Monthly Archives: April 2014

Academic Workshop Call for Abstracts: Sense of belonging in a diverse Britain

Academic Workshop Call for Abstracts:

Sense of belonging in a diverse Britain

 

Coventry University

20th – 21st November 2014

Organisers:

Dialogue Society, Birmingham Branch

Centre for Peace and Reconciliation Studies, Coventry University

 

EXTENDED DEADLINE: 16TH MAY 2014

Please circulate to relevant colleagues/students

A4 poster for printing and display: http://www.dialoguesociety.org/newsletter/poster/poster-Sense-of-Belonging.pdf

Introduction

The Dialogue Society, Birmingham Branch in partnership with Coventry University’s Centre for Peace and Reconciliation Studies invites abstracts from scholars and relevant practitioners who wish to share and explore ideas and research findings concerning the sense of belonging in contemporary Britain’s diverse society.

 

‘Sense of belonging’ is a phrase often heard in discussions of the cohesion of our society and, particularly, instances of its breakdown, including urban disturbances, ‘home-grown’ terrorism and gang membership. In this workshop, we invite contributors to shed light on the nature, causes and effects of sense of belonging and of its absence both in minority communities and majority communities. We seek to examine the impact of a lack of sense of belonging outside dramatic cases of crime and anti-social behavior as well as in those cases. We have a particular interest in contributions exploring how the absence of a sense of belonging might be addressed.

Costs

In general, participants will need to cover travel and accommodation costs.

Outcome

Workshop proceedings will be published in advance of the Workshop to allow contributors to read one another’s papers and engage with them more deeply and to disseminate the papers more widely to relevant scholars, researchers and libraries. (For an example of our workshop proceedings’ publications seehttp://www.dialoguesociety.org/publications/academia/768-debating-multiculturalism-2.html. )

 

Edited versions of some papers may be selected for either of the two journals published by the organizers. Authors of selected papers will be notified in due course.

 

In addition, an edited version of all or some of the papers presented may also be published by an independent reputable publishing house. For an example of an edited publication from a Dialogue Society conference see http://www.amazon.co.uk/Muslim-World-Politics-Transition-Contributions/dp/1441120874/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1394186929&sr=8-1&keywords=muslim+world+and+politics+in+transition.

 

Call for Papers

Authors are invited to send abstracts (maximum 400 words) of their proposed papers addressing questions such as the following:

  • Do we need more clarity about British values in order to promote a sense of belonging in British society? If so, who identifies those values, and how?
  • Has ‘state multiculturalism’ encouraged or undermined a sense of belonging?
  • Where in British society are we seeing a lack of sense of belonging?
  • Is the cultivation of a sense of belonging best served by paying more (affirmative) attention to cultural difference, or less?
  • Does a strong sense of belonging to a particular cultural group tend to enhance or undermine people’s relationships with the wider community?
  • How do we achieve a healthy balance between celebrating diverse identities and cultivating a sense of common belonging to Britain? How can families and communities keep their distinctive heritage alive while cultivating a sense of belonging where they are?
  • What factors – social, political, economic and/or cultural – encourage a sense of belonging in British society?
  • What are the most significant barriers to feeling a sense of belonging in Britain?
  • How far does immigration status (including citizenship) affect people’s sense of belonging?
  • What is the role of sense of belonging, and/or the lack of it, in:

o   Gangs

o   Urban disturbances

o   ‘Home-grown’ terrorism

in the UK?

  • How does a lack of sense of belonging impact people’s lives, aside from the cases of those involved in crime or antisocial behaviour?
  • How do traditional British symbols such as the Union Jack function in British society (to encourage and express belonging and/or to exclude from belonging)?
  • ‘United’ Kingdom? In an age of devolution, and as Scotland debates an independent future, is it to ‘Britain’ that British citizens feel they belong?
  • How far does Britain’s foreign policy affect the sense of belonging of British citizens with roots abroad?
  • What role can/should the British education system play in instilling a sense of belonging?
  • What effect, if any, do faith schools have on pupils’ sense of belonging to the wider community?
  • What is the role of the third sector in encouraging a sense of belonging among diverse communities?
  • The controversy of citizenship tests: what must a person know in order to belong in Britain?
  • How far is the lack of a sense of belonging a (neglected) problem within majority communities? How can the problem be addressed?
  • What can be done, by parents, schools, or voluntary organisations, to help young people negotiating complex identities to grow up with a secure sense of belonging?
  • How far does faith shape where, and to whom, British citizens feel they belong?
  • Does nationalism necessarily involve placing limits on who can belong?

 

Submission Procedure

Abstracts and CVs should be submitted, in English only, as MS Word documents attached to an email addressed to mdemir@dialoguesociety.org  no later than 17:00UK time, 16th May 2014.

 

For further information, including full submission schedule and style guide, please visit

http://www.dialoguesociety.org/birmingham-forthcoming/980-sense-of-belonging-in-a-diverse-britain.html

Back to naivety. Confessions of a journalist after visiting Uganda

Call for Papers: ‘Racism and Anti-Racism: from the labour movement to the far-right’

Call for Papers:

‘Racism and Anti-Racism: from the labour movement to the far-right’

A Two-Day Conference to be held at the University of Glasgow, 5-6 September 2014

The first decades of the 21st century have seen two worrying developments for anyone concerned with opposing oppression:

  • the continuing mutation and expansion of racism into new ‘cultural’ forms, above all in the form of a virulent Islamophobia; and
  • the electoral consolidation of parties of the far-right, who are not always fascist, but committed to deeply reactionary positions on most social issues, above all in relation to migration.

These two developments are distinct, but overlapping. On the one hand, racism is more widespread than on the far right, institutionally embedded over centuries in even the most notionally liberal states and exerting an influence even in the labour and trade union movement which might be thought to have most to lose from the divisions which it engenders. On the other hand, the far-right almost always includes racism among its repertoire of mobilising issues, but has politics which extend beyond it.

 

The plenaries and workshop sessions will interrogate:

  • racism in all its multifarious forms;
  • the new far-right of the neoliberal era (i.e. mid-1970s onwards), in both its fascist and non-fascist aspects, particularly its growing electoral impact; and
  • how the different varieties of racism and the far right can be challenged on the ground, and by whom.

Although our focus is international, no conference held in Scotland during September 2014 can avoid the fact of the independence referendum. While the national question is not our subject, any discussion of racism inevitably has to deal with its role in national formation, particularly in the case of the imperial powers of which Britain was once so preeminent. Themes which we hope to address in relation to Scotland are the reality (or otherwise) of claims that it suffers less from racism than England or other areas in Western Europe, and the reasons why, to date, it has remained relatively immune to the electoral appeal of the far-right.

We invite proposals for individual papers or panels from both established academics and postgraduate students, but also from those involved in addressing racism on a practical basis in advocacy groups, community campaigns, anti-racist mobilisations and trade unions. Proposals should be no longer than 250 words and submitted to both organisers (neil.davidson@glasgow.ac.uk and satnam.virdee@glasgow.ac.uk) by 16 May 2014.

Themes which the conference might address can include, but need not be restricted to the following:

Racism      

Racism, class and globalised capitalism

Racism and neoliberalism

State racisms, in particular the racialization of migration and asylum

Anti-Muslim racism and the appropriation and mobilization of feminist discourses

Racism and the ‘white’ working class

Forms of anti-racist activism: from social movements to the everyday

Theorizing contemporary racisms – Feminist, Critical Race Theory, Postcolonial and Neo-Marxist perspectives are particularly welcomed.

The legacy of anti-Irish racism in Scotland

Scots, the Empire and the externalisation of racism

Different attitudes to immigration in Scotland and England

The Far Right

The changing class basis of far right party membership

Distinguishing the ‘non-fascist’ far-right from fascism

Tensions between neoliberalism and far-right policy (the Tea Party, UKIP, etc.)

The far-right and the different phases of capitalist development

Working class electoral support for far-right parties

Campaigning against the far-right

Scottish Loyalism and far-right politics in Scotland

Why is the far-right weaker in Scotland than England?

*We are grateful to the Centre for Dynamics on Ethnicity (CoDE) and the Sociology Department at the University of Glasgow for providing financial support for the organization of the conference.

www.nasarmeer.com

 

New Research and Publications 04/30/2014

  • “For well over two decades, large numbers of the Somali population have been in flight— internally and externally—from violence and conflict, famine and severe food insecurity, and the impoverishment and uncertainty these bring in their wake. Internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Somalia have averaged over 1 million per year since at least 2007 (with numbers spiking to nearly 2 million during the early 1990s). The number of refugees averaged nearly 600,000 per year since 1990. As of 2012, about 1 million Somali refugees lived in 124 countries worldwide, with the largest numbers by far in Ethiopia (223,000) and Kenya (512,000). The world’s largest refugee camp, Dadaab in Northeastern Kenya, is home to the largest concentration of Somalis outside of Mogadishu. In recent years, the situation in Somalia has been described as among the worst humanitarian crises in the world.”

    tags:reports publications

  • “Migration Advisory Committee: triennial review

    PDF, 352KB, 55 pages
    Detail

    The Migration Advisory Committee provides independent and evidence-based advice to government on migration issues.

    On 27 March 2012 the Home Secretary announced the commencement of the triennial review of the Migration Advisory Committee. ”

    tags:publications government

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New publications: Disability Inclusion: Translating Policy into Practice in Humanitarian Action (Women’s Refugee Commission)

The Women’s Refugee Commission has published a report on ‘Disability Inclusion: Translating Policy into Practice in Humanitarian Action’.

This brand-new report presents the approaches, positive practices and ongoing challenges to operationalizing disability inclusion across UNHCR and its partner organizations, and provides lessons and recommendations for the wider humanitarian community. The full report and the Executive Summary (including versions in French, Arabic, and Word formats) can be downloaded at: http://womensrefugeecommission.org/programs/disabilities/disability-inclusion.

Over the last two years, the WRC has been partnering with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) on the global roll-out of its guidance on Working with Persons with Disabilities in Forced Displacement, conducting field assessments and providing technical support and training to UNHCR country offices, its implementing partners and disability organizations. WRC has consulted with over 770 displaced persons, including persons with disabilities, and nearly 400 humanitarian actors across refugee and displacement contexts in eight countries-India (New Delhi), Uganda, Thailand, Bangladesh, Nepal, Ethiopia, Philippines (Mindanao) and Lebanon-gathering their perspectives on access and inclusion in humanitarian programs and their suggestions for change.

The WRC extends thanks to all UN agencies, NGOs and civil society organizations that participated in this project, and is deeply grateful to the refugees and displaced persons with disabilities and their families who shared their valuable time, perspectives and ideas for change.

 

Sans Papiers: The Social and Economic Lives of Young Undocumented Migrants

Postcards from ...

Sans Papiers by Alice Bloch, Nando Sigona and Roger Zetter is finally in production – and with a new cover. It can be ordered on Pluto website for £19.50. The new cover is so new that it’s not yet on the website. So this is a bit of a premiere!

Sans Papiers, cover. Sans Papiers, cover.

Book synopsis from the back cover:

“Undocumented migration is a significant and much debated global phenomenon, yet little is known about the reality of the lives of those involved. This book combines theoretical and policy debates with an in-depth exploration of the lived experiences of undocumented migrants in the UK from Zimbabwe, China, Brazil, Ukraine and Turkish Kurdistan.
Built around their voices, the book provides a unique account of migratory processes, gendered experiences and migrant aspirations, exploring the challenges and contradictions of being a young undocumented migrant”

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New Racisms: Forms of Un/Belonging in Britain Today

Sussex Centre for Cultural Studies in partnership with DEMOS presents a day conference:

New Racisms: Forms of Un/Belonging in Britain Today

FRIDAY 9 MAY 2014

Speakers:
Les Back, Goldsmiths College, University of London
Melanie Friend: photographer, University of Sussex
Prof. Mary Hickman, St Mary’s University, London
Sunder Katwala, Director of British Future
Refugee Action
The Refugee Council

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

The publication of the Parekh Report on the Future of Multi-Ethnic Britain (Runnymede Trust 2000) sparked intense debate in Britain. In response to the report’s suggestion that Britishness carries ‘systematic, largely unspoken, racial connotations’, much of the ensuing debate focused on the extent to which Britain is an inherently multicultural and even hybrid nation. Britain was re-cast as being a ‘nation of immigrants’, where cultural diversity strengthens and enriches the nation (Fortier 2005).  Hall has described this as ‘multicultural drift’ (Back and Hall 2009), a sense that British society has irreversibly and incrementally moved away from its stable and mono-cultural foundations; and yet there remain deep and irreconcilable ambiguities towards some cultural differences and minority groups. New ‘hierarchies of belonging’ have emerged in which minority communities are positioned differently and afforded greater or lesser degrees of tolerance and inclusion (Back, Sinha and Bryan 2012). For example, new migrants can be depicted as ‘benefit tourists’, asylum seekers as a threat to national security, and even long settled Muslim communities are increasingly subject to scrutiny and suspicion as potential terrorists and a threat to British way of life. This conference seeks to explore these processes of ordering, and to attend to debates around inclusion/exclusion, belonging / unbelonging, equality/inequality, power/resistance.  To what extent are the new forms of globalised migration different from the colonial and post-colonial migration of the past, and how is this giving rise to racisms which are different from the past?

Since 2004 acquiring British citizenship has been tied to compulsory integration measures: migrants must demonstrate their English language skills and knowledge of British cultural values. This represents a re-framing of integration away from the rights-based conceptualisation of the 1990’s, where the focus was on legal equality, security of residence and social and political participation, to an identity issue with migrants having to prove their willingness to commit  to the ‘common values’ and cultural traits of the host country. In these debates there is assumed to be a set of dominant and clearly defined British values (as articulated in the Life in the UK citizenship test). These are set in opposition to migrant values which are left unexplored, but generally depicted as of concern. But how is this expectation to adopt a British identity, and espouse British values, viewed and experienced from the perspective of the migrants themselves, and how is cultural hybridity, or conflict, managed or avoided?

 

‘Super-diversity’ and the ‘diversification of diversity’ brought about by migration (Vertovec  2007), has resulted in the multiplication and increasingly complex axis of identification and difference. This is not just about the addition of further variables of difference; it is also about ‘new conjunctions of interactions of variables’ (Vertovec 2007:1025). Complex migration and asylum regimes further contribute to diversification by giving rise to multiple legal statuses and varying states of precariousness to more groups of people for longer (Zetter 2007). Identities are more complex and fluid reflecting shifting allegiances and interests, and giving rise to new issues and challenges. This has led some commentators to call into question the relevance of ethnic categories and to argue that they no longer have analytical purchase in the dynamism of today’s urban multiculture.  Instead, it is argued that super-diversity brings the need for a new politics of identity which transcends static ethnic categories (Fanshawe and Sriskandarajah 2010).

We welcome papers on the following topics:

  • Immigration, migration and the media
  • New forms of racism, new figurations of ‘race’
  • Emergent ethnicities and belonging
  • The rise of political parties and re/sentiments such as UKIP
  • Re-examinations of cosmopolitanism and multiculturalism/diversity
  • Stereotypes, visual images, and narratives of asylum, migration and refuge
  • Cultural formations and religious formations that deploy ‘race’
  • Complex political victims
  • The affects of racism

Papers should be no longer than 15- 20 minutes; please send 250 word proposals to sccsnewracisms@sussex.ac.uk by 31 March 2014.
Proposals may be in Word, PDF, or RTF formats with the following information in this order:

• author(s)
• affiliation
• email address
• title of abstract
• body of abstract
We welcome creative pieces, to discuss please contact Conference Directors s.r.munt@sussex.ac.uk and l.m.morrice@sussex.ac.uk
For any other queries about the conference please contact conference organisers: We look forward to welcoming you to Brighton in May!
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/sccs/activities/newracisms
www.lifeintheukproject.co.uk
@sccsconference

 

This conference is supported by Sussex Centre for Cultural Studies, and the AHRC Cultural Values Project: Cultural Values from the Subaltern Perspective: A Phenomenology of Refugees’ Experience of British Cultural Values.

This conference is being organised in conjunction with a Sussex Centre for Cultural Studies event in honour and memory of Stuart Hall, which will include a screening of John Akomfrah’s film ‘The Stuart Hall Project’, and a panel discussion

Stuart Hall’s work, with Dr Nirmal Puwar (Goldsmiths) and Professor Avtar Brah (Birkbeck). This will take place from 2-5.30pm on Thursday 8 May, and will be followed by a drinks reception.

 

CALL FOR PAPERS – Race in the Americas (RITA) Group: Across the Indian Ocean

CALL FOR PAPERS – Race in the Americas (RITA) Group: Across the Indian Ocean

The RITA group seeks abstract submissions on the theme across the Indian Ocean.

The symposium will be held on 29th October 2014, at Senate House, University of London.

Professor Francoise Vergès and Dr Shihan de Silva will be the keynote speakers.

The Indian Ocean region has been marked as ‘hybrid’, ‘creole’, ‘creolised’, and ‘plural’. These ongoing processes have been analysed across a raft of disciplines and media and have also acted as theoretical inroads into inequalities linked to the region’s colonial past and its current economic and geostrategic positioning.  Much like the Caribbean region, the Indian Ocean region experienced not only encounters between African slaves and European colonial masters and resulting cleavages created by hierarchies of race, class, gender, sexuality and language, but also great social complexity through cross-cultural exchanges in trade, labour, religion and culture.

In the way in which the politics of the past is similar to the Caribbean, this symposium seeks to explore the politics of the present across the Indian Ocean region. These comprise Mauritius, Seychelles, Réunion Island, Comoros and Madagascar. In the spirit of the shared history, this special edition RITA Group symposium seeks to explore how islands in the Indian Ocean region have been imagined and theorised in terms of race and culture and to connect with the Caribbean with its shared history of slavery, indentureship and migration flows.

We invite proposals from scholars and postgraduate students across disciplines, as well as activists, public policy theorists, and members of civil society organisations to submit proposals that commits to the theme of ‘race’ and culture in the Indian Ocean region.
Please send proposals of 250 – 300 words for a 20 minute presentation along with a brief biography to info@raceintheamericas.com by Saturday 31st May, 2014.  For further information please go to www.raceintheamericas.com.  Attendance will be free of charge.  Refreshments will be available. This event is generously supported by the Institute of Commonwealth Study, School of Advanced Study, University of London.

 

Free Workshop on War Refugees across the World: 30 April 2014

Please find below details of a (free) event next week at the RLI in London:

International Public Workshop

Regional Perspectives on Displacement: War, Generalised Violence and Refugee Protection
30 April 2014, 5.00 pm | L103, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

Speakers:
Professor Dawn Chatty (Refugee Studies Centre, Oxford)

Professor Susan Akram (Boston, USA)
Dr David James Cantor (RLI, London)
Ahmed Arbee (IARLJ, South Africa)

Justice Isaac Lenaola (High Court of Kenya)

Chair:
Professor James Simeon (CRS, Canada)

This is the second of two International Public Seminars on ‘Armed Conflict, Generalised Violence and Asylum Law’ organised collaboratively by the Centre for Refugee Studies at York University, Canada, and the Refugee Law Initiative at University of London, UK. They take place by video-conferencing.

This session will compare and contrast refugees, armed conflict and generalized violence at the regional level. In parts of the world affected particularly by these dynamics – such as the Middle East, Latin America and Africa – different perspectives exist on how refugee protection should function within each region. This session interrogates how such ‘localized’ asylum concepts and mechanisms emerge and adapt in response to the impact of refugee flows upon neighbouring and nearby countries within regions and, in turn, influence and effect international refugee law and practice. This session aims to provide a public forum for presenting and debating these global refugee law issues.

Registration is free but participants should reserve a place here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/regional-perspectives-on-the-consequences-of-displacement-war-generalized-violence-and-refugee-tickets-8370036003

 

Calls for papers: The Arab Uprising: Researching the Revolutions, Amman, 22-23 September 2014

Call for Papers:

The Arab Uprising: Researching the Revolutions
Amman, 22-23 September 2014

The Council for British Research in the Levant is pleased to open a call for papers for a workshop to be held in Amman on 22 and 23 September, 2014 on the broad topic of the Arab Uprising. From the end of 2010, a series of unexpected popular uprisings have spread across North Africa and the Middle East. The dramatic unfolding of events has disrupted the region in new and disturbing ways, including uprooting people both internally and across borders, transforming existing migrants into refugees and constraining the movement of mobile populations. Some events, as in Egypt and Tunisia, have been largely peaceful, with political transitions under the mediation of the army. Other events have been brutal, with a witnessing of force of arms and violent suppression of the opposition in Libya, and now also in Syria.  These diverse crises have resulted in significant political turmoil, humanitarian emergencies, and regional political crises as the burden of hosting displaced people becomes overwhelming.

This workshop will provide a space for interested researchers pre and post-doctoral to critically engage with the evolving contemporary crises across the Middle East and North Africa focusing in particular on the nature of popular uprisings and democratic transformation as well as the challenges surrounding the mass displacement of people. Some of the conceptual questions which might be addressed include:  what can we generalise about recent changes across the region? How much national/ regional specificity is required? Do events since 2011 mark an end to contentious notions about “Arab exceptionalism”, the persistence of authoritarianism and the “Arab street”? What can we learn from these events about “democratic transition” in the region? What can we learn about the comparative experiences of Islamist, liberal and secular radical currents? What issues of gender emerge from national and regional developments? Methodological and ethical questions might also be addressed and include:  how have the Arab uprisings been reported and researched, and what are the implications for academic practice? What methods are appropriate for data collection and analysis of mass movements for change? How can researchers in the social sciences mobilise insights from oral history and narrative methods in understanding experiential aspects of the uprisings? Is there a place for “action research”? What risks are acceptable for researchers during episodes of conflict?

Please send proposed paper titles and abstracts of no more than 250 words to CBRL@britac.ac.uk by April 30th. We will notify participants whether their paper has been accepted by the end of May.

The conference fee is £100, with a discounted rate of £50 for student participants. The fee will cover attendance at the conference, including lunches during the conference and the conference dinner.

The CBRL is able to provide a limited number of travel and accommodation bursaries for postgraduate student participants. If you would like to be considered for a bursary please include this request when submitting your abstract, together with a brief note confirming your current status.]

Archives News Stories 04/29/2014

  • “The National Library of Wales’ chief executive has set out new plans for the institution a year after a fire destroyed archives there.

    Aled Gruffydd Jones launched a three-year strategy twelve months after the fire caused £5m of damage to the library’s roof.

    Proposals include leading a debate on establishing a National Archive for Wales.

    It also aims to develop projects with the public sector.

    Mr Jones told staff the plan gave them a chance “not only to look back”, but also an opportunity “to look forward”.

    He added: “Our vision is for Welsh people everywhere to be connected with knowledge important to all aspects of their lives.””

    tags:archives

  • “I like a good lost city. Found cities are interesting (Troy, for example) but lost ones are even better. Here’s a picture (possibly) of one, taken by the cross dressing acrobat and photographer Lulu Farini, protégé of the Great Farini.”

    tags:news archives

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Reports and Publications: Syria 04/29/2014

  • “Hidden victims: Radical change needed for older, disabled and injured Syrian refugees

    London, 9th April 2014. New research published today shows that older, disabled and injured Syrian refugees are paying a double toll as a result of the conflict. The report, released by Handicap International and HelpAge International, provides new data showing how much these vulnerable refugees are struggling to meet their specific needs.

    The two agencies are calling on all national and international humanitarian stakeholders providing assistance to Syrian refugees to change the way aid is delivered so that disabled, injured and older refugees are no longer the hidden casualties of the conflict. More precise targeting and registration of refugees and better training of staff will ensure humanitarian assistance is accessible, appropriate and effective, says the report.”

    tags:reports publications Syria

  • “An ILO assessment of Syrian refugee employment in Lebanon finds that low wages, high unemployment and lack of labour market regulation pose serious challenges to livelihoods for both residents and refugees in host communities

    BEIRUT (ILO News) – Almost a third of Syrian refugees in Lebanon’s labour market are unemployed, said the International Labour Organization in a study entitled “Assessment of the Impact of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon and their Employment Profile”.

    The report says that most Syrian refugees working in Lebanon also suffer from low wages and harsh working conditions. It also points to refugees’ lack of skills and education.”

    tags:reports publications Syria

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

New Research and Publications 04/29/2014

  • “(Geneva) – Members of the UN Human Rights Council called on Egypt and Sudan on March 14, 2014, to investigate and prosecute traffickers for kidnapping, torturing, and killing refugees in the Sinai Peninsula. The 24 countries sponsoring the German-led statement also called on both countries to identify and prosecute any security officials who may have colluded with traffickers.

    On February 11 Human Rights Watch released a report titled “‘I Just Wanted to Lie Down and Die:’ Trafficking and Torture of Eritreans in Sudan and Egypt,” which documents how, since 2010, Egyptian traffickers have tortured Eritreans for ransom in the Sinai Peninsula usingrape, burning, and mutilation. It also documents torture by traffickers in eastern Sudan and 29 incidents in which victims said that Sudanese and Egyptian security officers facilitated trafficker abuses rather than arresting the traffickers and rescuing their victims.”

    tags:reports publications news

  • “The paper is part of FRA’s ongoing work in the area of asylum and migration. It is also a contribution to the evaluation and possible modification of EU legislation on assisting unauthorised entry. This is an important aspect of the European Commission’s ‘Task Force Mediterranean’, which was set up following the deaths of almost 400 people off the Italian island of Lampedusa in October 2013.”

    tags:reports publications

  • “his was the background to a Maastricht Studium Generale debate, “Knocking at the Doors of Fortress Europe: Migration Flows from the Maghreb to Europe: Is there a Long-term Solution?”, held on Wednesday 15 January 2014.

    The debate started with an introduction by Natasja Reslow, Postdoc Fellow at Maastricht Law Faculty. She spoke about the controversial policies of the EU’s Frontex Agency, EU Mobility Partnerships and the changing nature of asylum flows and policies to Europe. Hildegard Schneider, Dean of the Faculty of Law led the debate and brought forth many questions on the relationship between EU asylum policy and migrants rights.”

    tags:reports publications news

  • “Somalis in European Cities series produced by the Open Society Foundations’ At Home in Europe Project. It is the result of research that examines Somali living conditions in seven cities across Europe (Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Helsinki, Leicester, London, Malmö, and Oslo), as well as the ways in which municipal authorities counter growing social, political, and economic tensions and consider the needs of Somalis in key decision-making.”

    tags:reports publications

  • “On 12 and 13 December 2013, humanitarian practitioners, academics, private-sector representatives, international organizations, non-governmental and government representatives gathered in New York to attend the 2013 Global Humanitarian Policy Forum, convened by the Policy Analysis and Innovation Section of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). The forum discussed the future of the formal international humanitarian system and where it would stand in 2025.”

    tags:reports publications

  • “The Future of Humanitarian Security in Fragile Contexts: An analysis of transformational factors affecting humanitarian action in the coming decade stems from a recognition that the humanitarian landscape has changed dramatically in the past decade.

    The transformation of the humanitarian landscape has already made a significant impact on the operational security of INGOs and other humanitarian actors. Moreover, as contexts defined as ‘fragile’ increasingly draw the attention of the international community, humanitarian actors will need to give careful consideration to the impact of changes unfolding in fragile contexts.”

    tags:reports publications

  • “ATHENS/BRUSSELS/NEW YORK—Prolonged and systematic detention is leading to devastating consequences on the health and dignity of migrants and asylum seekers in Greece, the international medical humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) warned in a report released today, which called for an end to the practice.

    In Greece, undocumented migrants are routinely detained when apprehended without valid documents. Since the summer of 2012 and the launch of widespread police checks—known as ‘Operation Xenios Zeus’—administrative detention has been used on a massive scale, often applied for the maximum period of 18 months.”

    tags:reports publications

  • “All detention practices are specified in their individual country contexts although rarely defined as such. In the United Kingdom, for example, detention is seen as the “most usually appropriate” immigration enforcement mechanism

    to effect removal;
    initially to establish a person’s identity or basis of claim; or
    where there is reason to believe that the person will fail to comply with any conditions
    attached to the grant of temporary admission or release.”

    To be a lawful practice in that country, detention “must not only be based on one of the statutory powers and accord with the limitations implied by domestic and Strasbourg case law but must also accord with stated policy.”7 Likewise, in Australia, the regular detention policy is not defined as such but is understood in terms of its aims. The primary aim of the policy is to ensure the successful administration of new arrivals (“people who arrive without lawful authority do not enter the Australian community until their identity and status have been properly assessed and they have been granted a visa”) and removal (“people who do not have authority to be in Australia are available for removal from Australia”) of “unlawful” non-citizens who do not have a valid residence permit or visa.8″

    tags:reports publications news

  • “Every year, hundreds of thousands of young people around the world experience violent conflicts first hand. Violent conflicts interfere with youth development by disrupting everyday life, not only while the conflict is on-going, but also after the grenades and gunshots have fallen silent. Growing up surrounded by conflict and living in a post-conflict setting will have enormous impact on the lives of young people and their prospects as they grow into adulthood.

    Over the years, Red Cross and Red Crescent staff and volunteers have provided support to young people in post-conflict situations through psychosocial activities. Providing this kind of help to vulnerable people can take many forms and requires trained staff and volunteers.”

    tags:reports publications

  • “This is the third year in which the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) has outlined the key humanitarian concerns in the occupied Palestinian territory in one Humanitarian Overview document. This annual report aims to provide a comprehensive overview or ‘snapshot’ of the humanitarian situation in the oPt in a given year, to monitor trends and developments, and to inform policy and programming.”

    tags:reports publications

  • “Hidden victims: Radical change needed for older, disabled and injured Syrian refugees

    London, 9th April 2014. New research published today shows that older, disabled and injured Syrian refugees are paying a double toll as a result of the conflict. The report, released by Handicap International and HelpAge International, provides new data showing how much these vulnerable refugees are struggling to meet their specific needs.

    The two agencies are calling on all national and international humanitarian stakeholders providing assistance to Syrian refugees to change the way aid is delivered so that disabled, injured and older refugees are no longer the hidden casualties of the conflict. More precise targeting and registration of refugees and better training of staff will ensure humanitarian assistance is accessible, appropriate and effective, says the report.”

    tags:reports publications Syria

  • “The considerable diversity among Sweden’s immigrants reflects a humanitarian migration policy. Refugees have arrived in the country since the 1970s and 1980s, with their countries of origin shifting according to the ethnic and political conflicts of any given period. Sweden is also a longstanding magnet for labor migration from surrounding Scandinavia, and has attracted mobile EU citizens since its entry into the European Union in 1995—and especially following the EU enlargements of 2004 and 2007. Sweden’s immigration flows continue to change today, as policy reforms in 2008 allowed employers to bring non-EU labor migrants to the country for the first time in decades. “

    tags:reports publications

  • “An ILO assessment of Syrian refugee employment in Lebanon finds that low wages, high unemployment and lack of labour market regulation pose serious challenges to livelihoods for both residents and refugees in host communities

    BEIRUT (ILO News) – Almost a third of Syrian refugees in Lebanon’s labour market are unemployed, said the International Labour Organization in a study entitled “Assessment of the Impact of Syrian Refugees in Lebanon and their Employment Profile”.

    The report says that most Syrian refugees working in Lebanon also suffer from low wages and harsh working conditions. It also points to refugees’ lack of skills and education.”

    tags:reports publications Syria

  • “Reporting on Humanitarian Crises: A Manual for Trainers & Journalists and an Introduction for Humanitarian Workers presents a combination of standard, professional reporting techniques for journalists covering humanitarian response scenarios, plus a basic education in and understanding of the humanitarian sector, its architecture, mandates and modus operandi. The goal of the manual and the handouts section is to prepare journalists to cover natural and man-made disasters in a more informed, balanced way, and to show how a utilitarian approach to information content and dissemination can an effective life saver. It is intended to function as both an educational guide that journalists can read and learn from, and as an outline for a workshop focusing on the training of local reporters.”

    tags:reports publications

  • “A heated debate over whether humanitarian aid should also include building longer-term resilience in communities was triggered in the blogosphere in February by Jonathan Whittall, Mit Philips, and Michiel Hofman from Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). They argued that the resilience concept, as a bridge between humanitarian response and development aid, distracts humanitarian actors from short-term life-saving activities by focusing on supporting local and national systems to better face and recover from shocks over the longer term. “

    tags:reports publications news

  • “[Podcasts] Listen to the 26 February seminar by Dr Chaloka Beyani (London School of Economics; UN Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights of Internally Displaced Persons), part of the Hilary term 2014 Public Seminar Series

    In this seminar, Dr Beyani explores the results of his research into the right to seek and obtain asylum under African human rights instruments, also contained in his recent book Protection of the Right to Seek and Obtain Asylum Under the African Human Rights System (Brill | Nijhoff 2013).”

    tags:reports publications

  • “Strasbourg, 02.04.2014 – The Committee of Ministers today made public the annual report for 2013 on its supervision of the execution of judgments and decisions of the European Court of Human Rights. In accordance with the European Convention on Human Rights, the Committee of Ministers is responsible for supervising the execution of the Court’s judgments by the states concerned.

    The statistics 2013 confirm the positive trends of 2011 and 2012, and reveal a first decrease ever in the total number of pending cases. One can also note an all-time high in the number of cases closed through final resolutions. Like in 2012, the statistics 2013 also reveal improvements as to the respect of deadlines in the payment of just satisfaction.”

    tags:reports publications

  • “Syria, Democratic Republic of Congo, Yemen, South Sudan, Central African Republic and Egypt are among the most significant risers in this year’s internationally acclaimed global ranking Peoples under Threat, Minority Rights Group International (MRG) says.

    ‘A number of states which rose prominently in the index over the last two years – including South Sudan, the Central African Republic and Syria – have subsequently faced episodes of extreme ethnic or sectarian violence,’ says Mark Lattimer, MRG’s Executive Director. ‘The 2014 release of Peoples under Threat analysis shows that the risk in those states remains critical – but also that threat levels have risen in other states.'”

    tags:publications reports news

  • “African countries dominate the list of major risers in this year’s release of the internationally-acclaimed global ranking Peoples under Threat, says Minority Rights Group International (MRG).

    Risks have climbed in the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan, Central African Republic (CAR), Mali and Guinea Bissau, as recorded in Peoples under Threat, which identifies communities facing the greatest risk of genocide, mass killing or systematic violent repression. In countries at the very top of the list, including DRC, South Sudan and CAR, mass killing is already ongoing. ”

    tags:publications reports news

  • “A student activist in Iran’s 1979 revolution that overthrew the dictatorial Shah, Nahid Persson Sarvestani fled to Sweden with her baby after Islamists seized power and began persecuting leftists who had been their revolutionary allies. Three decades later, events in Iran inspire Nahid to revisit that part of her life. Prompted by brutal crackdowns on anti-government protests in 2009 and long-suppressed guilt for abandoning a younger brother to imprisonment and death, the internationally acclaimed filmmaker locates and reunites with five female activists who survived torture and terror in the Islamist regime’s jails. Now living in exile, the women share gripping accounts of how their jailers tried to break them physically and spiritually, and describe what sustained them during these horrible ordeals. With the support of these stalwart survivors, Sarvestani finds answers to haunting questions about her brother’s last days. Shifting skillfully between past and present, this deeply personal documentary is an essential resource for understanding Iran today. “

    tags:publications reports

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

News Stories (Daily) 04/29/2014

  • “(Geneva) – Members of the UN Human Rights Council called on Egypt and Sudan on March 14, 2014, to investigate and prosecute traffickers for kidnapping, torturing, and killing refugees in the Sinai Peninsula. The 24 countries sponsoring the German-led statement also called on both countries to identify and prosecute any security officials who may have colluded with traffickers.

    On February 11 Human Rights Watch released a report titled “‘I Just Wanted to Lie Down and Die:’ Trafficking and Torture of Eritreans in Sudan and Egypt,” which documents how, since 2010, Egyptian traffickers have tortured Eritreans for ransom in the Sinai Peninsula usingrape, burning, and mutilation. It also documents torture by traffickers in eastern Sudan and 29 incidents in which victims said that Sudanese and Egyptian security officers facilitated trafficker abuses rather than arresting the traffickers and rescuing their victims.”

    tags:reports publications news

  • “his was the background to a Maastricht Studium Generale debate, “Knocking at the Doors of Fortress Europe: Migration Flows from the Maghreb to Europe: Is there a Long-term Solution?”, held on Wednesday 15 January 2014.

    The debate started with an introduction by Natasja Reslow, Postdoc Fellow at Maastricht Law Faculty. She spoke about the controversial policies of the EU’s Frontex Agency, EU Mobility Partnerships and the changing nature of asylum flows and policies to Europe. Hildegard Schneider, Dean of the Faculty of Law led the debate and brought forth many questions on the relationship between EU asylum policy and migrants rights.”

    tags:reports publications news

  • “(Paris) – France detains as many as 500 children who arrive in the country alone each year in transit zones at the borders, where they are denied the protection and due process rights afforded other unaccompanied children on French territory, Human Rights Watch said today. Any unaccompanied child who arrives in France should be admitted to the country and provided with shelter and care while their immigration claims are decided.

    Under French law, unaccompanied children – who arrive at an airport or seaport without parents or guardians to protect them – can be held in one of more than 50 transit zones for up to 20 days, during which time the government claims they have not entered France.This legal fiction allows the French government to deny due process rights to children in transit zones that unaccompanied children in France enjoy. France has not changed its practice despite a 2009 court ruling that children in the transit zones are in fact in France.”

    tags:news

  • “All detention practices are specified in their individual country contexts although rarely defined as such. In the United Kingdom, for example, detention is seen as the “most usually appropriate” immigration enforcement mechanism

    to effect removal;
    initially to establish a person’s identity or basis of claim; or
    where there is reason to believe that the person will fail to comply with any conditions
    attached to the grant of temporary admission or release.”

    To be a lawful practice in that country, detention “must not only be based on one of the statutory powers and accord with the limitations implied by domestic and Strasbourg case law but must also accord with stated policy.”7 Likewise, in Australia, the regular detention policy is not defined as such but is understood in terms of its aims. The primary aim of the policy is to ensure the successful administration of new arrivals (“people who arrive without lawful authority do not enter the Australian community until their identity and status have been properly assessed and they have been granted a visa”) and removal (“people who do not have authority to be in Australia are available for removal from Australia”) of “unlawful” non-citizens who do not have a valid residence permit or visa.8″

    tags:reports publications news

  • “A heated debate over whether humanitarian aid should also include building longer-term resilience in communities was triggered in the blogosphere in February by Jonathan Whittall, Mit Philips, and Michiel Hofman from Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). They argued that the resilience concept, as a bridge between humanitarian response and development aid, distracts humanitarian actors from short-term life-saving activities by focusing on supporting local and national systems to better face and recover from shocks over the longer term. “

    tags:reports publications news

  • “This 2005 article in Forced Migration Review describes the accomplishments of IRIN, the well-known and well-regarded humanitarian news service, during its first 10 years of operation. But it might not be around to celebrate its 20th anniversary: A petition to “Save IRIN” that is currently circulating indicates that “IRIN’s parent organization in the UN has decided to wind it down.” According to numerous tweets, this will likely take place by the end of the year.”

    tags:news

  • “Syria, Democratic Republic of Congo, Yemen, South Sudan, Central African Republic and Egypt are among the most significant risers in this year’s internationally acclaimed global ranking Peoples under Threat, Minority Rights Group International (MRG) says.

    ‘A number of states which rose prominently in the index over the last two years – including South Sudan, the Central African Republic and Syria – have subsequently faced episodes of extreme ethnic or sectarian violence,’ says Mark Lattimer, MRG’s Executive Director. ‘The 2014 release of Peoples under Threat analysis shows that the risk in those states remains critical – but also that threat levels have risen in other states.'”

    tags:publications reports news

  • “African countries dominate the list of major risers in this year’s release of the internationally-acclaimed global ranking Peoples under Threat, says Minority Rights Group International (MRG).

    Risks have climbed in the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan, Central African Republic (CAR), Mali and Guinea Bissau, as recorded in Peoples under Threat, which identifies communities facing the greatest risk of genocide, mass killing or systematic violent repression. In countries at the very top of the list, including DRC, South Sudan and CAR, mass killing is already ongoing. ”

    tags:publications reports news

  • If you are following Refugee Law Project’s work with male survivors of Conflict-Related Sexual Violence, we invite you to take just three minutes of your time to watch a clip from one of Uganda’s TV channels, NTV. The news item, with the title “Male Rape as a tool of subjugation during war”, was broadcast on the occasion of a workshop on Sexual and Gender Based Violence, convened in Kampala in January 2014 by the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR). The clip can be found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sv6arFUf3lE

    tags:news

  • “DUBAI, 24 April 2014 (IRIN) – With the majority of today’s conflicts taking place in Muslim countries or involving Muslim combatants, aid agencies are operating – arguably more than ever before – in situations where Islamic norms govern the terrain in which they work.

    Islamic law contains a rich but complex set of rules on the protection of civilians. But can that centuries-old canon be reconciled with modern international humanitarian norms?

    In this series of reports we explore the tension (and overlap) between Islamic jurisprudence and international humanitarian law: we report on how jihadists are interpreting Islamic edicts , and how humanitarians are using those same principles to further access. ”

    tags:news reports publications

  • “In May 2013, the Minister for Immigration asked the MAC to advise on the issue, effects and the resulting economic and social impacts of low-skilled work migration.

    The minister specifically asked the MAC to:

    consider the labour market, economic and social impacts on the UK and specifically on British workers, drawing on and updating earlier work in this area.

    In particular, the MAC has been asked to research the growth of migrant labour, distinguishing where possible between EEA and non-EEA migrants, in low skilled sectors of the UK economy and the factors driving this.”

    tags:news government

  • “I like a good lost city. Found cities are interesting (Troy, for example) but lost ones are even better. Here’s a picture (possibly) of one, taken by the cross dressing acrobat and photographer Lulu Farini, protégé of the Great Farini.”

    tags:news archives

  • “A new report from the Scottish Refugee Council has found that pregnant asylum seekers and their children are “regarded first and foremost as women and children by health professionals,”

    IIt also has evidence that “insecure immigration status does not appear to preclude or constrain their access to maternity care in Glasgow.”

    But these encouraging findings are offset by a number of factors, including variations in interpretation services provided to users of health services and the “risk of destitution” which arises from Home Office asylum support policies.

    The report sets out six recommendations for improvements to the services provided to pregnant asylum seekers and their children in Scotland, which all centre around the principle that the NHS should be free to address them as ‘women and children first’, with issues of immigration status dealth with separately from their healthcare needs.

    To download both summary and full versions of the report Women and Children First? Refused asylum seekers’ access to and experiences of maternity care in Glasgow CLICK HERE”

    tags:news

  • “The fact that a party which includes the likes of William Henwood (Lenny Henry “should emigrate to a black country”) and Andre Lampitt (unsavoury views on everything from Muslims, to AIDS, slavery, Syria and forced sterilisation) amongst it candidates for the forthcoming local government election and, it appears, to be well-placed to come first in the poll for the European Parliament, ought to be seen as a powerful rejoinder to the idea that Britain is now a ‘post-racial’ society.

    The advocates of this idea have been keen to take at face value the apparent cosmopolitan ease that prevails across large sections of British society, conveniently forgetting the fact that what does count as progress has been won at the cost of countless battles against all the manifestations of racism. If it sometimes appears that we stand on the cusp of being able to declare a victory over this form of prejudice we should at least acknowledge that there at least a few major battles that need to be fought to finally settle the issue.”

    tags:news

  • “The Runnymede Trust and University of Reading present Romans Revealed, an interactive website that tells the stories of four people living in Britain in Roman times. The main aim is making children learn that migration and multiculturalism is not a new thing, but instead people have been travelling to and from Britain for centuries. The website is aimed at children aged 7-11, and there are also teaching resources for key stage 2. By teaching our children to accept diversity and equality from a young age, we can End Racism This Generation.”

    tags:news

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

In partnership with the Brookings-LSE Project on Internal Displacement , IDMC’s latest publication ‘National Instruments on Internal Displacement: A Guide to their Development is a valuable tool which aims to help law and policymakers address internal displacement in a planned and concerted manner.

JOURNAL OF INTERNAL DISPLACEMENT CALL FOR PAPERS (SPECIAL ISSUE)

*JULY 2014 EDITION*

UNDERSTANDING ISRAELI PRACTICES OF FORCED DISPLACEMENT AND SETTLER COLONIALISM IN THE OCCUPIED PALESTINIAN TERRITORIES

Guest Editor: LAMYA HUSSAIN*** Extended Deadline: *May 1, 2014 *

Email submission to: jid@evresearch.ca  or vpfynn@gmail.com no later than *May 1, 2014.*

For more information, please visit our website: http://journalinternaldisplacement.webs.com

In an attempt to document the impact of Israeli policies on Palestinian livelihoods this issue will deal with the trauma and devastation faced by communities through on-going evictions and demolition orders that forcefully displaced Palestinian communities in Area C and East Jerusalem. This special issue seeks to examine histories, narratives, and the daily experiences of communities that currently face forced displacement or have been displaced as a result of settler-colonial practices of the state of Israel. In documenting the narratives, this issue aims to present the legal tools employed by Israel to systematically displace Palestinians in Area C and East Jerusalem.

Further, the issue will seek papers that highlight the socio-economic and political motivations that inspire shifts in geographies and population transfer induced to maintain hegemonic control/access of resources (land and water) and population dynamics. Submissions and case studies that detail the impact of Israeli policies and practices of forced displacement are also invited to participate.

It is against this backdrop that JID seeks to stimulate inclusive and discursive dialogue from interested scholars, practitioners, and policy makers around the nature, characteristics, and experiences of forced migration and displacement across Palestinian territories with an emphasis on Area C and East Jerusalem.

We invite submissions that examine and investigate diverse perspectives on the above issues with respect to the following list of themes:

* Settler-Colonialism

* War and Conflict

* Environment, Conflict, and Displacement

* Peace-building and State-building

* International Relations and Peace Process

* Gender, Military Occupation, and Migration

* Non-Governmental Organizations, Humanitarian Assistance, and Protection

* Donor Patterns and Donor Dependency

* Oslo I, Oslo II, and The Paris Protocol