Monthly Archives: February 2014

Disappointment at Hong Kong refugee welfare changes

Jody-Lan Castle

Long-awaited welfare changes to affect thousands of refugees, have come into effect today in Hong Kong.  

Increases in rental and food assistance, utility expenses and help with rental deposits are among the improvements.

African migrants Unable to work, refugees have little to do. Photo: JC

But the policy still doesn’t include the right to work, even after residing in the city for a long period of time.

A Central African lawyer-turned-charity worker, who came to Hong Kong to seek asylum in 2004, is among many who say it’s not enough. 

Robert, who fled civil war and persecution in his country, says, “It’s not at all enough. In fact, in Hong Kong there’s no way you can get a room for HK$1500. It’s just a kind of cave, a place where you put your bed, nothing more.”

The value of the food bag given to refugees and asylum seekers, three to…

View original post 822 more words

‘Voices from the Syrian Tragedy’: Three New Poems

ArabLit & ArabLit Quarterly

Fawaz Azem has translated three new Syrian poems — one from Dima Yousf and two from Nihad Sayed Issa — all responding, in some way, to the nation’s current landscape:

By Fawaz Azem

Dima Yousf, courtesy of the author. Dima Yousf, courtesy of the poet.

Dima Yousf, a Syrian Palestinian born in 1986, graduated from Damascus University with a degree in Arabic literature and a teaching diploma. She teaches Arabic in Damascus schools, and is pursuing a graduate degree “but with a stay of execution.”  A recent post on her Facebook page reads “I have so many stories to tell, if I survive.”

Yousf’s poem is untitled.

#

Oh, if I only had a knife
like those that are forgotten on necks,
after massacres.
If I only had the fingers of a murderer
and his unblinking eyes.
If I could only utter the cry of his victim
the moment he gathers in the voices
from all four corners…

View original post 396 more words

Courses: Statelessness Summer Course – Tilburg University Law School

Statelessness Summer Course, 4 – 8 August 2014

We are pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for the Statelessness Summer Course, organised jointly by the Statelessness Programme, Open Society Justice Initiative and UNHCR. A PDF flyer with full details can be found online here: http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/upload/8d30cf56-acc0-418d-bb21-97b50cc6b588_draft%20flyer%202014.pdf. The deadline for applications is 1 April 2014.

The past few years have seen a growing acknowledgement of the true magnitude and impact of statelessness. However, much work remains to be done in terms of developing a full understanding of the phenomenon and building the required capacity to address it. Against this background, the Statelessness Summer Course offers a unique opportunity to learn about and reflect on the challenge that statelessness presents in the international legal system. Lasting one week, the Summer Course aims to enable people working in this and related fields – such as refugees, citizenship, human rights and anti-discrimination – to acquire new skills to better understand this problem.

Taught by experts from the Statelessness Programme at Tilburg Law School, Open Society Justice Initiative and UNHCR, the Summer Course offers a stimulating curriculum which combines academic excellence with practical experience:

“In 5 days I learned more about statelessness than I ever did in my law practice and teaching career. I’m very glad to have participated in this Course and to have learned so much about the practice on statelessness with colleagues from all around the world that had so many amazing stories to tell”

. Carolina de Abreu Claro, PhD researcher, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil (2013 participant)

“Nowhere else would I have been able to share with such a diverse and knowledgeable group of people so many experiences and information regarding statelessness. The Statelessness Summer Course is great for understanding and addressing such an important issue.”

. Barbara Perez Martinez, Deputy of Protection, Commission for Refugee Aid, Ministry of Interior, Mexico (2012 participant)

For more information about the course and to download the application form, please visit: http://www.tilburguniversity.edu/research/institutes-and-research-groups/statelessness/summercourse/

 

New Journal Articles (weekly)

  • “This article examines the role of parents and peers for the religiosity of ethnic minority and majority adolescents, about which little is known in the literature. We analyze data from the nationally representative and cross-nationally comparative survey ‘Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study in Four European Countries’ CILS4EU (2010–2011) with information from >13,000 adolescents in England, Germany, and the Netherlands. Results from this school-based survey show that ethnic minority adolescents, and in particular those with Muslim parents, are more religious than native-majority adolescents. Transmission of more private aspects of religiosity (i.e. ‘the subjective importance people attach to religion’) is more successful among ethnic minority families compared with native-majority families. No minority–majority differences are found in the intergenerational transmission of more public dimensions of religiosity (i.e. frequency of ‘religious attendance’ and ‘prayer’). Furthermore, we find that beyond the influence of parents, the religiosity of adolescents is positively associated with the average religiosity of their peers in class. In line with the argument that peer influence is stronger between members of the same, rather than different, ethnic groups, we also observe that the strength of the relation between average religiosity in class and individual religiosity increases with the share of co-ethnic peers in class. “

    tags: newjournalarticles

  • “Children of immigrants account for almost a quarter of the school-aged population in the United States, and this proportion is expected to rise to two in five by 2020 (p. 7). In this context, Kao, Vaquera, and Goyette provide a welcome account of research findings on the links between immigration and education in the United States. To be clear, the goal of their book is not to produce original results, but rather to review existing ones. This objective is achieved with flying colors: in a little more than 200 pages, Education and Immigration covers state-of-the-art knowledge in this field in a clear and structured way that will appeal to students, researchers, and interested readers on both sides of the Atlantic.

    In the introductory first chapter, the three authors justify the need for the historical and sociological inquiry of the educational outcomes of immigrants and their children in the United States, a country that is often presented as both a society of immigrants and a land of opportunity where it is believed that even newcomers can achieve success through education. Education is especially important in immigrant families, as it is ‘an indicator of assimilation and a precursor to upward mobility’ (p. 23). The book focuses mostly on post-1965 immigrants, who overwhelmingly come from Latin America and Asia, in contrast to older immigrants who mostly arrived from Europe. ”

    tags: newjournalarticles

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Events: Oxford Public Law Discussion Group: ‘Between Scotland and Palestine: Participation in Transformative Referenda and Putative Citizenship’

Oxford Public Law Discussion Group
Friday, 14 March 2014, 1230-1400
Law Faculty SCR
‘Between Scotland and Palestine: Participation in Transformative Referenda and Putative Citizenship’

Dr. Ruvi Ziegler (Lecturer in Law, University of Reading)

Abstract:
All democratic states set eligibility criteria for participation in elections of their institutions of government. Broadly speaking, these criteria fall into two categories: individual competence and membership of the state’s political community. The latter criterion is manifested by ubiquitous exclusion of non-citizen residents from national (and oftentimes also sub- or supra-national) elections. Concurrently, some states impose residency requirements which disqualify their expatriates (non-resident citizens) during part or all of their period of absence.

Stake-holding across time and ties features prominently in jurisprudential and theoretical discourses surrounding disenfranchisement of non-resident citizens (and, in parallel, of non-citizen residents). However, in the main, it is assumed that most of the state’s citizens reside therein and that the geographical boundaries of the state are stable. Thus, electoral processes affect the governance of an existing political unit, to which expatriates qua citizens retain the internationally recognised right to return. A current example may be the decision of the German Federal Constitutional Court to permit participation of German expatriates in Federal Elections even if they have never lived in the country.

In contradistinction, the proposed paper will address the constitutive roles of eligibility of non-residents to participate in electoral processes which (may) transform political and geographical borders. It will do so in the light of two contemporary case-studies.

The first case-study concerns the creation of a new country seceding from an existing country. Participants in the 18 September 2014 Scottish independence referendum will be asked whether Scotland should become an independent country. The non-residents concerned are citizens of the United Kingdom, formerly resident in Scotland, who will be electorally excluded (according to Section 2 of the Scottish Independence Referendum (Franchise) Act).

The second case-study concerns the creation of a new country whose prospective citizens are either stateless or citizens of other unrelated countries. The Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas recently asserted that, following the conclusion of any agreement between Israel and Palestine, a referendum will take place (while refraining from specifying its eligibility criteria). The non-residents concerned are members of the Palestinian Diaspora who could either become citizens of Palestine or eligible to become citizens thereof.
Stake-holding is evident in both scenarios: these referenda may determine the very existence of new countries, with ensuing ramifications for citizenship-contingent privileges of individual electors. Nevertheless, extending the franchise beyond the polity’s (prospective) geographical boundaries gives rise to considerable conceptual and practical challenges.

 

Courses: Center for Forced Migration Studies Summer Institute (Correction)

Here is the correct link:
2014 Summer Institute: http://www.bcics.northwestern.edu/documents/cfms/2014SummerInstituteSchedule-11-7-2013.pdf

Center for Forced Migration Studies’ Summer Institute: “The Refugee Status Determination Process”, June 1-7, 2014

Register here: http://www.northwesternevents.com/profile/web/index.cfm?PKWebId=0x60244dc0

The CFMS Summer Institute is an intensive, rigorous seven-day, non-degree earning certificate program. Through lectures, focused discussions, workshops, films and simulation exercises, the CFMS Summer Institute, held at Northwestern University’s campus in Evanston, IL, provides a forum to exchange ideas, build relationships, develop new approaches and policy recommendations and learn about new developments in the field. Past participants have included government officials, non-governmental organization personnel, university faculty and graduate students (select advanced undergraduate students may seek permission to attend). Applicants must have good to excellent English speaking and reading skills. No translation services are available.

The 2014 Summer Institute on The Refugee Status Determination Process introduces participants to the 1951 Refugee Convention and 1967 Protocol refugee regime, the international legal basis for refugee status and the variations in how UNHCR and authorities in different countries determine whether an asylum-seeker is eligible for refugee status, with a particular focus on the United States. It provides students with lectures and workshops focused on decision making and analytical skills, legal writing, research, and procedural issues, case preparation including taking testimony, evidence documentation, working with victims of trauma and with issues of credibility and includes a focus on special topics such as LGBTI and gang-related asylum claims and cases involving unaccompanied minors. The training materials consist of training modules that include case studies, accompanying memoranda, procedures manuals, precedent Board of Immigration Appeals decisions, federal court decisions, and other documents. The attached table of contents lists the specific topics that constitute the course and training materials provided on each topic.

Faculty include: Barbara Harrell-Bond, (University of Oxford); Michael Kagan (University of Nevada, Las Vegas); Uzoamaka Nzliebe (Northwestern University); Miriam Marton (University of Connecticut); Rachel Levitan (Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society); Sioban Albiol (DePaul University) and representatives from the United Nations High Commission for Refugees and the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services Asylum Division

Summer Institute Director: Galya Ruffer, CFMS Founding Director.

The 2014 Summer Institute is targeted at UNHCR staff, government employees, practicing attorneys, NGO refugee case workers, academics, law students and other graduate students seeking to expand their knowledge of critical elements of the refugee status determination process.

CLE-eligible based on state approval for 37.5credits, 1.5 of which are ethics)

Read the full schedule for the 2014 Summer Institute: http://www.bcics.northwestern.edu/documents/cfms/2014SummerInstituteSchedule-11-7-2013.pdf

Institute Fees:

Registration – $800 (Does not include meals or housing)

Late Registration – $1,000 (After May 2)

**Limited Scholarships and partial tuition assistance are available** Please contact cfms@northwestern.edu for more information.

Visa Applicants: Contact the US embassy nearest you for visa application

Do you think you might need a visa? See: http://travel.state.gov/visa/

Accommodation:
The Institute will be held on the Northwestern University Campus in Evanston, IL. A limited number of homestays are available upon request and as well as a dormitory option. There are also several hotels in Evanston and the surrounding area. Please direct accommodation related questions to cfms@northwestern.edu.

Call for Papers: Trasnational Social Review: ‘Linking Migration and Social Policy’

Call for Papers: Trasnational Social Review: ‘Linking Migration and Social Policy’

We are very pleased to inform you that TSR will be published by Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group starting in 2014. Due to its high demand it will be published three times a year from now on. We are very excited about this new cooperation and the new possibilities and development for TSR. More information will be soon available on the website: www.tandfonline.com/rtsr.

We also would like to refer to the Call for Papers for the focused topic on “Linking Migration and Social Policy” of TSR. We are looking for contributions that shed light on the myriad ways in which migration and social policy are interrelated based on concrete examples that are relevant to social work and related fields of study. The guest editors Dr Eberhard Raithelhuber and Professor Dr Wolfgang Schröer welcome the submission of contributions. The deadline for submission of full articles is April 1, 2014. Please find the complete Call for Papers attached [Moderator’s note: please find the Call below].

Please consider submitting and distributing the Call.

Best regards

Prof Dr Cornelia Schweppe                      
(Managerial Editor)                                                 

Claudia Olivier
(Managing Editor)

Research Cluster “Transnational Social Support”
Journal “Transnational Social Review – A Social Work Journal”

Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
Institute of Education
Jakob-Welder-Weg 12
55099 Mainz, Germany

Email: tss@uni-mainz.de
www.tss.uni-mainz.de

CALL FOR PAPERS
Linking Migration and Social Policy

Deadline for submission of articles:
April 1, 2014
For the focused topic on “Linking migration and social policy” in the journal “Transnational
Social Review – A Social Work Journal” (TSR), the guest editors Eberhard Raithelhuber and
Wolfgang Schröer hereby invite you to submit proposal abstracts.

Research Interest
Migration and social policy are treated as two strands of study which for the most part are not linked systematically. This is true though both are strongly connected to and regulated
through the nation state and related institutions, e.g. in their everyday boundary work, above
all with regard to the institution of citizenship. Sensational stories in the public discourse of
Western welfare states, e.g. on the “abuse” of social security systems by internationally
mobile people, reflect the strong but differential ties between the two issues – ties that are
both fabricated and highly contested not only in political practice, but also in everyday social
work and in related areas.

Recently, in an era of intensified globalization, transnationalization and mobility, the “old” modes of welfare regulation have started to change crucially, which is also true for migration
policy, while all of this generates “spillover” effects on the future of social work and related fields of theory, research and practice. We believe that looking closely and simultaneously at
the point where migration and social policy meet helps us to gain a better and more nuanced understanding how each of the two fields operates and how both develop jointly. In a broader perspective, changes in migration policy and in social welfare policy have been theorized and researched with regard to their impacts on citizenship, especially by researchers viewing social rights as a dependent variable of status within a national framework. Thus, both the negotiation of citizenship (especially for migrants with precarious status) and the lived citizenship reflected in the experiences of migrants, frontline workers or public agents are becoming important areas of interest. Nevertheless, only a small number of researchers make a strong link between changes in citizenship and welfare regulation on the one hand and migration on the other, taking into account their simultaneous interrelatedness to a number of processes on multiple scales. In this respect it is challenging, but also promising to reconstruct the frames, layers and trans-national contexts of these social and political regulations of migration and welfare policies. This complex perspective is yet to be explored, although some encouraging work has already been done. Seen in this light the question has to be asked of how these social policies and related translation processes construct migration, and – vice versa – how migration and related policies construct social policy. Therefore, we are looking for contributions that shed light on the myriad ways in which migration and social policy are interrelated based on concrete examples that are relevant to social work and related fields of study. Abstracts are invited for original articles including theoretical reviews, conceptual contributions and empirical research responding to (but not limited to) the following questions:

. How are migration-related ideas, images and concepts (e.g. categorizations)
employed or rendered relevant or irrelevant in concrete social policy measures
and practices, e.g. in the context of human service provision, and – vice versa –
how are social policy-related ideas, images and concepts engendered in
migration policy, including policy measures and practices?

. How and how far do practices in social work bring about concrete, practical forms
of migration policy and – vice versa – how do practices in migration and migration
policy generate and impact on concrete forms of social work and social policy?

. How are migration and migration policy linked to the formation of and changes in
national and transnational social policy (and related institutions and practices) and
how are concrete social practices in social work and related areas informed by
migration policy?

. How are these specific links between migration and social policy (e.g. in the
context of temporary worker programs) as well as related practices in social work
and welfare disturbed by the sometimes unexpected self-images, self-positionings
and actions of migrants and mobile people, including their self-organizations and
supporters, and how do they react towards them?

. How is knowledge in social policy created through the cross-border migration of
people and ideas, and – vice versa – how does the development and employment
of social policy shape knowledge in respectively on migration?

Submission Requirements
The guest editors welcome the submission of contributions. The deadline for submission of
full articles is April 1, 2014. The following table contains all deadlines and the time schedule
of the focused topic on “Linking Migration and Social Policy.”

April 1, 2014: Submission of articles
June 15, 2014: Peer review
July 15, 2014: Revision of articles, if necessary
July 21 2014: Final submission of publishable articles to Routledge
September 22, 2014: Online publication date
October 1, 2014: Print publication date

Articles are to be up to 8,000 words in length and authors are required to include an abstract of up to 150 words and up to six keywords, suitable for indexing and online search purposes. The authors are responsible for submitting proof-read and formatted articles. For the manuscript preparation please use the style sheet and the formatting guideline, which are available at: www.tss.uni-mainz.de/103.php.

Contact
Inquiries and all proposals should be sent to the guest editors of the focused topic on “Linking Migration and Social Policy”:

Dr Eberhard Raithelhuber
Professor Dr Wolfgang Schröer
University of Trier (until March 31, 2014)
Institute of Education

Private Address:
Gaisbergstrasse 10
69115 Heidelberg
University of Hildesheim
Institute of Social Work and Organization Studies
Marienburger Platz 22
31141 Hildesheim
Germany

Mobile: +49 151 20727528
eberhard.raithelhuber@gmx.de
Phone: +49 5121 883552
schroeer@rz.uni-hildesheim.de

Concept and Objective of the Journal TSR
“Transnational Social Review – A Social Work Journal” is a peer-reviewed journal that offers an international forum to discuss social work and related disciplines and professions from a
transnational perspective. It responds to the challenges resulting from the increasing impact of transnational social, political, economic, and cultural processes and structures upon social
work. The journal aims to open up and develop social work and related fields on a transnational level. Its main objective is to improve prospects for making the concept of transnationalism part of the knowledge structure and practice, in order to extend and transform the legitimation, concepts, research, and methods which to date are primarily nationally focused.

Frequency and Structure of the Journal TSR
TSR appears three times a year, guided by an international team of editors and board members at Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group in the United Kingdom. The journal pursues an interdisciplinary approach and fits the criteria of the Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI). All articles undergo rigorous peer reviews, based on initial editor screening and anonymous reviews by two or more referees to ensure the high quality of the journal. TSR is available online as well as in print. Its main publishing language is English but the online version offers the option to include versions of the contributions in the language in which they are originally written. Each issue consists of a cluster of articles focusing on a certain topic as well as general articles and book reviews. Additionally, the online version includes an open access section containing brief, up-to-date reports on research, teaching, social policies, practices and everyday life concerning the transnational worlds of social work.

2014 Issues
. 1/2014 Religion and Social Work – Transnational Perspectives (call closed)
. 2/2014 Social Services and Transnationality (call closed)
. 3/2014 Linking Migration and Social Policy

Download individual articles from each issue: http://www.tandfonline.com/rtsr. For any question regarding the journal, visit our website or contact our Journal Manager: Claudia Olivier, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Institute of Education, 55099 Mainz, Germany, phone: +49 (0)6131 39-20794, email: tss@uni-mainz.de, TSR website: http://www.tsr-journal.com.

 

Courses: Venice Academy of Human Rights 2014: ‘Judicial Legitimacy and the Rule of Law’

Venice Academy of Human Rights 2014
“Judicial Legitimacy and the Rule of Law”
[For an online version of this information please click here: http://issuu.com/eiuc/docs/eiuc_flyer_va2014_issuuversion]

The Venice Academy of Human Rights (http://www.eiuc.org/research/venice-academy-of-human-rights.html) will take place from 7-16 July 2014. The theme of this year’s academy is ‘Judicial Legitimacy and the Rule of Law’. Online applications (http://www.eiuc.org/research/venice-academy-of-human-rights/applications.html) are accepted until 4 May 2014.
The Academy offers an “early bird” registration with a reduced participation fee until 15 March 2014.

Faculty of the Venice Academy 2014

Distinguished Opening Lecture
Paul Mahoney
Judge at the European Court of Human Rights

General Course
Gráinne de Búrca
Florence Ellinwood Allen Professor of Law, NYU

Faculty
Philip G. Alston
John Norton Pomeroy Professor of Law, NYU

Andreas Føllesdal
Professor of Political Philosophy at the Norwegian Centre for Human Rights and Director of the Norwegian Centre of Excellence PluriCourts for the Study of the Legitimate Roles of the Judiciary in the Global Order, University of Oslo

Geir Ulfstein
Professor of International Law and Deputy Director of the Norwegian Centre of Excellence PluriCourts for the Study of the Legitimate Roles of the Judiciary in the Global Order, University of Oslo

Jeremy Waldron
University Professor of Law, NYU and Chichele Professor of Social and Political Theory, University of Oxford

Michael Zürn
Professor of International Relations at the Free University Berlin and Director of the Research Unit Global Governance at Social Science Research Center Berlin (Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung, WZB)

You can view the detailed programme here: http://www.eiuc.org/research/venice-academy-of-human-rights/programme.html

Key Facts
Participants: Academics, practitioners, PhD/JSD and master students
Type of courses: Lectures, seminars, workshops and discussion sessions
Number of hours: Up to 35 hours of courses
Location: Monastery of San Nicolò, Venice – Lido, Italy
Fees: 500 EUR (early bird registration until 15 March), 600 EUR (16 March – 4 May 2014)

Venice Academy of Human Rights
The Venice Academy of Human Rights is an international programme of excellence for human rights education, research and debate. It forms part of the European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation (EIUC – http://www.eiuc.org/). The Academy offers interdisciplinary thematic programmes open to academics, practitioners, doctoral and master students with an advanced knowledge of human rights. Participants attend morning lectures, participate in discussion sessions and workshops and can exchange views, ideas and arguments with leading international scholars and experts. This includes the opportunity for a number of participants to present and discuss their own “work in progress” such as drafts of articles, chapters of books or doctoral theses and receive comments from faculty members (including P. Alston, A. Føllesdal, G. Ulfstein and J. Waldron) and peers. At the end of the programme, participants receive a Certificate of Attendance issued by the Venice Academy of Human Rights.

Scientific Responsible
Prof Florence Benoît-Rohmer, EIUC Secretary General

Programme Responsible
Knut Traisbach, Programme Responsible Venice Academy of Human Rights

Copyright © 2014 European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation, All rights reserved.
Our mailing address is:
European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation
Riviera San Nicolò, 26
Venezia, Veneto 30126
Italy

Courses: Center for Forced Migration Studies Summer Institute: ‘The Refugee Status Determination Process’ (Northwestern University)

Center for Forced Migration Studies’Summer Institute: “The Refugee Status Determination Process”, June 1-7, 2014

Register here: http://www.northwesternevents.com/profile/web/index.cfm?PKWebId=0x60244dc0

The CFMS Summer Institute is an intensive, rigorous seven-day, non-degree earning certificate program. Through lectures, focused discussions, workshops, films and simulation exercises, the CFMS Summer Institute, held at Northwestern University’s campus in Evanston, IL, provides a forum to exchange ideas, build relationships, develop new approaches and policy recommendations and learn about new developments in the field. Past participants have included government officials, non-governmental organization personnel, university faculty and graduate students (select advanced undergraduate students may seek permission to attend). Applicants must have good to excellent English speaking and reading skills. No translation services are available.

The 2014 Summer Institute on The Refugee Status Determination Process introduces participants to the 1951 Refugee Convention and 1967 Protocol refugee regime, the international legal basis for refugee status and the variations in how UNHCR and authorities in different countries determine whether an asylum-seeker is eligible for refugee status, with a particular focus on the United States. It provides students with lectures and workshops focused on decision making and analytical skills, legal writing, research, and procedural issues, case preparation including takingtestimony, evidence documentation, working with victims of trauma and with issues of credibility and includes a focus on special topics such as LGBTI and gang-related asylum claims and cases involving unaccompanied minors. The training materials consist of training modules that include case studies, accompanying memoranda, procedures manuals, precedent Board of Immigration Appeals decisions, federal court decisions, and other documents.  The attached table of contents lists the specific topics that constitute the course and training materials provided on each topic.

Faculty include: Barbara Harrell-Bond, (University of Oxford); Michael Kagan (University of Nevada, Las Vegas); Uzoamaka Nzliebe (Northwestern University); Miriam Marton (University of Connecticut); Rachel Levitan (Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society); Sioban Albiol (DePaul University) and representatives from the United Nations High Commission for Refugees and the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services Asylum Division

Summer Institute Director:  Galya Ruffer, CFMS Founding Director.

The 2014 Summer Institute is targeted at UNHCR staff, government employees, practicing attorneys, NGO refugee case workers, academics, law students and other graduate students seeking to expand their knowledge of critical elements of the refugee status determination process.

CLE-eligible based on state approval for 37.5credits, 1.5 of which are ethics)

Read the full schedule for the 2014 Summer Institute:http://www.bcics.northwestern.edu/documents/cfms/2012-CFMS-SummerInstituteSchedule.pdf

Institute Fees:

Registration – $800 (Does not include meals or housing)

Late Registration – $1,000 (After May 2)

**Limited Scholarships and partial tuition assistance are available** Please contact cfms@northwestern.edu for more information.

Visa Applicants: Contact the US embassy nearest you for visa application

Do you think you might need a visa? See: http://travel.state.gov/visa/

Accommodation:
The Institute will be held on the Northwestern University Campus in Evanston, IL. A limited number of homestays are available upon request and as well as a dormitory option. There are also several hotels in Evanston and the surrounding area. Please direct accommodation related questions to cfms@northwestern.edu.

 

New publications: Migration Policy Centre blog: ‘On the Anti-Politics of Anti-Trafficking

Source: Forced Migration Discussion List.

The Migration Policy Centre (MPC) is delighted to present you its new Blog entry:

On the Anti-Politics of Anti-Trafficking: http://blogs.eui.eu/migrationpolicycentre/on-the-anti-politics-of-anti-trafficking/
by Neil Howard, Marie Curie Fellow at the MPC

Arguably, in Europe as elsewhere, ‘trafficking’ is still commonly understood as being about nasty, frequently male criminals who capture and enslave innocent women and children, usually for sex. The way the anti-trafficking field ‘deals’ with trafficking reflects these representations. Though there have been some advances, the dominant policy emphasis is still on getting the right laws passed, on ramping up prosecutions, on strengthening borders, and on ‘raising awareness’ by telling potential migrants that migrating is a bad idea because it could leave them vulnerable to traffickers. What has been the result of all this? Why is discourse so reductive and policy so ineffective? What are possible alternatives?

Come and visit the MPC blog:
http://blogs.eui.eu/migrationpolicycentre/
Come and visit the MPC website:
http://www.migrationpolicycentre.eu/
Follow the MPC on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/MigrationPolicyCentre/

Calls for papers: MRU Student Conference ‘Child & Youth Migrants: Global and Interdisciplinary Perspectives’

Source: Forced Migration Discussion List.

UCL Migration Research Unit Student Conference 2014
CHILD & YOUTH MIGRANTS: GLOBAL AND INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES
University College London, 14 June 2014

Call for Papers

According to a 2013 UN report, there are 232 million individuals living outside their country of origin today-approximately 35 million of these are children and young people under the age of 20. In exploring the challenges that these young people face, the tensions and frictions that exist between internationally-recognized human rights, national politics, and lived experience become readily apparent. Much work has been done on the educational opportunities and attainment of migrant children, and recent initiatives including the 2013 UN International Youth Day ‘Youth Migration: Moving Development Forward’ have highlighted the effect of young migrants on societal development. The increased visibility of grassroots efforts like the DREAMer movement in the United States has also proven that there are many perspectives to be heard on issues of youth and child migration.

The third annual UCL Migration Research Unit Student Conference wants to build upon this discussion and provide a chance for the new voices of migration studies to share their research. It seeks to explore, through global comparison, the complex issues facing mobile youth that are frequently overshadowed by more general debates about labour, forced, or family migration. How do generational dynamics in migrant families and communities affect questions of access, agency, and identity? In what ways do young migrants become a link, both culturally and linguistically, between their families and their country of residence? When immigration is seen as one, unified issue in policy making and public discourse do the nuances of child and youth migration fall between the cracks? The conference will be a forum for discussion between students, human rights and advocacy groups, and migrant community organizations.

We welcome applications from Master’s and PhD students from a variety of disciplines conducting research in, but not limited to, the following areas:

The best interest of the child:
–       Changing family dynamics & reunification
–       Caring for health & disability
–       Young irregular migrants and refugees, unaccompanied minors
Access to the public sphere:
–       Political access, activism, advocacy & community organising
–       Perceptions of young migrants in the media and popular discussion
–       Access to higher education

Laws, rights & social justice:
–       Detention and deportation of minors
–       Layering of rights (incl. rights of the child, of migrants, human rights, minority, LGBT, etc.)

Looking to the future:
–       Secondary migration & young return migrants
–       Transnationalism & questions of identity and belonging
–       Transitioning into adulthood (and its social and legal consequences)

Please submit applications with a title, 1 page abstract, and CV to geog.migrationconference@ucl.ac.uk no later than 1 March 2014. Presentations will be about 20 minutes long. If you will require a visa to attend the conference, please consider submitting your proposal before the deadline to ensure you have enough time to apply for your visa.

For more information, please visit http://blogs.ucl.ac.uk/ucl-migration-conference/#.UvY3jLTowRo

Conferences: ‘Human Rights and Change’ – Kadir Has Üniversitesi, Istanbul

Conferences: ‘Human Rights and Change’ – Kadir Has Üniversitesi, Istanbul

The human rights sections of the American Political Science Association, the European Consortium for Political Research, the International Political Science Association, and the International Studies Association, are pleased to announce the publication of the panel program and the opening of registration for the third joint international conference on human rights, on the theme “Human Rights and Change” to take place 16-18 June 2014 at Kadir Has Üniversitesi in Istanbul. You can find the program, and a link to registration, here: http://www.isanet.org/Conferences/HRIstanbul2014/Program.aspx . We had an overwhelming response to our call for papers, resulting in an excellent and diverse program. Other elements of the program, including plenary sessions, will be posted in the coming weeks.

The conference is being organized in association with, and will be followed immediately by, the ACUNS Annual Meeting: “Global Governance: Engaging New Norms and Emerging Challenges”. The ACUNS annual meeting will also be held at Kadir Has University, from June 19 – 21. The paper proposal deadline for the ACUNS conference is 3 March. Individuals registered to attend either conference will be eligible to receive a 20% discount registration for the other conference.

The organisers gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the following:

Glasgow Human Rights Network, University of Glasgow
Centre for Global Constitutionalism, University of St. Andrews
International Studies Association Human Rights Section
International Political Science Association Human Rights Research Committee
European Consortium for Political Research Standing Group on Human Rights and Transition
Journal of Human Rights

The organisers also acknowledge the support of Kadir Has University and the Academic Council on the United Nations System.

Best Regards,

The Human Rights and Change Team

Calls for papers: Refugee Protection Outside of the International Legal Framework

Source: Forced Migration Discussion List.

CALL FOR PAPERS: International Workshop

Refugee Protection Outside of the International Legal Framework: Expanding Cross-National and Cross-Disciplinary Collaborations

May 27-28, 2014

Center for Forced Migration Studies at the Buffett Center for International & Comparative Studies, Northwestern University, Evanston, USA

80% of the world’s refugees seek asylum in non-democratic states, or states that have not signed the 1951 International Convention for the Protection of Refugees and 1967 Protocol, do not have implementing legislation or, if they do, do not grant refugees rights as defined by the Refugee Convention. The Center for Forced Migration Studies (http://www.bcics.northwestern.edu/programs/migration/) at Northwestern University invites submissions for a two-day workshop designed to promote cross-disciplinary discussion and engage researchers, practitioners and policy makers in the theoretical and practical issues, the lessons to be learned and the strategies for achieving protection in these states, about which we know far too little.  The workshop seeks to build community and was intentionally designed in collaboration with the International Association for the Study of Forced Migration (http://iasfm.org/), the Refugee Research Network (http://www.refugeeresearch.net/), the Asian Pacific Refugee Rights Network (http://www.aprrn.info/1/) and the Southern Refugee Legal Aid Network (http://srlanetwork.wordpress.com/). We seek to expand and broaden our knowledge community to advance theorizing about the meanings, rules or laws governing refugee status outside of the Refugee Convention framework, address empirical puzzles regarding how refugees and international refugee advocacy networks mobilize international and national law, and identify promising lines of inquiry regarding how national institutions define, mediate and respond to refugee legal concerns. These impacts are central both to theory-building concerning legal mobilization and decision making by institutions and to understanding where and how a refugee status determination process structures refugee lives.

As refugee crises increase in duration and frequency, there is growing reluctance by states, party to the Refugee Convention, to be held to the letter or spirit of the Convention. The dialogue advanced at the workshop will assist in mapping the future of protection outside strict Refugee Convention parameters and inform efforts to provide alternative statuses and processes of protection to refugees who are unable to access national asylum status. The workshop seeks to further future research collaborations to answer questions about the behavior, treatment of people and processes of refugee status determination and protection in these contexts and the methodology through which we might measure outcomes and understand how the decision not to ratify the Refugee Convention affects refugee protection and local integration. Having such knowledge will contribute to United States’ efforts, as well as those of other states, the UNHCR and other UN agencies and international organizations, to provide sustainable solutions for refugees, victims of armed conflict or natural disaster, and stateless people around the world.

The workshop seeks to draw not only established experts, but also new scholars, graduate students and voices of underrepresented regions and groups. We invite submissions from any discipline, methodology, or a combination of them, that address the workshop themes listed below, including, but not limited to:

– Historical Legacies of Refugee Reception (papers that address how countries such as the United States received refugees prior to the passage of national legislation).

– Alternative Legacies: The Experience of Partition and National Understandings of Refugees (papers that address the decision of countries at the time of the adoption of the 1951 Refugee Convention and/or 1967 Protocol not to become party to the Convention. What rationales did these decisions follow and how did these decisions relate to the experience of displaced populations at the time)

– Formal Refugee Status Determination (RSD) Processes (papers that address, but are not limited to, the RSD process in transition/emerging systems such as Israel, Korea and Kenya; complementary forms of refugee protection such as temporary protected status; judicial decisions based systems in non-party states such as that in India)

– Quasi-Legal Non-State Mechanisms and Informal RSD Processes (papers that address community based concepts of protection or hospitality, common law principles of non-refoulement; local instruments, agents and institutions that provide refugee protection in the absence of formal law; refugee survival strategies that become “quasi legal”)

– Methods of Studying Socio-Legal Processes of Refugee Status in Local Contexts (papers that offer new methodological approaches to how we might understanding the costs and benefits of implementing an RSD process for the state and/or for the refugee seeking protection; methodological approaches to understanding the refugee experience of RSD in non-party states)

CONFERENCE VENUE

Northwestern University, Evanston, IL/USA

FORMAT

The workshop will have plenary sessions and working group sessions with lead participants/rapporteurs designed to promote an inclusive and interdisciplinary dialogue. A final session will allow for a “report back” of rapporteurs, recommendations and conclusions.

ORGANIZERS

Galya Ruffer, Center for Forced Migration Studies & Dept. of Political Science, Northwestern University

Bruce Spencer, Department of Statistics, Northwestern University

CONFERENCE COMMITTEE

James Simeon (York University), Jessica Therkelsen (Asylum Access & Vice-Chair of the Southern Refugee Legal Aid Network), Brian Barbour (Asia Pacific Refugee Rights Network), David Cantor (Refugee Law Initiative), Roni Amit (African Centre for Migration and Society) and Danesh Jayatilaka (Final year PhD student University of Colombo/University of Sussex)

ABSTRACT SUBMISSON

Please submit abstracts for papers or requests to serve as a lead participant by email to g-ruffer@northwestern.edu. Abstracts should include a title, your contact details (name, affiliation, mailing address, email) and description of your workshop paper (250-400 words) or qualifications for serving as a lead participant/rapporteur.

IMPORTANT DATES

Deadline for abstract submission: April 1st, 2014

Notification of Acceptance: April 15th, 2014

CMRB Event: Challenging Racism and State Violence

CMRB Event:

untitled

Challenging Racism and State Violence:
A conversation about the impact of immigration control, police violence and anti-terrorism laws on communities

Wednesday 26th March, 1.30pm to 4.30pm

Room CC.G.05, Stratford Campus, University of East London

 This event brings together scholars and activists to discuss the connections between state violences against migrants and Muslim, black and other minority communities. What can we learn by considering the links between these processes and the overlapping techniques of intimidation and repression that are employed? How do communities resist such incursions and what tactics could be shared?

Speakers include:

Bridget Anderson (COMPAS)

Nandita Sharma (University of Hawaii)

Anthony Gunter (UEL)

Frances Webber (Institute of Race Relations)

SOAS Detainee Support Group

This is an informal event for students, activists, researchers and anyone interested in resistance to state racism. There is no charge to attend, but places are limited. Please email g.bhattacharyya@uel.ac.uk to confirm attendance.

Hosted by the Centre for Migration, Refugees and Belonging, University of East London

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Call for papers: “The multilevel governance of migration and integration policies” – Politicologenetmaal 2014

Source: Forced Migration Discussion List.

Kindly find below the call for papers for the workshop on “The multilevel governance of migration and integration policies” at the Politicologenetmaal 2014 (the13th Dutch-Flemish political science conference), which will take place on 12-13 June at Maastricht University. For more information on the conference, go to http://politicologenetmaal.nl.

Call for papers:

13th Dutch-Flemish Politicologenetmaal Maastricht, 12-13 June 2014
The multilevel governance of migration and integration policies

Dr. Ilke Adam (Vrije Universiteit Brussel), ilke.adam@vub.ac.be
Dr. Peter Scholten (Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam), p.scholten@fsw.eur.nl

One out of several governance challenges to migration and integration policies is the fragmentation of these policies over various levels of government. Competencies that were originally located primarily at the national level have increasingly shifted upwards (EU) as well as downwards toward local and regional authorities. This makes these domains into exemplary cases for a broader development of multi-level governance, which has been drawing a growing interest in political sciences and policy studies. This involves studies of Europeanization of policies (top-down) as well as other forms of vertical interaction such as ‘vertical venue-shopping’ (bottom-up). These studies show the relevance of multi-level governance processes in this area in particular, but also show the governance dilemmas and consequences of failure to establish such multi-level governance processes.

The communitarization of EU migration and anti-discrimination policies by the Treaty of Amsterdam (1997) and the introduction of Community law and policies since the early 2000s represent a major turning point in the politics of migration and integration in Europe. The consequences of this communitarization are only gradually becoming apparent, primarily in the field of migration and anti-discrimination but to some extent also migrant integration policies. Beyond Europeanization, scholarly attention is increasingly drawn to the local and regional dimension of migration and integration and the interaction between these sub-state levels with the state and Europe. Cities throughout Europe have developed their own migrant integration policies and their own pan-European networks of policy learning. Regional authorities have developed immigrant integration and anti-discrimination policies that clearly differ from the state discourse. This is also reflected in a growing academic interest for the urban dimension of migrant integration policies in particular; some even speak of a local turn in migration studies. This panel starts from the proposition that migration and integration policies are shaped in interactions between policy actors at the local, regional, national and European level.

Contributions are invited that focus on the interaction between the local, regional, national, European and international levels (the vertical dimension). We welcome papers that explore these vertical interactions from a theoretical or empirical perspective, as well as comparative studies of whether there is a specifically European, national, regional or local dimension. Our workshop is workshop 13 in the general call for papers which you can find on the website.

Please send us your abstract (100-350 words) no later than 28 February 2014. We will let you know before 15 March 2014 whether your paper has been selected.