Daily Archives: Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Events: Refugee Testimonies workshop (reminder)

Refugee Testimonies Workshop at Clark University
September 19-21, 2014

The International Development, Community and Environment Department at Clark University is offering a three-day workshop entitled, Witnessing: Taking testimonies and constructing refugee narratives. Taught by Leora Kahn, Executive Director of PROOF: Media for Social Change, the workshop is geared towards professionals who work with refugees and other displaced people.

Workshop Description:
Testimonies have different purposes. They can be used for refugee status determination (RSD), in journalistic accounts, for testimony in an international court, for policy research and academic articles, to teach, or to preserve history. Testimonies have also helped stimulate and shape social change, and can be an effective tool for policy change and social transformation.

This three-day, hands-on workshop will introduce methods and ethics of testimony-taking and will examine the uses and importance of refugee testimonies. Participants will learn to take testimonies and construct narratives through different techniques, and will become familiar with techniques of visual story-telling for advocacy and other purposes. The workshop will bring together refugee service professionals, community leaders, field practitioners in local and international agencies, representatives of government entities and academics in a collaborative environment. We will explore ethical questions in taking testimonies to illuminate human rights issues. During this workshop participants will actively practice taking testimonies based on the topics and methods discussed in each class. The workshop also includes a field trip to an oral history exhibit based on refugee testimony, and coincides with the opening of the exhibit, Picturing Moral Courage: The Rescuers at Clark University. Topics and examples will include: oral history projects with refugees from Bhutan, testimony from Syrian asylum seekers in Europe, and visual narratives from Guatemala, among others.

About the Workshop Convener:

Leora Kahn is the founder and Executive Director of PROOF: Media for Social Justice, an award-winning organization that brings together photographers, documentarians, academics and activists to create visual documentary projects that become sustainable educational tools in regions riven by recent armed conflict and atrocities. Leora was previously the director of photography at Workman Publishing and at Corbis. She has also worked for Time, The New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, The New Yorker, and US News and World Report as well as for the Ford and Annie E. Casey Foundations. She has curated exhibitions for the Ford Foundation, ABC Television, Amnesty International, Women’s Refugee Commission, and the Holocaust Museum in Houston, and has held visiting appointments at the Genocide Studies Center at Yale University, where she conducted research on rescuers and rescuing behavior, and at Clark University’s Holocaust and Genocide Center.

Eligibility:
This non-credit workshop is open to practitioners, researchers, and students in the field of refugees, displacement, and forced migration. The workshop will be limited to a maximum of 20 participants. The language of this workshop is English; we are unfortunately unable to offer translation services.

Venue:
The workshop will be held in the beautiful Rose Library at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts. Map: http://goo.gl/maps/usfe2

Fees:
Tuition for the workshop is US$550, which includes course material, lunch and coffee breaks on all three days, field trip to Boston, and the Picturing Moral Courage exhibit reception.

Scholarships:
There are two available tuition-only scholarships for participants from refugee backgrounds. Please contact the workshop administrator for an application form.

Application Process:
To apply for the workshop, please email a cover letter and a recent CV to workshop administrator Danielle Strandson dstrandson@clarku.edu by the deadline August 20,  2014

A deposit of $150 is due by August 31. Please note that the deposit is non-refundable.

More information on payment method will be provided to accepted participants. A list of recommended accommodations will be sent to all accepted participants.

UEL researcher explores conflict prevention in the Western Balkans

UEL Research, Innovation and Impact

Vassilis-FouskasNew research into alternative conflict prevention in the Western Balkans is being explored today at a workshop co-hosted by UEL in cooperation with the University of Banja Luka, and the Ministry of Science and Technology of the Republic of Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

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Cyprus 40 years on

UEL Research, Innovation and Impact

Vassilis-FouskasProfessor Vassilis K. Fouskas, Director of the Centre for the Study of States, Markets & People (STAMP) at UEL, writes about the ongoing conflict on the Mediterranean island of Cyprus in openDemocracy. Read the article here.

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CMRB Seminar – ‘What was Gaza about?’

Event: International Convention On Human Rights And The Elimination Of All Forms of Discrimination in Society And Culture

Un ricordo di Piero

Postcards from ...

Piero Colacicchi, 1937-2014 Piero Colacicchi, 1937-2014

Il 13 Agosto 2014 si sono svolti a Firenze i funerali del professor Piero Colacicchi, docente all’Accademia di Belle Arti, archeologo dilettante e attivista instancabile per i diritti delle minoranze.

 Piero non c’è più, la sua morte lascia un enorme senso di vuoto; la sensazione di qualcosa di non-finito, di parole, idee e azioni che dovevano ancora venire, che stavamo discutendo e progettando insieme con gli altri membri di OsservAzione, il collettivo che avevamo formato nel 2005 e di cui lui era stato il primo presidente. Progetti che avrebbero preso forma nelle prossime settimane e mesi e che si innescavano senza soluzione di continuità in un dialogo iniziato anni fa, alla fine degli anni 90 a Napoli, in un’affollata riunione in cui lui presentò ‘Il paese dei campi’, il rapporto dell’European Roma Rights Center a cui aveva dato un contributo fondamentale, e si discusse la nascita…

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Ethiopia’s ‘Master Plan’ – good for development, damaging for minorities

‘Get out there and get it’ – Women and Leadership in Kenya

Un ricordo di Piero

Postcards from ...

Piero Colacicchi, 1937-2014 Piero Colacicchi, 1937-2014

Il 13 Agosto 2014 si sono svolti a Firenze i funerali del professor Piero Colacicchi, docente all’Accademia di Belle Arti, archeologo dilettante e attivista instancabile per i diritti delle minoranze.

 Piero non c’è più, la sua morte lascia un enorme senso di vuoto; la sensazione di qualcosa di non-finito, di parole, idee e azioni che dovevano ancora venire, che stavamo discutendo e progettando insieme con gli altri membri di OsservAzione, il collettivo che avevamo formato nel 2005 e di cui lui era stato il primo presidente. Progetti che avrebbero preso forma nelle prossime settimane e mesi e che si innescavano senza soluzione di continuità in un dialogo iniziato anni fa, alla fine degli anni 90 a Napoli, in un’affollata riunione in cui lui presentò ‘Il paese dei campi’, il rapporto dell’European Roma Rights Center a cui aveva dato un contributo fondamentale, e si discusse la nascita…

View original post 1,489 more words

Campzenship: on the camp as a space of membership

Postcards from ...

citizenship studiesFraming camps and camp-like institutions in terms of exception and emergency is certainly evocative and captures the sense of profound discomfort that many feel for this kind of institutions. However, this vocabulary also obscures the ‘normality’ of these spaces, in other words – paraphrasing Bauman – their being a product of our modernity (and post-modernity) not a one-off exception. It also obscures the lives and experiences of their inhabitants that the vocabulary of exception relegates in a terrain of indistinction and passivity. In an article just published in Citizenship Studies entitled ‘Campzenship: Reimagining the camp as a social and political space‘, responding to Bonnie Honig‘s invitation to de-exceptionalize the exception, I draw on my ethnographic fieldwork in camps for Roma refugees in Italy to show the camp as a space of sociality and politics that encapsulate postmodern political membership and the intimate and inherent relationship between space and…

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Is integration “impossible” for Roma in France?

Events: Seminar: ‘Refugees, Asylum and Effective Nationality’ (17 September 2014)

The American University in Cairo
School of Global Affairs and Public Policy
The Center for Migration and Refugee Studies

 “Refugees, Asylum, and Effective Nationality”

The modern, political, legal approach to human rights and protection is problematic in that human rights abuses are still widely occurring and in some cases are increasing. Despite legal and political regimes becoming more complex and growing in jurisprudence, the protections against human rights abuses that these systems purportedly aim to build are ineffective, and in many cases the complexities of the systems are specifically designed to protect other interests. These other interests can even be antithetical to their stated purposes of human rights protection. In fewer examples is this more clear than in the case of the modern concept of the refugee. By examining one aspect of refugee protection, namely the effective nationality against which claims for asylum are decided, this talk will focus on the idea that not all nationalities are created equal. The case of the refugee serves as a marker for a systemic problem of how human rights derivation is understood through nations, states, and legal protection. The protection shortfalls that are occurring are the basis of a critique aimed at seeing substantive change in the protection for refugees, asylum seekers, internally displaced persons (IDPs), and the stateless. The talk will focus on seeing this change happen through a shift in understanding of human rights as inherent to the nature of humanity and not as privileges established by state power structures.

Speaker:

Zachary Jackman

CMRS Student

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

6th Floor Lounge – Hill House, Tahrir Square Campus

6.00- 7.30 pm

Contact email: CMRS@aucegypt.edu

Europe’s Deadly Borders: An Inside Look at EU’s Shameful Immigration Policy

Victims’ Rights, the EU Charter, and Passport Confiscation – the Human Rights Roundup

UK Human Rights Blog

British_passport HRRWelcome back to the UK Human Rights Roundup, your regular (except for August) last night at the human rights Proms. The full list of links can be found here. You can find previous roundups here. Links compiled by Adam Wagner, post by Celia Rooney.

In recent news, the government outlines proposals for increased rights for the victims of crime, as well as for the revocation and confiscation of passports for ISIS fighters returning to the UK. In other news, the legality of the EU Charter comes back to haunt Chris Grayling once again.

New Rights for the Victims of Crime

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Annual Conference on EU Asylum Law 2014

IntLawGrrls

Objective

This conference will provide asylum law practitioners with practical insight into the current challenges and changes affecting applications for asylum in the EU under the subsidiary protection regime. It will also analyse the recent case law of the European courts on asylum law.

Key topics

The concept of subsidiary protection
The scope and limits of Art. 15(c) Qualification Directive (‘indiscriminate violence in situations of international or internal armed conflict’)
Changes to subsidiary protection in the reformed Common European Asylum System
Update on developments in European asylum legislation
Recent case law of the CJEU and ECtHR in the area of asylum law and their incorporation into national law

Background
It has long been recognised that individuals who do not qualify for refugee status may still be in a situation such that they should not be sent back to their country of origin. With the second-phase CEAS legislation, several aspects of…

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