Daily Archives: Friday, July 18, 2014

Calls for Papers: Human Migration and the Environment: Futures, Politics, Invention

Calls for Papers: Human Migration and the Environment: Futures, Politics, Invention.

Human Migration and the Environment: Futures, Politics, Invention

28 June – 1 July 2015
Durham University
Durham, United Kingdom

Confirmed Keynote Speakers

Professor David Held (Master of University College, Durham University)
Professor Wendy Brown (Class of 1936 First Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley)
Professor Claire Colebrook (Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of English, Pennsylvania State University)

Abstract

Human migration and the environment are two of the most pressing issues of our times. Migration is a defining attribute of the human condition, and yet all across the world negative attitudes towards migration are intensifying. Meanwhile, our natural environment is undergoing such profound transformation that the future habitability of Earth is regularly called into question. But what is stake when these two phenomena – human migration and environmental catastrophe – are articulated as a singular relation? In popular media, this relation is often said to be one of mass migration which culminates in religious or ethnic violence, whereas contemporary liberalism poses it as a problem of international cooperation or state managerialism. But how else might we conceive of this relation? Is it enough to understand it as a binary between alarmist rhetoric and managerial reason? Or does our of understanding of human migration and the environment require entirely new concepts? Are we to conceptualise migration in the context of climate change as a matter of in/justice, law and sovereignty? Or does it pose something more fundamental to the human condition? What does it mean when future environmental catastrophe conjugates with prejudice, inequality and difference? What ontological, epistemological and methodological challenges arise when environmental change and migration are characterised as a single relation? How are we to conceive of the Human, Nature, the State, the migrant and the citizen when human migration and environmental change are conjoined? What political, sociological, cultural and legal challenges does this relation pose? And what futures does it make possible? How should we conceive of migration in the Anthropocene?

By asking these and many other questions, this conference provides a multidisciplinary forum for scholars, policymakers, practitioners and artists to chart out the next generation of research on human migration and the environment. Whereas the first generation of research on environmental migration focussed squarely on problems of causation and on questions of law and policy, our starting point for the conference is that the relation between environment and migration is multidimensional, touching on all aspects of human and non-human life, including economy, social institutions, politics and culture, as well as bio- and geo-physical processes. The aim of the conference is to expand the debate on human migration and the environment beyond its current configuration as a problem of causation, law and policy towards a more pluralist debate that acknowledges the multidimensional nature of environmental change and migration. The conference should appeal to social scientists, humanities and legal scholars as well as to scientists committed to working with and within the social sciences, humanities and law.

Submission Deadlines

Paper session submission deadline: 31 October 2014
Paper submission deadline: 27 March 2015

Further Information

www.climatemigration.eu

Organising Committee

Dr Andrew Baldwin, Durham University
Dr Francois Gemenne, University of Liège / University of Versailles Saint-Quentin
Dr Dimitra Manou, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

Sponsors

COST Action IS1101 Climate change and migration: knowledge, law and policy, and theory. www.climatemigration.eu
Durham University

 

Courses: Distance learning Masters in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies (University of London)

UNIVERSITY OF LONDON LAUNCHES THE FIRST EVER DISTANCE LEARNING MASTERS IN REFUGEE STUDIES

The University of London International Programmes will shortly welcome its first cohort of students to the newly launched Masters in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies.

This is the first distance learning course of its kind and was developed by the Refugee Law Initiative, a University of London research centre for refugee law. The lead academics will draw on their wide practical expertise in delivering the programme.

The Programme Director, Dr David James Cantor said, “This is the first ever distance learning postgraduate course to be run on refugee and forced migration studies. The course has a very strong academic component that is informed by the world-leading expertise of those designing and teaching the modules. Unlike many other postgraduate programmes, however, this is complemented by a consistent focus on developing students’ vocational skills in a way that will readily enable them to work in this field.”

He added, “Distance learning will ensure that the course will be an affordable option for students in the developing world, as well as the developed world. They won’t have to pay international student fees, deal with the bureaucracy and cost of visas, air fares, accommodation, or give up professional or domestic commitments. In this way we are hoping to create a virtual meeting place for students from all parts of the globe. Distance learning also means that we can more easily enrol leading specialists and practitioners who will provide expert knowledge. In these ways, we intend to offer democratic access to the course and recruit students and experts from around the world.”

Dr Cantor believes the MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies will enable students not only to think constructively about related policy and law, but to develop actual policy recommendations.

He commented, “Having worked for the last 15 years in the refugee field, I can say that law and policy are the meat and bread of what we use to try to improve the humanitarian situation of refugees and other displaced persons. A critique of current laws and policies by itself can be useful, but of far less value than the positive recommendations that need to be generated.”

He added, “Working in this field is unusual, because one not only wears the hat of an academic – a student of humanity, as it were – but also there’s the imperative to try to use that knowledge to improve the situation of the subjects of one’s own research.”

The application deadline is 1 September 2014. To find out more or to apply, please visit www.londoninternational.ac.uk/refugee-migration.

For media enquiries:
Kyla Njoku
External Relations, University of London
Tel: +44 (0) 20 7862 8014
E: kyla.njoku

For more information about the course please contact:
Dr David James Cantor
Refugee Law Initiative School of Advanced Study, University of London
Tel: +44 (0) 20 7862 8827
E: david.cantor

Dr Sarah Singer
Refugee Law Initiative School of Advanced Study, University of London
Tel: +44 (0)20 7862 8571
E: sarah.singer

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Note: The material contained in this communication comes to you from the
Forced Migration Discussion List which is moderated by Forced Migration
Online, Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Oxford Department of International
Development, University of Oxford. It does not necessarily reflect the
views of the RSC or the University. If you re-print, copy, archive or
re-post this message please retain this disclaimer. Quotations or
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A conference call for papers: Anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms and the question of Palestine/Israel

A conference call for papers: Anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms and the question of Palestine/Israel

*Please circulate widely*

A conference call for papers: Anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms and the question of Palestine/Israel

This conference seeks to explore the multiple, complex and inter-related ways that anti-Jewish and anti-Muslim racisms are being constructed in relation to the question of Palestine/Israel. In particular it seeks to examine how the histories of Zionist settlement, anti-colonial and nation-building struggles and 20th century warfare in the Middle East region are being transformed in the current historical conjuncture. Of particular importance in this context will be ideological and political alliances that have emerged locally, regionally and globally around notions such as the ‘New Antisemitism’, ‘Islamophobia’ and how these relate to racialised discourses against Jews and Muslims. Drawing on the expertise of scholars and activists from a variety of backgrounds, the aim of the conference will be to serve as a step for building a transversal anti-racist political vision that will aim to destabilize some of the oppositional dichotomies which are currently hegemonic in discourses around Jews, Muslims and Middle East politics.

Location: SOAS
Date: 10 February 2015 (tbc)
Call for Paper Deadline: 30th September 2014

Sponsors: Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging (UEL), Centre for the study of Human Rights (LSE), The Runnymede Trust, Centre for Palestine Studies, London Middle East Institute (SOAS).

Confirmed plenary speakers (listed alphabetically):

Prof. Gilbert Achcar (SOAS)
Dr. Muhammad Idrees Ahmad (University for the Creative Arts)
Prof. Chetan Bhatt (LSE)
Prof. Gargi Bhattacharyya (UEL)
Prof. Haim Bresheeth (SOAS)
Dr. John Bunzl (OIIP)
Prof. Robert Fine (Warwick)
Prof. Yosefa Loshitzky (SOAS)
Dr. Dina Matar (SOAS)
Yasmin Rehman (Cross government working group on hate crimes)
David Rosenberg (Jewish Socialists’ Group)
Prof. Nira Yuval-Davis (UEL)
Prof. Sami Zubaida (Birkbeck)

Conference schedule

9-9.30 Coffee and registration

9.30-10 Welcome by organizers

10-11.15 Plenary panel 1: The Role of the Palestine/Israel Question in Racialised Discourses on Jews

11.15-12.30 Parallel sessions

12.30-1.30 Lunch

1.30-2.45 Plenary panel 2: The Role of the Palestine/Israel Question in Racialised Discourses on Muslims

2.45-4 Parallel discussion workshops

4-4.30 Tea break

4.30-6 Plenary panel 3: The Interrelationships between Anti-Jewish and Anti-Muslim Racialised Discourses

6-6.30 Final session: The Way Forward

We invite abstracts (500 words max.) for 20 minute presentations for the parallel sessions that address any aspect of the issues outlined above. Please send all abstracts to Jamie Hakim at j.hakim. Please include a short biographical note when sending the e-mail.

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Events: First Global Forum on Statelessness (reminder – 75 days to go)

First Global Forum on Statelessness: 15-17 September
The Hague, Netherlands

Tilburg Law School

75 days to go until the First Global Forum on Statelessness

The countdown to the First Global Forum on Statelessness has now truly begun. There are just 75 days to go before this landmark event kicks off at the Peace Palace in the Hague!

Never before has there been a global conference on statelessness, addressing such a broad spectrum of topics and bringing together such a diverse group of people to share their knowledge and exchange ideas. We are very excited about the programme which is taking shape: over 100 people from around the world will share their research, policy or practical experience on a panel or with a poster presentation. Full details of the line-up of speakers and topics can be found online here.

The countdown to the Global Forum is also the countdown to the launch of the most ambitious campaign ever undertaken on statelessness: to end statelessness within the next decade. UNHCR is spearheading this campaign and will officially launch it on the opening day of the Global Forum by setting out what action is needed to reach this bold but important objective. We hope that the Global Forum will mark the beginning of new dialogue and partnerships that will endure in the years to come and enable real progress to be achieved on statelessness.

Be a part of this exciting event: register now for the First Global Forum on Statelessness! Visit the Global Forum website for details and to register online: https://www.tilburguniversity.edu/research/institutes-and-research-groups/statelessness/news/forum/

The First Global Forum on Statelessness is organized in cooperation with UNHCR.

The First Global Forum is sponsored by the Municipality of The Hague, the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Hungarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Hungarian Ministry of Interior.

The Book of Abstracts will be sponsored by Wolf Legal Publishers.

Website: www.tilburguniversity.edu/statelessness2014
E-mail: statelessness2014
Phone: +31 (0)13 466 8388

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Note: The material contained in this communication comes to you from the
Forced Migration Discussion List which is moderated by Forced Migration
Online, Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Oxford Department of International
Development, University of Oxford. It does not necessarily reflect the
views of the RSC or the University. If you re-print, copy, archive or
re-post this message please retain this disclaimer. Quotations or
extracts should include attribution to the original sources.

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New publications: UNHCR Handbook on Protection Stateless Persons

UNHCR is pleased to announce the launch of the Handbook on Protection of Stateless Persons. The Handbook sets out guidance on interpretation and implementation of the provisions of the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons. The 1954 Convention establishes the definition of a “stateless person” and sets out minimum standards for the treatment of stateless persons.

Today, 82 States are party to the 1954 Convention, with 17 accessions in the past three years as a result of intense work by UNHCR and NGOs in a range of countries around the world. The stepped-up efforts have also led to a rise in the number of countries establishing statelessness determination procedures. Whilst such procedures may only be appropriate for the minority of the world’s stateless persons who are in a migratory situation, they are nevertheless critical, providing a route to a status consistent with the standards of both the 1954 Convention and international human rights law. On the other hand, a different approach is called for in the case of stateless persons who are in their own country. They need to be granted a nationality based on their strong connection to a State through, for example, birth or longstanding residence.

The content of this Handbook was first published in 2012 in the form of three UNHCR Guidelines: (1) on the Definition of a Stateless Person, (2) on Statelessness Determination Procedures and (3) on the Status of Stateless Persons. In replacing these Guidelines, the text of the Handbook replicates their content with only minimal changes, principally to address minor gaps identified since publication of the Guidelines and to update references to other UNHCR publications. The Handbook does not include guidance on prevention and reduction of statelessness; these are dealt with instead in separate Guidelines (Guidelines on Ensuring Every Child’s Right to Acquire a Nationality through Articles 1-4 of the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness and forthcoming Guidelines on loss and deprivation of nationality).

The Handbook is now available on Refworld: http://www.refworld.org/docid/53b676aa4.html. It will also be accompanied by a new advocacy brochure on statelessness determination procedures, which will also be published by the end of July and made available on Refworld (http://refworld.org/statelessness.html).

We encourage you to disseminate the Handbook widely.

UNHCR Statelessness Team

[Moderator’s note: Please click the link below for the Guidelines on Ensuring Every Child’s Right to Acquire a Nationality through Articles 1-4 of the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness: http://refworld.org/docid/50d460c72.html]

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Note: The material contained in this communication comes to you from the
Forced Migration Discussion List which is moderated by Forced Migration
Online, Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Oxford Department of International
Development, University of Oxford. It does not necessarily reflect the
views of the RSC or the University. If you re-print, copy, archive or
re-post this message please retain this disclaimer. Quotations or
extracts should include attribution to the original sources.

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Calls for Papers: Refugee Review: ‘Re-conceptualizing Refugees and Forced Migration in the 21st Century’

2014 CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Refugee Review: Re-conceptualizing Refugees and Forced Migration in the 21st Century

Deadline for Submissions: 1 September 2014

Submit to: refugeereview. Please send questions to the same address.

[Moderator’s note: Please see all relevant links at the end of this email.]

Refugee Review and the New Scholars Network (NSN)

The New Scholars Network is pleased to announce a call for submissions for the second volume of the Refugee Review. The Refugee Review, a publication of the New Scholars Network, is an open-access, peer-reviewed e-journal that features a range of submission styles as contributed by scholars, practitioners, activists, and those working and studying within the field of forced migration. The Refugee Review platform, based at no particular institution and tied to no particular location, offers a unique publishing opportunity for those in the early stages of their work and careers, as well as for established scholars that support this mission. Those who submit can expect dialogue with the NSN’s e-journal team throughout the publishing process, and are encouraged to work with the NSN to strengthen and promote the e-journal in the spirit of open scholarship and collaboration.

2014 Call for Submissions

The traditional definition of the refugee or forced migrant, as a category in forced migration studies and refugee law, has been steadily evolving. Push-pull factors have diversified. Asylum may be granted or denied regionally according to varying protocols and lack thereof. Calls for protections and supports for those that seek asylum have been both heralded and questioned in response to forced migration situations that the 21st century has created and inherited.

The realization that complex and overlapping factors influence the shape of migration prompts this call for a discussion of the evolving ‘category’ of refugee from a range of knowledgeable perspectives. Those that seek solutions for displacement situations must understand the nature and context of each particular and interrelated situation in order to react appropriately, combining the agency of forced migrants, NGOs, governments, and other bodies.

As refugees continue to flow across boundaries and borders, they contend with conceptualizations that not only attempt to define their lived experience but also directly and continually redefine their legal status and rights. For this reason, this call places the ‘category’ of refugee at the centre of its conversation, in order to 1) discuss the ways in which the refugee experience has been and can be reconceptualized in both theory and practice, and 2) what changes such a reconceptualization can effect.

The following focal questions may inform submissions for this volume: In what ways can the refugee and forced migrant be reconceptualized based on contemporary lived experiences? What new parameters, if any, are being established in the broadening of the definition of the refugee or forced migrant, and to what end? Do contemporary policies and regional practices challenge the legal definition of Convention refugee status? Who is, and has been, entitled to define ‘the refugee,” and why? How do we define the contemporary ethics of response to varied forced migration situations-from societal violence to environmental degradation, from responses to extraterritorialization to enacting durable solutions? What is the role of refugees in demonstrating their experience and leading or contributing to new responses to forced migration situations? What is the role of researchers and practitioners in the same?

Submission Categories:

We recognize and value the multidisciplinary nature of forced migration studies, and therefore encourage submissions from across various disciplines-including but not limited to political science, law, anthropology, ethics and philosophy, sociology, economics, public health, and media studies. You may submit to any submission category listed below, regardless of where you locate your study or practice.

Please identify which submission category your piece is being submitted under. We encourage you to consider the range of submission styles available in this Call for Submissions during the development of your piece and structure/develop your submission accordingly.

Submissions will go through a peer-review process and those selected will go through a peer-editing process before publication. The editing team may, when deemed appropriate, move your piece so a different submission section (for example from the Academic Article section to the Opinion Piece section) if they feel it is better suited to another category.

Academic Articles:

The Academic Articles section provides a space for thorough scholarship and serves as a forum for authors to engage critically with practical and theoretical issues relating to forced migration. In the Academic Articles section we seek submissions that interrogate the existing literature on forced migration, present in-depth research in a given area or offer original insights into a situation or trend. Submissions to the Academic Articles must not exceed 6000 words (including footnotes, which should be kept to a minimum). Articles are required to use Chicago style endnotes.

Opinion Papers and Practitioner Reports:

Opinion Papers and Practitioner Reports may be contributions that reflect on personal experiences of displacement as well as and reports from non-governmental organization (NGO) and CBO staff. This section presents an opportunity for those directly affected by the policies, laws and activities of governments and the agencies we evaluate to express their insights and perspectives. This may take the form of a discussion of particular problem that has not been given due attention or commentary on government policies in a specific country, region or locale. We seek critical, balanced analyses that allow the reader to gain an understanding of the context in which the report is written and that engages with wider implications of the situation described. Articles for the Opinion and Report Section should be approximately 2000 words and no more than 5000 words. At present we are only able to accept written submissions in English.

Multimedia Submissions:

Multimedia submissions may include, but are not limited to: videos, photos, artwork and spoken word pieces. Accompanying the multimedia submission should be a short blurb of approximately 300 words about the author and the piece itself. PLEASE ENSURE YOU HAVE PERMISSION TO PHOTOGRAPH OR VIDEO THE SUBJECT(S) YOU SUBMIT. Please note that videos, audio recordings, and photos must be sent as an attachment in a zipped file not exceeding 25 MB. Videos may also be submitted as links if they are also hosted privately on Vimeo or YouTube.

Links:

New Scholars Network: http://newscholarsnetwork.wordpress.com/

Refugee Review: http://refugeereview.wordpress.com/page/2/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Note: The material contained in this communication comes to you from the
Forced Migration Discussion List which is moderated by Forced Migration
Online, Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Oxford Department of International
Development, University of Oxford. It does not necessarily reflect the
views of the RSC or the University. If you re-print, copy, archive or
re-post this message please retain this disclaimer. Quotations or
extracts should include attribution to the original sources.

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New publications: ‘Displacement and dispossession through land grabbing in Mozambique: the limits of international and national legal instruments’ (RSC Working Paper 101)

Displacement and dispossession through land grabbing in Mozambique: the limits of international and national legal instruments
By Hannah Twomey
July 2014
http://www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/publications/displacement-and-dispossession-through-land-grabbing-in-mozambique-the-limits-of-international-and-national-legal-instruments

A debate exists regarding the limits of international law to influence state behaviour. Some attribute these limits to the inability of law to compel states to incorporate norms into domestic legal frameworks. Others maintain that even if institutionalised, the incapacity of states to put those norms into action is where the problem lies. In examining displacement and dispossession through land grabbing in Mozambique, the author investigates what limits the ability of international and national law to address displacement and dispossession. She argues that the limits of law to address displacement and dispossession are not due to a lack of institutionalising international good governance norms into domestic-level legal frameworks. Rather, the limits of law lie within the norm implementation process, wherein norms are conditioned by the local Mozambican governance context to serve domestic interests. As such, the other frequently cited reason of lack of state capacity is not to blame. The author explains the gap between law and practice by examining the role that a decentralised land governance structure has had upon shaping the norm implementation process. The evidence points to a state that devolves power over norm implementation to local actors, who frequently interpret them to their advantage. This co-option cannot be attributed to a lack of state capacity, as the material benefits the state accrues in the process point to a state that is disinterested in seeing the norms implemented and has devised decentralisation as a strategic governance strategy to accumulate these benefits.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Note: The material contained in this communication comes to you from the
Forced Migration Discussion List which is moderated by Forced Migration
Online, Refugee Studies Centre (RSC), Oxford Department of International
Development, University of Oxford. It does not necessarily reflect the
views of the RSC or the University. If you re-print, copy, archive or
re-post this message please retain this disclaimer. Quotations or
extracts should include attribution to the original sources.

E-mail: fmlist
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Sending essential supplies to South Sudanese refugees

Voices from the Field

A child arrives at Kakuma. Photo courtesy of Lutheran World Federation. A child arrives at Kakuma. Photo courtesy of Lutheran World Federation.

Our Road to Kakuma shipment will soon be on its way, thanks to the support of Canadian Lutherans across the country. See below for a media release about the shipment’s departure:

Volunteers and staff members from Canadian Lutheran World Relief (CLWR) are sending supplies to refugees in Kenya’s Kakuma refugee camp.

The shipping container will be loaded Wednesday, July 16, from 8 a.m. to approximately 2 p.m. at 549 King Edward Street (CLWR’s Winnipeg warehouse).

The supplies are urgently needed. South Sudan’s crisis is swelling refugee camps like Kakuma beyond their normal capacity, and humanitarian agencies are struggling to provide services to everyone. The crisis has put nearly five million people in desperate need of aid.

“The people I met in Kakuma have gone through so much, and they continue to struggle,” says Heather Pryse, project officer for CLWR…

View original post 166 more words

Tamil asylum seekers being held at sea in windowless locked rooms

The paradox beneath Strasbourg’s French veil ban decision

UK Human Rights Blog

french-veil-ban-001S.A.S v France (Application no. 43835/11) – read judgment

The Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights has rejected a challenge to a French law which prohibits the wearing of veils in public. The ruling is, of course, of great political and media interest, but it is also significant from a legal perspective. In a lengthy and detailed judgment, the Court ultimately accepts that, as a matter of principle, a government can legitimately interfere with the rights of individuals in pursuit of social and cultural cohesion.

On 11th April 2011, Law no. 2010-1192 came into force in the French Republic. Subject to certain limited exceptions, the law prohibits anyone from wearing any clothing which conceals their face when in public places, on pain of a 150 euro fine, and/or compulsory citizenship classes. Whilst phrased in general terms, the most obvious effect of the law, and its clear…

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“Whoever wants me will find me here. This is my home now”

Refugees International Japan Blog

I came across this delightful article which narrates the blossoming hope within a refugee camp. Here at Zaatari camp, refugees are regaining control of their lives as they are stimulating their camp into a place like ‘home’.

http://www.trust.org/item/20140714184514-crdrn/source=search&utm_source=MailingList&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Weekly+16+July+2014

Zaatari refugee camp – Photo by Mohammad Hannon/APmp (Guardian Website)

This article was exciting for me as it reasserts the fact that refugees are the same group of people as us who desire to live normal lives. As Rifai (one of the refugees in Zaatari camp) says, despite the tough and unusual circumstances they are forced to live in, the refugees are able to rebuild their lives. 

By organising their own volunteer group among the camp’s youth, they are able to help the most vulnerable refugees and have also constructed equipped schools, supermarkets and playgrounds. This clearly shows that they have created a stronger and sustainable community which doesn’t have to rely…

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Tory Human Rights Plans, Child Abuse Inquiry and the Burqa Ban – the Human Rights Roundup

UK Human Rights Blog

Niqab HRRWelcome back to the UK Human Rights Roundup, your regular tour de force of human rights news and views. The full list of links can be found here. You can find previous roundups here. Links compiled by Adam Wagner, post by Celia Rooney.

This week, the role of Lady Butler-Sloss in the forthcoming inquiry into child abuse is challenged, while the government pushes for emergency legislation to monitor phone and internet records. Meanwhile, the European Court of Human Right upholds France’s niqab ban and the Tories get closer to announcing their plans for human rights reform.

In the News

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Rwandan Genocide: Our campaign marking 20 years since the genocide comes to an end

World Without Torture

banner-website-rwanda-no-button-748

Over the past 100 days we have been marking one of the biggest, most damaging humanitarian atrocities in history – the 1994 Rwandan Genocide. Through the testimonies of ten brave women, we helped fulfil their goal — that their stories not only reach other women who are victims of rape but also the perpetrators.

They hoped that the men who have caused them and others so much pain may, through reading the stories, come to understand what their past actions have caused in terms of suffering among the women they violated.

In the space of 100 days over one-million civilians were tortured, raped and murdered in one of the largest examples of ethnic cleansing the world has ever seen as Hutus repeatedly and mercilessly attacked the Tutsi population following the death of Rwandan President Juvénal Habyarimana, himself a Hutu.

Special thanks to artist Yildiz Arslan who has supported us throughout this campaign Special thanks to artist Yildiz Arslan who has supported us throughout…

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Sexual violence a ‘normal thing’ in many countries at war

Guest Post: The effect of negative labelling – Why are we still talking about ‘migrants’?

MIGRANTS AT SEA

By Dr Melissa Phillips

As the number of people arriving by boat to Europe continues to rise, so does the rhetoric about an influx of ‘illegal migrants’, ‘boat migrants’ , ‘migrant boats’ and just plain ‘illegals’. Academics have long written about the impact of press reporting on asylum issues and the effect of labelling on refugees and asylum seekers.(1) Their findings show the way predominantly negative labels are repeated and entrenched having a detrimental consequence for how we understand asylum issues and perceive asylum seekers. Perhaps the most pernicious of these labels has been ‘illegal’ which human rights groups, refugee advocates and media organisations have been campaigning against as inaccurate and legally incorrect.(2)

More recently commentators have been at pains to distinguish between groups of migrants and refugees arriving in Europe by boat, noting that there are technical legal arguments to guide terminology as well as familiar tropes that we…

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