Daily Archives: Sunday, September 14, 2014

Archive News Stories (weekly)

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Journal Articles (weekly)

  • “This article evaluates the relief work carried out by British voluntary societies among German civilians between 1945 and 1950. Drawing on the archives of voluntary societies and on interviews with relief workers, the article highlights the centrality of the German refugee crisis and the importance of the sometimes conflictual relationship between attitudes at home and realities on the ground in explaining the development, direction and significance of the British relief effort in post-war western Germany. It concludes that volunteers in Germany and observers at home ultimately found a greater value in the ‘spirit’ in which voluntary societies approached their work than in any of the limited material results arising from it.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “In recent years, protracted crises and fragile post-conflict settings have challenged the co-existence, and even the linear continuum, of relief and development aid. Forced migration has tested humanitarian and development paradigms where sudden-onset emergencies, violence and displacement arise alongside ongoing development work. Drawing on Médecins Sans Frontières interventions in the region from December 2010 to May 2011, this paper examines aid and healthcare responses to displacement in Côte d’Ivoire and Liberia; it focuses on challenges to the maintenance of preparedness for such foreseeable emergencies and to adaptation in response to changing situations of displacement and insecurity. This ‘backsliding’ from development to emergency remains a substantial challenge to aid; yet, in exactly such cases, it also presents the opportunity to ensure access to medical care that is much more urgently needed in times of crisis, including the suspension of user fees for medical care.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “With a view towards suggesting improvements to the official UK Guidance for disaster exercises, this paper critically examines a representative sample of recent disaster management exercises in the United Kingdom to determine how they are planned, conducted and assessed. Personal observations and in-depth qualitative interviews were used to study three representative multi-agency disaster exercises in the UK: (1) the Hitachi 395 Evacuation Workshop and Exercise Twin Bore, (2) Exercise Saxon Shore and (3) Exercise Operation Safe Return. The research demonstrates that disaster exercises in the UK generally consist of four main approaches: (1) disaster response and adaptability, (2) building-block approach, (3) citizen participation and (4) discussion-based debriefs. While the data demonstrates that each of these approaches has significant merit, it also elucidates key improvements that should be made to the official UK guidance and reflected in future exercises. In particular, the research suggests that the Guidance should highlight the importance of adaptability at the scene of a disaster, advance a building-block methodology to organising exercises and reiterate the need for better debriefings of volunteer participants.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This article is an analysis of the current immigration policy in Australia from the perspective of critical social work. The analysis is based on the outcomes of the immigration applications of three families of children with disabilities. It is argued that, as seen in the experience of the three families, Australian immigration policy is markedly underpinned by ableism and economic rationalism, rendering the assessment process to determine immigration eligibility patently discriminatory against people with disabilities and their families. Such discriminatory practice is seen as a challenge for social work practice.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “Using a nationally representative sample of Asian immigrant women in the USA (N = 33,032), we examined ethnic variations in labor force participation and different predictors of labor force participation among six Asian ethnic subgroups, including Chinese, Filipino, Asian Indian, Vietnamese, Korean, and Japanese. Our findings indicated that having a higher level of education, fewer children under age 5, US citizenship, a longer length of residence in the USA, and a better English proficiency were significantly related to higher rates of labor force participation among certain ethnic subgroups. The different predictors of labor force participation by ethnic subgroups were further analyzed in cultural contexts.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

  • “This study examined relationships between social networks and immigration stress among first-generation Chinese immigrants. Using data from a larger study of health behavior among first-generation Mandarin/English-speaking immigrants residing in the Los Angeles metropolitan area (N = 1,183), this study found that Chinese immigrants living closer to immediate family and maintaining larger social networks experienced lower immigration stress. Unexpectedly, immigrants with larger family sizes and who participated in voluntary associations (e.g., religious, alumni, and nationality associations) reported increased immigration stress. The findings suggest that practitioners need to be cautious of a possible downside in designing interventions to expand social networks among immigrant clients. The study is especially important in the context of a rapidly increasing immigrant population from Mainland China to the USA.

    Key Practitioner Message: ● Working with immigration families should incorporate assessment of their social network; ● Interventions designed to facilitate supportive social networks should differentiate different social network ties; ● Different social network ties may affect the stress level of immigrants differently.”

    tags:newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.