ESSHC Vienna: migration and ethnicy. Deadline May 15 2013.

*** Apologies for Cross-Posting ***

Dear all

The ESSHC is one of the most important venues for migration researchers. The next ESSHC will be held in Vienna in 2014.

http://esshc.socialhistory.org/news/call-papers

Registration for ESSHC 2014 is now open.

The deadline for pre-registration is 15 may 2013. To go directly to the registration form click

http://esshc.socialhistory.org/esshc-user/pre-registration

Ethnicity and Migration is the largest network at the ESSHC. There were over 40 sessions and 160 papers on migration and ethnicity at the last two conferences (Ghent 2010 and Glasgow 2012).

We invite you to submit ideas for a session or an abstract for a paper.

A session consists of four speakers, a chair and a commentator. The chair and the commentator can be the same person. The speakers are not to come from the same institute (best also not from the same country).

In the past organisers of sessions have successfully used H-migration for finding additional speakers, chairs and commentators.

We have a preference for the submission of complete sessions, but authors can also submit individual papers. We as network chairs will do our best to allocate them to sessions. It may not always be a perfect match.

Below please find some themes and questions that arose during the last network meeting in Glasgow. We would definitely welcome sessions and individual papers fitting in with these themes. We are going to encourage that the best sessions will lead to publications.

Your contribution might not fit into these areas, or cover very different ground. We will still consider them, since the ESSHC sessions are always open to new and exciting research and themes..

We are looking forward to your ideas and hope that with your participation the ESSHC 2014 will be as successful as the previous one.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

The Chairs of the Ethnicity and Migration Network

Marlou Schrover            Leiden University, History Department,   m.l.j.c.schrover@hum.leidenuniv.nl <mailto:m.l.j.c.schrover@hum.leidenuniv.nl>

Dariusz Stola                  Institute of Political Studies of the Polish Academy of Sciences stola@isppan.waw.pl <mailto:stola@isppan.waw.pl>

Phillipe Rygiel                 Université Paris I, Centre d’histoire sociale du XXe siècle, France, prygiel@ens.fr <mailto:prygiel@ens.fr>

Per-Olof Gronberg         Centre for Population Studies, Umeå University, Sweden, per-olof.gronberg@ddb.umu.se <mailto:per-olof.gronberg@ddb.umu.se>

Suggestions for sessions:

+ The Other Europeans. Migrations to and from eastern and central Europe in modern times

+ Forgotten makers of migrations.

Scholarly texts have for a very long time focused mainly on migrants and to a lesser extent states as primary forces determining migration patterns and volumes. We do however know that many other actors take part in the migration process and sometimes greatly contribute to its forms and patterns, be they churches, private companies, unions, and private actors providing means or resources to migrants for various reasons. The fact however has never really been theorized or historicized.

+ Defining the migrants

In any given context, deciding who is and who is not a migrant is a very demanding task. For various reasons a lot of people who cross border are not defined as such, but are called visitors, or tourists or students, or merchants, or expatriates, or illegal foreigners. The definition of these categories, changing over time, promises to shed light on the way state agencies and societies define and regulate the migration process.

+ Migrations and empires

Scholarship on migrations within imperial spaces tends to be divided along national lines (ie French, English, Portuguese, Dutch). Comparing the different experiences would be a first

+ Health and migrations in modern times

Migration control emerges quite often from the will to avoid the spread of diseases and uses some of the same techniques. Also, representations of migrants, quite often insist on them as plague carriers.

+ Transnational norms and migrations. An historical look

Historiography on migrations has been very nation and state centered, and ignored attempt to define international norms for migrations that sometimes, through very similar bilateral agreements, can be traced back to early modern times .

+ Public discourses, Migrations and Ethnicity

Do debates have any effect on the regulation of migration? Do they aim to? Who are the claim makers? Who sets the agenda?

+ Children and migrations

When and  why did children become a separate category of migrants/

+ In defense of migrants

Anti-migrants feelings, and policies, have been flaring up in recent years but they have also witnessed public manifestations of solidarity with targeted migrant or ethnic groups and intense political activism emanating from political actors defining the defense of migrants as an important part of their political agenda. If xenophobic or anti-migrants manifestations and activism has been well documented, the activities of their opponents has been generally overlooked.

+ gender and  migration

Studies which address gender seem to get stuck on the same issues: trafficking, prostitution and exploitation. Furthermore, they tend address femininity and women rather than making comparisons to masculinity and men.

+ selecting migrants

Much of migration policy today and in the past is based on the idea that it is possible to select migrants.

Other issues we would like to see addressed:

– regulating migration: visa policies and migration control

– migration and religion

– migrant cinema

– migration and mobility

– immigration and emigration: two sides of the same coin

– migration and professional networks

 

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