1915 events,” and added that “Turkey has repeatedly proposed to create an independent commission to investigate the events of 1915.” http://asbarez.com/128170/national-archive-chief-says-enough-documents-to-bring-turkey-to-court/; http://en.trend.az/world/turkey/2327556.html In addition,

the head of the Armenian church in Lebanon announced plans to sue Turkey for property lost and “the restitution of its historical centre, the Catholicate of Sis.” Link: https://iwpr.net/global-voices/armenian-church-seeks-restitution-from-turkey

(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, October 2014).

Events and Call for Papers

Forthcoming events organised by the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB) at the university of East London:

‘Beyond the Beast of Austerity: Inequality and the lives we hope to lead’, Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL).
This seminar will take place 4-6pm, Monday 12th January 2014 in EB G.06, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD (http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/)

‘Hierarchy, Inequality and Stratification: classing intersectionality and intersectionalising class’, Prof. Floya Anthias (UEL).
This seminar will take place 4-6pm, Monday 26th January 2014 in EB G.06, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD (http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/)

Conference: Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel

Monday 9th February 2015, 09.00–18.30, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG

Further details can be found on the CMRB website at: www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/events.htm or alternative please email Jamie Hakim at: j.hakim@uel.ac.uk

Online Resources

Rule of Terror: Living under ISIS in Syria. Report of the Independent International Commission on the Syrian Arab Republic. A new report by the Commission which is based upon “over 300 interviews with men, women and children who fled or are living in ISIS-controlled areas” within Syria. Both the testimonies collected as the basis for this report and the ongoing collection of records by the Commission will be important for documenting and preserving any human rights violations within Syria during this period. (Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, November 2014).

A new website opened on forced labor, trafficking and slavery: “Over the next 12 months you’ll see dozens of pieces from academics and practitioners on a range of debates. Starting in January, each month will focus on a distinct theme. We’ll begin by examining the common misconceptions of slavery, trafficking, and forced labor as promoted by politicians and across the mainstream media. We’ll follow this by looking at how political structures, economic systems, and legal frameworks sustain and entrench human vulnerability in a way that allows such exploitation and domination to flourish in plain sight.” https://www.opendemocracy.net/beyondslavery

(Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, October 2014).

Other News

“Camps of Death,’ a documentary directed by film-maker Avdo Huseinovic for the Association of Concentration-Camp Detainees in Bosnia and Herzegovina, was shown for the first time at the Bosnian Culture Centre in Sarajevo. For information about the documentary, contact the Association of Concentration-Camp Detainees. www.logorasibih.ba#sthash.4HZn3DPm.dpuf (Source: International Council on Archives Human Rights Working Group Newsletter, November 2014).

New Additions to the Archive

Britain’s forgotten prisoners : $$b meeting the needs of Immigration Act detainees / Kathy Lowe.

HM Chief Inspector of Prisons for England and Wales : annual report 2008-09 / HM Chief Inspector of Prisons for England and Wales.

A report on alternatives to the detention of families : for the All Party Parliamentary Groups for Refugees and Children / No Place for a Child Campaign.

A hidden trade : child trafficking research in Scotland, 2005/6 / [written by Sheila Arthur and Richard Morran ; edited by Susan Fisher, Douglas Hamilton and Stefanie Keir].

The small hands of slavery : modern day child slavery / a report by Save the Children UK

Impact from the trafficking prevention project : stories from the beneficiaries / a report by Save the Children UK.

Counter trafficking directory / National Missing Persons Helpline

Dispatches: How to break into Britain. (off air recording)

Starting over : young refugees talk about life in Britain / The Prince’s Trust with The Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund.

Where are the children? : A mapping exercise on numbers of unaccompanied asylum-seeking children in the UK : September 2000 – March 2001 / carried by the Refugee Council and British Agencies for Adoption and Fostering, (BAAF).

The deportation machine : Europe, asylum and human rights / $$c Liz Fekete.

Making separated children visible : the need for a child-centred approach : executive summary / Dr. Nalinie Mooten for the Irish Refugee Council.

I did not choose to come here : listening to refugee children / Selam Kidane.

Out of exile : developing youth work with young refugees / Ros Norton and Brian Cohen.

Home truths : adult refugees and asylum seekers : a guide for donors and funders / Sarah Sandford, Tris Lumley.

A long way from home : young refugees in Manchester write about their lives / [edited by Jackie Ould ; illustrations by Ahmed El Hassan].

Mono-cultural communities and their effect on asylum/immigration seekers in Humberside / Andrew Dawson.

A long way to go : young refugees and asylum seekers in the UK : a guide for donors and funding / Eleanor Stringer and Tris Lumley.

Local impacts of international migration : the information base / Gary Craig, Andy Dawson, Sandra Hutton, Nerys Roberts, and Mick Wilkinson

Welcome to Britain : voices from the front line of the refugee crisis / The Medical Foundation.

Incoming assets : why Tories should change policy on immigration and asylum / by John Bercow.

An examination of UK asylum policy : how successive UK Governments have tried, failed, and are still trying / Rt. Hon. Ann Widdecombe MP.

Making separated children visible : the need for a child-centred approach / Nalinie Mooten for the Irish Refugee Council.

The end of the road : the impact on families of section 9 of the Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants) Act 2004 / Nancy Kelley and Lise Meldgaard.

Caring for unaccompanied asylum-seeking children and young people / written by Eileen Fursland.

Caring for unaccompanied asylum-seeking children and young people from Afghanistan / written by Eileen Fursland.

Caring for unaccompanied asylum-seeking children and young people from Iran / written by Eileen Fursland.

Caring for unaccompanied asylum-seeking children and young people from Eritrea / written by Eileen Fursland.

Child and family social work with asylum seekers and refugees / guest editor, Ravi Kohli.

Refugees : |b perspectives on the experience of forced migration / edited by Alastair Ager.

Ensuring quality education for young refugees from Syria (12-25 years) : a mapping exercise / Sarah Wahby, Hashem Ahmadzadeh, Metin Corabatir, Leen Hashem, Jalal Al Husseini with contributions from Farah Akel, Maha Alasil, Zeina Bali and Hoshang Waziri. (Arabic Version).

Repatriation through a trust-based lens : refugee-state trust relations on the Thai-Burma border and beyond / Karen Hargrave.

Assessing the burden of key infectious diseases affecting migrant populations in the EU/EEA : executive summary / European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

Fundamental rights at airports : border checks at five international airports in the European Union : summary / by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights.

Schengen : your gateway to free movement in Europe / Consilium.

The EU in the world 2014 : a statistical portrait Eurostat.

Education : the situation of Roma in 11 EU member states / by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights.

EASO country of origin information report : South and Central Somalia country overview / by the European Asylum Support Office.

Migrant health : sexual transmission of HIV within migrant groups in EU/EEA and implications for effective interventions / European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

Mapping youth transitions in Europe / European Foundation for the improvement of Living and Working Conditions.

Fundamental rights : key legal and policy developments in 2013 / by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights.

Handbook on European law relating to asylum, borders and immigration / by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights.

Medical assistance to self-settled refugees : Guinea, 1990-96 / Wim Van Damme.

Education in the developing world : conflict and crisis / Sarah Graham-Brown on behalf of World University Service.

Exclusion and inclusion of refugees in contemporary Europe / edited by Philip Muus.

Multicultural policies and the state : a comparison of two European societies / edited by Marco Martiniello.

Further Archive Information

The current Opening Hours for our Archival collections are detailed as follows. The Refugee Council Archive and the British Olympic Association Archive are currently located on our Docklands Campus Library whilst the Hackney Empire Archive is currently located in our Stratford Campus Library.

The opening hours for both Docklands and Stratford Archives are as follows:

Docklands Archive

Mondays:  1pm – 6pm*

Tuesdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Wednesdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Thursdays:  1pm – 6pm*

Fridays: 1pm – 5pm*

Sat/Sun:  Both Archives Closed

Access to the Stratford Archive for the Hackney Empire Archive is by prior appointment only.

* Morning appointments between 10am and 12pm are available by prior appointment.  The Archive will be closed between 12pm and 1pm for lunch.

We would recommend that, especially for external users, that you contact us in advance of your trip in order to make an appointment to use the Archives.  This enables us to ensure that a member of staff will be on hand to assist you.

To make an appointment, please click on the link to our Make an Appointment page.

Archive Web Resources and Email List

Please find details below of our various online and social media resources which are currently available online and please do take a look. We would also welcome any feedback that you may have on how these can be improved:

Blogs

We have created several blogs to help support the archival work that we undertake and these are highlighted as follows:

Facebook

Please join and Like Us on Facebook, links are as follows:

Twitter

Please follow us on Twitter by selecting one of the options below:

Refugee-Research Email Mailing List

Please also consider joining our Refugee Research Jiscmail e-mail list which is managed in conjunction with this blog.  To subscribe to the mail group
www.jiscmail.ac.uk, type REFUGEE‐RESEARCH into the ‘find lists’ box, or use the alphabetical index to scroll down to R. and then follow the instructions on our REFUGEERESEARCH homepage to ‘join or leave the list’. Most users need only enter their email address and name. Alternatively, email the Archivist, Paul Dudman on p.v.dudman@uel.ac.uk, requesting to join the mail group.

Please let us know of any further links that you would like to see added.

 

Contact Details

Paul Dudman is currently the Archivist responsible for all of the physical Archives located here at the University of East London Library and Learning Services: Archives. Paul is happy to receive and respond to any questions or queries that you may have in response to both our Archival collections and also our social media presence.

If you wish to contact the Archive, please contact Paul Dudman via one of the contact methods detailed below:

By email at: library-archives@uel.ac.uk

By telephone at: +44 (0) 20 8223 7676

Online at: uelarchivesportal.wordpress.com/contact-us/

On Twitter at: @refugee_archive

By post to:

Paul V. Dudman
Archivist
Library and Learning Services
University of East London
Docklands Campus
4-6 University Way
London, E16 2RD
United Kingdom.

CMRB Event: ‘Beyond the Beast of Austerity: Inequality and the lives we hope to lead’, Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya

CMRB Event:

‘Beyond the Beast of Austerity: Inequality and the lives we hope to lead’, Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya

CMRB is delighted to announce the following seminar:

‘Beyond the Beast of Austerity: Inequality and the lives we hope to lead’, Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL)

This seminar will take place 4-6pm, Monday 12th January 2014 in EB G.06, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD (http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/)

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at beyondthebeastofausterity.eventbrite.co.uk

Full details can be found on the attached flyer. Please circulate widely.

Queries should be directed to: j.hakim@uel.ac.uk

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) is pleased to announce the following seminar:

Beyond the Beast of Austerity:
Inequality and the lives we hope to lead

This seminar will take place in EB G.06, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD
http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

Monday 12th January 2014, 4–6pm

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at
beyondthebeastofausterity.eventbrite.co.uk

Abstract: The language, logic and practices of austerity seem to have saturated everyday life. In the process, we have lived through a concerted attack on ideas of entitlement and equality. This paper tries to understand the manner and nature of the shift in popular discourse and institutional practices brought about through austerity measures. The paper argues that (i) austerity is not and has never been designed as a short-term measure (ii) austerity represents an attempt to reshape the political terrain in a manner that dismantles many of the partial gains of the twentieth century (iii) this dismantling goes far beyond a cutting of service provision and threatens to corrode social connections and confound the articulation of entitlement, solidarity or conviviality. As always, the question is how we think beyond the constraints of this unhappy moment.

Bio: Professor Gargi Bhattacharyya is Professor of Sociology at the University of East London. She has written extensively in the area of ‘race’ and racisms, sexuality, global cultures and the ‘war on terror’. She is completing a book with Palgrave Macmillan on equality and justice in a post-austerity world.

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb

 

CMRB Event: Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel

CMRB Event:

Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel

A full conference programme is now available for the following event:

‘Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel’

Date: Monday 9th February 2015
Time: 09.00–18.30
Place: School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG

To register use the following link: ajamrqpisoas.eventbrite.co.uk

Full price tickets – £20
Concessionary tickets (All students; Staff associated with sponsoring organisations) – £15

The conference programme can be downloaded from the CMRB website: www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/events.htm

This conference seeks to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are being constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel. In particular it seeks to examine how the histories of Zionist settlement, anti-colonial and nation-building struggles and 20th century warfare in the Middle East region are being transformed in the current historical conjuncture. Of particular importance in this context will be ideological and political alliances that have emerged locally, regionally and globally around notions such as the ‘New Antisemitism’, and ‘Islamophobia’ and how these relate to racialised discourses against Jews and Muslims. Drawing on the expertise of scholars and activists from a variety of backgrounds, the aim of the conference will be to serve as a first step for building a transversal anti-racist political vision that will aim to destabilize some of the oppositional dichotomies which are currently hegemonic in discourses around Jews, Muslims and Middle East politics.

The conference is sponsored by University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging, SOAS’s Centre for Palestine Studies (London Middle East Institute), the Runnymede Trust and the LSE Centre for the Study of Human Rights.

Further Details:

University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging, SOAS’s Centre for Palestine Studies (London Middle East Institute), the Runnymede Trust, and the LSE Centre for the Study of Human Rights are delighted to announce:

Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel

This conference will take place at: School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG
Map and directions here:

Monday 9th February 2015, 09.00–18.30

To register use the following link: ajamrqpisoas.eventbrite.co.uk

Registration details
Early bird (ends 30 Nov 2014) – £15
Concessionary (All students; Staff associated with sponsoring organisations) – £15
Full price – £20
All enquiries to be directed to j.hakim@uel.ac.uk

This conference seeks to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are being constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel. In particular it seeks to examine how the histories of Zionist settlement, anti-colonial and nation-building struggles and 20th century warfare in the Middle East region are being transformed in the current historical conjuncture. Of particular importance in this context will be ideological and political alliances that have emerged locally, regionally and globally around notions such as the ‘New Antisemitism’, and ‘Islamophobia’ and how these relate to racialised discourses against Jews and Muslims. Drawing on the expertise of scholars and activists from a variety of backgrounds, the aim of the conference will be to serve as a first step for building a transversal anti-racist political vision that will aim to destabilize some of the oppositional dichotomies which are currently hegemonic in discourses around Jews, Muslims and Middle East politics.

PROGRAMME
9-9.30 Coffee and registration

9.30-10 Welcome by organizers

10-11.15 Plenary panel 1: The Role of the Palestine/Israel Question in Racialised Discourses on Jews
Speakers: David Rosenberg (Jewish Socialist Group), Yasmin Rehman (Cross government working group on hate crimes), Prof. Robert Fine (Warwick), Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL).
Chair: Prof. Gilbert Achcar (SOAS)

11.15-12.30 Parallel sessions

1. Palestine/Israel in the Media
Speakers: Dr. Anne De Jong (University of Amsterdam), Dr David Kaposi (UEL), Hagai van der Horst (SOAS), Prof. Annabelle Sreberny (SOAS).
Chair: Dr. Karim Murji (OU)

2. Rightward Bound: Palestine/Israel and right wing movements across the globe
Speakers: Hilary Aked (Bath University), Dr. Farid Hafez (University of Salzburg), Omran Shroufi (Freie Universität Berlin), Dr. Aaron Winter (UEL).
Chair: Richard Kuper (JfJfP)

3. Historicising Conflicts and Palestine/Israel
Speakers: Dr. Emily Gottreich (Berkley), Alma R Heckman (UCLA), Dr. Gil Hochberg (UCLA), Dr James Renton, (Edge Hill University).
Chair: Dr. Georgie Wemyss (UEL)

4. Unexpected alliances: tracing contemporary racisms and anti-racisms in the context of Palestine/Israel
Speakers: Stefano Bellin (UCL), Dr. Keith Kahn Harris (Birkbeck), Anna-Esther Younes (IHEID), Dr. Marcel Stoetzler (Bangor).
Chair: Prof. Floya Anthias (UEL)

12.30-1.30 Lunch

1.30-2.45 Plenary panel 2: The Role of the Palestine/Israel Question in Racialised Discourses on Muslims.
Speakers: Prof. Haim Bresheeth (SOAS), Dr. Muhammad Idrees Ahmad (University of Stirling), Dr. Dina Matar (SOAS), Dr. Subir Sinha (SOAS).
Chair: Omar Khan (Runnymede Trust)

2.45-4 Parallel discussion workshops.

Chairs: Prof. Annabelle Sreberny (SOAS), Prof. David Feldman (Birkbeck), Gita Saghal (CSS), Prof. Avishai Ehrlich (Academic College, Tel Aviv-Yaffa).

4-4.30 Tea break

4.30-6 Plenary panel 3: The Interrelationships between Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racialised Discourses
Speakers: Prof. Gilbert Achcar (SOAS); Prof. Yosefa Loshitzky (SOAS); Prof. Sami Zubaida (Birkbeck).
Chair: Dr. Jamie Hakim (UEL/UEA)

5.30-6.30 Final session: The Way Forward, led by Prof. Nira Yuval-Davis (UEL)
A full conference programme including paper titles, abstracts and speaker bios is available from the CMRB website

 

CMRB Event at UEL: Hierarchy, Inequality and Stratification: classing intersectionality and intersectionalising class, Prof. Floya Anthias (UEL)

CMEB Event:

Hierarchy, Inequality and Stratification: classing intersectionality and intersectionalising class, Prof. Floya Anthias (UEL)

CMRB is delighted to announce the following seminar:

‘Hierarchy, Inequality and Stratification: classing intersectionality and intersectionalising class’, Prof. Floya Anthias (UEL)

This seminar will take place 4-6pm, Monday 26th January 2014 in EB G.06, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD (http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/)

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at floyaanthiascmrb.eventbrite.co.uk

Full details can be found on the attached flyer. Please circulate widely.

Queries should be directed to: j.hakim@uel.ac.uk

The University of East London’s CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) is pleased to announce the following seminar:

Hierarchy, Inequality and Stratification: classing intersectionality and intersectionalising class

This seminar will take place in EB G.06, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD

http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

Monday 26th January 2014, 4–6pm

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at

floyaanthiascmrb.eventbrite.co.uk

Abstract: The complexity of social divisions and their inter-relations, both as analytical categories and categories of practice asks us to rethink the terms that we use for understanding both ‘identity’ formations and forms of inequality. In this paper I cross reference debates on class and debates on intersectionality. These debates rarely engage with each other. I will argue that both debates fail in different ways. Intersectionality debates rarely provide a clear analysis of the role of class formation in power relations. Stratification approaches rarely engage with the inter-relationships of different modalities of power, for example around gender and race in ways that don’t subordinate them to ‘class’. I will reflect critically on some approaches to class that attempt to move away from a traditional focus on relations of production and labour markets, thereby attempting to incorporate gender and ethnicity into class theory and the newer more culturally nuanced political economy. I will also consider how intersectional frameworks could be developed in ways that attend more centrally to classed social relations.

An analysis of hierarchy and inequality needs to rethink some major categories of social analysis including notions of materiality and culture (daunting to say the least apropos the Marxisant demise), needs to be more global in scope (surprisingly lacking in the literature given the prominence of debates on globalisation and the critique of methodological nationalism) and consider particularly how transnational mobilities and  related social exclusions and boundaries  set up new forms of social stratification and inequality. Global inequalities, the challenges to secularism, fundamentalisms and the racialisation of religion are particularly important in the current period.

Bio: Prior to becoming a Professor of Sociology at UEL in 2013 Floya Anthias was Professor of Sociology and Social Justice at the University of Roehampton (where she remains as Emeritus Professor). She has also been Professor of Sociology at the University of Greenwich and Oxford Brookes University.

Her main academic writings have explored different forms of stratification, social hierarchy and inequality, and how they interconnect. Her research spans a range of theoretical and empirical concerns relating to this.  This has included a focus on racism, diaspora and hybridity, multiculturalism, gender and migration, labour market disadvantages and class position.  Her most recent work has been developing the concept of translocational positionality as a way of addressing some of the difficulties identified with concepts of hybridity, identity and intersectionality. She has published on these issues in a range of top peer reviewed journals.

Floya’s books include Woman Nation State, Palgrave (with N. Yuval Davis), Racialised Boundaries: nation, race, ethnicity, colour and class and the anti racist struggle (with N Yuval-Davis), Routledge, Ethnicity, Class, Gender and Migration, Greek Cypriots in Britain, Avebury, Into the Margins: Migration and Exclusion in Southern Europe, (with G. Lazaridis), Ashgate, Gender and Migration in Southern Europe: women on the move (with G. Lazaridis), Berg, Rethinking Anti-racisms: from theory to practice, (with Cathie Lloyd), Routledge, Paradoxes of Integration: Female Migrants in Europe, (with M. Kontos and M. Morokvasic), Springer, Contesting Integration, Engendering Migration, Palgrave (with M. Pajnik), and  Work and the Challenges of Belonging (with M. Pajnik), Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

For more info on CMRB: uel.ac.uk/cmrb

Photography project – Brian Sokol

IOM Report on Recent Use of Cargo Ships to Transport Syrians to Italy

MIGRANTS AT SEA

Excerpts from a short IOM report released on 6 January 2015 on the recent use of cargo ships, specifically the Blue Sky M and the Ezadeen, to transport Syrians towards Italy:

“IOM analysts do believe the prospect of single-nationality cargoes – on these latest voyages, migrants fleeing Syria – creates opportunities for smuggling rings to employ certain economies of scale that were not apparent in the more ‘mixed’ passenger manifests seen leaving Egypt and Libya in 2014.”

“‘The predictability of thousands now fleeing Syria every month allows smugglers to plan for a reliable stream of customers, which of course allows them to set a price point,’ explained Joel Millman, a spokesperson for IOM in Geneva. ‘So they can predict how much revenue each trip will bring, and then quickly deploy vessels and crews’. Millman added that Lebanon’s recent decision to require visas of Syrian migrants seeking to enter Lebanon may…

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