New Publications from Human Rights Watch and Selected Advance Access Articles

Human Rights Watch Reports:

“Tell Them That I Want to Kill Them”

“Tell Them That I Want to Kill Them”

“Tell Them That I Want to Kill Them”:Two Decades of Impunity in Hun Sen’s Cambodia.
By Human Rights Watch.

This 68-page report documents key cases of unsolved killings of political activists, journalists, opposition politicians, and others by Cambodian security forces since the 1991 Paris Agreements, which were signed by 18 countries, including the five permanent United Nations Security Council members. The Paris Agreements and the subsequent United Nations (UN) peacekeeping mission were supposed to usher in a new era of democracy, human rights, and accountability in Cambodia. More than 300 people have been killed in politically motivated attacks since then, yet not one case has resulted in a credible investigation and conviction.

[Download the full report]

“The Law Was Against Me”

“The Law Was Against Me”

“The Law Was Against Me”:Migrant Women’s Access to Protection for Family Violence in Belgium.
By Human Rights Watch.

This 59-page report found three major protection gaps for migrant women who experience domestic violence in that country. Women who migrate to Belgium to join a husband or partner may face deportation if they report the violence during the period when their status is being confirmed, as do undocumented migrant women. And domestic violence victims, especially undocumented women, lack adequate access to shelters.

[Download the report]
Read the Press Release – Belgium: Abused Migrant Women Fear Deportation

Death of a Dictator

Death of a Dictator

Death of a Dictator: Bloody Vengeance in Sirte
by Human Rights Watch

This 58-page report details the final hours of Muammar Gaddafi’s life and the circumstances under which he was killed. It presents evidence that Misrata-based militias captured and disarmed members of the Gaddafi convoy and, after bringing them under their total control, subjected them to brutal beatings. They then executed at least 66 captured members of the convoy at the nearby Mahari Hotel. The evidence indicates that opposition militias took Gaddafi’s wounded son Mutassim from Sirte to Misrata and killed him there.

Under the laws of war, the killing of captured combatants is a war crime, and Libyan civilian and military authorities have an obligation to investigate war crimes and other violations of international humanitarian law.

[Download the full report]
Read the Press Release – Libya: New Proof of Mass Killings at Gaddafi Death Site

Selected Advance Access Articles

Creating a Frame: A Spatial Approach to Random Sampling of Immigrant Households in Inner City Johannesburg
By Gayatri Singh and Benjamin D. Clark
Journal of Refugee Studies.
Link:-  http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/10/27/jrs.fes031.1.short?rss=1

Sampling in an Urban Environment: Overcoming Complexities and Capturing Differences.
By Joanna Vearey
Journal of Refugee Studies
Link:-  http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/10/27/jrs.fes032.1.short?rss=1

Gutters, Gates, and Gangs: Collaborative Sampling in ‘Post-Violence’ Johannesburg.
By Jean-Pierre Misago and Loren B. Landau.
Journal of Refugee Studies.
Link:-  http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/10/27/jrs.fes033.1.short?rss=1

Quantitative Methodological Dilemmas in Urban Refugee Research: A Case Study of Johannesburg.
By Darshan Vigneswaran and Joel Quirk.
Journal of Refugee Studies
Link:-  http://jrs.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/10/27/jrs.fes035.1.short?rss=1

Readmission Agreements of EU Member States: A Case for EU Subsidiarity or Dualism?
By Marion Panizzon.
Refugee Survey Quarterly.
Link:- http://rsq.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/11/02/rsq.hds014.short?rss=1

 

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