Daily Archives: Thursday, February 7, 2013

Postcards from ...

Anna Fifield on today’s FT writes an interesting piece on the proactive approach taken by cities like Baltimore and Dayton in US to attract more migrants to settle. This comes from the recognition that migrants, irrespective of their legal status, bring a new lease of life to ailing cities. To make Baltimore a safe haven to new comers last year the mayor of Baltimore, Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, went so far as to sign an executive order prohibiting any city official from asking residents for their immigration status. On this side of the Atlantic, while we haven’t seen yet any local authorities to take such a bold stand, movements such as the Cities of Sanctuary or Strangers into Citizens enjoyed the support of numerous local authorities that wanted a more welcoming approach to migrants and a regularisation programme for those undocumented because they could see and appreciate the benefits that migrants bring…

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Postcards from ...

[Article published in OpenDemocracy 50:50 on 4 February 2013]

The family rules introduced by the UK government as part of its crusade to curb net migration are surreptitiously redefining the meaning of citizenship and the boundaries between the state and its subjects, says Nando Sigona.

There is nothing new about seeing immigration and immigrants used as scapegoats for popular anxiety or as a diversion from the economic crisis (see the significant following of Golden Dawn in Greece). It is even less surprising to see politicians mobilize electoral support around the moral panic surrounding new immigrant arrivals (see lately the terms and tone of the debate on potential new arrivals from Romania and Bulgaria). Still, the new immigration family rulesintroduced last summer shed light on a less visible side of immigration policy and practice: the permeability and historically contingent nature of the boundaries between citizenship and non-citizenship and the…

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Refugees, Capitalism and the British State

Below are videos from some of the talks at ‘Against Racism’, an event I spoke at in Newcastle last Saturday, that was organised by Tyneside Community Action against Racism (TCAR).

Frances Webber, Institute of Race Relations, speaking about struggles for migrant and refugee rights inside and outside the courtroom:

Raul Ally, TCAR, speaking about his experiences imprisoned in Morton Hall Immigration Removal Centre in the summer 0f 2012:

Kyronne, Hands Off Somalia, speaking about British imperialism’s interests in Somalia and the state’s treatment of Somali people in Britain:

Toby Harbertson, Fight Racism! Fight Imperialism! speaking about Israeli state racism and British support for Israel:

More information on TCAR can be found at: http://tcarblog.blogspot.co.uk, including information on their urgent campaign to prevent the deportation of Hassanat Omeneke Aliyu and her three daughters to Nigeria.

tcar

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irregular voices

[Article published in OpenDemocracy 50:50 on 4 February 2013]

The family rules introduced by the UK government as part of its crusade to curb net migration are surreptitiously redefining the meaning of citizenship and the boundaries between the state and its subjects, says Nando Sigona.

There is nothing new about seeing immigration and immigrants used as scapegoats for popular anxiety or as a diversion from the economic crisis (see the significant following of Golden Dawn in Greece). It is even less surprising to see politicians mobilize electoral support around the moral panic surrounding new immigrant arrivals (see lately the terms and tone of the debate on potential new arrivals from Romania and Bulgaria). Still, the new immigration family rulesintroduced last summer shed light on a less visible side of immigration policy and practice: the permeability and historically contingent nature of the boundaries between citizenship and non-citizenship and the…

View original post 1,138 more words

mpcblog

When EU countries visualise an ideal immigrant, a highly-skilled and educated immigrant comes to mind. For many, the highly-skilled and skilled represent the only ´legitimate´ form of immigration. EU immigration policy in its current form is characterised by three main dimensions: attracting highly-skilled workers, deterring irregular migration, and promoting the integration of third country nationals. The EU approach is one of increased migration management so that Europe receives legal migration, particularly in sectors that are lacking in personnel. The increased emphasis on cooperation both with countries of origin and between Member States, as reflected in the Global Approach to Migration adopted in 2011, is part of this drive to more efficiently manage migration. EU migration policy is therefore implicitly based on the assumption that low-skilled labor is no longer needed, and indeed, would be harmful to the European economy at a time of economic crisis and high unemployment, especially among…

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CMRB Event: Women, Sexuality and Christian Fundamentalism

CMRB (Centre for research on Migration, Refugees and Belonging) (University of East London) and the Centre for Gender Studies (SOAS) would like to invite you to a symposium on the question of:

WOMEN, SEXUALITY AND

CHRISTIAN FUNDAMENTALISM

which will take place at the Khalili Lecture Theatre in SOAS (www.soas.ac.uk/visitors/location/maps/)

Saturday 9th March, 2-5pm

Confirmed Speakers:

Dr. Ann Rossiter

‘The role of the Catholic Church in the making of a London-Irish abortion underground trail’

Dr. Carmen Sepulveda, UCL

‘Religion and feminism “face to face”: institutions and the roll back of reproductive rights in Latin America’

Dr. Rahul Rao, SOAS

‘The international relations of homophobia’

Dr. Sukhwant Dhaliwal, Goldsmiths

‘The Christian Peoples Alliance: race, regeneration and reproductive

rights’.

Natalie Bennett

‘Women and Christian Fundamentalism in the UK’

Chair: Prof. Nadje Al-Ali, SOAS

Discussant: Prof. Nira Yuval-Davis, UEL

The event is free but places are limited so please RSVP to Jamie Hakim, CMRB administrator (j.hakim@uel.ac.uk).

Prof. Nadje Al-Ali, Chair of the Centre for Gender Studies, SOAS  www.soas.ac.uk/genderstudies/

Prof. Nira Yuval-Davis, CMRB UEL Director
www.uel.ac.uk/cmrb/

Ann Rossiter is a long-standing Irish feminist activist who has lived in London for more than half a century.  For twenty years she was a member of the London Irish Women’s Abortion Support Group, set up to support abortion seekers with information, money, accommodation, and not least, a sympathetic ear.  She published the history of the group and its experiences in Ireland’s Hidden Diaspora in 2009.

Carmen Sepúlveda Zelaya is a PhD candidate at the Institute of the Americas, at UCL. She holds a BA in Political Science from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. She earned her MPhil degree in Development Studies from the Institute for Development Studies, at the University of Sussex. She has also worked in the development sector within international NGOs, focusing on women’s rights and sexual and reproductive rights at both national and international level. Her current PhD research focuses on the legal and political battles behind the distribution of emergency contraception in Chile under the governments of Ricardo Lagos (2000-2005) and Michelle Bachelet (2006-2010). Her research interests include the role and interaction of institutions and actors in the policy process, gender and development, feminism, women’s movements, sexual and reproductive health and rights, religion, gender and health, abortion, public health, democratisation and judicialisation processes.

Rahul Rao is a Lecturer in Politics at the School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London. He has a law degree from the National Law School of India University (Bangalore) and a doctorate in international relations from the University of Oxford. His research interests encompass International Relations, political theory and queer studies, with an area focus on South Asia and East Africa. He is the author of Third World Protest: Between Home and the World (Oxford University Press, 2010), as well as of numerous articles. He blogs occasionally at ‘The Disorder of Things’.

Sukhwant Dhaliwal grew up in Southall in the shadow of an emergent anti-racist and Black feminist movement but also during one of the earliest diasporic fundamentalist mobilisations – that of the Khalistani movement – which called for secession from the Indian state and the establishment of a Sikh theocracy. In her 20s she moved to east London and engaged with anti-racist politics, challenging racist mobilisations of the British National Party and the daily racial harassment of black residents. Overshadowed by male voices, she sought empowerment in women’s organisations speaking out against domestic violence. Attending a WAF meeting in Conway Hall in the mid-1990s was an important marker for understanding how these various issues could fit together and she joined WAF in 1995. Two years later she went to India to learn more about the roots of diasporic fundamentalisms and enrolled for a course at Delhi School of Economics. Sukhwant has recently completed a PhD entitled ‘Religion, Moral Hegemony and Local Cartographies of Power: Feminist Reflections on Local Politics’ from the Sociology Department at Goldsmiths, University of London.

Natalie Bennett is the leader of the Green Party of England and Wales. Natalie is a journalist by profession and between 2007 and 2012 she was the editor of The Guardian Weekly. She blogs regularly for The Guardian’s Comment is Free and on The Huffington Post. She has two bachelors degrees, one in Agricultural Science and one in Asian Studies and holds a Masters Degree in Mass Communication from the University of Leicester. Natalie has also edited Thailand Country Study: Best Practice Guide on Sustainable Action Against Child Labour and Women’s Health and Development, Country Profile Thailand.

Nadje Al-Ali is Professor of Gender Studies and Chair of the Centre for Gender Studies, at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. Her main research interests revolve around gender theory; feminist activism; women and gender in the Middle East; transnational migration and diaspora mobilization; war, conflict and reconstruction. Nadje is a feminist, peace activist and academic who co-founded Act Together: Women’s Action for Iraq in the late 90s. During this period she also started to get involved with Women in Black UK. Her feminist activism started in Egypt during the early 1990s. Her involvement in a leftist secular women’s organization triggered her interest to study secularism in the context of the Egyptian women’s movement. She joined WAF while working on her PhD at SOAS. Nadje is currently President of the Association of Middle East Women’s Studies (AMEWS) and a member of the Feminist Review Collective.

Nira Yuval-Davis is the Director of the Research Centre on Migration, Refugees and Belonging (CMRB) at the University of East London. She has been the President of the Research Committee 05 (on Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations) of the International Sociological Association, a founder member of Women Against Fundamentalism and the international research network of Women In Militarized Conflict Zones. Nira Yuval-Davis has written extensively on theoretical and empirical aspects of intersected nationalisms, racisms, fundamentalisms, citizenships, identities, belonging/s and gender relations in Britain & Europe, Israel and other Settler Societies. Among her written and edited books are: Racialized Boundaries, 1992; Gender and Nation, 1997; Warning Signs of Fundamentalisms, 2004; The Politics of Belonging: Intersectional Contestations, 2011.

 

Migration Will Define Our Future: Study at Tel Aviv University

*International M.A. in Migration Studies*

*Migration Will Define the Future: *

*The International MA in Migration Studies is a one year graduate degree taught in English*

*Explore a global phenomenon through an interdisciplinary lens:* With

> courses given by experts in the field, this program brings theexperience of a country that was built on migrants into the classroom.

Practical courses give students the opportunity to gain the real-life skills and expertise to pursue careers in public policy, international affairs, politics, academia, and non-profits. Our diverse student body will get a chance to explore the newest trends, compare immigration policies and debate some of the most controversial issues in today’s globalized world.

*Academic Focus*

–         Introductory and core courses in the first semester;  intensive seminars, practicum, electives, and workshops in the second and third semester.

–          Students with a strong research orientation can choose to do independent research and write a thesis (requires enrollment for an extra semester).

–          Multidisciplinary focus: Lecturers are leading experts in the field of migration and come from a broad range of backgrounds.

–          Guest speakers from international organizations and local NGOs give insight into the practicalities of working in the field.

*Career Prospects: *

A Master’s degree in Migration Studies prepares graduate for careers in migration and development in sectors including government, public policy, diplomacy, non-governmental organizations, grassroots organizations, journalism, and entrepreneurial pursuits. Graduates are also excellent candidates for continued doctoral study and research at the world’s top universities.

*Program Features:*

–          Migration is studied through a multidisciplinary approach combining theory and practice.

–        Students receive both an M.A. degree as well as a Certificate of Participation in the Migration Workshops organized by the     Center for International Migration and Integration (CIMI).

–       Extracurricular activities including field trips and film screenings bring the issues to life.

–         Classes are held Monday – Thursday afternoons, allowing time to travel, study Hebrew or Arabic, or intern in a relevant    organization.

–         Thesis track available for those interested in pursuing an academic or research career.

*Program Benefits:*

–          Develop professional skills through interactive workshops organized by international organizations.

–          Gain hands-on experience through an internship, site visits and organized trips.

–          Meet a diverse new network of International and Israeli students through social events offered throughout the year.

–          Explore Israel’s complex demographic issues first-hand with experts in the field

Upcoming application deadline: February 28th, 2013

For more information, please contact migrate@post.tau.ac.il or visit our website at  http://socsci.tau.ac.il/migration/

International MA Program in Migration Studies Tel Aviv University |
Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 69978 *| *tel: +972 (3) 6406599
Visit us on our website http://socsci.tau.ac.il/migration/

http://www.facebook.com/TAUMigration