Monthly Archives: October 2014

News Stories (Daily) 10/31/2014

  • “In early September, according to eyewitnesses, Egyptian smugglers deliberately sunk a boat carrying aout 450 migrants, most of them Palestinians fleeing Gaza after this summer’s war. The UN’s human rights chief called it “mass murder in the Mediterranean.””
    A ‘mass murder in the Mediterranean’ leaves nearly 450 lost at sea, including this man’s family http://t.co/4wpPnX0pZT @hratsea

    tags:news

  • “In the past four weeks alone, the Minister of Justice and Security in the Netherlands was blamed for deporting failed asylum seekers with severe medical conditions to countries in which their health treatment cannot be guaranteed; the chief of the national police in Melilla, Spain, was charged by a judge for illegally performing ‘pushback’ operations of migrants into Morocco; and the Israeli High Court ordered the dismantling of the biggest detention center and revoked a recent law that permitted the imprisonment of asylum seekers for one year without trial. I could go on providing more examples from other countries that illustrate the formal and informal mess that overwhelmingly characterizes the running of modern state deportation regimes.”

    tags:news

  • “By: Sarah Spencer, Open Society Fellow, and Nicola Delvino (Nicola is a lawyer and worked as a researcher and co-authored the COMPAS report “Irregular Migrants in Italy: Law and Policy on Entitlements to Services”)

    This month sees the first anniversary of Italy’s Mare Nostrum operation, launched to reinforce rescue capacity in the Mediterranean following the drowning of 368 migrants off the coast of Lampedusa in October last year. In the intervening months many lives have still been lost but many saved. A consequence for Italy has been that thousands more people from the Middle East and parts of Africa are reaching its shores in need of help.”

    tags:news

  • “David Needham knows first hand the struggle French police and border officials face in preventing illegal immigrants from crossing the Channel into Britain.

    The experienced British lorry driver runs the gauntlet of desperate gangs daily as he passes through Calais on his route between Kent and Belgium.

    An estimated 2,300 people live in squalid camps near the French port just waiting for the opportunity to sneak onto a vehicle such as his.

    Mr Needham is one of a growing number of British road hauliers who will not stop in Calais, even to refuel his vehicle, nevermind to rest overnight.

    “We all used to park on the seafront and never have any trouble, now you wouldn’t dare to stop in Calais,” he told The Telegraph. ”

    tags:news

  • ““Ordre, ordre. Je veux te – si je peux be so bold – welcomer ici. It is not souvent que the Lady Mayor de Calais gets to meet moi,” said Keith Vaz in the pre-rehearsed speed-dating routine he usually reserves for his mirror. Natacha Bouchart looked startled, as much by the sound of her native language being badly mauled as by the nature of her welcome. She had made the day trip on Eurostar to give evidence to the home affairs committee on immigration only to find herself treated like an illegal immigrant.”

    tags:news

  • “Evidence of waste and poor management within Britain’s immigration system has been laid bare by a parliamentary report which reveals that failed IT systems are to cost up to £1bn while officials cannot find 50,000 rejected asylum seekers.

    The Commons public accounts committee (PAC) also discloses that 11,000 asylum seekers in the UK have been waiting for at least seven years to hear whether they can stay and that officials have still not resolved 29,000 asylum applications dating back to at least 2007.”

    tags:news

  • “Courtesy of Natacha Bouchart, the mayor of Calais, Britain’s rightwing press has had a field day. Speaking before the home affairs select committee in London yesterday, Bouchart also gave the immigration-obsessed Westminster village a run for its money. Even by Ukip standards, her comments were inflammatory. Nigel Farage must have thought that the French politician was the most effective recruiter ever for his cause. The media used a rather loose translation of her words to make them sound more dramatic than they actually were.”

    tags:news

  • “We are under siege from great hordes of immigrants as we wave around our “lavish” benefits. They climb over huge fences erected to protect politicians from protestors. They dangle on spikes of barbed wire, half-gone from exhaustion. No one can stop them. All the systems that are meant to control their numbers are in disarray.”

    tags:news

  • “As the construction boom in the West Asian (Gulf) countries continues, including building of the World Cup related structures in Qatar and the complex of international museums in Abu Dhabi, there is increasing attention and growing concern in the world’s media and human rights organisations about the situation of migrants recruited for low-skilled, low-paid work in these countries. Recent reports estimate that over 90% of the total workforce in some Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries is made up of non-nationals. While most of the migrants in the construction sector, and some in the service sector, are male, there is a continuing influx of female domestic workers in the region. In contrast to workers in high-skilled, high-paid jobs who largely tend to come from richer countries in the global north, the majority of migrants recruited for low-skilled jobs are from South and South East Asia.”

    tags:news

  • “The great majority of labour immigration programmes (and almost all temporary labour migration programmes) in high-income countries operate “labour market tests”, which aim to ensure that employers recruit migrant workers only after having made every reasonable effort to recruit “local workers”. Labour market tests usually require employers to advertise their vacancies for a minimum period of time before applying for a work permit for a migrant worker. For example, the UK’s “resident labour market test” for employing non-EU workers is explained here (pages 83-91) and Ireland’s version is here.”

    tags:news

  • “Many commentators, especially those who are broadly “pro-migration”, blame the media for creating a public discourse of hostility to immigration through its use of inflamed language and scare-mongering statistics. Others, especially those who are broadly “anti-migration”, defend the media as simply responding to public fears and concerns, reflecting back an issue on which voters feel passionate. But what evidence is there about the content of media messages on migration?”

    tags:news

  • “The investigation was ordered following an exposé by the Observer newspaper which uncovered evidence of an asylum seeker being asked inappropriate and sexually explicit questions by a Home Office case worker.”

    tags:news

  • “The UK Government has shamefully refused to support search and rescue efforts, aimed at saving the lives of people who are forced to take perilous journeys across the Mediterranean Sea as they try to reach safety in Europe.

    This week, the Italian-funded search and rescue operation focused on helping people whose boats get into difficulty in the Mediterranean is due to come to an end.”

    tags:news

  • “An influential group of MPs has criticised the Government for a mounting backlog of asylum cases, blaming in part the decision to downgrade asylum decision makers at the Home Office.

    The Public Accounts Committee (PAC) has slammed the Home Office for failing to resolve 29,000 asylum applications dating back to at least 2007, of which 11,000 have not even received an initial decision on their claim.”

    tags:news

  • “Pantomime season began early this week, set to the beat of a calypso drum. And part of the soap-opera drama of UK immigration politics – all dodgy peerages and unpaid bills this week – surely stems from the ease with which the “truth” is bent to our own convenience. So Migration Watch has ‘improved public understanding’ of immigration; Sir Andrew Green has ‘no political axes to grind’. In this world-turned-upside down, this is Democracy in Action: not the loss of a measured, meaningful debate on migration in favour of prejudice. “

    tags:news

  • ” 366 refugees died off Lampedusa on 3 October 2013. One year later, refugees still have no other choice but to risk their lives in order to seek protection. One year later, despite much talk, there is still no legal and safe access to Europe for people fleeing war and persecution. One year later, a truly European response to guarantee sustainable and effective search and rescue in the Mediterranean is still missing. It’s high time the EU acts. NGOs call on the EU to open up legal and safe routes for refugees and step up search and rescue efforts in the Mediterranean.”

    tags:news

  • “More than 140,000 Syrian refugees have fled across the border to southern Turkey. CARE is assessing needs and coordinating with the Turkish authorities and other organisations to distribute food, blankets and hygiene items to newly arrived refugees most in need. Here are some of their stories.

    Alan Abraka* is a lawyer from a village 50km from Kobane, Syria. He is helping CARE to carry out assessments in Turkey.”

    tags:news

  • “The last thing I remember about Syria is my last day at school. It was the hardest day of my life. I have always been very ambitious and one of the top students in my class. I had only four weeks left to finish ninth grade when my father told my sister, my two brothers and me that we would have to flee to Jordan. I was yelling at him and screaming. He explained to us that it was not safe anymore, that people were getting killed and arrested. I did not care about our safety and told my parents that I preferred to stay in the middle of the bombings rather than having to leave my country. But in the end I kept quiet. I knew that if I made my family stay and anything would happen, I could never ever forgive myself. The only thing I knew about Jordan I knew from TV. I had seen videos of Zaatari Camp on the news, and I was horrified.”

    tags:news

  • “His neat uniform holds the emblem of a private security company. In the moonlight I could see the rolling hills with their bare, small patches of grass and bush in a sea of stones and dust. No houses, street lamps, or mosques in sight. Not even a moving car. At least nowhere near the perimeter that marks the boundaries of what could turn into one of the biggest refugee camps in the world.”

    tags:news

  • “Sri Lanka must stop making empty promises to the international community and the Sri Lankan people on improving the country’s still desperate human rights situation, Amnesty International said ahead of a UN review of the country’s rights record.

    The UN Human Rights Committee (HRC) in Geneva, Switzerland, will on 7 and 8 October 2014 be reviewing Sri Lanka’s respect for rights enshrined in the key human rights treaty: the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR). This is the first such assessment since 2003.”

    tags:news

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

The New Refugee Council Archive at UEL (hopefully) Weekly Bulletin

Refugee Archives News
The Refugee Council Archives at UEL (hopefully) Weekly Bulletin
Issue: 1, 30 October 2014.

Introduction

dscf5929Welcome to the first/latest issue of Refugee Archive News: The Refugee Council Archives at UEL (hopefully) Weekly Bulletin.

This bulletin has the aim of providing both the latest news and developments on the Refugee Council Archive at the University of East London whilst also providing additional information on issues of concern to refugee and forced migration studies more generally. This I hope will include details of news stories, calls for papers, conferences and seminars, and online resources of potential interest. This bulletin, I hope, will aim to provide useful information to both students and academics on both UEL undergraduate courses in International Development and postgraduate students on our courses in Refugee Studies; Refugee Studies and Community Development and Conflict, Displacement and Human Security, whilst also being hopefully of interest to a wider readership represented by our Twitter and Blog followers.

This bulletin will be circulated via our Refugee Archive WordPress blog and also via our Refugee-Research Jiscmail email list. We would welcome any feedback that you may have on this bulletin and we would also welcome any input that you may have in terms of current and future content for both this bulletin and also our WordPress blog more generally. Please Contact Paul Dudman via email (library-archvies@uel.ac.uk) or Twitter (@PaulDudman) with any feedback or thoughts that you may have.

There are also some general Archive details included at the end of this and every bulletin posting for your reference.

Archive, CMRB and Course-Related News

News from the UEL Archives

Details of UEL Libraries Christmas and New Year Opening Hours for 2014/15 have just been published on the UEL Library website. Further details are available here: http://www.uel.ac.uk/lls/about/openinghours/christmas2014/

News from the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB) at UEL.

CMRB Seminar Announcement: CMRB is pleased to announce as part of its Borders and Bordering Seminar Series:

‘Between Innocence and Deviance: figuring the asylum-seeker child in Australia’, Dr. Carly McLaughlin (University of Potsdam)

This seminar will take place 4–6pm, Monday 10th November 2014,  in EB 1.04, Docklands Campus, UEL, E16 2RD
http://www.uel.ac.uk/about/campuses/docklands/

IF YOU ARE COMING FROM OUTSIDE UEL PLEASE RESERVE A PLACE BEFORE 12PM ON FRIDAY 7TH NOVEMBER SO WE CAN ENSURE YOU HAVE ACCESS TO THE SEMINAR ROOM. WHEN YOU ARRIVE, PLEASE REGISTER AT THE RECEPTION OF DOCKLANDS CAMPUS AND YOU WILL BE ISSUED WITH A VISITOR’S PASS.

The event is free but space is limited so please reserve a place at
https://betweeninnocenceanddeviance.eventbrite.co.uk

All queries to be directed to Jamie Hakim, CMRB Administrator, on j.hakim@uel.ac.uk.

CMRB Conference Announcement:

We are delighted to announce that registration is now open for the following conference:

‘Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel’

Date: Monday 9th February 2015
Time: 09.00–18.30
Place: School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG on  between

To register use the following link: ajamrqpisoas.eventbrite.co.uk

Early bird registration (ends 30 Nov 2014) – £15
Concessionary (All students; Staff associated with sponsoring organisations) – £15
Full price – £20

This conference seeks to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are being constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel. In particular it seeks to examine how the histories of Zionist settlement, anti-colonial and nation-building struggles and 20th century warfare in the Middle East region are being transformed in the current historical conjuncture. Of particular importance in this context will be ideological and political alliances that have emerged locally, regionally and globally around notions such as the ‘New Antisemitism’, and ‘Islamophobia’ and how these relate to racialised discourses against Jews and Muslims. Drawing on the expertise of scholars and activists from a variety of backgrounds, the aim of the conference will be to serve as a first step for building a transversal anti-racist political vision that will aim to destabilize some of the oppositional dichotomies which are currently hegemonic in discourses around Jews, Muslims and Middle East politics.

The conference is sponsored by University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging, SOAS’s Centre for Palestine Studies (London Middle East Institute), the Runnymede Trust and the LSE Centre for the Study of Human Rights.

All queries to be directed to Jamie Hakim, CMRB Administrator, on j.hakim@uel.ac.uk.
In the News

News Stories of Interest from this week – UK and Europe:

News on the UK’s decision to no longer support future search and rescue operations to prevent migrants drowning in the Mediterranean Sea and Italy’s decision to end Mare Nostrum:

BBC News – UK opposes future migrant rescues in Mediterranean

The Independent – UK axes support for Mediterranean migrant rescue operation

The Independent – Italy’s decision to end Mare Nostrum will put the lives of thousands of migrants and refugees at risk

Amnesty International – Is there ever a justification for leaving people to drown in the Med?

The Telegraph – Drown an immigrant to save an immigrant: why is the Government borrowing policy from the BNP?

The Guardian – Italian navy says it will continue refugee rescue mission despite plan to scrap it

The Guardian – Migrants’ tales: ‘I feel for those who were with me. They got asylum in the sea’

The Independent – European governments must come to the rescue of asylum-seekers

ECRE – ECRE and UNHCR Concerned over the ending of Mare Nostrum without European rescue initiative to replace it.

ECRE – Mare Nostrum to end – New Frontex operation will not ensure rescue of migrants in international waters

UNHCR – UNHCR concerned over ending of rescue operation in the Mediterranean

Other UK and International News

BBC News – 29,000 asylum cases still unresolved from 2007, say MPs.

BBC News – UK benefits a magnet to migrants, says Calais mayor

The Migration Observatory at Oxford University – Calais and clandestine migration into the UK: Concerns and context

The Telegraph – Trafficking gang offered ‘a la carte’ routes to UK.

BBC News – London asylum seekers moved to Folkestone hotel

The Huffington Post – Thousands Of Asylum Seekers Wait Seven Years To Learn Their Fate

The Guardian – Better integration is the best way to quell immigration fears

The Guardian – Don’t dismiss public fears about migration as mere bigotry

The Independent – Britain admits nearly three times more migrants from outside the EU than anyother member state, statistics show

The Independent – Cutting EU immigration will backfire, say employers

The Independent – Sir Andrew Green peerage: A highly misguided Lords appointment forthe Migration Watch founder

The Telegraph – Migrants fight in Calais for control of routes to Britain, say police

The Telegraph – Migrants storm UK-bound lorries at Calais

The Guardian – Gay asylum seekers face ‘intrusive’ sexual questions

The Independent – More than 10,000 asylum-seekers ‘left in limbo’

The Telegraph – Britain’s schools need more resources for ‘influx’ of immigrant children, chief schools inspector warns

The Huffington Post – The Secret Gardens Of Syria’s Refugee Camps

The Guardian – Tamil Nadu’s exploited garment workers need help from British justice. See details of report below.

Events and Call for Papers

Events

News from the London Migration Research Group (LMRG) about their upcoming Seminars for 2014-15, entitled `Talking Across Disciplines.’ Convenors: Fiona Adamson & Kristin Surak (SOAS), Claire Dwyer (UCL) and Eiko Thielemann (LSE)
When: Tuesdays, 17.30 – 19.00
Where: New York University in London, 6 Bedford Square, WC1B 3RA, Room tbc

4 Nov Ruben Anderson<http://rubenandersson.com/>(LSE)
Rescued and caught: the humanitarian paradox at Europe’s maritime frontiers

18 Nov Nadia Jaworsky<http://www.muni.cz/fss/people/370423/publications> (Yale/Masaryk University)
A Cultural Sociology of Cyberactivism: The U.S. Immigrant Rights Movement Online

2 Dec Gregor Noll<http://works.bepress.com/gregor_noll/> (University of Lund)
Junk Science: The Politics of Age and Unaccompanied Asylum Seekers

To attend, please join the respective event on our facebook page<https://www.facebook.com/pages/London-Migration-Research-Group-LMRG/108613799294580> or send an email to e.thielemann@lse.ac.uk
Calls for Papers

Special Issue of the: Journal of Human Trafficking, Fall 2015:

Traffickers and Slaveholders: Human Rights Violators in Comparative Perspective

Guest Editor: Austin Choi Fitzpatrick
Link:- http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/cfp/uhmtcfp.pdf

Citizenship  Studies

Call for Papers for two special issues of the journal: Citizenship  Studies to be published in 2016.
Further details: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/pdf/ccst-2016-special-issues.pdf

Online Publications

Publications reproduced from Minority Ethnic Matters Overview (MEMO), Issue 413, (20th October 2014). Available to [Download here]

Chasing status: the ‘surprised Brits’ who find they are living with irregular immigration status
http://www.lag.org.uk/media/186917/small_chasing_status.pdf

This is how it feels to be lonely
http://migrantforum.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Loneliness-report_The-Forum_UPDATED.pdf

Mid-term report on the implementation of the EU strategy towards the eradication of trafficking in human beings
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/home-affairs/what-is-new/news/news/docs/20141017_midterm_report_on_the_2012-2016_eu_strategy_on_trafficking_in_human_beings_en.pdf

Trafficking in human beings
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/home-affairs/what-isnew/news/news/docs/20141017_working_paper_on_statistics_on_trafficking_in_human_beings_en.pdf

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament on the application of Directive 2004/81 on the residence permit issued to third country nationals who are victims of trafficking in human beings or who have been the subject of an action to facilitate illegal immigration, who cooperate with the competent authorities
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/home-affairs/e-library/documents/policies/immigration/irregularimmigration/docs/communication_on_the_application_of_directive_2004-81_en.pdf

Human trafficking in the EU: infographic
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/home-affairs/e-library/docs/infographics/thb/thb_en.pdf

New Off Air Recordings

The following off-air recording requests have been made for the Refugee Council Archive for the week beginning Saturday, 1st November:

Saturday 1st November

0430-0500: BBC News 24: Our World – Switzerland: Stolen Childhoods with Kavita Puri. Series Recording.

Sunday 2nd November

2100-2200: BBC2: (2/2) Afghanistan: the Lion’s Last Roar.

Monday 3rd November

2100-2235: Channel 4: Make Leicester British.

Thursday 6th November

0310-0400: Channel 5: Black Market Britain: Undercover Sting – Sham Wedding Crashers.

Friday 7th November

0305-0330: Channel 4: (5/8) Unreported World – India’s Electric Dreams. Series Recording.

1935-2000: Channel 4: (6/8) Unreported World – The Kids of Murder High. Series Recording.

Archive Opening Hours

The current Opening Hours for our Archival collections are detailed as follows. The Refugee Council Archive and the British Olympic Association Archive are currently located on our Docklands Campus Library whilst the Hackney Empire Archive is currently located in our Stratford Campus Library.

The opening hours for both Docklands and Stratford Archives are as follows:

Docklands Archive

Mondays:  1pm – 6pm*
Tuesdays:  1pm – 6pm*
Wednesdays:  1pm – 6pm*
Thursdays:  1pm – 6pm*
Fridays: 1pm – 6pm*
Sat/Sun:  Both Archives Closed

Access to the Stratford Archive for the Hackney Empire Archive is by prior appointment only.

* Morning appointments between 10am and 12pm are available by prior appointment.  The Archive will be closed between 12pm and 1pm for lunch.

We would recommend that, especially for external users, that you contact us in advance of your trip in order to make an appointment to use the Archives.  This enables us to ensure that a member of staff will be on hand to assist you.

To make an appointment, please click on the link to our Make an Appointment page.

Archive Web Resources and Email List

Please find details below of our various online and social media resources which are currently available online and please do take a look. We would also welcome any feedback that you may have on how these can be improved:

Blogs

We have created several blogs to help support the archival work that we undertake and these are highlighted as follows:

Facebook

Please join and Like Us on Facebook, links are as follows:

Twitter

Please follow us on Twitter by selecting one of the options below:

Refugee-Research Email Mailing List

Please also consider joining our Refugee Research Jiscmail e-mail list which is managed in conjunction with this blog.  To subscribe to the mail group
www.jiscmail.ac.uk, type REFUGEE‐RESEARCH into the ‘find lists’ box, or use the alphabetical index to scroll down to R. and then follow the instructions on our REFUGEERESEARCH homepage to ‘join or leave the list’. Most users need only enter their email address and name. Alternatively, email the Archivist, Paul Dudman on p.v.dudman@uel.ac.uk, requesting to join the mail group.

Please let us know of any further links that you would like to see added.

Contact Details

Paul Dudman is currently the Archivist responsible for all of the physical Archives located here at the University of East London Library and Learning Services: Archives. Paul is happy to receive and respond to any questions or queries that you may have in response to both our Archival collections and also our social media presence.

If you wish to contact the Archive, please contact Paul Dudman via one of the contact methods detailed below:

By email at: library-archives@uel.ac.uk

By telephone at: +44 (0) 20 8223 7676

Online at: uelarchivesportal.wordpress.com/contact-us/

On Twitter at: @refugee_archive

By post to:

Paul V. Dudman
Archivist
Library and Learning Services
University of East London
Docklands Campus
4-6 University Way
London, E16 2RD
United Kingdom.

News: ECRE and UNHCR Concerned over the ending of Mare Nostrum without European rescue initiative to replace it.

Extract:

ECRE and UNHCR have warned that ending Italy’s rescue operation Mare Nostrum without replacing it by a well-resourced European search and rescue initiative would mean more deaths at sea.

One year ago, just a few days after more than 300 people drowned off the coast of Lampedusa, Italy launched the Mare Nostrum operation to ensure search and rescue of migrants in the Mediterranean. Since then, Mare Nostrum has saved around 150,000 people.

“Everyone was horrified at the loss of lives off Lampedusa one year ago. Italy did something about it. Now this life-saving Mare Nostrum operation is at stake. Refugees, many fleeing war in Syria and oppression in Eritrea, cannot stay in lawless Libya and it is not possible for them to reach a safe place legally and safely. If Mare Nostrum ends without being replaced by a well-resourced operation whose priority is to save lives, more people will die in their attempt to reach our shores. A European effort is urgently needed, if the EU is really serious about putting an end to the deaths in the Mediterranean,” said ECRE’s Secretary General Michael Diedring.

Read the full article online via the ECRE website here: ECRE and UNHCR Concerned over the ending of Mare Nostrum without European rescue initiative to replace it.

Further news and social media coverage of this story are available via the following links:

BBC News – UK opposes future migrant rescues in Mediterranean

The Independent – UK axes support for Mediterranean migrant rescue operation

The Independent – Italy’s decision to end Mare Nostrum will put the lives of thousands of migrants and refugees at risk

Amnesty International – Is there ever a justification for leaving people to drown in the Med?

The Telegraph – Drown an immigrant to save an immigrant: why is the Government borrowing policy from the BNP?

The Guardian – Italian navy says it will continue refugee rescue mission despite plan to scrap it

The Guardian – Migrants’ tales: ‘I feel for those who were with me. They got asylum in the sea’

The Independent – European governments must come to the rescue of asylum-seekers

ECRE – Mare Nostrum to end – New Frontex operation will not ensure rescue of migrants in international waters

UNHCR – UNHCR concerned over ending of rescue operation in the Mediterranean

 

German scholarship programme for Syrian refugees

The (ab)normality of migration and the legal position of migrants under international law

Interest Group on Migration and Refugee Law

Call for blog submissions

The ESIL Interest Group on Migration and Refugee Law seeks to organize a blog symposium in the Fall/Winter of 2014 on the topic of the (ab)normality of migration.

Migration is a normal part of life, and always has been. Cells migrate, birds migrate and, of course, humans migrate. Human migration is a constant in the history of the world. Migrants make up a steady 3% of the world’s population. As the world’s population grew, the number of migrants grew with it. But this has not changed the percentage: it continues to be roughly 3%. People have always sought new and better homes, for varying reasons. Of course, some of the underlying reasons for migration should not be accepted as normal, such as persecution, war and natural disasters. However, such forced migration only accounts for a small percentage of overall migration. Moreover, the causes of a phenomenon…

View original post 323 more words

CMRB Seminar: Between Innocence and Deviance: figuring the asylum-seeker child in Australia

CMRB (The Centre for Research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) at the University of East London is pleased to announce as part of its Borders and Bordering Seminar Series:

Between Innocence and Deviance:
figuring the asylum-seeker child in Australia
Dr.
Carly McLaughlin
(University of Potsdam)

 This seminar will take place in

EB.1.04, Docklands Campus, University of East London, E16 2RD, nearest tube: Cyprus DLR
(
http://www.uel.ac.uk/campuses/docklands/)
4-6pm, Monday 10th November 2014

The event is free but spaces are limited so please reserve a place by following the below link https://betweeninnocenceanddeviance.eventbrite.co.uk

Abstract: In Australia, the depiction of asylum seekers as monstrous parents who throw their children into the sea or force their children to take part in protests in detention centres has rightly been identified as part of the government’s campaign to dehumanise asylum seekers. So far, however, little focus has been placed on the children and the discourses which form around them. This paper examines the way in which the figure of the child asylum seeker has been produced and instrumentalised in different discursive contexts. Across the political divide, asylum-seeker children have invariably been figured as victims, an image which has not only served the government’s cause of demonising adult asylum seekers, but has also been used as powerful political currency for those campaigning on behalf of asylum seekers. The instrumentalisation of this figure hinges on universal ideas about childhood as a universal, apolitical state of innocence and vulnerability. The paper explores how this leads to the image and behaviour of asylum seeker children in Australia being contained within normative ideas about childhood, thus ensuring that the figure of the innocent and vulnerable asylum-seeker child remains intact. Ultimately, this abstracts children from the highly politicised context of Australia’s mandatory detention regime and renders them invisible as political subjects.

Carly McLaughlin is a lecturer in literary and cultural studies in the Department of English and American Studies at the University of Potsdam, Germany. In her research, she is interested in how the politics of childhood influences how child migrants are perceived, especially within the context of ‘illegal’ migration. She is currently working on her post-doctoral project which is concerned with the legal, social and cultural production of the figure of the asylum seeker child in Australia and Great Britain.

See www.euborderscapes.eu for more information on the EU Borderscapes project, www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/borderscapes for details of the UEL Borderscapes team and www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb for information on CMRB

 

Registration Open for CMRB Conference: Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel

University of East London’s Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging, SOAS’s Centre for Palestine Studies (London Middle East Institute), the Runnymede Trust, and the LSE Centre for the Study of Human Rights are delighted to announce:

Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel

This conference will take place at: School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG
Map and directions here:

Monday 9th February 2015, 09.00–18.30

To register use the following link: ajamrqpisoas.eventbrite.co.uk

Registration details
Early bird (ends 30 Nov 2014) – £15
Concessionary (All students; Staff associated with sponsoring organisations) – £15
Full price – £20
All enquiries to be directed to j.hakim@uel.ac.uk

This conference seeks to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are being constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel. In particular it seeks to examine how the histories of Zionist settlement, anti-colonial and nation-building struggles and 20th century warfare in the Middle East region are being transformed in the current historical conjuncture. Of particular importance in this context will be ideological and political alliances that have emerged locally, regionally and globally around notions such as the ‘New Antisemitism’, and ‘Islamophobia’ and how these relate to racialised discourses against Jews and Muslims. Drawing on the expertise of scholars and activists from a variety of backgrounds, the aim of the conference will be to serve as a first step for building a transversal anti-racist political vision that will aim to destabilize some of the oppositional dichotomies which are currently hegemonic in discourses around Jews, Muslims and Middle East politics.

Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racisms and the Question of Palestine/Israel
Programme
09.00-09.30 Coffee and registration
09.30-10.00 Welcome by organizers
10.00-11.15 Plenary panel 1: The Role of the Palestine/Israel Question in Racialised Discourses on Jews
Speakers: David Rosenberg (Jewish Socialist Group); Yasmin Rehman (Cross government working group on hate crimes); Prof. Robert Fine (Warwick); Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL)
11.15-12.30 Parallel sessions
12.30-13.30 Lunch
13.30-14.45 Plenary panel 2: The Role of the Palestine/Israel Question in Racialised Discourses on Muslims
Speakers: Prof. Haim Bresheeth (SOAS); Dr. Muhammad Idrees Ahmad (University of Stirling); Dr. Dina Matar (SOAS); Dr. Subir Sinha (SOAS)
14.45-16.00 Parallel discussion workshops
16.00-16.30 Tea break
16.30-17.30 Plenary panel 3: The Interrelationships between Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racialised Discourses
Speakers: Prof. Gilbert Achcar (SOAS); Prof. Yosefa Loshitzky (SOAS); Prof. Sami Zubaida (Birkbeck);
17.30-18.30 Final session: The Way Forward
A booklet containing full paper titles, abstracts and speaker’s bios will shortly be downloadable from: http://ajamrqpisoas.eventbrite.co.uk

Opting out of Mediterranean rescue condemns desperate migrants to death

Postcards from ...

By Nando Sigona, University of Birmingham

[This article was originally published on The Conversation, 29 October 2014]

Strait_of_gibraltarThe UK government is seeking to defend its decision not to support rescue missions for migrants making the dangerous crossing to Europe via the central Mediterranean. And even though Europe professes to be stepping up to the plate, the emphasis is now being placed on monitoring European waters rather than actually helping those in trouble. Unless all of Europe faces what is, in reality, a shared problem, many more tragic deaths are likely to follow the thousands that have occurred in the past few years.

According to a recent report by the International Organization for Migration, more than 3,000 have died trying to cross the Mediterranean in 2014 alone. Before then, in October 2013, 366 migrants drowned in a single incident when a boat taking them from Libya to Italy…

View original post 438 more words

UNHCR: Significant Increase in Deaths at Sea Off Yemen Coincides with Increasing Numbers of Migrants Reaching Yemen by Boat

MIGRANTS AT SEA

Excerpts from UNHCR press statement 17 Oct. 2104: “[T]here has been a sharp increase this year in the number of migrants and asylum-seekers losing their lives in attempts to get to Yemen, mainly from the Horn of Africa, with more deaths at sea in 2014 than in the last three years combined. One of the recent tragic incidents took place on 2 October when 64 migrants and three crew died when their vessel, sailing from Somalia, sank in the Gulf of Aden. Since, then five more deaths bring the yearly tally for 2014 to 215, exceeding the combined total for 2011, 2012 and 2013 of 179….

The latest deaths come amidst a dramatic increase in the number of new arrivals to Yemen by boat in September. At 12,768, it marks the single biggest month for arrivals since current records began to be kept in 2002. Most of the migrants are…

View original post 70 more words

OHCHR Releases Recommended Principles and Guidelines on Human Rights at International Borders

MIGRANTS AT SEA

The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights yesterday issued Recommended Principles and Guidelines on Human Rights at International Borders. OHCHR, along with multiple stakeholders, has been working on the principles and guidelines since 2012.

Excerpts:
I. Introduction
A. Human rights at international borders
1. International borders are not zones of exclusion or exception for human rights obligations. States are entitled to exercise jurisdiction at their international borders, but they must do so in light of their human rights obligations. This means that the human rights of all persons at international borders must be respected in the pursuit of border control, law enforcement and other State objectives, regardless of which authorities perform border governance measures and where such measures take place.
2. Migration discourse is replete with terminology used to categorize people who migrate, such as “unaccompanied or separated children”, “migrants in irregular situations”, “smuggled migrants” or…

View original post 900 more words

UNHCR: Significant Increase in Deaths at Sea Off Yemen Coincides with Increasing Numbers of Migrants Reaching Yemen by Boat

MIGRANTS AT SEA

Excerpts from UNHCR press statement 17 Oct. 2104: “[T]here has been a sharp increase this year in the number of migrants and asylum-seekers losing their lives in attempts to get to Yemen, mainly from the Horn of Africa, with more deaths at sea in 2014 than in the last three years combined. One of the recent tragic incidents took place on 2 October when 64 migrants and three crew died when their vessel, sailing from Somalia, sank in the Gulf of Aden. Since, then five more deaths bring the yearly tally for 2014 to 215, exceeding the combined total for 2011, 2012 and 2013 of 179….

The latest deaths come amidst a dramatic increase in the number of new arrivals to Yemen by boat in September. At 12,768, it marks the single biggest month for arrivals since current records began to be kept in 2002. Most of the migrants are…

View original post 70 more words

OHCHR to Issue Recommended Principles and Guidelines on Human Rights at International Borders (22 Oct-Brussels; 23 Oct-New York)

MIGRANTS AT SEA

The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights next week will launch Recommended Principles and Guidelines on Human Rights at International Borders. The Guidelines will be released and discussed at events in Brussels on 22 October 2014 and New York on 23 October.

From OHCHR: “These Guidelines are offered by OHCHR to states and other relevant stakeholders to develop human-rights respecting border governance measures; and thus improve the respect, protection and fulfilment of migrants at international borders.”

“OHCHR has been working on these principles and guidelines since 2012, together with multiple stakeholders. They accompany the report of the Secretary-General on the Protection of Migrants (A/69/277) (also available here) and will be provided to the 69th session of the General Assembly (GA).”

“International borders are not zones of exclusion or exception of human rights obligations. States have the duty to comply with their human rights obligations and all of…

View original post 164 more words

Iranian Woman Fights Off a Rapist, But She’s the One Who Receives the Unimaginably Horrific Sentence

~~Defender of Faith~Guardian of Truth~~

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In Iran, a woman has received the worst possible sentence after stabbing a man who tried to rape her.

On Saturday, 27-year-old Reyhaneh Jabbari was hung at dawn for what Iranian officials concluded was “premeditated murder.” Amnesty International said the sentence is another “bloody stain” on Iran’s human rights record.

The event that led to Jabbari’s execution took place in 2007. A man approached Jabbari in a cafe who happened to be an Iranian intelligence agent. He told her that he wanted to discuss business with her at his office.

However, when Jabbari arrived the man had no intention to talk business. He tried to drug and rape her. Fearing for her life, Jabbari grabbed a pocketknife and stabbed the man.

What any American court would likely dismiss as self-defense, an Iranian court declared cold-blooded murder.

Before her hanging, Jabbari was given a chance to make one last call to her mother Sholeh…

View original post 229 more words

Plan UK launch 2014 ‘Because I Am a Girl’ report

Raluca Enescu

Yesterday Plan UK launched the 2014 edition of the “Because I am a Girl”/State of the World’s girls report; which contains all the newest research behind world’s leading global campaign for adolescent girls’ empowerment. This year’s topic is “Pathways to Power: Creating Sustainable Change for Adolescent Girls”.

There is a lot to be said about it, and I will definitely dedicate it a few blog posts; for now, I only wanted to say that I am immensely proud to have been part of the team who made this happen.

report

I worked for Plan UK as a research intern for 6 months, between November 2013 and April this year. This is where i learned how to do serious qualitative research, how to code in-depth interviews, how to work with surveys in Nvivo and make it spit out pretty graphs and various others such interesting geeky things; but most importantly, I have…

View original post 72 more words

Calls for papers: African Human Mobility Review (reminder – submission deadline 30 October 2014)

CALL FOR PAPERS

African Human Mobility Review (AHMR)

Vol. 1(1): January, 2015

AHMR is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed on-line journal created to encourage and facilitate the study of all aspects (socio-economic, political, legislative and developmental) of human mobility in Africa. Through the publication of original research, policy discussions and evidence research papers, AHMR provides a comprehensive forum devoted exclusively to the analysis of contemporaneous trends, migration patterns and some of the most important migration-related issues.

AHMR welcomes manuscripts on the various aspects of human mobility in Africa. Contributors are requested to submit their manuscripts in English to the Chief Editor for critical peer review. Each issue of AHMR has a theme but part of each issue is usually set aside for articles on other issues related to human mobility in Africa.

As part of our continuing efforts to support both authors and reviewers AHMR has adopted the web-based submission. All manuscript submissions must be made at http://sihma.org.za/submit-an-article. Full instructions and support are available on the site. If you have any questions about the submission process, please contact editor@sihma.org.za

The submission date for manuscripts is 30 October 2014.

Note: Before submitting your manuscript please refer to the author guidelines, which are available on the SIHMA website www.sihma.org.za/submission-guidelines/

 

Chief Editor

 

African Human Mobility Review (AHMR)