Daily Archives: Tuesday, January 22, 2013

New Publications on Health; Refugees in Scotland; Migration Policy; Human Trafficking and Asylum Legal Aid

Publications on Health

“Translating Healthcare: Stories from refugees, providers, and friends.”
By Miriam Mara, Kevin Brooks.
Abstract:

Drawing on interviews and participatory observation, this article weaves stories of translating healthcare told from the perspectives of refugees, health care providers, and friends. The research finds that while literal translations of documents and information are important to the health care process for refugees of New Americans, cultural translations of concepts like health care and preventive care are perhaps even more important. That translation, however, is not simple or literal either; refugees and New Americans may resist, or remain suspicious of, these concepts even once understood. Friends of refugees can provide an important role in helping with cultural and institutional translations, and their role should be consider as part of a culturally-centered approach to healthcare, as outlined by Dutta (2008). Note: all participant and researcher names have been changed in order to protect human subjects.

“The introduction of the voice of the subaltern participant in the discursive space elucidates the interaction between structure and agency” (Dutta, 2008 p. 248).

[Access]
(Source: Kevin Brooks).

Cultural Traditions and the Reproductive Health of Somali Women: Comprehensive Research Report
By Nancy Deyo.
[Access Full Report]
See Also – “Minnesota Somalis lack culturally competent reproductive health care” .
(Source: Kevin Brooks)

Publications form the Minority Ethnic Matters Overview (MEMO) Newsletter.

MEMO is produced by the Scottish Council of Jewish Communities in partnership with BEMIS – empowering Scotland’s ethnic and cultural minority communities. It provides an overview of information of interest to minority ethnic communities in Scotland, including parliamentary activity at Holyrood and Westminster, new publications, consultations, forthcoming conferences and news reports.

Publications from Memo 336

Improving the Lives of Refugees in Scotland after the Referendum: An Appraisal of the Options
By the Scottish Refugee Council
[Download Full Report]

Fair and democratic migration policy: A principled framework for the UK
By the IPPR.
[Download Full Report]

Beyond borders: Human trafficking from Nigeria to the UK
By the IPPR.
[Download Full Report]

Publications from Memo 332

Justice At Risk: Quality and Value for Money in Asylum Legal Aid
By the Runnymede Trust
[Download Full Report]

 

 

New Publications on Sri Lanka; Night Workers; Refugee Youth; Italy; Nauru; and Children in Poverty

Eligibility Guidelines for Assessing the International Protection Needs of
asylum-seekers from Sri Lanka (UNHCR, Dec 2012)
[Download Full Text]
(Source: Forced Migration Discussion List)

Night Workers: London’s Unseen Migrant Workforce (MRCF, Dec 2012)
[Download Full Text]
(Source: Forced Migration Discussion List)

Safeguarding Refugee Youth: Turning 18 in the Asylum System (MRCF, Dec 2012)
[Download Full Text]
(Source: Forced Migration Discussion List)

Italy: Exploited Labour: Migrant workers in Italy’s agricultural sector
By Amnesty International

The agricultural sector in Italy is heavily reliant on migrant workers. This report focuses on the violation of labour rights of migrant workers in the areas of Latina and Caserta. It documents widespread labour exploitation, including wages below minimum standards, arbitrary reductions, delays or non-payment of wages and long hours of work. Amnesty International demonstrates that Italian migration policy increases the vulnerability of migrant workers to labour exploitation and that Italian legislation offers them inadequate protection and limited access to justice.

[Download Full Report]
(Source: Amnesty International – Italy: Time to address exploitation of migrant workers)

UNHCR Mission to the Republic of Nauru 3-5 December 2012 Report
Produced by the UNHCR.
[Download Full Report]
(Source: UNHCR – UNHCR releases report critical of Nauru processing centre).

Children in Poverty: Update 01-2013
Produced by GLA Inteligence.
[Download Full Report](Source: Greater London Authority.)

 

New Publications on Internal Displacement by the IDMC

Internal displacement and the Kampala Convention: an opportunity for development actorsInternal displacement and the Kampala Convention: an opportunity for development actors

According to the African Union (AU), Africa is “a continent disproportionately affected by internal displacement”.1 The African region, with almost 10 million people internally displaced in 22 countries by armed conflict and other forms of violence, hosts more than one third of the 26.4 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) worldwide at the end of 2011.2 Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Somalia rank globally among the states with the five biggest displacement situations.3 Even in African countries with smaller figures, very large percentages of people may be in displacement in regions primarily affected by violence.4 Such violence has multiple causes, including the long-lasting consequences of colonial heritage, outside intervention, crises of identity in multi-ethnic countries and conflicts over resources. Today, political exclusion and inequality between ethnic, regional or religious groups are particularly important drivers of violence.

By the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, (IDMC).
[Download Full Report]
(Source: the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre).

Mali: Nowhere to run: Fleeing Malians struggle to find safety and assistance
By the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, (IDMC).
[Download Full Report]
(Source: the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre).

Kenya: IDPs’ significant needs remain as inter-communal violence increases
By the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, (IDMC).
[Download Full Report]
(Source: the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre).

Haiti: A Humanitarian Crisis In Need Of A Development Solution
By the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, (IDMC).
[Download Full Report]
(Source: the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre).

Yemen: Internal displacement continues amid multiple crises
By the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, (IDMC).
[Download Full Report]
(Source: the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre).

By the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, (IDMC).
[Download Full Report]
(Source: the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre).

New Publications on International Aid; Afghanistan; International Humanitarian and Development Organisations; Employment Trends; Sri Lanka; Refused Asylum Seekers; Racism; and Detention

Time to Listen: Hearing People on the Receiving End of International Aid

Time to Listen: Hearing People on the Receiving End of International Aid

Time to Listen: Hearing People on the Receiving End of International Aid
By Mary B. Anderson, Dayna Brown, Isabella Jean, Dec 2012.

Time to Listen represents the cumulative evidence of five years gathering evidence from people living in societies that are recipients of international aid.

CDA’s Listening Project organized teams of “listeners” across 20 countries and contexts to gather the voices, insights,andlessons from people both inside an outside the aid system. This publication represents the lessons that have come forth through conversations with nearly 6,000 people. Using their words, their experiences, and their ideas, we describe why the cumulative impacts of aid have not met expectations and describe a way forward to make changes that, according to those on the receiving end, will lead to more effective results.

[Download Full Report]
(Source: IRIN – Report calls on aid agencies to listen to, work with, beneficiaries)

Treatment of Conflict-Related Detainees in Afghan Custody:  One Year On.
Produced by the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan, and the
United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, January 2013.
[Download Full Report]
(Source: UN News Centre – New UN report highlights ongoing problem of torture in Afghan detention facilities).

The State of HR in International Humanitarian and Development Organisations 2013.
Produced by People In Aid, January 2013.
[Download Full Report]
(Source: ALNAP).

Global Employment Trends 2013

Global Employment Trends 2013

Global Employment Trends 2013: Recovering from a second jobs dip.
New report produced by the International Labour Office.
[Download the Full Report and the Executive Summary](Source: UN News Centre – World’s youth facing worsening unemployment, warns new UN report).

Briefing: Sri Lanka’s Muslim IDPs 25 years on.
By IRIN humanitarian news and analysis.
[Access]

Between a Rock and a Hard Place: the dilemma facing refused asylum seekers [December 2012].
A new report by the Refugee Council

Thousands of people who have been refused asylum here but who fear returning to their home countries, are being left to live in poverty with no rights while they remain in the UK. The new Refugee Council report, Between a Rock and a Hard Place, highlights examples of the human rights abuses and persecution facing many refused asylum seekers on return to DRC, Eritrea, Somalia, Sudan and Zimbabwe. The findings include:

  • Mass rape and sexual violence against women and girls at the hands of the army, the police and non-state militia groups in the DRC
  • Severe punishment of those who evade compulsory national service including long-term imprisonment or the death penalty in Eritrea
  • In Somalia, indiscriminate attacks on civilians by government and para-military Al-Shabaab forces, and extrajudicial killings of opposition members
  • In Zimbabwe, the torture and death of people seen to oppose the powerful Zanu-PF party, and ongoing political violence in the run up to the elections next year.
  • In Sudan, human rights activists, journalists, and opponents of the ruling party being harassed, arrested and tortured by state military and police forces.

[Download Full Report]
(Source: The Independent – Refugees ‘are forced into destitution’ in Britain because they cannot be sent back).

Race Equality and Racism in Wales

Race Equality and Racism in Wales

A Report on Race Equality and Racism in Wales: An Exploratory Study.
Report produced by Race Council Cymru.
[Access Full Report]
(Source: Wales Online: Racism is still a ‘significant issue’ in Wales, warns new report).

The effectiveness and impact of immigration detention casework: a joint thematic review
By the HM Chief Inspector of Prisons and Independent Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration.
[Download Full Report]
(Source: IRR – Revealing the impact of immigration detention).

 

Courses: International Summer School in Forced Migration and Palestine Refugees and International Law Short Course

The Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford has forwarded details of the following course:

International Summer School in Forced Migration 1-19 July 2013
Refugee Studies Centre, Oxford University

Application is now open!

The summer school is aimed at mid-career or senior policy makers and practitioners involved with humanitarian assistance and policy making for forced migrants. Participants typically include host government officials, intergovernmental and non-governmental agency personnel engaged in planning, administering and co-ordinating assistance. We also accept applications from Researchers specialising in the study of forced migration.

The Refugee Studies Centre’s International Summer School fosters dialogue between participants working to improve the situation of refugees and other forced migrants. It provides the time and space for them to reflect on their experiences and to think critically about some of the aims and assumptions underlying their work.

Over three weeks, around 70–80 participants from all over the world study together, take part in group activities and produce independent presentations. The course looks at the complex phenomenon of forced migration from a number of different angles. Beginning with reflection on the diverse ways of conceptualising forced migration, the course considers the political, legal and well being issues associated with contemporary displacement. Individual course modules also tackle a range of other topics, including globalisation and forced migration, and negotiating strategies in humanitarian situations.

The fee for 2013 is £3,220 (Pay by 31 March to qualify for a reduced fee of £3,050). This covers 19 nights’ bed-and-breakfast accommodation and all weekday lunches; all tuition; all course materials, including reading materials; and a range of social activities.

Please note that the deadline for applications is 1 May 2013

For further details and how to apply see:
www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/study/international-summer-school

Palestine Refugees and International Law 15-16 March 2013 The British Institute, Amman, Jordan

Convenors: Professor Dawn Chatty (RSC) and Professor Susan Akram (Boston University)

This two-day non-residential workshop places the Palestinian refugee case study within the broader context of the international human rights regime. It examines, within a human rights framework, the policies and practices of Middle Eastern states as they impinge upon Palestinian refugees. Through a mix of lectures, working group exercises and interactive sessions, participants engaged actively and critically with the contemporary debates in international law and analyse the specific context of Palestinian refugees in the Middle East (Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, the West Bank, Gaza and Israel).

The fee for this short course is £350 and includes a course pack of materials, and refreshments (lunches, morning and afternoon tea/coffee breaks).

The course has a maximum of twenty-five spaces.

For further details and how to apply see:
www.rsc.ox.ac.uk/events/palestine-refugees-international-law-2013

Refugee Studies Centre
Oxford Department of International Development
University of Oxford
3 Mansfield Road
Oxford, OX1 3TB
UK
tel: +44 (0) 1865 281728/9
fax:+44 (0) 1865 281730
email: summer.school@qeh.ox.ac.uk
web: www.rsc.ox.ac.uk

 

Refugees, Capitalism and the British State

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Vickers provides an important and timely analysis of state policies to control and contain refugees and asylum seekers in Britain today. At a time of economic crisis and wholesale attacks on the working class, its value is in a re-engagement with Marxism as a tool to understand both the global causes of the mass displacement of millions and the methods used by the British state to manage the relatively small number who find their way here.

The book reminds us of Britain’s role as an oppressor nation fostering a parasitic relationship with the oppressed countries from which refugees come. These ‘super-exploited’ modern migrants prop up British capital both in their countries of origin and once resident here. This ‘Imperialist System’ relies on the international division of the working class …

This is an extract from a review by Debra Hayes, Senior Lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University, published in the British Journal of Social Work…

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